If You Fall Down Seven Times, Rise For An Eighth Time

Buy a "Fall Down 7 times, Get Up 8" Japanese Proverb Calligraphy Wall Scroll...

  1. One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

  2. Adoring Love

  3. Autumn / Fall Season

  4. Wisdom from Hard Knocks

  5. You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes

  6. Feeling of Bliss

  7. Brave Heart

  8. You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure

  9. Broken Mirror Rejoined

10. Construction Crane

11. The Night is Darkest Before the Dawn

12. Death Before Surrender

13. Double Happiness Guest Book

14. Enlightened Warrior

15. Eternal Happiness

16. Even Monkeys Fall From Trees

17. Everything Happens for a Reason

18. Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

19. Keep Your Feet on the Ground

20. A Bright Future

21. Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs

22. Flower Open / Blooming Flower

23. Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

24. Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither

25. Flowers Fall / The End Comes

26. Soccer / Football / Futbol

27. Forgiveness

28. The Four Seasons

29. Gaman

30. Golden Anniversary / 50th Wedding Anniversary

31. Grandmaster

32. The Guts Theory

33. Gyaku

34. Having High Principles

35. Hua Mulan

36. Improvise Adapt Overcome

37. Indomitable / Unyielding

38. Inhale

39. Katana

40. Kodokan

41. Live Free or Die

42. Loving Heart / One’s Love

43. Marijuana / Weed / Pot

44. Marine

45. Marine Corps

46. Marine / Soldier of the Sea

47. Mind Your Own Business

48. Missing / Yearning

49. Mixed Martial Arts

50. A Mother’s Love

51. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

52. Better Late Than Never

53. Opening / Blooming Flowers

54. No Pain No Gain

55. Even an iron bar can be ground to a needle

56. Phenomenon

57. Pursue Your Dreams

58. Pursuit of Happiness

59. Push or Knock

60. Realistic / Practical

61. Restoration to Good Health

62. Sakasa / Reverse

63. Sand / Gravel

64. Snow

65. True Love

66. Unbreakable

67. United States Marine Corps

68. Wado-Kai

69. Wado-Ryu

70. Each Time You Stumble and Fall, You Gain Experience and Wisdom

71. Wrestling

72. Yue Fei

73. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country


One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

China yí rì qiān qiū
Japan ichi jitsu sen shuu
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years Vertical Wall Scroll

一日千秋 is a Japanese and Chinese proverb about missing someone.

一日千秋 is often used to express how hard it is to wait for someone's return, or to be away from someone.

Some will translate this as, "one day feels like a very long time," or "waiting for someone (something) is hard."

You might see this romanized as a single word, Ichijitsusenshuu, or as "Ichijitsu Senshuu" from Japanese.
If you break down the characters one-by-one, we get:
一 = one / a
日 = day / sun (can also represent time, or a date)
千 = 1000 / a thousand
秋 = autumn / fall

Together, 千秋 can mean, "autumn comes thousand times" (or 1000 years). It can also be read as 1000 periods of time.
However you literally read this, it relays the idea of heartache as you wait for someone that you miss.

Adoring Love

China ài mù
Japan ai bou
Adoring Love Vertical Wall Scroll

愛慕 means "adoring love" in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

I suppose this is the best kind of love to have. 愛慕 has the well-known character for love. But the second character modifies and reinforces the meaning to become adore, adoring love, or to love and adore.

Ancient Chinese warning:
Adoring someone is fine until you are in the shoes of the Prince of the Kingdom of Wu. This Prince adored a certain beautiful woman (Xi Shi) so much that he neglected his duties, and soon let the kingdom fall into ruins.

Autumn / Fall Season

China qiū
Japan aki
Autumn / Fall Season Vertical Wall Scroll

秋 is the word/character used to describe the Autumn or Fall season in Chinese and Japanese.


See Also:  Winter | Spring | Summer | Four Seasons

Wisdom from Hard Knocks

The school of hard knocks
China ái yī quán dé yī zhāo ái shí quán biàn zhū gě
Wisdom from Hard Knocks Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Receive on blow, [and one] learns a lesson; Receive ten blows, [and one] becomes a great Zhuge [Liang].

You must first understand that a man named Zhuge Liang was one of the great strategists and philosophers in Chinese history. He's known as a man of great wisdom.

Figuratively, this phrase means:
One can learn much from failure or "hard knocks."

You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes

China qíng rén yǎn lǐ chū xī shī
You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes Vertical Wall Scroll

Any woman with affection for Asian art and you will love a gift of this Chinese proverb calligraphy on a wall scroll. She will melt in your arms as you tell her the meaning of these characters.

Contained in this phrase is a reference to the most beautiful woman in Chinese history. Her name was Xi Shi, and she was known to have good looks that need not fine robes or make up. Her charms were so powerful that she brought down an entire kingdom (in a successful effort to bring honor and pride back to her people).

This is a great way to express that the woman in your life is your one love.

Feeling of Bliss

Japan shi fuku kan
Feeling of Bliss Vertical Wall Scroll

至福感 is "feelings of bliss" in Japanese.

A break down of the Kanji in this title:
至福 (shifuku) beatitude; supreme bliss.
感 (kan) feeling; sensation; emotion; admiration; impression.

Brave Heart

China yǒng gǎn de xīn
Brave Heart Vertical Wall Scroll

勇敢的心 is the title "Braveheart," as in the movie starring Mel Gibson.

The character meanings break down this way:
勇敢 brave.
的 possessive particle.
心 heart / mind.

You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure

China bǎi shèng nán lǜ dí sān zhé nǎi liáng yī
You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: [Even a general who has won a] hundred victories [may be] hard put to see through the enemy's [strategy], [but one who has] broken [his] arm three [times] [will] be a good doctor.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot always depend on past successes to guarantee future success but one can always learn from lessons drawn from failure.


See Also:  Failure - Mother of Success | Experience - Mother of Success | Hard Knocks

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Vertical Wall Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:


You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.


The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb, 破鏡重圓, is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Construction Crane

China qǐ zhòng jī
Japan kijuuki
Construction Crane Vertical Wall Scroll

A customer requested this specifically after a bit of confusion over the bird by the same name. This refers to the huge machine that lifts materials high into the air as crews construct huge buildings.

In an odd twist, while they don't know this name in English sounds like a bird, the building crane is jokingly called "The real national bird of China" because of the accelerated level of construction in Beijing and elsewhere ever since preparations began for the 2008 Olympics. As of 2018, construction has barely slowed.

If you want the type of construction crane that drives down the road, please note that the word is totally different for that kind of "vehicle crane."

The Night is Darkest Before the Dawn

China lí míng qián de hēi àn
The Night is Darkest Before the Dawn Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the most natural way to write, "The night is darkest before the dawn," in Chinese.

