Because in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Because calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Because” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Because” title below...


  1. Shaw

  2. Keegan

  3. Lon

  4. Happiness / Joy

  5. Kintsukuroi

  6. Acceptance

  7. Andi

  8. Andy

  9. Mind, Body and Spirit

10. Queen Bee

11. Kishan

12. Beijing Opera

13. Gabriela

14. Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision

15. Live Laugh Love

16. Unbreakable / Indestructible

17. Holy Man / Saint

18. Tai Chi / Tai Ji

19. Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks

20. Penis

21. Honesty

22. Benevolent Heart

23. Happy Birthday

24. Smriti

25. Kill / Massacre / Mass Killing

26. Rai / Rei

27. Divine Protection

28. Happy New Year

29. Rose Flower

30. Xavier

31. Crystal

32. Happy Birthday

33. Fujin

34. Lioness

35. Brave the Waves

36. Destiny / Fate

37. Bamboo Moon

38. Sword

39. Kill / Slaughter / Murder / Butcher

40. Phoenix

41. Isshin Ryu Karate Do

42. Peaceful Heart

43. John 14:15

44. Leopard / Panther / Jaguar

45. Danger

46. John 14:18

47. Contentment

48. Heaven Blesses the Diligent

49. Naruto

50. Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

51. Spirit

52. Strength: Strong and Solid

53. Kirin / Giraffe / Mythical Creature

54. Misery Loves Company

55. Flying Tigers

56. Heart / Mind / Spirit

57. Construction Crane

58. Integrity

59. Light / Bright and Promising Future

60. Five Red Bats

61. Eternal Love

62. Pillars of Marriage

63. Live Strong

64. Home of the Auspicious Golden Dragon

65. Che Guevara

66. Earth

67. Clarity

68. Live Laugh Love

69. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

70. Moon

71. Ninja

72. Ronin / Masterless Samurai

73. Empress

74. Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance

75. Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo

76. Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu

77. John 3:16

78. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

79. Double Happiness

80. Zen Buddhism

81. Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

82. Glory and Honor

83. Turtle

84. Better Late Than Never

85. Kung Fu / Gong Fu

86. Wing Chun Fist Maxims

87. Body and Earth in Unity

88. Qi Gong / Chi Kung

89. Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde

90. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu


shaa
Shaw Scroll

I like this version of Shaw written in Katakana (phonetic Japanese) because it sounds more like the name when pronounced in English.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

jí gēn
Keegan Scroll

We like this way to transliterate the name Keegan into Mandarin Chinese because it has a nice meaning.

It kind of means, "The root of luck".

ron
Lon Scroll

ロン is the name Lon in Japanese Katakana.

Because there is not really an "L" sound in Japanese, this sounds like "Ron".


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Happiness / Joy

Happiness / Joy Scroll

禧 is the type of happiness known in the west as "joy".

The radical on the right side of this character is often seen alone (with the same meaning - and we do recommend that version because it's more universal).

kintsukuroi
Kintsukuroi Scroll

金繕い is kintsukuroi or kinzukuroi, the Japanese art of repairing pottery with a lacquer mixed with gold, silver, etc.

I added this because many people searched for this title. Not sure how appropriate this is for a calligraphy wall scroll.

judaku
Acceptance Scroll

受諾 is a simple Japanese word for acceptance.

Because it's a general term, it can mean acceptance in a lot of different contexts (acceptance of your friends, family, differences, faults, etc.).

ān dí
Andi Scroll

安迪 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Andi or Andy.

Because transliteration goes by sound, these are both "spelled" the same in Chinese.

ān dí
Andy Scroll

安迪 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Andy or Andi.

Because transliteration goes by sound, these are both "spelled" the same in Chinese.

Mind, Body and Spirit

shēn xīn líng
mi shin rei
Mind, Body and Spirit Scroll

This is probably the best way to express the idea of "Body, Mind and Spirit" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word for "heart" here because for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say "warm-hearted" or "I love you with all of my heart". In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is "body, heart & spirit" which could also be interpreted as "body mind & soul".

