Force in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Force calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Force” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Force” title below...


  1. The Force

  2. Life Force

  3. Air Force

  4. Strong / Powerful / Force

  5. Motivation

  6. Vitality

  7. Life Energy / Spiritual Energy

  8. Gutsy / Daring / Bold

  9. Warriors: Quality Over Quantity

10. Resiliency

11. Inner Strength

12. Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm

13. Strength / Ability

14. Military Engineering

15. Non-Violence

16. Power / Strength

17. Tenacious / Tenacity

18. Strength and Honor

19. Inner Strength

20. Strength and Honor

21. Spiritual Soul Mates

22. Reiki

23. Value of Warrior Generals

24. Soldiers

25. Marine Corps

26. Five Reflections / Gosei

27. Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine

28. Martial Arts / Budo

29. Iron Palm

30. Fight / Beat Someone

31. Bloodless Victory

32. The Mysterious Bond Between People

33. Push or Knock

34. Hapkido


foosu
The Force Scroll

フォース is how Japanese will write The Force, as in Star Wars.

フォース is phonetic, so it's meant to sound like the English word "force" rather than mean force in Japanese.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

yuán lì
The Force Scroll

原力 is how "The Force" is written in Chinese.

This regards "The Force" is referred to in the Star Wars universe and fandom in China. The characters can be literally translated as "prime power".

shēng mìng
seimei / inochi
Life Force Scroll

This Chinese, Korean and Japanese word means "life force" or simply "life".

The first character means "life" or "birth". The second means "life" or "fate". Together they create the meaning of "life force", though some will translate this as "existence" and sometimes "vitality".


See Also:  Vitality | Birth

kōng
kuugun
Air Force Scroll

空軍 is "Air Force" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

If you're an airman, this could be the title for you.

Strong / Powerful / Force

qiáng
kyou
Strong / Powerful / Force Scroll

This "strong" character means strength, force, powerful, better, stubborn, and stiff (yes, all of this in one character). This "strong" has less to do with physical strength and more to do with having a winning attitude, or just having the ability to win at something.

Note that most of the time, this character is pronounced "qiang" but when used with the meaning of stubborn, unyielding, or stiff, it is pronounced "jiang" in Chinese.

Also, sometimes "qiang" is used in modern Chinese to describe people that do crazy things (Example: Bicycling from Beijing to Tibet alone). I sometimes can be found outside my Beijing apartment wearing nothing but shorts and a tee-shirt while eating an ice cream during a snow storm, just to hear my neighbors call me "qiang". Maybe they mean "strong" but perhaps they are using the new meaning of "crazy strong".

Also a Korean Hanja with same meaning but mostly used in compound words.

強 is used in Japanese (though normally in compound words). In Japanese, it has the same meaning but in some context can mean "a little more than..". or "a little over [some amount]". Most Japanese would read this as tough, strength, stiff, hard, inflexible, obstinate, or stubborn.

dòng lì
douryoku
Motivation Scroll

動力 can be used for motivation - it can also mean power / motion / propulsion / force. It can be anything internal or external that keeps you going.

動力 is the safest way to express motivation in Chinese. If your audience is Japanese, please see the other entry for motivation. 動力 is a word in Japanese and Korean but it means "motive power" or "kinetic energy" (without the motivation meaning that you are probably looking for).


See Also:  Enthusiasm | Passion

yaruki
Motivation Scroll

やる気 means motivation in Japanese.

It also can be translated as willingness (e.g. to do something), eagerness, inspiration, determination, totally willing, fully motivated, and high aspirations.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Enthusiasm | Passion

shēng mìng lì
seimeiryoku
Vitality Scroll

生命力 can mean "vitality" or "libido".

The first two characters mean "life" or "life force". The last character is a common word that means "strength". So together you get the meaning "life strength" which is the essence of vitality.

Some will also translate this word as "good health".


See Also:  Health

Life Energy / Spiritual Energy

Chi Energy: Essence of Life / Energy Flow
ki
Life Energy / Spiritual Energy Scroll

This energy flow is a fundamental concept of traditional Asian culture.