The words break down this way by meaning this way:
1.黎明 dawn / daybreak
2.前 before / in front / ago / former / previous / earlier / front
3.的 (possessive particle) / of
4.黑暗 dark / darkly / darkness

If you try to understand the Chinese word order and grammar, it's like, "Before dawn, is the darkest [time]".

Death Before Surrender

Rather die than compromise
China níng sǐ bù qū
Death Before Surrender Vertical Wall Scroll

寧死不屈 is often translated as "Death Before Dishonor."

The literal translation is more like, "Better die than compromise." The last two characters mean "not to bend" or "not to bow down." Some might even say that it means "not to surrender." Thus, you could say this proverb means, "Better to die than live on my knees" or simply "no surrender" (with the real idea being that you would rather die than surrender).

Double Happiness Guest Book

Customize a special Asian guest book for your wedding
China
Double Happiness Guest Book Vertical Wall Scroll

Start customizing a "Double Happiness Guest Book Wall Scroll" Here!

The paper panel length can be whatever you choose from 68cm to 135cm (27" to 53").

If you don't mention what paper length you want in the special instructions tab (on the next page), we'll make it about 100cm (40").

How many signatures fit

The medium size scroll with a 33cm x 100cm (13" x 40") paper panel can usually handle up to 89 signatures. That breaks down to 37 signatures per empty square and 15 signatures around the 囍 character. If you switch to a 135cm paper panel, add another 37 potential signatures.

We can splice two 135cm papers together, but that would be a crazy-long scroll. These are only estimates, your mileage may vary.


With silk panels this will yield a wall scroll about 155cm (61") long. That's enough for up to 89 signatures. Of course, that depends on if your guests just sign a brief salutation and name, or more verbose good wishes. Customer feedback is that 126 people can sign the 135cm long paper on a medium-sized scroll. If we go bigger than that, there will be a minor paper seam and an extra charge. Email me with your specifications if you need something special.

Most customers pick the festive red paper with gold flecks and white or ivory silk. Red is a good luck color in Chinese culture, thus the most popular choice. But, you can do any color combination that you want.

There is a long history of Chinese-character-use outside of mainland China. This Double Happiness character is also seen at weddings in Korea, Vietnam, Hong Kong, Taiwan, as well as Chinese communities in Thailand, Indonesia, and elsewhere. While Japan borrowed Chinese characters into their language, you won't see 囍 as often at Japanese weddings.

Enlightened Warrior

China jué xǐng wǔ shì
Enlightened Warrior Vertical Wall Scroll

覺醒武士 is not a commonly used title in Chinese but sometimes used in Martial arts and military context to refer to a warrior who seems to always be fully aware, enlightened, knowledgeable, noble, and just.

The first two characters are a word that means: to awaken; to come to realize; awakened to the truth; the truth dawns upon one; scales fall from the eyes; to become aware.

The last two characters mean warrior but can also refer to a samurai, soldier, or fighter.

Eternal Happiness

China xìng fú yǒng héng
Eternal Happiness Vertical Wall Scroll

幸福永恆 is a short way to say eternal happiness in Chinese.

Breaking down the parts:
幸福 means happiness, happy, blessed, blessedness, joy, and/or well-being.
永恆 means eternal, everlasting, and/or forever.

Another way to write this is 永恆的幸福. It reverses the word order and adds a possessive article. I prefer the shorter version, which is also a bit more natural in Chinese.

Even Monkeys Fall From Trees

Meaning: Anyone can make a mistake
Japan saru mo ki kara ochiru
Even Monkeys Fall From Trees Vertical Wall Scroll

猿も木から落ちる is the Japanese proverb, "Even monkeys fall from trees."

It suggests that even the most skilled, can make a mistake in something they should be a master of. Or, to put it simply, "Anyone can make a mistake."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Everything Happens for a Reason

Japan monogoto ha subete riyuu ga at te okiru
Everything Happens for a Reason Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a work in progress. We're still trying to decide the best way to express this in Japanese. If you order this, we might have a discussion about the best version that fits you. Here's how the characters break down by meaning (keep in mind, Japanese grammar and sentence construction is very different from English, so it doesn't make complete sense in English)...

物事 = things, everything
は particle
全て all, the whole, entirely
理由 reason
が particle
あっ be, exist, have, take place, happens
て particle
起きる to occur, to happen; to take place (usually unfavorable incidents)


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

Always rising after a fall or repeated failures
Japan shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb relays the vicissitudes of life, with the meaning "seven times down eight times up."

Some would more naturally translate it into English as "Always rising after a fall or repeated failures" or compare it to the English, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again."

The first Kanji is literally "7." The second means "fall down" (sometimes this Kanji means "turn around," "revolve" or "turn over" but in this case, it holds the meaning of "fall"). The third is "8." And the last is "get up," "rouse," or "rise."

Basically, if you fail 7 times, you should recover from those events and be prepared to rise an 8th time. This also applies if it is the world or circumstances that knock you down seven times...
...just remember that you have the ability to bounce back from any kind of adversity.

Note: This can be pronounced two ways. One is "shichi ten hakki" or "shichitenhakki." The other is "nana korobi ya oki" also written, "nanakorobi-yaoki."

Special Note: The second character is a Kanji that is not used in China. Therefore, please only select our Japanese master calligrapher for this selection.

Keep Your Feet on the Ground

Be Down-to-Earth
China jiǎo tà shí dì
Keep Your Feet on the Ground Vertical Wall Scroll

This four-character proverb suggests that you should be practical, realistic, and grounded. Some translate this as a suggestion to be down-to-earth.

The first character means "feet."
The second means "step on" or "stand."
The third means "solid," "real," or "true."
The last character means "ground," "earth," or "terra."

Literally this means, "[keep your] Feet Standing [on] Solid Ground."

A Bright Future

Incredible 10,000-Mile Flight of the Peng
China péng chéng wàn lǐ
A Bright Future Vertical Wall Scroll

鵬程萬里 is an ancient Chinese proverb used in modern times to wish someone a long and successful career.

It's really about the 10,000 Flight of the Peng (Peng, also known as Roc is a mythical fish that can turn into a bird and take flight).

Zhuangzi

庄子 - Zhuangzi

Breaking down each character:
1. Peng or Roc (a kind of bird).
2. Journey (in this case, a flight).
3. 10,000 (Ten Thousand).
4. Li is a unit of distance often referred to as a "Chinese Mile," though the real distance is about half a kilometer.

Direct Translation: "Peng's Journey [of] 10,000 Li."
Literal meaning: "The 10,000-Li Flying Range Of The Roc."
Perceived meaning: "To have a bright future" or "To go far."

This proverb/idiom comes from the book of Zhuangzi. It tells the tale of a huge fish which could turn into a gigantic bird. This bird was called "peng" and was many miles long. This legendary size allowed the Peng to fly from the Northern Sea to the Southern Sea in a single bound.

