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Live On in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Live On calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Live On” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Live On” title below...

  1. You Only Live Once

  2. Live Without Regret

  3. Live In The Moment / Live In The Now

  4. Living / Live Life

  5. Live For The Day

  6. Live Laugh Love

  7. Live For The Day / Seize The Day

  8. No Regrets

  9. A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

10. Carpe Diem / Seize the Day

11. Live in Prosperity

12. Ikiru / To Live

13. Live Strong

14. Live Laugh Love

15. Live Strong

16. Traveler / To Live Abroad

17. Live in Peace and Contentment

18. Live and Let Die

19. Live for What You Love

20. Live Free or Die

21. Live Together and Help Each Other

22. Live Love Die

23. Life Force

24. Everyday Life

25. Birth / Life

26. Life Goes On

27. Life is Short

28. Alive

29. Immortal / Immortality

30. Life Goes On

31. Life is a Journey

32. A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

33. Optimism / Happy With Your Fate

34. A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

35. Die Without Regret

36. Alone / Solitary Existence

37. Valkyrie

38. Embrace Life / Embrace Living

39. The Noble Eightfold Path

40. Banzai / Wansui

41. Longevity / Long Life

42. Ikebana

43. Death Before Dishonor

44. Survive

45. Galatians 5:25

46. Tanjun / Simplicity

47. Madly in Love

48. Principles of Life

49. Death Before Dishonor

50. Together Forever in Love

51. Community

52. Banzai

53. Prosperity and Happiness

54. Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity

55. The Single Life

56. 100 Years of Happy Marriage

57. Death Before Surrender

58. Thug Life

59. Learning is Eternal

60. Eat Drink and Be Merry

61. Life in Every Breath

62. Love Life

63. Danger

64. Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever

65. Death Before Surrender

66. Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity

67. Clarity

68. Bushido / The Way of the Samurai

69. Day

70. Heaven

71. Frightful Demon / Asura

72. Choose Life

73. A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

74. Body and Earth in Unity

75. Tiger Rumor

76. Better Late Than Never


You Only Live Once

ichi do da ke i ki ru
You Only Live Once Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the simplest Japanese phrase that means, "[you] only live once" or "only one [life] to live."

The first four characters create a word that means "only once."
The last three characters create a word that means, "to live" or "to exist."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

You Only Live Once

shēng mìng zhǐ yǒu yí cì
You Only Live Once Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the translation to Chinese of the popular English phrase, "You only live once."

This is a more modern idea for Chinese people. The reason is, most Chinese people were taught quite the opposite idea from Buddhism.

Live Without Regret

jinsei kui nashi
Live Without Regret Vertical Wall Scroll

This is how to say "live without regrets" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Live for Today

Live Without Regret

shēng ér wú huǐ
Live Without Regret Vertical Wall Scroll

生而無悔 is how to say "live without regrets" in Mandarin Chinese.


Note: There is some debate about whether this makes sense in Japanese. It would be read, "nama ji mu ke," and be understood in Japanese. But, a Japanese person will probably think it's Chinese (not Japanese).


See Also:  Live for Today

Live In The Moment / Live In The Now

xiàn shì
gen sei
Live In The Moment / Live In The Now Vertical Wall Scroll

現世 is a very short way to write "live in the moment" or "live in the now" in Japanese.

This short word is open to interpretation. It's used in Japanese Buddhism to mean "the current epoch" or "the current age" (the current age is but a brief moment in the greater scope of existence). When used in that context, this is pronounced "utsushiyo" or "ustusiyo" in Japanese. Otherwise, it's pronounced "gensei" in Japanese.

Other translation possibilities include:

Live for now
Earthly world
This world
This life
Earthly life
Present life
Present generation
Present incarnation
Current age
This existence
This (momentary) reality


Note: This is also a word in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. While the meaning is more or less the same, this is not recommended for a wall scroll if your audience is Chinese or Korean. This selection is best if your audience is Japanese.

Living / Live Life

shēng huó
sei katsu
Living / Live Life Vertical Wall Scroll

生活 means life, living, to live, or the state of being alive. It can also refer to your daily existence or livelihood. It can also be a suggestion to just "Live life."

生活 is also the term used in other titles such as "healthy living" or Lance Armstrong's "Livestrong" campaign (Chinese title for Livestrong only).

If you need a reminder that you are alive, and to take a breath, this might be the perfect wall scroll for you.

Live For The Day

huó zài jīn tiān
Live For The Day Vertical Wall Scroll

活在今天 is not really an eastern concept, so it does not translate into a phrase that seems natural on a wall scroll.

However, if this is your philosophy, the characters shown here do capture your idea of living for today or living in the moment. 活在今天 literally say "Live in today" and they are grammatically correct in Chinese.


Note: This kind of makes sense in Korean Hanja but the grammar is Chinese, so it's not that natural in Korean.

Live Laugh Love

xiào ài shēng huó
Live Laugh Love Vertical Wall Scroll

In English, the word order shown in the title is the most natural or popular. In Chinese, the natural order is a little different:

The first character means laugh (sometimes means smile).

The second character means love.

The last two characters mean "live" as in "to be alive" or "pursue life."

Please note: 笑愛生活 is not a normal phrase, in that it does not have a subject, verb, and object. It is a word list. Word lists are not common in Asian languages/grammar (at least not as normal as they are in English). We only added this entry because so many people requested it.

We put the characters in the order shown above, as it almost makes a single word with the meaning, "A life of laughter and love." It's a made-up word but it sounds good in Chinese.


We removed the Japanese pronunciation guide from this entry, as the professional Japanese translator deemed it "near nonsense" from a Japanese perspective. Choose this only if your audience is Chinese and you want the fewest-possible characters to express this idea.

In Korean, this would be 소애생활 or "so ae saeng hwar" but I have not confirmed that this makes sense in Korean.

Live For The Day / Seize The Day

ima wo i ki ru
Live For The Day / Seize The Day Vertical Wall Scroll

今を生きる is a Japanese phrase that can be translated as "live for the day," "live for the moment," "seize the day," or "make the most of the present."

You can think of this as the Japanese version of "Carpe Diem."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

No Regrets

wú huǐ
mu ke
No Regrets Vertical Wall Scroll

無悔 is how to say "no regrets" in Mandarin Chinese.

This also makes sense in Japanese though not the most common way to express "no regrets" in Japanese.


See Also:  Live for Today

No Regrets

kou kai na shi
No Regrets Vertical Wall Scroll

後悔無し is how to say "no regrets" in Japanese.


See Also:  Live for Today

A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

kou fuku to ha nei no jin sei
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "A life of happiness and prosperity" or "A life of happiness and success."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Prosperity

Carpe Diem / Seize the Day

bǎ wò jīn rì
Carpe Diem / Seize the Day Vertical Wall Scroll

把握今日 is the closest and most natural way to express this proverb in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "to seize" but can also be translated as "take control of."

The last two characters mean "today."