氣 is romanized as "Qi" or "Chi" in Chinese, "Gi" in Korean, and "Ki" in Japanese.
Chi is believed to be part of everything that exists, as in "life force" or "spiritual energy". It is most often translated as "energy flow", or literally as "air" or "breath". Some people will simply translate this as "spirit" but you have to take into consideration the kind of spirit we're talking about. I think this is weighted more toward energy than spirit.

The character itself is a representation of steam (or breath) rising from rice. To clarify, the character for rice looks like this: 米
Steam was apparently seen as visual evidence of the release of "life energy" when this concept was first developed. The Qi / Chi / Ki character is still used in compound words to mean steam or vapor.
The etymology of this character is a bit complicated. It's suggested that the first form of this character from bronze script (about 2500 years ago) looked like these samples: 氣氣
However, it was easy to confuse this with the character for the number three. So the rice radical was added by 221 B.C. (the exact time of this change is debated). This first version with the rice radical looks like this: 氣
The idea of Qi / Chi / Ki is really a philosophical concept. It's often used to refer to the "flow" of metaphysical energy that sustains living beings. Yet there is much debate that has continued for thousands of years as to whether Qi / Chi / Ki is pure energy, or consists partially, or fully of matter.

You can also see the character for Qi / Chi / Ki in common compound words such as Tai Chi / Tai Qi, Aikido, Reiki and Qi Gong / Chi Kung.

In the modern Japanese Kanji, the rice radical has been changed into two strokes that form an X.

気 The original and traditional Chinese form is still understood in Japanese but we can also offer that modern Kanji form in our custom calligraphy. If you want this Japanese Kanji, please click on the character to the right, instead of the “Select and Customize” button above.


More language notes: This is pronounced like “chee” in Mandarin Chinese, and like “key” in Japanese.
This is also the same way to write this in Korean Hanja where it is Romanized as “gi” and pronounced like “gee” but with a real G-sound, not a J-sound.
Though Vietnamese no longer use Chinese characters in their daily language, this character is still widely known in Vietnam.


See Also:  Energy | Vitality | Life | Birth | Soul

Gutsy / Daring / Bold

pò lì
hakuryoku
Gutsy / Daring / Bold Scroll

This Chinese word is a form of personal strength.

It is a word that describes a person who is willing to take a risk. In English, we might say, "Someone with guts".

An example might be a person that is not rich but invests a lot of money into something (knowing they could double their money, or lose it all). Win or lose, this is a person that knows or pushes their potential.

Tearing this word apart, the first character means "to compel", urgent, urge, force, imminent, or "spur on". The second means power, strong, bear, or exert.

Note: 迫力 is also a word in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja but with a meaning more like force, intensity, appeal, strength, impact, force, or simply power.

Warriors: Quality Over Quantity

bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō
Warriors: Quality Over Quantity Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally means: [The value of] soldiers/warriors lies in [their] quality, not [just] in [their] quantity.

In simple terms, this says that in regard to warriors, quality is better than quantity.

Most tacticians will agree that this can aid in the factor known as "force multiplication". Having good troops, of high morale, excellent training, and good discipline is like having a force that is three times larger.


See Also:  兵在精

hanpatsuryoku
Resiliency Scroll

This Japanese word means resiliency, repellent force, or elasticity.

Inner Strength

nèi lì
nai ryoku
Inner Strength Scroll

內力 is the shorter version of inner-strength (can also be translated as "internal force"). The first character holds the meaning of "inner" or "internal". The second character means "power", "force" or "strength".

內力 is kind of a Kung Fu way of talking about an inner power or strength from within. 內力 is sort of a way to express "inner-chi". 內力 is clearly something that you might hear in a real Chinese Kung Fu movie.

While understood in both Chinese and Japanese, this can have a secondary meaning of "inner stress" in Japanese.

Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm

huó lì
katsuryoku
Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word can be defined as energy, vitality, vigor, vital force, enthusiasm, energetic, or dynamism.

Strength / Ability

lì liàng
riki ryou
Strength / Ability Scroll

力量 is a general strength term.