Wishing someone "a Peng's Journey of 10,000 Li," will imply that they will be able to travel far without stopping, and will have great success, a long career, and a prosperous future.

Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs

Eiko-Seisui
Japan ei ko sei sui
Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb can be translated as, "flourish and wither, prosper and perish," "life is full of fortune and misfortune," or simply "vicissitudes of life."

This is about the rise and fall of human affairs or the ups and downs of life. Prosperity comes and goes, everything is fleeting and temporary but like waves, another swell of prosperity may come.

Here's how the Kanji break down in this proverb:

栄 = prosper; thrive; flourish; boom.
枯 = wither; die.
盛 = prosperous; flourishing; thriving; successful; energetic; vigorous; enthusiastic.
衰 = become weaker; decline; get weak; die down; subside; abate; fail.


榮 Notes: The original version of the first character looks like the image to the right. In modern Japan, they simplified that Kanji a bit into the version shown above. If you have a preference for which style is used for your calligraphy, please let me know when you place your order.

Apparently, with that original version of the first character, this is also used in Korean Hanja. However, I have not confirmed that it's used in the same way or is widely-known in Korean.

Flower Open / Blooming Flower

China huā kāi
Flower Open / Blooming Flower Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters literally mean "flower open."

花開 is also associated with Springtime, the beginning of something, or youth.

花開 is often followed by "flower falls" (closes and loses its petals) which means "Things come and go" or "Youth comes and goes."

If you like flowers and the Springtime, this is a great selection for you. However, if you want the companion "flower falls" (flower withers), we offer that as a companion wall scroll or all together as a four-character phrase.


See Also:  Flowers Fall

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

China huā kāi huā luò
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall Vertical Wall Scroll

花開花落 is a complete proverb that lightly speaks of the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life. It is used as a metaphor to suggest that youth is a temporary state, which in time will pass.

This can also be used to suggest that fortunes can come and go (everything is temporary).

Note: There are two versions of this proverb which are very similar. The other uses a word that means wither instead of fall.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall

Japan hana wa sa ki hana wa chi ru
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb is about the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life.

This can be used to suggest that youth, fortune, and life can come and go (everything is temporary).


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither

China huā kāi huā xiè
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither Vertical Wall Scroll

花開花謝 is a complete proverb that lightly speaks of the cycle of life, or how things come and go in life. It is used as a metaphor to suggest that youth is a temporary state, which in time will pass.

This can also be used to suggest that fortunes can come and go (everything is temporary).

Note: There are two versions of this proverb which are very similar. The other uses a word that means fall instead of wither.

Flowers Fall / The End Comes

China huā sà
Flowers Fall / The End Comes Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters mean flower fall (closes and loses its petals). It suggests nearing the end of something. A time that some might call "The sunset of life." 花落 often follows "flower open" to talk of the cycle of life.

We offer this as a possible companion to a "flower open" scroll (to be placed side by side, or at either side of a doorway to say "things come and go" - a cool metaphor for a doorway). If placed in a doorway, it could be used as a suggestion to your guests that things bloom when they arrive through your door but wither when they leave (a great compliment).


See Also:  Flowers Bloom

Soccer / Football / Futbol

China zú qiú
Soccer / Football / Futbol Vertical Wall Scroll

This the word for football or soccer in Chinese. As with most of the world, football is very popular in China. During the World Cup, the whole country seems to shut down to watch (regardless of whether Team China is playing or not).

Soccer is probably the 3rd most popular participation sport in China (after ping pong and badminton).

As you might expect, the first character means "foot" and the second character means "ball."


FYI: This game would never be confused with American Football in Chinese. As with the rest of the world, there is a vague awareness of what American Football is (often described as "that game kind of like rugby").

For those familiar with American Football, there is some disgust regarding the fact that winners of the Superbowl call themselves "world champions" of a game that is only played in the USA. This is one of the reasons that jokes abound about how Americans are unaware that there is a world outside of their borders.

Forgiveness (from the top down)

China róng shè
Japan you sha
Forgiveness (from the top down) Vertical Wall Scroll

容赦 is the kind of forgiveness that a king might give to his subjects for crimes or wrong-doings.

容赦 is a rather high-level forgiveness. Meaning that it goes from a higher level to lower (not the reverse).

Alone, the first character can mean "to bear," "to allow" and/or "to tolerate," and the second can mean "to forgive," "to pardon" and/or "to excuse."

When you put both characters together, you get forgiveness, pardon, mercy, leniency, or going easy (on someone).


See Also:  Benevolence

The Four Seasons

China chūn xià qiū dōng
Japan shunkashuutou
The Four Seasons Vertical Wall Scroll

春夏秋冬 is one way to express "The Four Seasons " or "All Year Round ."

The characters here represent Spring, Summer, Autumn (Fall) and Winter.

Gaman

China wǒ màn
Japan ga man
Gaman Vertical Wall Scroll

Gaman is a Zen Buddhist term from Japan that means "enduring the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity."

This title can also be translated as patience, perseverance, tolerance, or self-denial.

我慢 is also a Chinese Buddhist term with a different pronunciation. It comes from Sanskrit abhimāna or ātma-mada. Chinese Buddhism defines this very differently as, "Egoism exalting self and depreciating others," "self-intoxication," or "pride." Alone, the first character means "Me, I, or Self," and the second character in a Buddhist context comes from Sanskrit māna and means pride, arrogance, self-conceit, looking down on others, supercilious, etc.


I'm currently working with Japanese and Chinese translators to try and reconcile the true meaning or any commonality of this word between languages. For now, please only consider this if your audience is Japanese.

Golden Anniversary / 50th Wedding Anniversary

China xìng fú jīn hūn
Japan kou fuku kin kon
Golden Anniversary / 50th Wedding Anniversary Vertical Wall Scroll

This means "Happy Golden Anniversary" and is a great gift for a couple who is celebrating 50 years together.

The first two characters mean happy, blessed, or happiness.

The last two characters mean, "couple's golden anniversary." It literally means "golden wedding" or "golden marriage" but this is only used for the 50-year-mark of a marriage (the same way we use gold to represent 50 years in the west).

This is a nice title to use with an inscription. You could request something like, "Happy 50th Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Smith," to be written down the side of this title, in smaller Chinese characters.


Please note: This can be pronounced and understood in Japanese but not as commonly used in Japan. Japanese people who read this will understand it but might tend to feel it's of Chinese origin.

Grandmaster

Japan daishihan
Grandmaster Vertical Wall Scroll

大師範 is a Japanese title for master, grandmaster, or senior instructor.

大師範 is a bit of an odd selection for a piece of calligraphy artwork, so proceed with caution. Better to find an appropriate phrase or title (such as the name of the martial art), and then add something like "Grandmaster Smith" as a smaller inscription down the side.