Live in Prosperity

shēng huó yú fán róng zhōng
Live in Prosperity Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "live in prosperity." It's kind of a suggestion to be prosperity the center of your world.

This is the way some people want to live (and you should always live for what you love). However, this phrase does not suggest a peaceful life - rather one that is always busy. It's not for everyone but it might be for you.


See Also:  Prosperity

Ikiru / To Live

ikiru
Ikiru / To Live Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese title means, to live, to exist, to make a living, to subsist, to come to life, or to be enlivened.

生きる is also the title of a 1952 Japanese movie that uses the translated English title of, "To Live."

Note: This term, when used in the context of baseball, and some Japanese games such as "go" can mean "safe."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live Strong

jiān qiáng shēng huó
Live Strong Vertical Wall Scroll

While hard to translate directly, this is the best way to write "Live Strong" in Chinese. If you are a cancer survivor, or simply support Lance Armstrong's ideas, this is a nice selection for a wall scroll.

The first two characters mean strong or staunch. The last two mean living or life (daily existence). While the Chinese version is the reverse order of "Live Strong" it is the only way to write it in a natural form that is also grammatically correct.

Note that we are in no way affiliated or connected to Lance, nor his foundation. This translation is offered because of multiple requests from customers whose philosophies or ideas match those of the Live Strong idea.

Live Laugh Love

ai to warai no seikatsu
Live Laugh Love Vertical Wall Scroll

Because a word list of "Live Laugh Love" is not natural in Japanese, this takes the concept and incorporates it into a proper phrase.

This can be translated as, "A life of love and laughter" or "Live life with love and laughter."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live Strong

tsuyoku ikiru
Live Strong Vertical Wall Scroll

強く生きる is, "Live Strong" in Japanese.

If you are a cancer survivor, or simply support Lance Armstrong's ideas, this is a nice selection for a wall scroll.


Note that we are in no way affiliated or connected to Lance, nor his foundation.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Traveler / To Live Abroad

jī lǚ
kiryo
Traveler / To Live Abroad Vertical Wall Scroll

羈旅 is a Chinese and Japanese title for traveler / traveller, to live abroad, to be traveling, or just travel.

Live in Peace and Contentment

ān jū lè yè
an kyo raku gyou
Live in Peace and Contentment Vertical Wall Scroll

安居樂業 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja proverb for, "living in peace and working happily," or "to live in peace and be content with one's occupation."

Live and Let Die

shinu no wa yatsuradesu
Live and Let Die Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "live and let die," in Japanese.

This is the Japanese title of the James Bond 007 movie of the same name.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live and Let Die

huó yě ràng bié rén sǐ
Live and Let Die Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "live and let die," in Chinese.

This is the Chinese translation of the song lyric by Guns n Roses for the James Bond 007 movie of the same name.

Live for What You Love

jin sei ou ka
Live for What You Love Vertical Wall Scroll

人生謳歌 means, "live for what you love" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean "human life" or simply "living." The last two characters mean, "merit," "prosperity," or "what you enjoy." This phrase can suggest working or staying busy for your own goals (in your career).


See Also:  Prosperity

Live Free or Die

Give me liberty or give me death
bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
Live Free or Die Vertical Wall Scroll

不自由毋寧死 means, "Give me liberty or give me death," in Chinese.

This is also the best way to say, "Live free or die."

The characters break down this way:
不 = Not; none; without.
自由 = Freedom; liberty; freewill; self-determination.
毋寧 = Rather; would rather; rather be.
死 = Dead; death.

This will go nicely next to your, "Don't tread on me," flag. This phrase is known well enough in China that it's listed in a few dictionaries. Though I doubt you will find too many Chinese citizens willing to yell this on the steps of the capital in Beijing.


See Also:  Death Before Dishonor

Live Together and Help Each Other

kyou son kyou ei
Live Together and Help Each Other Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "live together and help each other," "existing together, thriving together," or "co-existence and co-prosperity."

Live Love Die

shēng ài sǐ
sei ai shi
Live Love Die Vertical Wall Scroll

This came from a customer's request but it's not too bad.

These three simple characters suggest that you are born, you learn to love, and then exit the world.

Life Force

shēng mìng
seimei / inochi
Life Force Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Korean and Japanese word means "life force" or simply "life."

The first character means "life" or "birth." The second means "life" or "fate." Together they create the meaning of "life force," though some will translate this as "existence" and sometimes "vitality."


See Also:  Vitality | Birth

Everyday Life

rì cháng shēng huó
nichi jou sei katsu
Everyday Life Vertical Wall Scroll

This simply means everyday life or regular life.

You can also translate it as "Living day to day."

Birth / Life

shēng
shou / iku
Birth / Life Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means "to be born" and "to give birth."

Also, it's often used to refer to life itself, and sometimes "to grow."

生 is used in a lot of compound words such as "yi sheng," which means "doctor" (literally "healer of life"), "sheng ri" which means "birthday" (literally "birth day") and "xue sheng" which means student (literally "studying life" or "learner [about] life"). Few Chinese people will think of the literal meaning when this use words like doctor and student - but it is interesting to note.

生 has the same root meaning in Korean Hanja and Japanese. However, in Japanese, there are many possible pronunciations, and this can be used to mean "raw" or "unprocessed" (as in draft beer). Therefore, not be the best if your audience is Japanese.


See Also:  Vitality

Life Goes On

jin sei ha tsudu ku
Life Goes On Vertical Wall Scroll

人生は続く is a Japanese phrase that expresses, "Life Goes On."

The first two characters mean "life" (literally "human life").
The third character is a particle which connects the ideas in this phrase.
The last two characters mean "to continue," "to last," "to go on," "to occur again and again."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Life is Short

jinsei ha mijikai
Life is Short Vertical Wall Scroll

人生は短い is "life is short" in Japanese.

The character breakdown:
人生 (jinsei) life (i.e. conception to death); human life, living, lifetime.
は (ha/wa) particle (means "is" in this case).
短い (mijikai) short.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Life is Short

A 100-year-old is but a traveler passing through this life
bǎi suì guāng yīn rú guò kè
Life is Short Vertical Wall Scroll

百歲光陰如過客 directly translates as: [Even a] hundred-year-old [person] is [just a] traveler passing by.

The simple message is, "Human life is short." Of course, there is an unspoken suggestion that you should make the best of the time you have here on earth.

Alive

huó zhe
Alive Vertical Wall Scroll

活著 is the word that means alive, as in the state of living or being alive (Chinese only).

Immortal / Immortality

bù xiǔ
fukyuu
Immortal / Immortality Vertical Wall Scroll

不朽 means immortal or immortality in Chinese, Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja.

The literal translation is "without decay" or "never rotting." Basically, this title speaks of something or someone who never dies and thus never rots or decays.

This can also be translated as everlasting, eternal or imperishable.

Life Goes On

shēng huó zài jì xù
Life Goes On Vertical Wall Scroll

No matter what happens, life goes on.

For better or worse, life goes one. 生活在繼續 is the basic idea behind this modern Chinese proverb which literally says "Life goes on" in these five characters.