It can refer to mental or physical strength (depending on context). 力量 can also be used to describe strength in terms of capability, capacity, ability and even tact. Some may translate this as power or force.

Military Engineering

gōng bīng
kouhei
Military Engineering Scroll

工兵 means the "engineering corps" of the army or other branch of the military.

The first character alone means work, worker, skill, profession, trade, craft, construction or labor. The second character means army, force or military.


See Also:  Military

fēi bào lì
hibouryoku
Non-Violence Scroll

非暴力 is fairly self-explanatory.

The first character means "not", "non-" or "un-"
The middle and last character together mean "violence", "use of force" or simply "violent".

Together, these three characters would normally be translated as "nonviolence". A great gift for your favorite peace-lover.


See Also:  Peace

Power / Strength

chikara / ryoku
Power / Strength Scroll

力 is the simplest form of "power" or "strength".

In Japanese it is pronounced "chikara" when used alone, and "ryoku" when used in a sentence (there are also a few other possible pronunciations of this Kanji in Japanese).

In some context, this can mean ability, force, physical strength, capability, and influence.


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Tenacious / Tenacity

wán qiáng
gan kyou
Tenacious / Tenacity Scroll

These two characters together mean "Tenacious", "Hard to Defeat", or "Dogged".

Alone, the first character means mischievous, obstinate or stubborn. But it loses some of the mischievous meaning when the second character is added.

The second character means strength, force, powerful or better.


See Also:  Determination | Dedication | Devotion | Never Give Up

Strength and Honor

lì liàng yǔ róng yù
Strength and Honor Scroll

力量與榮譽 is, "strength and honor" in Chinese.

The first two characters are usually understood as (physical) strength but can also mean power or force.

The middle character is a connecting particle like, "and".

The last two characters are a way to say, honor but can also be understood as honorable reputation, honorary, or glory.

Inner Strength

nèi zài lì liàng
Inner Strength Scroll

內在力量 is the slightly-verbose way to say inner-strength.

The first two characters mean "intrinsic" or "inner". The second two characters mean "power", "force" or "strength" (especially physical strength). 內在力量 is more a short phrase rather than just a word in Chinese and Korean. This can sort of be understood in Japanese but it's not normal/proper Japanese.

Strength and Honor

chikara to mei yo
Strength and Honor Scroll

力と名譽 is, "strength and honor" in Japanese Kanji (with one Hiragana).

The first Kanji is understood as strength, power, or force.

The second character is a connecting particle like, "and" or "with".

The last two Kanji mean honor, honour, credit, or prestige. This last word is also used in the Bushido code to mean honor.

Spiritual Soul Mates

tamashii no han ryo
Spiritual Soul Mates Scroll

魂の伴侶 is a Japanese-only title for soulmates.

魂 means soul, spirit, immortal soul (the part of you that lives beyond your physical body), or the conscious mind. In the Buddhist context, this is vijñāna or viññāṇa (consciousness, life force, or mind).

の is a possessive article that connects everything together here.

伴侶 means mates, companions, partners, spouses.

líng qì
reiki
Reiki Scroll

靈氣 is the title of a healing practice that is now found throughout the world but with origins in Japan.

Special note: Outside of the context of the healing practice of Reiki, this means "aura" or "spiritual essence that surrounds all living things". A Japanese person not familiar with the practice will take the "aura" meaning.

Reiki is a technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also heals. It can be compared to massage but is based on the idea that an unseen "life force energy" flows through us and is what causes us to be alive. If your life force energy is low, you'll be more likely to get sick or feel stress. If your life force energy is abundant and flowing well, you become more capable of being happy and healthy.

There is a lot of information available if you want to Google this term - my job is to offer the calligraphy, while you can decide if it is right for you.

Note: We are showing the ancient (traditional) form of the Reiki Kanji. I have seen Reiki written with both the slightly simplified version and this more classic form. If you want the form of Reiki with the two strokes in the shape of an X on the second character and the modern first character, simply click on the Kanji characters to the right.