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply "feels" like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we have to be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).


霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

fēng wáng
Queen Bee Scroll

I added this because a customer got confused about queens.

In Chinese, they do not use the same title of queen for bees as they do for humans. 蜂王 is the proper title for the queen bee of a hive.

jí shàng
Kishan Scroll

This an alternate transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Kishan.

We like this one better because of the way it sounds, and the good meaning. 吉尚 is also a rare but real family name in Chinese culture.

Beijing Opera

jīng jù
Kyougeki
Beijing Opera Scroll

京劇 is the title for "Beijing Opera".

Because it's the opera of the capital, this is seen as the national opera of China. Therefore, this title can also be translated as, "Classical Chinese Opera".

gài bù lǐ ài lā
Gabriela Scroll

蓋布里艾拉 is an alternate transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Gabriela.

There are more common versions of Gabriela but we like this one the best because we feel it sounds more like the original pronunciation of Gabriela.

Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision

Also means: honor loyalty morality righteousness
gi
Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision Scroll

義 is about doing the right thing or making the right decision, not because it's easy but because it's ethically and morally correct.

No matter the outcome or result, one does not lose face if tempering proper justice.

義 can also be defined as righteousness, justice, morality, honor, or "right conduct". In more a more expanded definition, it can mean loyalty to friends, loyalty to the public good, or patriotism. This idea of loyalty and friendship comes from the fact that you will treat those you are loyal to with morality and justice.

義 is also one of the five tenets of Confucius doctrine.

儀 There's also an alternate version of this character sometimes seen in Bushido or Korean Taekwondo tenets. It's just the addition of a radical on the left side of the character. If you want this version, click on the image to the right instead of the button above.


This is also a virtue of the Samurai Warrior
See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Judgment | Impartial | Confucius Tenets

Live Laugh Love

ai to warai no seikatsu
Live Laugh Love Scroll

Because a word list of "Live Laugh Love" is not natural in Japanese, this takes the concept and incorporates it into a proper phrase.

This can be translated as, "A life of love and laughter" or "Live life with love and laughter".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Unbreakable / Indestructible

jiān bù kě cuī
Unbreakable / Indestructible Scroll

堅不可摧 means "unbreakable" in Chinese.

It can also mean invulnerable, indestructible, or impregnable.

You may be searching for this because you like the 2000 film, Unbreakable, starring Bruce Willis. 堅不可摧 is the title of that film in Chinese.

Holy Man / Saint

shèng rén
seijin
Holy Man / Saint Scroll

聖人 can mean saint, sage, or holy man.

Note: There is more than one way to express this idea. This one really matches "Holy man" because the second character means "human" or "person" (therefore, this could equally mean "Holy woman").

Tai Chi / Tai Ji

tài jí
taikyoku
Tai Chi / Tai Ji Scroll

太極 is the shortened title for Tai Chi Chuan or Tai Ji Quan that as sometimes used in Western countries.

Basically just removing the last character which means fist. I don't recommend this two-character selection because it's not really a word without the third character in Japanese and Chinese.

Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks

hyakusenrenma
Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks Scroll

百戦錬磨 is a Japanese proverb or title that mean veteran, or rather, someone schooled by adversity in many battles, or someone rich in life experience.

If you are who you are because of the adversity you experienced in life, this could be the title for you.

NOT APPROPRIATE FOR
CUSTOM CALLIGRAPHY

Penis

yīn jīng
in kei
Penis Scroll

陰莖 is the most common title for penis in Chinese. There are at least 10 more ways to express penis.

A colloquial term used commonly in Chinese is "little brother".

This selection is not appropriate for custom calligraphy. I only added this entry because thousands of people searched for penis on our website. You guys are weird!