A further explanation of this phrase can now be found on our forum here: Life Goes On in Chinese, explained.

Life is a Journey

rén shēng shì yí duàn lǚ chéng
Life is a Journey Vertical Wall Scroll

This proverb means "Life is a Journey."

If this matches your philosophy, this might be the perfect Chinese calligraphy for you.

A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a kind of complex ten-character proverb composed by Zhuge Liang about 1800 years ago.

This Chinese proverb means "Leading a simple life will yield a clear mind, and having inner peace will help you see far (into the world)."

What I have translated as "simple life" means NOT being materialistic and NOT competing in the rat race.

The last word means "far" but the deeper meaning is that you will surpass what you can currently see or understand. Perhaps even the idea of opening up vast knowledge and understanding of complex ideas.

The whole phrase has a theme that suggests if you are NOT an aggressive cut-throat person who fights his way to the top no matter how many people he crushes on the way, and instead seek inner peace, you will have a happier existence and be more likely to understand the meaning of life.


See Also:  Serenity

Optimism / Happy With Your Fate

lè tiān
raku ten
Optimism / Happy With Your Fate Vertical Wall Scroll

樂天 is about being optimistic and also making the best of whatever life throws at you.

樂天 / 楽天 is hard to define. One dictionary defines this as, "acceptance of fate and happy about it." There is one English word equivalent which is sanguinity or sanguinary.

You can also say that this means, "Be happy with whatever Heaven provides," or "Find happiness in whatever fate Heaven bestows upon you." 樂天 suggests being an optimist in life.

Note: 樂天 / 楽天 is sometimes a given name in China.


楽 Please note that Japanese tend to write the first character in a slightly-different form (as seen to the right). Let us know if you have a preference when you place your order.

A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

xìng fú chéng gōng de yì shēng
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "A life of happiness and prosperity" or "A life of happiness and success."

It's a great and very positive and inspirational wall scroll selection.


See Also:  Prosperity

Die Without Regret

sǐ ér wú huǐ
Die Without Regret Vertical Wall Scroll

死而無悔 is how to say "die with no regrets" in Mandarin Chinese.

This proverb comes from the Analects of Confucius.


See Also:  No Regrets

Alone / Solitary Existence

dú jū
dokkyo
Alone / Solitary Existence Vertical Wall Scroll

獨居 is a Chinese word that can be translated as to live alone, to live a solitary existence, solitude, solitary life, dwelling alone.

You might use a word like this in regards to a hermit.


独 In modern Japan, and Simplified Chinese, they use the version of the first character shown to the right. If you want this version please click on the character to the right instead of the button above.

Valkyrie

nǚ wǔ shén
Valkyrie Vertical Wall Scroll

女武神 is the Chinese title for Valkyrie, the female spirit who determines which Soldiers live and die in battle.

Embrace Life / Embrace Living

yōng bào shēng huó
Embrace Life / Embrace Living Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese title means to embrace or to hug life, or the embrace what it is to live.

The Noble Eightfold Path

Ashtangika Marga / Astangika-Marga / Atthangika Magga
bā zhèng dào
ha sshou dou
The Noble Eightfold Path Vertical Wall Scroll

八正道 is a complex set of steps that Buddhists much take to cleanse karma, achieve enlightenment, eventually cease the cycle of rebirth and live in a state of Nirvana.


If the idea of 8 separate wall scrolls plus this title is too much for you, we can custom-arrange all eight of these concepts on a single wall scroll. Just contact me, and we can discuss options.

Note: This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term and remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Banzai / Wansui

Old Japanese / Traditional Chinese & Korean
wàn suì
banzai / manzai
Banzai / Wansui Vertical Wall Scroll

萬歲 is the traditional Chinese, Korean Hanja, and ancient Japanese way to write banzai.

In modern times, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. So you might want to select the other entry for more universal readability.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 萬歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

Other translations include: Cheers! (not the drinking kind), hurrah!, long live [name]!, congratulations!

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other.

Longevity / Long Life

cháng shòu
chouju
Longevity / Long Life Vertical Wall Scroll

Used as a noun, this word means "longevity" or "the ability to live long."

It can also be an adjective meaning "long lived."


Japanese LongevityPlease note that Japanese use a simplified version of the second character of longevity - it also happens to be the same simplification used in mainland China. Click on the character to the right if you want the Japanese/Simplified version of this two-character longevity calligraphy.

Ikebana

ikebana
Ikebana Vertical Wall Scroll

生け花 is the Japanese term ikibana, meaning living or live flower arrangement.

The literal translation is simply, "living flowers."

Death Before Dishonor

Better to be broken jade than unbroken pottery
níng wéi yù suì bú wéi wǎ quán
Death Before Dishonor Vertical Wall Scroll

寧為玉碎不為瓦全 is the long version of a Chinese proverb which means, "rather be shattered piece of jade than an unbroken piece of pottery."

A little more explanation:
Death is implied with the "broken" meaning. Jade is one of the most precious materials in Chinese history, and in this case is compared with one's honor and self-worth. Pottery is just something you eat off of, it has no deep value, just as a person who has lost their honor, or had none to begin with.
Thus, this means, "better to die with honor than to live in shame" or words to that effect.

This is often translated in English as "Death Before Dishonor," the famous military slogan.

I would also compare this to the English proverb, "Better to die on your feet than live on your knees."


This is an idiom. It therefore doesn't directly say exactly what it means. If you think about the English idiom, "The grass is always greener," it does not directly say "jealousy" or "envy" but everyone knows that it is implied.

Survive

shēng cún
seizon
Survive Vertical Wall Scroll

生存 means "to survive." In some context, it can mean survival, to live, to exist or existence.

生存 is not a common selection for a wall scroll but a lot of people search for this term, so I added it to the database.

Galatians 5:25

If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit
wǒ men ruò shì kào shèng líng shēn jiù dàng kào shèng líng xíng shì
Galatians 5:25 Vertical Wall Scroll

我們若是靠聖靈得生就當靠聖靈行事 is the translation of Galatians 5:25 into Mandarin Chinese via the Chinese Union Bible.

KJV: If we live in the Spirit, let us also walk in the Spirit.

NIV: Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit.

The annotation of this Chinese translation:
1.我们 wǒ men - we / us / ourselves
2.若是 ruò shì - if
3.靠 kào - depend upon / lean on / near / by / against / to support
4.圣灵 shèng líng - Holy Ghost
5.得 děi - to have to / must / ought to / degree or possibility
6.生就 shēng jiù - born one way or another (nervous, suspicious, etc.)
7.当 dàng - suitable / adequate / fitting / proper
8.靠 kào - depend upon / lean on / near / by / against / to support
9.圣灵 shèng líng - Holy Ghost
10.行事 xíng shì - how one does things / how one runs things (in this case, it suggests, "to walk in step with")

Tanjun / Simplicity

tanjun
Tanjun / Simplicity Vertical Wall Scroll

Tanjun is a Japanese word that means simplicity, simple, and/or uncomplicated.