Note: 靈氣 is also a Chinese word but in Chinese, these characters create a word that refers to a smart person or someone with high aspirations. It is not read as a healing method in Chinese.
In Korean Hanja, this can be read as "mysterious atmosphere" by a Korean who is not familiar with the practice of Reiki (still has a cool meaning in Korean).

Value of Warrior Generals

bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō jiàng zài móu ér bú zài yǒng
Value of Warrior Generals Scroll

This literally means: [Just as] warriors [are valued for their] quality and not [just] for quantity, [so] generals [are valued] for their tactics, not [just] for [their] bravery.

兵在精而不在多將在謀而不在勇 is a proverb that follows one about how it is better to have warriors of quality, rather than just a large quantity of warriors in your army/force.


See Also:  兵在精而不在多

bīng
hei
Soldiers Scroll

兵 can be used to express soldiers, troops, a force, an army, weapons, arms, military, warfare, tactics, strategy, or warlike.

The final meaning depends on context. It's also part of the Chinese title for the Terracotta soldiers. In fact, this character is usually used in compound words (words of more than one character). Sometimes this single character is the title used for the pawns in a chess game (in a related issue, this is also a nickname for soldiers with the rank of Private).


See Also:  Military | Warrior

hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì
Marine Corps Scroll

海軍陸戰隊 is the Chinese way to express "Marine Corps". This could be the Marine Corps of virtually any country that has an amphibious military force.

Let me know you want a more specific title such as British Royal Marines or U.S. Marine Corps.

The Chinese title for Marines is very verbose...
Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea military/arms shore/land fighting/war/battle corps/team/group".


See Also:  Military

Five Reflections / Gosei

shi se i ni moto ru na ka ri shi ka? gen kou ni ha zu ru na ka ri shi ka?
ki ryo ku ni ka ku ru na ka ri shi ka? do ryo ku ni u ra mi na ka ri shi ka?
bu sho u ni wa ta ru na ka ri shi ka?
Five Reflections / Gosei Scroll

These are the "Five Reflections" of Vice Admiral Hajime Matsushita of the Japanese Imperial Navy.

These days, the Five Reflections are recited or contemplated daily by Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force recruits in training. This long proverb is popularly translated into English this way:

Hast thou not gone against sincerity?
Hast thou not felt ashamed of thy words and deeds?
Hast thou not lacked vigor?
Hast thou not exerted all possible efforts?
Hast thou not become slothful?


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine

jīng qì shén
Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine Scroll

These are the characters jing, qi, and shen.

As a set, these three characters are known in English as the treasures of traditional Chinese medicine, the treasures of Qi Gong, or the three treasures of Taoism / Daoism.

Sometimes this set is titled as 三寶 (sānbǎo) or "three treasures" but here, we're writing each treasure out.

Here's how these characters are perceived in this context...
Jing: nutritive essence; refined; perfected; pure
Qi: vitality; energy; force; breath; vigor
Shen: spirit; soul; mind; being

To keep it simple, you can use, "essence, vitality and spirit", to define these.

Martial Arts / Budo

Way of the Warrior
wǔ dào
bu dou
Martial Arts / Budo Scroll

武道 is the very common Japanese way to say "Martial Arts".

武道 is used mostly in Japanese dojos but is also understood in Chinese and Korean.

Some will use this title to mean chivalry (the conduct of a knight) or military art. The way this word is understood would depend on the context in which it is used.

The first character means "force" or "warlike" or "essence of a warrior".

The second character means "method", "path", and "the way". It is the same character used to describe/mean the philosophy of Taoism / Daoism.

Some will also translate this as, "The Way of the Warrior", especially in the context of Korean martial arts.

tiě zhǎng
tetsu-tenohira
Iron Palm Scroll

These two characters mean "iron palm", the martial arts technique taught by Brian Gray and others.

This term can mean different things to different people. The consensus is that rather than a type or style of martial arts, this is a technique for refining hand position and strengthening of hands to strike blows for with maximum force and effect.

The regime may include herbal treatments and special exercises to fortify the hands.

In more extreme versions, the carpals and metacarpal bones in the hand are systematically broken, so that when they heal, they will become stronger.

Japanese note: This does make sense in Japanese (though the version shown above is the ancient form of the first Kanji) this is far from a commonly-known term.