The Guts Theory

The belief that where there's a will there's a way.
Japan kon jou ron
The Guts Theory Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese title refers to the belief that where there's a will, there's a way.

Another way to translate this is, "The Guts Theory" or "The Doctrine of Will-Power." Maybe breaking down the meaning of the characters will help clarify this:
根性 = will-power; guts; temper; nature; spirit; nature and character; the nature of the powers of any sense.
論 = theory; doctrine; treatises on dogma, philosophy, discipline, etc.

Gyaku

Japan gyaku
Gyaku Vertical Wall Scroll

逆 is a Japanese Kanji that means reverse, inversion, upside down, inverted, reverse, opposite, or wicked.

Having High Principles

Do not bow down for the sake of five pecks of rice
China bù wèi wǔ dǒu mǐ zhé yāo
Having High Principles Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese idiom/proverb speaks of being above bribes, and not losing face or honor for a short-term gain. Some may also translate the perceived meaning as, "high-hearted," or "integrity beyond reproach."

The more literal meaning is "Do not bow down for the sake of five pecks of rice."

Hua Mulan

China huā mù lán
Hua Mulan Vertical Wall Scroll

花木蘭 is the name of the famous Chinese woman warrior Hua Mulan.

She was made famous in the west by Disney's animated movie, "Mulan."

Most of the historical information about her comes from an ancient poem. It starts with a concerned Mulan, as she is told a man from each family is to serve conscription in the army. Her father is too old, and her brother is too young. Mulan decides to take the place of her father. After twelve years of war, the army returns and the best warriors are awarded great posts in the government and riches. Mulan turns down all offers, and asks only for a good horse for the long trip home. When Mulan greets visiting comrades wearing her old clothes, they are shocked to find the warrior they rode into battle with for years was actually a woman.

Improvise Adapt Overcome

China jí xìng fā huī jí kè shì yìng jí shí kè fú
Improvise Adapt Overcome Vertical Wall Scroll

即興發揮即刻適應即時克服 is the coolest way to put together this famous word list, "Improvise Adapt Overcome."

There are shorter ways to write "adapt," and "overcome", but "improvise" needs a four-character word to be expressed accurately in Chinese. To match them up, the other two are using four-character words as well. This makes it sound more natural in Chinese (though word lists are not a natural construct in Chinese grammar).

The words break down like this: 即興發揮, 即刻適應, 即時克服. I suggest the 3-column option when you customize your wall scroll. That way, the words will occupy one column each.

A great gift for a U.S. Marine, or anyone who follows this mantra.

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
Indomitable / Unyielding Vertical Wall Scroll

不屈不撓 means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding."

不屈不撓 is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means "bendable."

The last means "scratched" or "bothered."

So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered." I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit." This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable."

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Inhale

China xī rù
Japan kyuu nyuu
Inhale Vertical Wall Scroll

吸入 is a Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean word that means inhale, inhalation, or to breathe in.

吸 by itself can mean to inhale or suck in.
入 means to enter (in this case, the body) so it clarifies that this is true inhalation of air into the body.

If you need a reminder to breathe (slow down and take a deep breath) this may be the word you want hanging on your wall.

Katana

Japanese Samurai Sword
China dāo
Japan katana
Katana Vertical Wall Scroll

刀 is the Japanese Kanji for "sword." This refers to the style of sword carried by warriors, samurai, and shogun of ancient Japan.

With the pacification of Japan, such swords are now only used for ceremony and decoration. The true art of sword-smithing is all but lost in Japan with new sword production dedicated to making inexpensive replicas for the tourist and foreign market.

For those of you that want to ask whether I can get you a real antique sword. Let me tell you that most real Asian swords were melted down after WWII in Japan, and during the Great Leap Forward in China. Any remaining swords are family heirlooms that nobody will part with.

Please carefully note that the Japanese kanji character shown above is only for a Japanese audience. In China, this character means "knife." See our other entry for "sword" in Chinese.
Note: 刀 can mean knife, sword, or blade in Korean, depending on context.


See Also:  Sword

Kodokan

Japan kou dou kan
Kodokan Vertical Wall Scroll

This title refers to a certain kind or school of Judo martial arts.

Here's how the characters break down in meaning for this one:
1. Mutual Assistance or Association. Can also refer to a lecture, speech, or explaining something (as in teaching).
2. Way / Path (the Tao/Dao as in Taoism/Daoism)
3. Schoolroom / Building / Establishment / Mansion / Small Castle / Hall (of learning)

Altogether, you get something like, "The Path of Mutual Learning Hall."

More about Kodokan from the Institute of Kodokan.

Kodokan

Japan kou dou kan
Kodokan Vertical Wall Scroll

光道館 is Kodokan. 光道館 is the title of an Aikido dojo, studio, or hall.

Be careful in selecting the correct Kodokan, as there are two different titles that romanize as Kodokan.

Here's how the characters break down in meaning for this one:
1. Light / Bright
2. Way / Path (the Tao/Dao as in Taoism/Daoism)
3. Schoolroom / Building / Establishment / Mansion / Hall (of learning)

Altogether, you get something like, "The Path of Light Establishment."

Live Free or Die

Give me liberty or give me death
China bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
Live Free or Die Vertical Wall Scroll

不自由毋寧死 means, "Give me liberty or give me death," in Chinese.

This is also the best way to say, "Live free or die."

The characters break down this way:
不 = Not; none; without.
自由 = Freedom; liberty; freewill; self-determination.
毋寧 = Rather; would rather; rather be.
死 = Dead; death.

This will go nicely next to your, "Don't tread on me," flag. This phrase is known well enough in China that it's listed in a few dictionaries. Though I doubt you will find too many Chinese citizens willing to yell this on the steps of the capital in Beijing.


See Also:  Death Before Dishonor

Loving Heart / One’s Love

Japan koi gokoro
Loving Heart / One’s Love Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means "loving heart." It can also be translated as "one's love" or "awakening of love."

戀心 is used exclusively for love between boyfriends and girlfriends or husband and wife.

Breaking down the meaning by each Kanji, the first means love, affection, or tender passion. The second Kanji means heart, mind, or soul (most will read it as heart).


See Also:  Compassion | Love

Marijuana / Weed / Pot

China dà má
Japan tai ma
Marijuana / Weed / Pot Vertical Wall Scroll

大麻 is how to write marijuana, weed, pot, grass, cannabis or hemp in Chinese and Japanese Kanji. I never thought to add this but these terms were searched for more than 5000 times on our website.

I have not checked to see if our calligraphers might have any problem with writing this. In case you didn't know, using, selling, distributing pot in China is punishable by death. However, you can buy nice Lebanese hash at the hotel just down the way from the Lebanese Embassy in Beijing (I'm pretty sure it's brought in the country via diplomatic pouch).