男
根

Another way to say penis is "male root," pronounced "nán gēn" in Chinese, "dan kon" in Japanese, and 남근 or "nam geun" in Korean. This is shown to the right.

zhèng zhí
shoujiki
Honesty Scroll

Honesty is being truthful and sincere. It is important because it builds trust. When people are honest, they can be relied on not to lie, cheat or steal. Being honest means that you accept yourself as you are. When you are open and trustworthy, others can believe in you.

正直 is one of the 8 key concepts of Tang Soo Do.


Note: This entry is cross-listed as "integrity" because it also fits that definition.

Japanese jikiPlease note that the second Kanji sometimes has an alternate form in Japanese. Let us know if you want the alternate form shown to the right.


See Also:  Truth | Trust | Integrity

Benevolent Heart

ji hi no kokoro
Benevolent Heart Scroll

慈悲の心 means benevolent heart, compassionate heart, or merciful heart in Japanese.

慈悲の心 is a Japanese-only phrase, and should be ordered from our Japanese master calligrapher. 慈悲の心 is because the third character is special Hiragana.

Chances are you are into Inuyasha and are seeking the title of chapter 471 which is often translated as "Merciful Heart".


See Also:  Love | Altruism

Happy Birthday

shuku tan jou bi
Happy Birthday Scroll

祝誕生日 is the shortest way to write "Happy Birthday" in Japanese.

The first Kanji means "wish" or "express good wishes", and the last three characters mean "birthday".

Because a birthday only lasts one day per year, we strongly suggest that you find an appropriate and personal calligraphy gift that can be hung in the recipient's home year-round.

chuán chéng
denshou
Smriti Scroll

傳承 is a Chinese and Japanese word that means to pass on (to future generations).

This can also mean passed on (from former times), a continued tradition, handing down (information), legend, tradition, folklore, transmission, or an inheritance.

傳承 is the Chinese equivalent of Smriti (from Sanskrit: स्मृति / Smṛti). The term can be used for Hindu (and sometimes Buddhist) texts that have authority because the author is known.

Kill / Massacre / Mass Killing

shā lù
satsuriku
Kill / Massacre / Mass Killing Scroll

殺戮 is how to write "kill" or "massacre".

殺戮 is an absolutely shocking word to have on a wall scroll. It will bewilder, scare, and perhaps offend any Chinese, Korean or Japanese person who sees it. I do not in any way recommend this for a piece of calligraphy artwork. This entry is only here because our calligraphy search engine received so many requests for "kill" and "massacre".

You are all a bunch of sick puppies!

líng
rei / re
Rai / Rei Scroll

霊 means soul or spirit.

Sometimes 霊 can be a departed soul or ghost. 霊 is actually a Japanese variant of the Chinese character 靈 (and would be recognized in Chinese).

I titled this as Rai because 霊 was romanized as Rai and represented a fictional superhero that appeared in books published by Valiant Comics.

In Japanese, this can be the given name Rei or Tama. It can also be the Japanese surnames Mitama or Tamazaki.

Divine Protection

jiā hù
ka go
Divine Protection Scroll

加護 is Japanese for "divine protection" or "the saving grace of God".

Please consider this blessing to be Japanese only. This can have the same meaning in the context of Buddhism in Chinese but it's also a nickname for "intensive care" at Chinese hospitals.

Note: My Japanese translator says this is not very commonly used in Japanese. I added this because a customer asked for it. There is not really a better Japanese phrase to express this idea - so this is it if you want it.

Happy New Year

xīn nián kuài lè
Happy New Year Scroll

If you want to wish someone a happy new year this is the way.

You can hang this up during Western New Years (Dec 31st - Jan 1st) and keep it up until after Chinese New Years which happens in either January or February of each year (it changes from year to year because China uses a lunar calendar).

Rose Flower

(The flower of love)
qiáng wēi
bara / shoubi
Rose Flower Scroll

薔薇 is the most universal way to write rose (as in the flower) because it is understood in both Chinese and Japanese (same characters in either language). 薔薇 is also a common way to write about roses in Asian poetry. This can be translated as "wild rose" if you are looking for that title.