Fight / Beat Someone

dòu
Fight / Beat Someone Scroll

斗 is how to express the act of fighting in Chinese.

Generally, this means fighting against someone or some force whether physically or metaphorically.

Note: There is more than one way to write this character. You will notice variations on the next page after you click "Select and Customize". If you have a preference, please let us know when you place your order.

Please note that there is a secondary pronunciation and meaning of this character. It can also mean "measuring cup" or in Japanese "sake dipper" or even "The Big Dipper". In Japanese and Korean, this does not have the fighting meaning associated with it. You should, therefore, select this character only if your audience is Chinese, or you are a big fan of sake dippers or The Big Dipper (as that is how it will be read by Japanese and Korean people).

Bloodless Victory

bīng bù xuè rèn
Bloodless Victory Scroll

Perhaps a pacifist view or perhaps the best kind of victory; these characters reflect this idea:
The edges of the swords not being stained with blood.

You could also translate it as: Win victory without firing a shot.

The first character means army or force. The second character means without or none. The last two characters mean bloodstained knives. So it represents a returning victorious army without bloodstained knives. 兵不血刃 is the very literal sense of this Chinese proverb. The title definition is more accurate to the way this proverb is understood.

Asking yourself why the direct or literal translation is different?
...Think of compound words in English such as "nevertheless" if we break it apart to "never the less" we will have trouble getting the real definition of "in spite of that". Similar things happen when multiple-characters are used to create a compounded word in Chinese.

The Mysterious Bond Between People

The invisible force that brings people together forever
yuán
en
The Mysterious Bond Between People Scroll

緣 represents the fate that brings and bonds people together.

緣 is a complicated single character. It can mean a lot of different things depending on how you read it.

In Japanese, it can mean fate, destiny, a mysterious force that binds two people together, a relationship between two people, bond, link, connection, family ties, affinity, opportunity, chance (to meet someone and start a relationship). It can also mean "someone to rely on", relative, reminder, memento, or the female given name, Yori.

It's basically the same in Chinese, where it's defined as cause, reason, karma, fate, or predestined affinity.

In the Buddhist context, it's Pratyaya. 緣 / 縁 is the concept of indirect conditions, as opposed to direct causes. It's when something happens (meeting someone) by circumstance or a contributing environment. Instead of a direct cause or act, it is a conditioning cause without direct input or action by the involved people.

Occasionally, this character is used in a facetious way to say hem, seam, or edge of clothing. In this case, it's the seam that brings or holds the clothing together.


縁Note: Japanese will tend to use the variant of this Kanji shown to the right. If you want this version (and are ordering this from the Japanese master calligrapher), click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above.

Push or Knock

To weigh one's words
fǎn fù tuī qiāo
Push or Knock Scroll

During the Tang Dynasty, a man named Jia Dao (born in the year 779), a well studied scholar and poet, went to the capital to take the imperial examination.

One day as he rides a donkey through the city streets, a poem begins to form in his mind. A portion of the poem comes into his head like this:

"The bird sits on the tree branch near a pond,
A monk approaches and knocks at the gate..".


At the same time, he wondered if the word "push" would be better than "knock" in his poem.

As he rides down the street, he imagines the monk pushing or knocking. Soon he finds himself making motions of pushing, and shaking a fist in a knocking motion as he debates which word to use. He is quite a sight as he makes his way down the street on his donkey with hands and fists flying about as the internal debate continues.

As he amuses people along the street, he becomes completely lost in his thoughts and does not see the mayor's procession coming in the opposite direction. Jia Bao is blocking the way for the procession to continue down the road, and the mayor's guards immediately decide to remove Jia Bao by force. Jia Bao, not realizing that he was in the way, apologizes, explains his poetic dilemma, and awaits his punishment for blocking the mayor's way.

The mayor, Han Yu, a scholar and author of prose himself, finds himself intrigued by Jia Dao's poem and problem. Han Yu gets off his horse, and addresses Jia Bao, stating, "I think knock is better". The relieved Jia Bao raises his head, and is invited by the mayor to join the procession, and are seen riding off together down the street exchanging their ideas and love of poetry.