This means "Cannabis Sativa" in Korean but they add a third Hanja character to specifically mean the marijuana species that you know and love.

Marine

Amphibious Warrior
China hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì yuán
Marine Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the Chinese way to express "Marine." (as in a member of the Marine Corps). It is not country-specific, so it could be the Royal Marines, U.S. Marines, Chinese Marines, etc.
In Australian English, they would translate this as "Naval Infantryman."

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea military/arms shore/land fighting/war/battle corps/team/group person/member." Note that the first two characters presented together but outside of this phrase mean "navy" (sea military).


See Also:  Warrior | Military | Navy | Art of War

Marine Corps

China hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì
Marine Corps Vertical Wall Scroll

海軍陸戰隊 is the Chinese way to express "Marine Corps." This could be the Marine Corps of virtually any country that has an amphibious military force.

Let me know you want a more specific title such as British Royal Marines or U.S. Marine Corps.

The Chinese title for Marines is very verbose...
Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea military/arms shore/land fighting/war/battle corps/team/group."


See Also:  Military

Marine Corps

Japan kaiheitai
Marine Corps Vertical Wall Scroll

海兵隊 is the Japanese and Korean way to express "Marine Corps" or simply "Marines." It is not specific, so this can be the Marine Corps of any country, such as the British Royal Marines to the U.S. Marines.

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea soldiers/army corps/regiment/group."


See Also:  Military

Marine / Soldier of the Sea

Japan kai hei
Marine / Soldier of the Sea Vertical Wall Scroll

This way to express "Marine" as in an individual "Soldier of the Sea" in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja characters (not to be confused with Korean Hangul).

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea soldier/army/warrior."

Please note that this Japanese/Korean version kind of means "sailor" or "navy" in Chinese.


See Also:  Military

Mind Your Own Business

Japan yokei na osewa
Mind Your Own Business Vertical Wall Scroll

This suggests that you not give unwanted help or advice to someone.

The Japanese characters break down this way:
余計 (yokei) too much, unnecessary, extraneous, abundance, surplus, excess, superfluity.
な (na) connecting article. お世話 (osewa) help, aid, assistance.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Missing / Yearning

I miss you
Japan koishi garu
Missing / Yearning Vertical Wall Scroll

戀しがる is the most common Japanese verb for missing someone or yearning for someone (it could also be missing a place).

戀しがる is the shortest way to say, "I miss you" or "I yearn for you" in Japanese.

Breaking down the characters:
恋し (koishi) yearned for; longed for; missed (acts as an adjective in Japanese).
がる (garu) to feel, behavior (this represents emotion, and turns the whole word into a verb in Japanese).


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Mixed Martial Arts

China zōng hé gé dòu
Mixed Martial Arts Vertical Wall Scroll

綜合格鬥 is a common Chinese title for "Mixed Martial Arts" or "MMA."

The characters or words in this title break down this way:
綜合 zōng hé = composite / synthesized / to sum up / to integrate / to synthesize.
格 gé = style / frame / rule.
斗 dòu = fight / to battle / to struggle.

A Mother’s Love

China mǔ ài
A Mother’s Love Vertical Wall Scroll

母愛 is a way to write a mother's love in Chinese.

Breaking down the characters:
母 means mother.
愛 means love.

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Vertical Wall Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty.

It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.


Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds, people's homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.


Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present-day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Opening / Blooming Flowers

China kāi huā
Japan kai ka
Opening / Blooming Flowers Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters literally mean opening flowers (a verb). 開花 is also associated with Springtime, the beginning of something, or youth.

If you like flowers and the Springtime, this is a great selection for you.

In Korean Hanja, this can be a metaphor for achieving enlightenment or becoming civilized (blooming civilization).


See Also:  Flowers Fall

No Pain No Gain

Japan itami naku shite erumono wa nashi
No Pain No Gain Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase means "no pain, no gain."

Literally, this suggests that with pain, a gain must follow.

The pain Kanji here can also be translated as sorrow or suffering. The gain can also mean profit, advantage, or benefit. In Japanese Buddhist context, that gain Kanji can mean rebirth in paradise, entering nirvana.

The character break down:
痛みなく (itami naku) pain; ache; sore; grief; distress. The naku part adds a meaning of "a lot of" or "extended"
して (shite) and then. (indicates a causative expression; acts as a connective particle)
得る (eru) to get; to acquire; to obtain; to procure; to earn; to win; to gain; to secure; to attain.
もの (mono) conjunctive particle indicating a cause or reason.
なし (nashi) none of; -less; without; no.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Even an iron bar can be ground to a needle

China mó chǔ chéng zhēn
Even an iron bar can be ground to a needle Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "to grind an iron bar down to a fine needle," or "Even a bar of iron can be ground down to a needle [with perseverance]."

Figuratively, this means to persevere in a difficult task or to study diligently.

Phenomenon

China xiàn xiàng
Japan genshou
Phenomenon Vertical Wall Scroll

I must first say that this word is an odd thing to put on a wall scroll in Asian cultures. It won't make a lot of sense alone, unless you have a special or personal meaning that you attach to it for yourself.

These two characters mean phenomenon in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Hanja. They can also be translated as "a happening" depending on context.

The sum of these characters is a little different than their individual meanings. But I will break it down anyway...
The first character means present, existing, actual, appear, now or current.
The second character alone means pattern after, imitate, image, shape, sign (of the times), form, appearance, to be like, to resemble, to take after, to seem or elephant.

Pursue Your Dreams

China zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
Pursue Your Dreams Vertical Wall Scroll

追尋夢想 means "pursue your dreams," "follow your dreams," or "chase your dreams" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "to pursue," "to track down," or "to search for."

The last two mean dreams. This version of dreams refers to those with an element of reality (not the dreams you have when you sleep but rather your aspirations or goals in life).

This title will tell everyone that you want to make your dreams come true.


See Also:  Pursuit of Happiness

Pursuit of Happiness

China zhuī xún xìng fú
Pursuit of Happiness Vertical Wall Scroll

追尋幸福 is the best way to translate the English phrase "pursuit of happiness" into Chinese.

The first two characters mean "to pursue," "to track down," or "to search for."

The last two mean happiness, happy, or blessed.


See Also:  Follow Your Dreams

Pursuit of Happiness

Japan koufuku o motome te
Pursuit of Happiness Vertical Wall Scroll

幸福を求めて is "Pursuit of Happiness" or "In Search of Happiness" in Japanese.

Here's how the characters break down:
幸福 (koufuku) happiness; blessedness; joy; well-being.
を (o) particle
求め (motome) to want; to seek; to pursue; to request
て (te) particle


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Follow Your Dreams

Push or Knock

To weigh one's words
China fǎn fù tuī qiāo
Push or Knock Vertical Wall Scroll

During the Tang Dynasty, a man named Jia Dao (born in the year 779), a well studied scholar and poet, went to the capital to take the imperial examination.