薔薇 is also how to write "rose" in old Korean Hanja (though they now us Hangul and most Koreans of this generation will not be able to read this without a dictionary).

Xavier

(Version 2)
zé wéi ěr
Xavier Scroll

澤維爾 is another way that Xavier can be transliterated into Chinese. Neither way is right or wrong. 澤維爾 is just a tough name because there is no sound in Chinese like an initial X in a word.

If you are wondering, when you see a Romanized Chinese word with an X, it is actually pronounced more like SH but with your tongue at the bottom of your mouth. It's kind of a weird convention of Romanizing Chinese.

shuǐ jīng
suishou
Crystal Scroll

水晶 means "crystal" such as fine crystal glassware or diamonds in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Hanja.

水晶 is a cool selection if your name is Crystal, as it will match your name by meaning (rather than pronunciation).

It's also cool because it will universally contain the meaning of your name in most Asian languages.

Happy Birthday

shēng rì kuài lè
Happy Birthday Scroll

生日快樂 is how to write "Happy Birthday" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "birthday", and the second two characters mean "happiness", or rather a wish for happiness.

Because a birthday only lasts one day per year, we strongly suggest that you find an appropriate and personal calligraphy gift that can be hung in the recipient's home year-round.

fū ren
fu jin
Fujin Scroll

夫人 is a Japanese word that romanizes as Fujin.

I added this because several people have searched for "Fujin". 夫人 can mean: lady; madam; Mrs.; consort of the emperor; wife; wife of a nobleman (aristocrat, etc.); the wife of a king. 夫人 mean the same thing in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

夫人 is an odd choice for a wall scroll but I have fulfilled your search for "Fujin" I think.

cí shī
Lioness Scroll

雌獅 is how to write "lioness" in Chinese.

Note: 雌獅 is not a very common title for a wall scroll in China. Perhaps because lions are not indigenous to China. Though oddly enough, rarity of lions made them very prized - and lion dances are a popular festival attraction.
If you do see name of this species of animal written on a wall scroll, it's more likely to be the masculine form of "lion".

Brave the Waves

pò làng
ha rou
Brave the Waves Scroll

破浪 can be translated from Chinese as "braving the waves" or "bravely setting sail".

It literally means: "break/cleave/cut [the] waves".

破浪 is a great title to encourage yourself or someone else not to be afraid of problems or troubles.

Because of the context, this is especially good for sailors or yachtsmen and surfers too.

Note: While this can be understood in Japanese, it's not commonly used in Japan. Therefore, please consider this to be primarily a Chinese proverb.

Destiny / Fate

mìng yùn
Destiny / Fate Scroll

These two characters contain the ideas of "fate", "destiny", "fortune" and "luck".

You can also say that it means "what life throws at you" or "your lot in life" because the first character contains the idea of "life" or "living".

This version is really only used in Chinese. There's another version with just the characters reversed that is more universal. In fact, just skip this one. The opposite character order is better.

yuè zhú
tsuki take
Bamboo Moon Scroll

月竹 is the title, "Bamboo Moon" - Technically, it's in the order of "moon bamboo" but that's the most natural order in Chinese and Japanese.

With a little research, I found this title has been used as the name of a linen company, a band, a song title, an actual person's name, the title for a piece of artwork featuring bamboo with a moon in the background, and a few other things. I added it here because a lot of people searched for "bamboo moon" on my website, so here it is for you.


The typical Japanese pronunciation would probably be "tsu-ki ta-ke." However, this would not be the only possible pronunciation in Japanese (especially if used as a given name).

jiàn
ken
Sword Scroll

剱 is the modern Japanese way to write sword.

This Kanji character comes from original Chinese. This form would also be understood in Chinese (there are often several ways to write the same character) but I suggest this one only if your audience is Japanese (because they've settled on a slightly different form as the standard in China).

In Japanese, this character also means saber/sabre, blade, bayonet, stinger and clock hand (clock hands are the "swords" of the clock).