In modern Chinese, this idiom is used when someone is trying to decide which word to use in their writing or when struggling to decide between two things when neither seems to have a downside.

Hapkido

Korean Martial Art of re-directing force
hé qì dào
ai ki do
Hapkido Scroll

Hapkido or 合氣道 is a mostly-defensive martial art of Korea.

Hapkido has some connection to Aikido of Japan. In fact, they are written with the same characters in both languages. However, it should be noted that the Korean Hanja characters shown here are the traditional Chinese form - but in modern Japan, the middle character was slightly simplified.
Note: You can consider this to be the older Japanese written form of Aikido. Titles on older books and signs about Aikido use this form.

The connection between Japanese Aikido and Korean Hapkido is a bit muddled in history. The issue is probably due to the difficult relationship between the two countries around the time of WWII. Many Koreans became virtual slaves for the Japanese during that period. After WWII, many things in Korea were disassociated from having any Japanese origin. The relationship has greatly mellowed out now.

Looking at the characters, the first means "union" or "harmony".
The second character means "universal energy" or "spirit".
The third means "way" or "method".
One way to translate this into English is "Harmonizing Energy Method". This makes since, as Hapkido has more to do with redirecting energy, rather that fighting with strength against strength.

More Hapkido info

More notes:
1. Sometimes Hapkido is Romanized as "hap ki do", "hapki-do" "hab gi do" or "hapgido".

2. Korean Hanja characters are actually Chinese characters that usually hold the same meaning in both languages. There was a time when these characters were the standard and only written form of Korean. The development of modern Korean Hangul characters is a somewhat recent event in the greater scope of history. There was a time when Chinese characters were the written form of many languages in places known in modern times as North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mainland China, and a significant portion of Malaysia. Even today, more people in the world can read Chinese characters than English.

3. While these Korean Hanja characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
The Forceフォースfoosu / fosu
The Force原力yuán lì / yuan2 li4 / yuan li / yuanliyüan li / yüanli
Life Force生命seimei / inochishēng mìng
sheng1 ming4
sheng ming
shengming
Air Force空軍
空军
kuugun / kugunkōng / kong1 jun1 / kong jun / kongjunk`ung chün / kungchün / kung chün
Strong
Powerful
Force

kyou / kyoqiáng / qiang2 / qiangch`iang / chiang
Motivation動力
动力
douryoku / doryokudòng lì / dong4 li4 / dong li / donglitung li / tungli
Motivationやる気yaruki
Vitality生命力seimeiryokushēng mìng lì
sheng1 ming4 li4
sheng ming li
shengmingli
Life Energy
Spiritual Energy