One day as he rides a donkey through the city streets, a poem begins to form in his mind. A portion of the poem comes into his head like this:

"The bird sits on the tree branch near a pond,
A monk approaches and knocks at the gate..."


At the same time, he wondered if the word "push" would be better than "knock" in his poem.

As he rides down the street, he imagines the monk pushing or knocking. Soon he finds himself making motions of pushing, and shaking a fist in a knocking motion as he debates which word to use. He is quite a sight as he makes his way down the street on his donkey with hands and fists flying about as the internal debate continues.

As he amuses people along the street, he becomes completely lost in his thoughts and does not see the mayor's procession coming in the opposite direction. Jia Bao is blocking the way for the procession to continue down the road, and the mayor's guards immediately decide to remove Jia Bao by force. Jia Bao, not realizing that he was in the way, apologizes, explains his poetic dilemma, and awaits his punishment for blocking the mayor's way.

The mayor, Han Yu, a scholar and author of prose himself, finds himself intrigued by Jia Dao's poem and problem. Han Yu gets off his horse, and addresses Jia Bao, stating, "I think knock is better." The relieved Jia Bao raises his head, and is invited by the mayor to join the procession, and are seen riding off together down the street exchanging their ideas and love of poetry.

In modern Chinese, this idiom is used when someone is trying to decide which word to use in their writing or when struggling to decide between two things when neither seems to have a downside.

Realistic / Practical

China tā shí
Realistic / Practical Vertical Wall Scroll

踏實 means realistic or practical.

If you need a reminder to remain grounded in your life, this is a great way to do that. It also can have the meanings of "at ease" or "down to earth."

Restoration to Good Health

China píng fù
Japan byou fuku
Restoration to Good Health Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese title means "to be cured," "to be healed," "restoration to health," or "recovery from illness."

In some context, it can mean "to pacify" or "to calm down."

Sakasa / Reverse

Japan sakasa
Sakasa / Reverse Vertical Wall Scroll

逆さ is a Japanese word that means reverse, inversion, upside down, inverted, reverse, opposite, and in some context (especially without the secondary hiragana character) can mean wicked.

逆さ has some significance to those practicing certain forms of Japanese martial arts.

Note: The first character is kanji (originally a Chinese character now used in Japanese) it still holds the same meaning in Chinese. However, the secondary hiragana makes this a Japanese-only entry.

Sand / Gravel

China shā
Japan suna
Sand / Gravel Vertical Wall Scroll

砂 means sand or gravel in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The radicals in the character imply the grit from ground-down stone or rock.


This can also be the Japanese surname Sunahama.

Snow

China xuě
Japan yuki
Snow Vertical Wall Scroll

雪 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for the word "snow" or "snow fall."

Note: In Korean, this can also mean to whiten or wipe our a grievance.

True Love

China zhēn ài
Japan shinai
True Love Vertical Wall Scroll

真愛 is literally "True Love" in Chinese.

The first character means "real," "true" and "genuine." The second character means "love" and "affection."

During the customization of your calligraphy wall scroll, there is a place to add an inscription. You might want that inscription to be your names in Chinese down the side of your wall scroll, or perhaps just below these two main characters (just $9 extra). A nice gift to celebrate an anniversary or marriage!

Unbreakable

Japan kowa re na i
Unbreakable Vertical Wall Scroll

壊れない means unbreakable in Japanese.

The first two characters mean to be broken; to break; to fall through; to come to nothing. But the last two characters create a negative meaning (like adding "un-" to "breakable").


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Indomitable Spirit

United States Marine Corps

Japan bei kai hei tai
United States Marine Corps Vertical Wall Scroll

米海兵隊 is the Japanese way to write "United States Marine Corps" or simply "U.S. Marines."

Breaking down each Kanji, this means:
"rice (American) ocean/sea soldiers/army/military corps/regiment/group."

This title will only make sense in Japanese, it is not the same in Chinese! Make sure you know your audience before ordering a custom wall scroll.

If you are wondering about the rice, America is known as "rice country" or "rice kingdom" when literally translated. The Kanji for rice is often used as an abbreviation in front of words (like a sub-adjective) to make something "American." Americans say "rice-burner" for a Japanese car, and "rice-rocket" for a Japanese motorcycle. If you did the same in Japanese, it would be exactly the opposite meaning.


Note: I have not verified this but I've found this title used for U.S. Marines in Korean articles, so it's most likely a normal Korean term as well (but only in Korean Hanja).


See Also:  Marine Corps | Navy | Army | Art of War | Warrior | Military

Wado-Kai

Japan wa dou kai
Wado-Kai Vertical Wall Scroll

Wado-Kai is used as a title for styles of Karate and Aikido.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou kai" or "wa dō kai." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Club" or "Peace Method Association." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.


See Also:  Wado-Ryu

Wado-Ryu

Style of Karate or Jujitsu
Japan wa dou ryuu
Wado-Ryu Vertical Wall Scroll

Wado-Ryu is a style of Karate or Jujutsu (Jujitsu).
Note: Many will argue as to whether this is a style of Karate or Jujutsu.

While some find Wado-Ryu similar to Shotokan Karate, enough differences exist in perspective and technique that it stands by itself.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou ryuu" or "wa dō ryū." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Style" or "Peace Method Style." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.


See Also:  Wado-Kai

Each Time You Stumble and Fall, You Gain Experience and Wisdom

China chī yí qiàn, zhǎng yí zhì
Each Time You Stumble and Fall, You Gain Experience and Wisdom Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "Fall into a moat and you will gain wisdom from the experience."

It really suggests that the failures, troubles, frustrations, and setbacks that you encounter in your life are actually helping you to find wisdom. Some would also translate this proverb as, "Learn from your mistakes" or "Learn from your experience."

If you are studying Chinese, you will recognize the first character as "eat" but in this case, it means to "experience" (as used in this proverb, it is suggesting that you have fallen into a moat and/or had a hard time crossing it).
Literally translated character by character, this whole proverb is, "Experience one moat, gain one wisdom/knowledge."

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used phrase.

Wrestling

China shuāi jiāo
Wrestling Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese title usually refers to the sport of wrestling, or to wrestle.

Outside the context of the sport, this can mean to trip and fall.

Yue Fei

China yuè fēi
Japan gakuhi
Yue Fei Vertical Wall Scroll

岳飛 is the name of General Yue Fei (1103-1142). He was a famous General of the Song Dynasty army in China. Many legendary stories have been written about him, and passed down through the generations.

In Japanese, this can be the personal name, Gakuhi.

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
China jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Vertical Wall Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty." More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country."

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country." Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country."