Do you want to live the "tanjun lifestyle"? Maybe this wall scroll will remind you to uncomplicate your life.

Madly in Love

ài de sǐ qù huó lái
Madly in Love Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese phrase means, "to be madly in love."

It almost literally means, "Love as if your life depended on it," or "Love you to death, just to live."

Principles of Life

shēng huó xìn tiáo
Principles of Life Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "principles of life" or "The personal obligations and rules that you live by."

For instance, if you were a vegetarian, the act of not eating meat fits into this category.
This could also be translated as "Way of living."

Death Before Dishonor

Better to be broken jade than unbroken pottery
níng wéi yù suì
Death Before Dishonor Vertical Wall Scroll

寧為玉碎 is the short version of a longer Chinese proverb which means, "rather be shattered piece of jade than an unbroken piece of pottery."

寧為玉碎 just say the "rather be a broken piece of jade" part (the second half is implied - everyone in China knows this idiom).

A little more explanation:
Death is implied with the "broken" meaning. Jade is one of the most precious materials in Chinese history, and in this case is compared with one's honor and self-worth. Pottery is just something you eat off of, it has no deep value, just as a person who has lost their honor, or had none to begin with.
Thus, this means, "better to die with honor than to live in shame" or words to that effect.

寧為玉碎 is often translated in English as "Death Before Dishonor," the famous military slogan.

I would also compare this to the English proverb, "Better to die on your feet than live on your knees."

Together Forever in Love

yǒng yuǎn ài zài yī qǐ
Together Forever in Love Vertical Wall Scroll

This is "together forever in love" in Chinese.

It's a nice phrase if you're a couple who plans to stay together and make your love last as long as you live.

Community

shè qū
Community Vertical Wall Scroll

社區 is how to write community in Chinese.

社區 can mean the neighborhood you live in. It can also be used in the same way we use the word community in English.

Examples: African-American community, Christian community, Asian community etc.


If you need a special calligraphy wall scroll to describe your community, just contact me, and I'll translate it and make it for you.

Banzai

Modern Japanese Version
wàn suì
banzai
Banzai Vertical Wall Scroll

万歲 is the modern Japanese way to write banzai.

We've made two almost identical entries for this word, with just a variation on the first character. In the last century, 萬 was simplified to 万 in Japan and China. The new generation will expect it to be written as 万 but the old generation can still read the more traditional 萬 form. You must make your own determination as to what version is best for you. If your audience is mostly Japanese, I suggest 万歲.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 万歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Other translations: hurrah, long life, congratulations, cheers, live long.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Prosperity and Happiness

fù lè
furaku
Prosperity and Happiness Vertical Wall Scroll

富樂 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for a title meaning prosperity and happiness.

If you have a desire to live in prosperity and happiness, this is for you.

Note: This title is often used in a Buddhist context.

Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity

bù qì bù chóu huó dào bái tóu
Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "Without anger or worry, you will have a long life, until after all your hair is white."

It more literally reads, "Don't get angry or worried [and you will] live [long] till [all your] hair [becomes] white."

The Single Life

Dokushin-Kizoku
do kushin ki zoku
The Single Life Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb literally means "Single Aristocrat" or "Single Noble."

The understood meaning is that single people can live freely without a spouse or kids to support. To put it in an old cliché, they are footloose and fancy-free.

If you are a bachelor or bachelorette with few responsibilities and just a thirst for freedom and a worry-free life, this could be the title for you.

100 Years of Happy Marriage

bǎi nián hǎo hé
100 Years of Happy Marriage Vertical Wall Scroll

百年好合 is a wish or greeting, often heard at Chinese weddings, for a couple to have 100 good years together.

Some will translate this more naturally into English as: "May you live a long and happy life together."

The character breakdown:
百 = 100
年 = Years
好 = Good (Happy)
合 = Together

Death Before Surrender

nìng sǐ bù xiáng
Death Before Surrender Vertical Wall Scroll

This ancient Chinese proverb can be translated as "Rather to die than surrender," "Prefer death over surrender," "To prefer death to surrender," or simply "No surrender."

寧死不降 is probably the closest proverb to the English proverb "Better to die on your feet than live on your knees."

Thug Life

bào tú shēng huó
bou to sei katsu
Thug Life Vertical Wall Scroll

暴徒生活 is probably the best way to say "Thug Life" in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

It's a strange title to be sure, so expect native Asian people to be confused when they see your Thug Life calligraphy.

The first two characters mean bandit, thug, ruffian, insurgent, rioter, or mob.

The last two characters mean life, live, or living.

Learning is Eternal

xué wú zhǐ jìng
Learning is Eternal Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese philosophy tells of how we continue to learn throughout our lives. This proverb can be translated in a few ways such as "Study has no end," "Knowledge is infinite," "No end to learning," "There's always something new to study," or "You live and learn."

The deeper meaning: Even when we finish school we are still students of the world gaining more knowledge from our surroundings with each passing day.


See Also:  An Open Book Benefits Your Mind | Wisdom | Learn From Wisdom

Eat Drink and Be Merry

chī hē wán lè jí shí xíng lè
Eat Drink and Be Merry Vertical Wall Scroll

This is just about the closest proverb to match the western idea of "Eat, drink, and be merry."

This Chinese proverb more literally means, "Eat, drink, play, be merry, enjoy everything as long as you can."

It's basically a suggestion that you try to enjoy everything in life, as long as you live, or as long as you are able.

Life in Every Breath

hakuiki hitotsu nimo seimei ga yadori
Life in Every Breath Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "life in every breath" in Japanese.

This phrase is more like "every single breath as you live and dwell."

The characters breakdown this way:
吐く息 (hakuiki) to breathe; exhaled air; one's breath; breathing.
一つ (hitotsu) one; only; just.
にも (nimo) also; too; as well; even.
生命 (seimei) life; existence; living.
が (ga) particle.
宿り (yadori) to lodge; to dwell; lodging; abode; shelter.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Love Life

rè ài shēng mìng
Love Life Vertical Wall Scroll

熱愛生命 is the Chinese phrase for "Love Life" or "Love of Life."

If you love your life, or want a reminder on your wall to keep you loving your life each day, this is the selection for you.

To clarify, this is different than "A life full of love," or "love while you live." With this phrase, you are loving the state of being alive.


Note: Korean pronunciation is included above, though use of this phrase in Korean has not been verified.

Danger

A dangerous character in every way
wēi
ki
Danger Vertical Wall Scroll

危 means danger, peril or "to endanger." If you live a dangerous life, or want to subtly warn others that you are a dangerous person, this may be the selection for you.

This also means "danger" and sometimes "fear" in Japanese and Korean but is seldom seen outside of compound words in those languages (as a single character, it's kind of like an abbreviation for danger in Japanese and Korean). 危 is also a rather odd selection for a wall scroll anyway. It's only here because people search for danger on our website.

Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever

yǒng yuǎn de péng yǒu
Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever Vertical Wall Scroll

永遠的朋友 is exactly what the title suggests. 永遠的朋友 means friends that are eternal or a friendship that will last forever - you will remain the best of friends as long as you live.

The first two characters mean forever, eternal, eternity, perpetuity, immortality, and/or permanence.

The middle character links the words (it's a possessive article).

The last two characters represent friendship, or simply "friends."

Death Before Surrender

Rather die than compromise
níng sǐ bù qū
Death Before Surrender Vertical Wall Scroll

寧死不屈 is often translated as "Death Before Dishonor."

The literal translation is more like, "Better die than compromise." The last two characters mean "not to bend" or "not to bow down." Some might even say that it means "not to surrender." Thus, you could say this proverb means, "Better to die than live on my knees" or simply "no surrender" (with the real idea being that you would rather die than surrender).

Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity

zūn yán
son gen
Dignity / Honor / Sanctity / Integrity Vertical Wall Scroll

This form of honor is showing great respect for yourself, other people, and the rules you live by.

When you are honorable, you keep your word. You do the right thing regardless of what others are doing.

尊嚴 is the kind of personal honor or dignity that is of great value. If you lose this, you have lost yourself and perhaps the reputation of your family as well.

While this is not directly the same thing as "face" or "saving face" in Asian culture, it is associated with the same concept in China.


厳In Japan, they currently use a more simplified second character for this word. The ancient Japanese form is the same as China but after WWII some Kanji were changed. If you want the modern Japanese version, just click on the Kanji image shown to the right, instead of the button above.

Clarity

qīng
sei
Clarity Vertical Wall Scroll

清 means clarity or clear in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Looking at the parts of this character, you have three splashes of water on the left, "life" on the top right, and the moon on the lower right.

Because of something Confucius said about 2500 years ago, you can imagine that this character means "live life with clarity like bright moonlight piercing pure water." The Confucian idea is something like "Keep clear what is pure in yourself, and let your pure nature show through." Kind of like saying, "Don't pollute your mind or body, so that they remain clear."

This might be stretching the definition of this single Chinese character but the elements are there, and "clarity" is a powerful idea.


Korean note: Korean pronunciation is given above but this character is written with a slight difference in the "moon radical" in Korean. However, anyone who can read Korean Hanja, will understand this character with no problem (this is considered an alternate form in Korean). If you want the more standard Korean Hanja form (which is an alternate form in Chinese), just let me know.

Japanese note: When reading in Japanese, this Kanji has additional meanings of pure, purify, or cleanse (sometimes to remove demons or "exorcise"). Used more in compound words in Japanese than as a stand-alone Kanji.

Bushido / The Way of the Samurai

wǔ shì dào
bu shi do
Bushido / The Way of the Samurai Vertical Wall Scroll

武士道 is the title for, "The Code of the Samurai."

Sometimes called "The Seven Virtues of the Samurai," "The Bushido Code," or "The Samurai Code of Chivalry."

This would be read in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja as "The Way of the Warrior," "The Warrior's Way," or "The Warrior's Code."

It's a set of virtues that the Samurai of Japan and ancient warriors of China and Korea had to live and die by. However, while known throughout Asia, this title is mostly used in Japan, and thought of as being of Japanese origin.

The seven commonly-accepted tenets or virtues of Bushido are: Benevolence 仁, Courage 勇, Honesty 誠, Honour 名誉, Loyalty 忠実, Respect 礼(禮), and Rectitude 義. These tenets were part of an oral history for generations, thus, you will see variations in the list Bushido tenets depending on who you talk to.


See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Samurai | Warrior

Day

hi / nichi
Day Vertical Wall Scroll

日 is how to write "day" in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Hanja.

This can also mean "Sun," the star in the middle of the Solar system in which we live. In Japanese, it can also mean "sunshine" or even "Sunday."

When writing the date in modern Chinese and Japanese, putting a number in front of this character indicates the day of the month. Of course, you need to indicate the month too... The month is expressed with a number followed by the character for the moon. So "three moons ten suns" would be "March 10th" or "3/10."

Note: 日 is also the first character for the proper name of Japan. Remember that Japan is "The land of the rising sun"? Well, the first character for Japan means "sun" the second means "origin" so you get the real meaning now. Sometimes, in China, this sun character can be a short name for Japan or a suffix for something of or from Japan.

Heaven

tiān
ten
Heaven Vertical Wall Scroll

天 means "heaven" or "sky" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The context determines if you are talking about heaven or the sky above (often they are the same concept).

When combined with other characters, words like "today" and "tomorrow" are created. While sometimes the character for "sun" is used to mean "day," often "sky" represents "day" in Asian languages.
Example: 今天 (this sky) = "today," 明天 (next sky) = "tomorrow" in modern Chinese and Japanese.

In Chinese culture, regardless of which religion, it's almost always assumed that God (and any other deities) live up above in the sky. The concept of God living in the sky is likely the reason heaven is associated with this character.
The equation goes something like this: God's domain is the sky, thus, the sky is heaven.


Note: As a single character, this is a little ambiguous, so you might want to choose our Kingdom of Heaven selection instead.


See Also:  Heaven | God | Today | Sun

Frightful Demon / Asura

ē xiū luó
ashura
Frightful Demon / Asura Vertical Wall Scroll

This demon title comes from the ancient Sanskrit word Asura.

阿修羅 is often used in Buddhism when describing various demons. Sometimes defined as "Fighting and battling giant demon."

In the context of Buddhism: This title originally meant a spirit, spirits, or even the gods (perhaps before 1700 years ago). It now generally indicates titanic demons, enemies of the gods, with whom, especially Indra, they wage constant war. They are defined as "not devas," and "ugly," and "without wine." There are four classes of asuras, separated according to their manner of rebirth. They can be egg-born, womb-born, transformation-born, and spawn- or water-born. Their abode is in the ocean, north of Sumeru but certain of the weaker dwell in a western mountain cave. They have realms, rulers, and palaces, as have the devas.

In terms of power, Asuras rank above humans but below most of the other deities. They live in the area near the coastal foot of Mount Sumeru (on the northern side). Their domain is partially or wholly in the ocean.

Choose Life

xuǎn zé shēng huó
Choose Life Vertical Wall Scroll

選擇生活 can mean to choose life instead of death (or suicide) or to choose to live life to the fullest.

I think of it as the key phrase used by Renton (Ewan McGregor) in the movie Trainspotting. While Chinese people will not think of Trainspotting when they see this phrase, for me, it will always be what comes near the end of this colorful rant:

Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family. Choose a fucking big television, Choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players, and electrical tin can openers. Choose good health, low cholesterol, and dental insurance. Choose fixed-interest mortgage repayments. Choose a starter home. Choose your friends. Choose leisure wear and matching luggage. Choose a three piece suite on hire purchase in a range of fucking fabrics. Choose DIY and wondering who the fuck you are on a Sunday morning. Choose sitting on that couch watching mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing fucking junk food into your mouth. Choose rotting away at the end of it all, pissing your last in a miserable home, nothing more than an embarrassment to the selfish, fucked-up brats you have spawned to replace yourself. Choose your future. Choose life.