气 / 気
kiqì / qi4 / qich`i / chi
Gutsy
Daring
Bold
迫力hakuryokupò lì / po4 li4 / po li / polip`o li / poli / po li
Warriors: Quality Over Quantity兵在精而不在多bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō
bing1 zai4 jing1 er2 bu2 zai4 duo1
bing zai jing er bu zai duo
bingzaijingerbuzaiduo
ping tsai ching erh pu tsai to
pingtsaichingerhputsaito
Resiliency反発力hanpatsuryoku
Inner Strength內力
内力
nai ryoku / nairyokunèi lì / nei4 li4 / nei li / neili
Dynamic Energy
Enthusiasm
活力katsuryokuhuó lì / huo2 li4 / huo li / huoli
Strength
Ability
力量riki ryou / rikiryou / riki ryo / rikiryolì liàng / li4 liang4 / li liang / liliang
Military Engineering工兵kouhei / koheigōng bīng
gong1 bing1
gong bing
gongbing
kung ping
kungping
Non-Violence非暴力hibouryoku / hiboryokufēi bào lì
fei1 bao4 li4
fei bao li
feibaoli
fei pao li
feipaoli
Power
Strength
chikara / ryokulì / li4 / li
Tenacious
Tenacity
頑強
顽强
gan kyou / gankyou / gan kyo / gankyowán qiáng
wan2 qiang2
wan qiang
wanqiang
wan ch`iang
wanchiang
wan chiang
Strength and Honor力量與榮譽
力量与荣誉
lì liàng yǔ róng yù
li4 liang4 yu3 rong2 yu4
li liang yu rong yu
liliangyurongyu
li liang yü jung yü
liliangyüjungyü
Inner Strength內在力量
内在力量
nèi zài lì liàng
nei4 zai4 li4 liang4
nei zai li liang
neizaililiang
nei tsai li liang
neitsaililiang
Strength and Honor力と名譽
力と名誉
chikara to mei yo
chikaratomeiyo
Spiritual Soul Mates魂の伴侶tamashii no han ryo
tamashiinohanryo
tamashi no han ryo
tamashinohanryo
Reiki靈氣
灵气 霊気
reikilíng qì / ling2 qi4 / ling qi / lingqiling ch`i / lingchi / ling chi
Value of Warrior Generals兵在精而不在多將在謀而不在勇
兵在精而不在多将在谋而不在勇
bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō jiàng zài móu ér bú zài yǒng
bing1 zai4 jing1 er2 bu2 zai4 duo1 jiang4 zai4 mou2 er2 bu2 zai4 yong3
bing zai jing er bu zai duo jiang zai mou er bu zai yong
ping tsai ching erh pu tsai to chiang tsai mou erh pu tsai yung
Soldiersheibīng / bing1 / bingping
Marine Corps海軍陸戰隊
海军陆战队
hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì
hai3 jun1 lu4 zhan4 dui4
hai jun lu zhan dui
haijunluzhandui
hai chün lu chan tui
haichünluchantui
Five Reflections
Gosei
一至誠に悖るなかりしか一言行に恥づるなかりしか一氣力に缺くるなかりしか一努力に憾みなかりしか一不精に亘るなかりしかshi se i ni moto ru na ka ri shi ka? gen kou ni ha zu ru na ka ri shi ka?
ki ryo ku ni ka ku ru na ka ri shi ka? do ryo ku ni u ra mi na ka ri shi ka?
bu sho u ni wa ta ru na ka ri shi ka?
shi se i ni moto ru na ka ri shi ka? gen ko ni ha zu ru na ka ri shi ka?
ki ryo ku ni ka ku ru na ka ri shi ka? do ryo ku ni u ra mi na ka ri shi ka?
bu sho u ni wa ta ru na ka ri shi ka?
shiseinimotorunakarishika?genkonihazurunakarishika?
kiryokunikakurunakarishika?doryokuniuraminakarishika?
bushouniwatarunakarishika?
Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine精氣神
精气神
jīng qì shén
jing1 qi4 shen2
jing qi shen
jingqishen
ching ch`i shen
chingchishen
ching chi shen
Martial Arts
Budo
武道bu dou / budou / bu do / budowǔ dào / wu3 dao4 / wu dao / wudaowu tao / wutao
Iron Palm鐵掌
铁掌
tetsu-tenohiratiě zhǎng
tie3 zhang3
tie zhang
tiezhang
t`ieh chang
tiehchang
tieh chang
Fight
Beat Someone
dòu / dou4 / doutou
Bloodless Victory兵不血刃bīng bù xuè rèn
bing1 bu4 xue4 ren4
bing bu xue ren
bingbuxueren
ping pu hsüeh jen
pingpuhsüehjen
The Mysterious Bond Between People緣 / 縁
enyuán / yuan2 / yuanyüan
Push or Knock反復推敲
反复推敲
fǎn fù tuī qiāo
fan3 fu4 tui1 qiao1
fan fu tui qiao
fanfutuiqiao
fan fu t`ui ch`iao
fanfutuichiao
fan fu tui chiao
Hapkido合氣道
合气道
ai ki do / aikidohé qì dào
he2 qi4 dao4
he qi dao
heqidao
ho ch`i tao
hochitao
ho chi tao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Hapkido Scroll
Hapkido Scroll
Hapkido Scroll
Hapkido Scroll


And formats...

Hapkido Vertical Portrait
Hapkido Horizontal Wall Scroll
Hapkido Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Force in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

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