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years一日千秋ichi jitsu sen shuu
ichijitsusenshuu
ichi jitsu sen shu
ichijitsusenshu
yí rì qiān qiū
yi2 ri4 qian1 qiu1
yi ri qian qiu
yiriqianqiu
i jih ch`ien ch`iu
ijihchienchiu
i jih chien chiu
Adoring Love愛慕
爱慕
ai bou / aibou / ai bo / aiboài mù / ai4 mu4 / ai mu / aimu
Autumn
Fall Season
akiqiū / qiu1 / qiuch`iu / chiu
Wisdom from Hard Knocks挨一拳得一招挨十拳變諸葛
挨一拳得一招挨十拳变诸葛
ái yī quán dé yī zhāo ái shí quán biàn zhū gě
ai2 yi1 quan2 de2 yi1 zhao1 ai2 shi2 quan2 bian4 zhu1 ge3
ai yi quan de yi zhao ai shi quan bian zhu ge
ai i ch`üan te i chao ai shih ch`üan pien chu ko
ai i chüan te i chao ai shih chüan pien chu ko
You are always a beauty in your lover’s eyes情人眼里出西施qíng rén yǎn lǐ chū xī shī
qing2 ren2 yan3 li3 chu1 xi1 shi1
qing ren yan li chu xi shi
qingrenyanlichuxishi
ch`ing jen yen li ch`u hsi shih
chingjenyenlichuhsishih
ching jen yen li chu hsi shih
Feeling of Bliss至福感shi fuku kan
shifukukan
Brave Heart勇敢的心yǒng gǎn de xīn
yong3 gan3 de xin1
yong gan de xin
yonggandexin
yung kan te hsin
yungkantehsin
You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure百勝難慮敵三折乃良醫
百胜难虑敌三折乃良医
bǎi shèng nán lǜ dí sān zhé nǎi liáng yī
bai3 sheng4 nan2 lv4 di2 san1 zhe2 nai3 liang2 yi1
bai sheng nan lv di san zhe nai liang yi
pai sheng nan lü ti san che nai liang i
Broken Mirror Rejoined破鏡重圓
破镜重圆
pò jìng chóng yuán
po4 jing4 chong2 yuan2
po jing chong yuan
pojingchongyuan
p`o ching ch`ung yüan
pochingchungyüan
po ching chung yüan
Construction Crane起重機
起重机
kijuuki / kijukiqǐ zhòng jī
qi3 zhong4 ji1
qi zhong ji
qizhongji
ch`i chung chi
chichungchi
chi chung chi
The Night is Darkest Before the Dawn黎明前的黑暗lí míng qián de hēi àn
li2 ming2 qian2 de hei1 an4
li ming qian de hei an
limingqiandeheian
li ming ch`ien te hei an
limingchienteheian
li ming chien te hei an
Death Before Surrender寧死不屈
宁死不屈
níng sǐ bù qū
ning2 si3 bu4 qu1
ning si bu qu
ningsibuqu
ning ssu pu ch`ü
ningssupuchü
ning ssu pu chü
Double Happiness Guest Book
喜喜
xǐ / xi3 / xihsi
Enlightened Warrior覺醒武士
觉醒武士
jué xǐng wǔ shì
jue2 xing3 wu3 shi4
jue xing wu shi
juexingwushi
chüeh hsing wu shih
chüehhsingwushih
Eternal Happiness幸福永恆
幸福永恒
xìng fú yǒng héng
xing4 fu2 yong3 heng2
xing fu yong heng
xingfuyongheng
hsing fu yung heng
hsingfuyungheng
Even Monkeys Fall From Trees猿も木から落ちるsaru mo ki kara ochiru
sarumokikaraochiru
Everything Happens for a Reason物事は全て理由があって起きるmonogoto ha subete riyuu ga at te okiru
monogoto ha subete riyu ga at te okiru
monogotohasubeteriyugaatteokiru
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight七転八起shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
shichi ten haki / nana korobi ya oki
shichitenhaki/nanakorobiyaoki
Keep Your Feet on the Ground腳踏實地
脚踏实地
jiǎo tà shí dì
jiao3 ta4 shi2 di4
jiao ta shi di
jiaotashidi
chiao t`a shih ti
chiaotashihti
chiao ta shih ti
A Bright Future鵬程萬里
鹏程万里
péng chéng wàn lǐ
peng2 cheng2 wan4 li3
peng cheng wan li
pengchengwanli
p`eng ch`eng wan li
pengchengwanli
peng cheng wan li
Rise and Fall
Ups and Downs
栄枯盛衰 / 榮枯盛衰
荣枯盛衰
ei ko sei sui
eikoseisui
Flower Open
Blooming Flower
花開
花开
huā kāi / hua1 kai1 / hua kai / huakaihua k`ai / huakai / hua kai
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall花開花落
花开花落
huā kāi huā luò
hua1 kai1 hua1 luo4
hua kai hua luo
huakaihualuo
hua k`ai hua lo
huakaihualo
hua kai hua lo
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Fall花は咲き花は散るhana wa sa ki hana wa chi ru
hanawasakihanawachiru
Flowers Bloom and Flowers Wither花開花謝
花开花谢
huā kāi huā xiè
hua1 kai1 hua1 xie4
hua kai hua xie
huakaihuaxie
hua k`ai hua hsieh
huakaihuahsieh
hua kai hua hsieh
Flowers Fall
The End Comes
花落huā sà / hua1 luo4 / hua luo / hualuohua lo / hualo
Soccer
Football
Futbol
足球zú qiú / zu2 qiu2 / zu qiu / zuqiutsu ch`iu / tsuchiu / tsu chiu
Forgiveness (from the top down)容赦you sha / yousha / yo sha / yosharóng shè / rong2 she4 / rong she / rongshejung she / jungshe
The Four Seasons春夏秋冬shunkashuutou
shunkashuto
chūn xià qiū dōng
chun1 xia4 qiu1 dong1
chun xia qiu dong
chunxiaqiudong
ch`un hsia ch`iu tung
chunhsiachiutung
chun hsia chiu tung
Gaman我慢ga man / gamanwǒ màn / wo3 man4 / wo man / woman
Golden Anniversary
50th Wedding Anniversary
幸福金婚 / 倖福金婚
幸福金婚
kou fuku kin kon
koufukukinkon
ko fuku kin kon
kofukukinkon
xìng fú jīn hūn
xing4 fu2 jin1 hun1
xing fu jin hun
xingfujinhun
hsing fu chin hun
hsingfuchinhun
Grandmaster大師範daishihan
The Guts Theory根性論kon jou ron
konjouron
kon jo ron
konjoron
Gyakugyaku
Having High Principles不為五斗米折腰
不为五斗米折腰
bù wèi wǔ dǒu mǐ zhé yāo
bu4 wei4 wu3 dou3 mi3 zhe2 yao1
bu wei wu dou mi zhe yao