A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

-or- The crafty rabbit has three different entrances to its lair
jiǎo tù sān kū
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den Vertical Wall Scroll

This speaks to the cunning character of a sly rabbit. Such a rabbit will not have just one hole but rather a few entrances and exits from his liar.

About 2,250 years ago a very rich man told his assistant to go and buy something wonderful that he did not yet posses. He was a man that already had everything, so the assistant went to a local village that owed a great deal of money to the rich man. The assistant told the village elders that all debts were forgiven. All the villagers rejoiced and praised the rich man's name. The assistant returned to the rich man and told him he had purchased "benevolence" for him. The rich man was mildly amused but perhaps a bit confused by the action.

Some time later, the rich man fell from the favor of the Emperor, and was wiped out without a penny to his name. One day he was walking aimlessly and stumbled into the village in which the debts had been forgiven. The villagers recognized the man and welcomed him with open arms, clothed, fed, and gave him a place to live.

Without trying, the man had become like the sly and cunning rabbit. When his exit was blocked, he had another hole to emerge from - and was reborn. This story and idiom comes from a book titled "The Amendment" - it's unclear whether this man actually existed or not. But the book did propel this idiom into common use in China.

Still today this idiom about the rabbit is used in China when suggesting "backup plans" alternate methods, and anyone with a good escape plan.

Body and Earth in Unity

shindofuni / shindofuji
Body and Earth in Unity Vertical Wall Scroll

身土不二 (Shindofuni) is originally a Buddhist concept or proverb referring to the inseparability of body-mind and geographical circumstances.

身土不二 literally reads, "Body [and] earth [are] not two".

Other translations or matching ideas include:
Body and land are one.
Body and earth can not be separated.
Body earth sensory curation.
You are what you eat.
Indivisibility of the body and the land (because the body is made from food and food is made from the land).

Going further, this speaks of our human bodies and the land from which we get our food being closely connected. This phrase is used often when talking about natural and organic vegetables coming directly from the farm to provide the healthiest foods in Japan.

Character notes: 身(shin) in this context does not just mean your physical body rather a concept including both body and mind.
土 (do) refers to soil, earth, clay, land, or in some cases, locality. It's not the proper name of Earth, the planet. However, in can refer to the land or realm we live in.

Japanese note: This has been used in Japan, on and off since 1907 as a slogan for a governmental healthy eating campaign (usually pronounced as shindofuji instead of the original shindofuni in this context). It may have been hijacked from Buddhism for this propaganda purpose, but at least this is "healthy propaganda."

Korean note: The phrase 身土不二 was in use by 1610 A.D. in Korea where it can be found in an early medical journal.
In modern South Korea, it's written in Hangul as 신토불이. Korea used Chinese characters (same source for Japanese Kanji) as their only written standard form of the language until about a hundred years ago. Therefore, many Koreans will recognize 身土不二 as a native phrase and concept.


See Also:  Strength and Love in Unity

Tiger Rumor

sān rén chéng hǔ
Tiger Rumor Vertical Wall Scroll

These four characters together relay the meaning that can be expressed in English as, "When three people say there's a tiger running in the street, you believe it."

Of course, there is an ancient story behind this idiom...

三人成虎 is actually a proverb that resulted from a conversation that occurred around 300 B.C.

The conversation was between the king of the Wei kingdom and one of the king's ministers named Pang Cong.

It was near the end of one of many wars, this time with the Zhao kingdom. Pang Cong was to be sent by the king to the Zhao kingdom with the king's son who was to be held hostage. It was common at the time for a king to make his son a hostage to secure stable peace between warring kingdoms.

Before minister Pang Cong departed, he asked his king, "If one person told you there was a tiger running in the street, would you believe it?."

"No," the king said.

The minister continued, "What if two people told you?"

The king replied, "Well, I would have my doubts but I might believe it."

The minister continued, "So, what if three people told you that there is a tiger running in the streets?"

The king replied, "Yes, I would believe it, it must be true if three people say it."

The minister then reminded the king, "Your son and I are now traveling far away to live in the distant Zhao kingdom - much farther from your palace than the street. Rumors may fly about me in my absence, so I hope your majesty will weight such rumors appropriately."

The king replied, "I have every trust in you, do not worry"

While the minister was gone, the king's enemies gossiped about minister Pang Cong on many occasions. At first, the king thought nothing of these comments and rumors. But slowly as the rumors mounted, the king began to suspect ill of his minister.

Some time later when peace was well-established, the minister and prince were freed and returned to the kingdom of Wei. The king received his son, BUT DID NOT EVEN SUMMON MINISTER PANG CONG TO THE PALACE!

Hopefully this story will help you see how dangerous words can be when used to promote rumors, or create ill will. And perhaps will inspire you to not believe everything you hear.

There is also a secondary suggestion in this idiom that gossip is as ferocious as a tiger. Some Chinese people who don't know the ancient story above may believe that this scroll means that rumors are as vicious as three tigers.

Note: This proverb appears in my Korean dictionary but is not well-known in Korea.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

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Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
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Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll


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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
You Only Live Once一度だけ生きるichi do da ke i ki ru
ichidodakeikiru
You Only Live Once生命隻有一次
生命只有一次
shēng mìng zhǐ yǒu yí cì
sheng1 ming4 zhi3 you3 yi2 ci4
sheng ming zhi you yi ci
shengmingzhiyouyici
sheng ming chih yu i tz`u
shengmingchihyuitzu
sheng ming chih yu i tzu
Live Without Regret人生悔い無しjinsei kui nashi
jinseikuinashi
Live Without Regret生而無悔
生而无悔
shēng ér wú huǐ
sheng1 er2 wu2 hui3
sheng er wu hui
shengerwuhui
sheng erh wu hui
shengerhwuhui
Live In The Moment
Live In The Now
現世
现世
gen sei / genseixiàn shì / xian4 shi4 / xian shi / xianshihsien shih / hsienshih
Living
Live Life
生活sei katsu / seikatsushēng huó
sheng1 huo2
sheng huo
shenghuo
Live For The Day活在今天huó zài jīn tiān
huo2 zai4 jin1 tian1
huo zai jin tian
huozaijintian
huo tsai chin t`ien
huotsaichintien
huo tsai chin tien
Live Laugh Love笑愛生活
笑爱生活
xiào ài shēng huó
xiao4 ai4 sheng1 huo2
xiao ai sheng huo
xiaoaishenghuo
hsiao ai sheng huo
hsiaoaishenghuo
Live For The Day
Seize The Day
今を生きるima wo i ki ru
imawoikiru
No Regrets無悔
无悔
mu ke / mukewú huǐ / wu2 hui3 / wu hui / wuhui
No Regrets後悔無しkou kai na shi
koukainashi
ko kai na shi
kokainashi
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity幸福と繁栄の人生kou fuku to ha nei no jin sei
koufukutohaneinojinsei
ko fuku to ha nei no jin sei
kofukutohaneinojinsei
Carpe Diem
Seize the Day
把握今日bǎ wò jīn rì
ba3 wo4 jin1 ri4
ba wo jin ri
bawojinri
pa wo chin jih
pawochinjih
Live in Prosperity生活于繁榮中
生活于繁荣中
shēng huó yú fán róng zhōng
sheng1 huo2 yu2 fan2 rong2 zhong1
sheng huo yu fan rong zhong
shenghuoyufanrongzhong
sheng huo yü fan jung chung
shenghuoyüfanjungchung
Ikiru
To Live
生きるikiru
Live Strong堅強生活
坚强生活
jiān qiáng shēng huó
jian1 qiang2 sheng1 huo2
jian qiang sheng huo
jianqiangshenghuo
chien ch`iang sheng huo
chienchiangshenghuo
chien chiang sheng huo
Live Laugh Love愛と笑いの生活ai to warai no seikatsu
aitowarainoseikatsu
Live Strong強く生きるtsuyoku ikiru
tsuyokuikiru
Traveler
To Live Abroad
羈旅
羁旅
kiryojī lǚ / ji1 lv3 / ji lv / jilvchi lü / chilü
Live in Peace and Contentment安居樂業
安居乐业
an kyo raku gyou
ankyorakugyou
an kyo raku gyo
ankyorakugyo
ān jū lè yè
an1 ju1 le4 ye4
an ju le ye
anjuleye
an chü le yeh
anchüleyeh
Live and Let Die死ぬのは奴らだshinu no wa yatsuradesu
shinunowayatsuradesu
Live and Let Die活也讓別人死
活也让别人死
huó yě ràng bié rén sǐ
huo2 ye3 rang4 bie2 ren2 si3
huo ye rang bie ren si
huoyerangbierensi
huo yeh jang pieh jen ssu
huoyehjangpiehjenssu
Live for What You Love人生謳歌jin sei ou ka
jinseiouka
jin sei o ka
jinseioka
Live Free or Die不自由毋寧死
不自由毋宁死
bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
bu2 zi4 you2 wu2 ning4 si3
bu zi you wu ning si
buziyouwuningsi
pu tzu yu wu ning ssu
putzuyuwuningssu
Live Together and Help Each Other共存共栄kyou son kyou ei
kyousonkyouei
kyo son kyo ei
kyosonkyoei
Live Love Die生愛死
生爱死
sei ai shi / seiaishishēng ài sǐ
sheng1 ai4 si3
sheng ai si
shengaisi
sheng ai ssu
shengaissu
Life Force生命seimei / inochishēng mìng
sheng1 ming4
sheng ming
shengming
Everyday Life日常生活nichi jou sei katsu
nichijouseikatsu
nichi jo sei katsu
nichijoseikatsu
rì cháng shēng huó
ri4 chang2 sheng1 huo2
ri chang sheng huo
richangshenghuo
jih ch`ang sheng huo
jihchangshenghuo
jih chang sheng huo
Birth
Life
shou / iku / sho / iku / sho / ikushēng / sheng1 / sheng
Life Goes On人生は続くjin sei ha tsudu ku
jinseihatsuduku
Life is Short人生は短いjinsei ha mijikai
jinseihamijikai
Life is Short百歲光陰如過客
百岁光阴如过客
bǎi suì guāng yīn rú guò kè
bai3 sui4 guang1 yin1 ru2 guo4 ke4
bai sui guang yin ru guo ke
baisuiguangyinruguoke
pai sui kuang yin ju kuo k`o
paisuikuangyinjukuoko
pai sui kuang yin ju kuo ko
Alive活著
活着
huó zhe / huo2 zhe / huo zhe / huozhehuo che / huoche
Immortal
Immortality
不朽fukyuu / fukyubù xiǔ / bu4 xiu3 / bu xiu / buxiupu hsiu / puhsiu
Life Goes On生活在繼續
生活在继续
shēng huó zài jì xù
sheng1 huo2 zai4 ji4 xu4
sheng huo zai ji xu
shenghuozaijixu
sheng huo tsai chi hsü
shenghuotsaichihsü
Life is a Journey人生是一段旅程rén shēng shì yí duàn lǚ chéng
ren2 sheng1 shi4 yi2 duan4 lv3 cheng2
ren sheng shi yi duan lv cheng
renshengshiyiduanlvcheng
jen sheng shih i tuan lü ch`eng
jen sheng shih i tuan lü cheng
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding淡泊以明志寧靜而致遠
淡泊以明志宁静而致远
dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
dan4 bo2 yi3 ming2 zhi4, ning2 jing4 er2 zhi4 yuan3
dan bo yi ming zhi, ning jing er zhi yuan
tan po i ming chih, ning ching erh chih yüan
Optimism
Happy With Your Fate
樂天 / 楽天
乐天
raku ten / rakutenlè tiān / le4 tian1 / le tian / letianle t`ien / letien / le tien
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity幸福成功的一生xìng fú chéng gōng de yì shēng
xing4 fu2 cheng2 gong1 de yi4 sheng1
xing fu cheng gong de yi sheng
xingfuchenggongdeyisheng
hsing fu ch`eng kung te i sheng
hsingfuchengkungteisheng
hsing fu cheng kung te i sheng
Die Without Regret死而無悔
死而无悔
sǐ ér wú huǐ
si3 er2 wu2 hui3
si er wu hui
sierwuhui
ssu erh wu hui
ssuerhwuhui
Alone
Solitary Existence
獨居
独居
dokkyo / dokyodú jū / du2 ju1 / du ju / dujutu chü / tuchü
Valkyrie女武神nǚ wǔ shén
nv3 wu3 shen2
nv wu shen
nvwushen
nü wu shen
nüwushen
Embrace Life
Embrace Living
擁抱生活
拥抱生活
yōng bào shēng huó
yong1 bao4 sheng1 huo2
yong bao sheng huo
yongbaoshenghuo
yung pao sheng huo
yungpaoshenghuo