See Also:  Katana

Kill / Slaughter / Murder / Butcher

shā
satsu
Kill / Slaughter / Murder / Butcher Scroll

殺 is how to write "to kill" or "killing".

殺 is an absolutely shocking word to have on a wall scroll. It will bewilder, scare, and perhaps offend any Chinese, Korean, or Japanese person who sees it. I do not in any way recommend this for a piece of calligraphy artwork. This entry is only here because our calligraphy search engine received so many requests for "kill".

Note: In Korean Hanja, this character is not often used alone - see the other two-character entry for "kill".

Phoenix (male)

fèng
ootori
Phoenix (male) Scroll

鳳 is the simplest way to write "Phoenix" in Chinese. Because dragon is usually expressed as a single character, when you see "dragon and phoenix" written in Chinese, you'll often see this single-character version.

Please note, this is also the male element of phoenix, so it also means "male phoenix bird". However some Chinese people may argue that the phoenix has a female characteristic, regardless of which character you use.

Isshin Ryu Karate Do

i sshin ryuu kara te dou
Isshin Ryu Karate Do Scroll

This is the full title for Isshin-Ryu Karate-Do.

The literal meaning is "one heart method empty hand way".

There are also other ways you can translate this, but if you are looking for this title, you already know that.

This would make a great wall scroll for your dojo or private studio, if you study this form of Japanese (technically from Okinawa) Karate.

Because this is a specifically-Japanese title, I strongly recommend that you select our Japanese Master Calligrapher to create this artwork for you.

Peaceful Heart

jìng xīn
shizugokoro / seishin
Peaceful Heart Scroll

靜心 is how to write "peaceful heart" in Chinese.

The first character means peaceful, calm, and quiet. The second means heart but can also mean mind, soul, or spirit.

Because the word for heart / mind / soul is interchangeable in Chinese, this can also be translated as "a peaceful soul" or "a quiet mind".

I have also seen this translated as "placid temperament" or "spirit of serenity", especially from Japanese.


静While they once used the same first character form in Japan, they now use a slightly-simplified version in modern Japan (after WWII). This version is shown to the right, and can be selected for your wall scroll by clicking on that Kanji instead of the button above.

nǐ mén ruò ài wǒ jiù bì zūn shǒu wǒ de mìng lìng
John 14:15 Scroll

你們若愛我就必遵守我的命令 is the translation of John 14:15 into Chinese.

This comes from the Chinese Union Bible which comes from a revised King James version. This Chinese Bible was originally translated and printed in 1919 (several revisions since then).

Because of the origin being the KJV, I'll say that in English, this would be, "If ye love me, keep my commandments..".

In basic English, this would be, "If you have love for me, you will keep my laws".

Leopard / Panther / Jaguar

bào
hyou
Leopard / Panther / Jaguar Scroll

豹 is the Chinese and Japanese word for the big cat known as a leopard, panther or Jaguar.

This can refer to most cats of the Panthera genus as well as the Puma genus (but this is not used for most kinds of lions, except smaller ones like the mountain lion).

Because Jaguars are not native to Asia, the characters for "American continent" is usually added before this character to specifically designate a Jaguar.

This also kind of means Panther or Leopard in Korean Hanja but in modern Korean, they add a Hangul character to complete the word.

Danger

A dangerous character in every way
wēi
ki
Danger Scroll

危 means danger, peril or "to endanger" in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

If you live a dangerous life or want to subtly warn others that you are a dangerous person, this may be the selection for you.

This also means "danger" and sometimes "fear" in Japanese and Korean but is seldom seen outside of compound words in those languages (as a single character, it's kind of like an abbreviation for danger in Japanese and Korean). 危 is also a rather odd selection for a wall scroll anyway. It's only here because people search for danger on our website.

wǒ bù piě xià nǐ mén wéi gū ér wǒ bì dào nǐ mén zhè lǐ lái
John 14:18 Scroll

我不撇下你們為孤兒我必到你們這里來 is the translation of John 14:18 into Chinese.