buweiwudoumizheyao
pu wei wu tou mi che yao
puweiwutoumicheyao
Hua Mulan花木蘭
花木兰
huā mù lán
hua1 mu4 lan2
hua mu lan
huamulan
Improvise Adapt Overcome即興發揮即刻適應即時克服
即兴发挥即刻适应即时克服
jí xìng fā huī jí kè shì yìng jí shí kè fú
ji2 xing4 fa1 hui1 ji2 ke4 shi4 ying4 ji2 shi2 ke4 fu2
ji xing fa hui ji ke shi ying ji shi ke fu
chi hsing fa hui chi k`o shih ying chi shih k`o fu
chi hsing fa hui chi ko shih ying chi shih ko fu
Indomitable
Unyielding
不屈不撓
不屈不挠
fukutsu futou
fukutsufutou
fukutsu futo
fukutsufuto
bù qū bù náo
bu4 qu1 bu4 nao2
bu qu bu nao
buqubunao
pu ch`ü pu nao
puchüpunao
pu chü pu nao
Inhale吸入kyuu nyuu / kyuunyuu / kyu nyu / kyunyuxī rù / xi1 ru4 / xi ru / xiruhsi ju / hsiju
Katanakatanadāo / dao1 / daotao
Kodokan講道館
讲道馆
kou dou kan
koudoukan
ko do kan
kodokan
Kodokan光道館
讲道馆
kou dou kan
koudoukan
ko do kan
kodokan
Live Free or Die不自由毋寧死
不自由毋宁死
bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
bu2 zi4 you2 wu2 ning4 si3
bu zi you wu ning si
buziyouwuningsi
pu tzu yu wu ning ssu
putzuyuwuningssu
Loving Heart
One’s Love
戀心
恋心
koi gokoro / koigokoro
Marijuana
Weed
Pot
大麻tai ma / taimadà má / da4 ma2 / da ma / damata ma / tama
Marine海軍陸戰隊員
海军陆战队员
hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì yuán
hai3 jun1 lu4 zhan4 dui4 yuan2
hai jun lu zhan dui yuan
haijunluzhanduiyuan
hai chün lu chan tui yüan
haichünluchantuiyüan
Marine Corps海軍陸戰隊
海军陆战队
hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì
hai3 jun1 lu4 zhan4 dui4
hai jun lu zhan dui
haijunluzhandui
hai chün lu chan tui
haichünluchantui
Marine Corps海兵隊
海兵队
kaiheitai
Marine
Soldier of the Sea
海兵kai hei / kaihei
Mind Your Own Business余計なお世話yokei na osewa
yokeinaosewa
Missing
Yearning
戀しがる
恋しがる
koishi garu
koishigaru
Mixed Martial Arts綜合格鬥
综合格斗
zōng hé gé dòu
zong1 he2 ge2 dou4
zong he ge dou
zonghegedou
tsung ho ko tou
tsunghokotou
A Mother’s Love母愛
母爱
mǔ ài / mu3 ai4 / mu ai / muai
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu遠上寒山石徑斜白雲生處有人家停車坐愛楓林晚霜葉紅於二月花
远上寒山石径斜白云生处有人家停车坐爱枫林晚霜叶红于二月花
yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
yuan3 shang4 han2 shan1 shi2 jing4 xia2 bai2 yun2 sheng1 chu4 you3 ren2 jia1 ting2 che1 zuo4 ai4 feng1 lin2 wan3 shuang4 ye4 hong2 yu2 er4 yue4 hua1
yuan shang han shan shi jing xia bai yun sheng chu you ren jia ting che zuo ai feng lin wan shuang ye hong yu er yue hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng ch`u yu jen chia t`ing ch`e tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng chu yu jen chia ting che tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
Opening
Blooming Flowers
開花
开花
kai ka / kaikakāi huā / kai1 hua1 / kai hua / kaihuak`ai hua / kaihua / kai hua
No Pain No Gain痛みなくして得るものなしitami naku shite erumono wa nashi
Even an iron bar can be ground to a needle磨杵成針
磨杵成针
mó chǔ chéng zhēn
mo2 chu3 cheng2 zhen1
mo chu cheng zhen
mochuchengzhen
mo ch`u ch`eng chen
mochuchengchen
mo chu cheng chen
Phenomenon現象
现象
genshou / genshoxiàn xiàng
xian4 xiang4
xian xiang
xianxiang
hsien hsiang
hsienhsiang
Pursue Your Dreams追尋夢想
追寻梦想
zhuī xún mèng xiǎng
zhui1 xun2 meng4 xiang3
zhui xun meng xiang
zhuixunmengxiang
chui hsün meng hsiang
chuihsünmenghsiang
Pursuit of Happiness追尋幸福
追寻幸福
zhuī xún xìng fú
zhui1 xun2 xing4 fu2
zhui xun xing fu
zhuixunxingfu
chui hsün hsing fu
chuihsünhsingfu
Pursuit of Happiness幸福を求めてkoufuku o motome te
koufukuomotomete
kofuku o motome te
kofukuomotomete
Push or Knock反復推敲
反复推敲
fǎn fù tuī qiāo
fan3 fu4 tui1 qiao1
fan fu tui qiao
fanfutuiqiao
fan fu t`ui ch`iao
fanfutuichiao
fan fu tui chiao
Realistic
Practical
踏實
踏实
tā shí / ta1 shi2 / ta shi / tashit`a shih / tashih / ta shih
Restoration to Good Health平復
平复
byou fuku / byoufuku / byo fuku / byofukupíng fù / ping2 fu4 / ping fu / pingfup`ing fu / pingfu / ping fu
Sakasa
Reverse
逆さsakasa
Sand
Gravel
sunashā / sha1 / sha
Snowyukixuě / xue3 / xuehsüeh
True Love真愛
真爱
shinaizhēn ài / zhen1 ai4 / zhen ai / zhenaichen ai / chenai
Unbreakable壊れないkowa re na i
kowarenai
United States Marine Corps米海兵隊bei kai hei tai
beikaiheitai
Wado-Kai和道會
和道会
wa dou kai / wadoukai / wa do kai / wadokai
Wado-Ryu和道流wa dou ryuu
wadouryuu
wa do ryu
wadoryu
Each Time You Stumble and Fall, You Gain Experience and Wisdom吃一塹長一智
吃一堑长一智
chī yí qiàn, zhǎng yí zhì
chi1 yi2 qian4 zhang3 yi2 zhi4
chi yi qian zhang yi zhi
chiyiqianzhangyizhi
ch`ih i ch`ien chang i chih
chihichienchangichih
chih i chien chang i chih
Wrestling摔跤shuāi jiāo
shuai1 jiao1
shuai jiao
shuaijiao
shuai chiao
shuaichiao
Yue Fei岳飛
岳飞
gakuhiyuè fēi / yue4 fei1 / yue fei / yuefeiyüeh fei / yüehfei
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.