The Noble Eightfold Path八正道ha sshou dou
hasshoudou
ha sho do
hashodo
bā zhèng dào
ba1 zheng4 dao4
ba zheng dao
bazhengdao
pa cheng tao
pachengtao
Banzai
Wansui
萬歲
万岁
banzai / manzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Longevity
Long Life
長壽
长寿
chouju / chojucháng shòu
chang2 shou4
chang shou
changshou
ch`ang shou
changshou
chang shou
Ikebana生け花ikebana
Death Before Dishonor寧為玉碎不為瓦全
宁为玉碎不为瓦全
níng wéi yù suì bú wéi wǎ quán
ning2 wei2 yu4 sui4 bu2 wei2 wa3 quan2
ning wei yu sui bu wei wa quan
ningweiyusuibuweiwaquan
ning wei yü sui pu wei wa ch`üan
ning wei yü sui pu wei wa chüan
Survive生存seizonshēng cún
sheng1 cun2
sheng cun
shengcun
sheng ts`un
shengtsun
sheng tsun
Galatians 5:25我們若是靠聖靈得生就當靠聖靈行事
我们若是靠圣灵得生就当靠圣灵行事
wǒ men ruò shì kào shèng líng shēn jiù dàng kào shèng líng xíng shì
wo3 men ruo4 shi4 kao4 sheng4 ling2 dei3 shen1 jiu4 dang4 kao4 sheng4 ling2 xing2 shi4
wo men ruo shi kao sheng ling dei shen jiu dang kao sheng ling xing shi
wo men jo shih k`ao sheng ling tei shen chiu tang k`ao sheng ling hsing shih
wo men jo shih kao sheng ling tei shen chiu tang kao sheng ling hsing shih
Tanjun
Simplicity
単純tanjun
Madly in Love愛得死去活來
爱得死去活来
ài de sǐ qù huó lái
ai4 de5 si3 qu4 huo2 lai2
ai de si qu huo lai
aidesiquhuolai
ai te ssu ch`ü huo lai
aitessuchühuolai
ai te ssu chü huo lai
Principles of Life生活信條
生活信条
shēng huó xìn tiáo
sheng1 huo2 xin4 tiao2
sheng huo xin tiao
shenghuoxintiao
sheng huo hsin t`iao
shenghuohsintiao
sheng huo hsin tiao
Death Before Dishonor寧為玉碎
宁为玉碎
níng wéi yù suì
ning2 wei2 yu4 sui4
ning wei yu sui
ningweiyusui
ning wei yü sui
ningweiyüsui
Together Forever in Love永遠愛在一起
永远爱在一起
yǒng yuǎn ài zài yī qǐ
yong3 yuan3 ai4 zai4 yi1 qi3
yong yuan ai zai yi qi
yongyuanaizaiyiqi
yung yüan ai tsai i ch`i
yungyüanaitsaiichi
yung yüan ai tsai i chi
Community社區
社区
shè qū / she4 qu1 / she qu / shequshe ch`ü / shechü / she chü
Banzai万歲 / 萬歲
万岁
banzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Prosperity and Happiness富樂
富乐
furakufù lè / fu4 le4 / fu le / fule
Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity不氣不愁活到白頭
不气不愁活到白头
bù qì bù chóu huó dào bái tóu
bu4 qi4 bu4 chou2 huo2 dao4 bai2 tou2
bu qi bu chou huo dao bai tou
buqibuchouhuodaobaitou
pu ch`i pu ch`ou huo tao pai t`ou
puchipuchouhuotaopaitou
pu chi pu chou huo tao pai tou
The Single Life独身貴族 / 獨身貴族
独身贵族
do kushin ki zoku
dokushinkizoku
100 Years of Happy Marriage百年好合bǎi nián hǎo hé
bai3 nian2 hao3 he2
bai nian hao he
bainianhaohe
pai nien hao ho
painienhaoho
Death Before Surrender寧死不降
宁死不降
nìng sǐ bù xiáng
ning4 si3 bu4 xiang2
ning si bu xiang
ningsibuxiang
ning ssu pu hsiang
ningssupuhsiang
Thug Life暴徒生活bou to sei katsu
boutoseikatsu
bo to sei katsu
botoseikatsu
bào tú shēng huó
bao4 tu2 sheng1 huo2
bao tu sheng huo
baotushenghuo
pao t`u sheng huo
paotushenghuo
pao tu sheng huo
Learning is Eternal學無止境
学无止境
xué wú zhǐ jìng
xue2 wu2 zhi3 jing4
xue wu zhi jing
xuewuzhijing
hsüeh wu chih ching
hsüehwuchihching
Eat Drink and Be Merry喫喝玩樂及時行樂
吃喝玩乐及时行乐
chī hē wán lè jí shí xíng lè
chi1 he1 wan2 le4 ji2 shi2 xing2 le4
chi he wan le ji shi xing le
chihewanlejishixingle
ch`ih ho wan le chi shih hsing le
chih ho wan le chi shih hsing le
Life in Every Breath吐く息一つにも生命が宿りhakuiki hitotsu nimo seimei ga yadori
Love Life熱愛生命
热爱生命
rè ài shēng mìng
re4 ai4 sheng1 ming4
re ai sheng ming
reaishengming
je ai sheng ming
jeaishengming
Dangerkiwēi / wei1 / wei
Eternal Friendship
Friends Forever
永遠的朋友
永远的朋友
yǒng yuǎn de péng yǒu
yong3 yuan3 de peng2 you3
yong yuan de peng you
yongyuandepengyou
yung yüan te p`eng yu
yungyüantepengyu
yung yüan te peng yu
Death Before Surrender寧死不屈
宁死不屈
níng sǐ bù qū
ning2 si3 bu4 qu1
ning si bu qu
ningsibuqu
ning ssu pu ch`ü
ningssupuchü
ning ssu pu chü
Dignity
Honor
Sanctity
Integrity
尊嚴
尊严 / 尊厳
son gen / songenzūn yán / zun1 yan2 / zun yan / zunyantsun yen / tsunyen
Clarityseiqīng / qing1 / qingch`ing / ching
Bushido
The Way of the Samurai
武士道bu shi do / bushidowǔ shì dào
wu3 shi4 dao4
wu shi dao
wushidao
wu shih tao
wushihtao
Dayhi / nichirì / ri4 / rijih
Heavententiān / tian1 / tiant`ien / tien
Frightful Demon
Asura
阿修羅
阿修罗
ashuraē xiū luó
e1 xiu1 luo2
e xiu luo
exiuluo
o hsiu lo
ohsiulo
Choose Life選擇生活
选择生活
xuǎn zé shēng huó
xuan3 ze2 sheng1 huo2
xuan ze sheng huo
xuanzeshenghuo
hsüan tse sheng huo
hsüantseshenghuo
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den狡兔三窟jiǎo tù sān kū
jiao3 tu4 san1 ku1
jiao tu san ku
jiaotusanku
chiao t`u san k`u
chiaotusanku
chiao tu san ku
Body and Earth in Unity身土不二shindofuni / shindofuji
Tiger Rumor三人成虎sān rén chéng hǔ
san1 ren2 cheng2 hu3
san ren cheng hu
sanrenchenghu
san jen ch`eng hu
sanjenchenghu
san jen cheng hu
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Live On Kanji, Live On Characters, Live On in Mandarin Chinese, Live On Characters, Live On in Chinese Writing, Live On in Japanese Writing, Live On in Asian Writing, Live On Ideograms, Chinese Live On symbols, Live On Hieroglyphics, Live On Glyphs, Live On in Chinese Letters, Live On Hanzi, Live On in Japanese Kanji, Live On Pictograms, Live On in the Chinese Written-Language, or Live On in the Japanese Written-Language.

7 people have searched for Live On in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Live On was last searched for by someone else on Jan 21st, 2014