This comes from the Chinese Union Bible which comes from a revised version of the King James. This Chinese Bible was originally translated and printed in 1919 (several revisions since then).

Because of the origin being the KJV, I'll say that in English, this would be, "I will not leave you comfortless: I will come to you..".

In basic English, this would be, "I will not let you be without a friend: I am coming to you".

zhī zú
chisoku
Contentment Scroll

知足 means content with one's situation, or to know contentment (hence happiness).

From Zen Buddhist context, Chisoku or 知足 (knowing what’s enough) means to always know and be satisfied with one’s lot.

Human pain and suffering is born of greed, and that greed arises because we do not know what’s enough.

The Chinese philosopher, Menzi (372-289 BCE) said, “to nourish the mind, there is nothing better than to make the desires few”. This relays the idea that the best method to cultivate the mind is to have little desire.

Heaven Blesses the Diligent

tiān dào chóu qín
Heaven Blesses the Diligent Scroll

This can be interpreted a few different ways:
God blesses those who work hard.
It is the way of Heaven to smile on the diligent.
God will reward those that are worthy.
Heaven blesses those who are diligent.

Whichever translation you like, a scroll like this on your wall may serve as a reminder to work hard because your diligence will pay off both in this life and the next.


Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly used term.

Naruto

Japanese Anime Series
na ru to
Naruto Scroll

ナルト is the title "Naruto" from the Japanese animation series. See Naruto Anime Series.

Because of the special Japanese character set used to write this title, it can only be written by the Japanese master calligrapher. Do not try to order it from one of our Chinese calligraphers.

Please note that while this is the correct title for this anime series, it can also mean the "@" sign or "at" in Japanese under different context (a Japanese person not familiar with the series may be confused by your wall scroll).


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

zì ài
ji ai
Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself Scroll

This title means: self-love; self-regard; regard for oneself; to cherish one's good name; taking care of oneself.

In Buddhist context, this is the cause of all pursuit or seeking, which in turn causes all suffering. All Buddhas discharge themselves from self-love and all pursuits of personal gratification. Such elimination of self-love is a step towards nirvāṇa.

This title can be taken as positive or negative, depending on how you read it. Some will see it as arrogant, others will read it as a token of self-respect. Because of this ambiguity, I do not recommend this title for a wall scroll.

jīng shén
sei shin
Spirit Scroll

精神 is the kind of spirit that you have if you perform well in sports or competition. It is the idea of having a good attitude, and putting your all into something - so much so that others can see or feel your spirit. It is the essence of your being that can only be subjectively described because there are no words that can fully explain what "spirit" really is.

For your information:
My Japanese dictionary further tries to explain this word by comparing it to mind, soul, heart or intention.
My Chinese dictionary compares these characters to meanings like vigor, vitality, drive and mentality.
My Korean dictionary defines this as mind, spirit and soul.


See Also:  Vitality | Heart | Soul

Strength: Strong and Solid

qiáng gù
kyouko
Strength: Strong and Solid Scroll

強固 means firmness, stability, security, and strength in Japanese.

It's not used commonly in China but it means "powerful", "firm", "solid", "strong" or "better than others" in Chinese. There is a slight variation in the top of the first character between Chinese and Japanese. Because this is more a Japanese word, we are showing the Japanese form here.

強固 is also a Korean word but Korean Hanja uses the Chinese form of the first character (one tiny stroke is a little different), so just let me now if your audience is Korean when you place your order, and we'll have it written in the Chinese/Korean version.

Kirin / Giraffe / Mythical Creature

qí lǐn
keilun
kirin
Kirin / Giraffe / Mythical Creature Scroll

麒麟 is the title of a mythical beast of Asia.

The animal is thought to be related to the giraffe, and in some ways, it is a giraffe. However, it is often depicted with the horns of a dragon or deer and sometimes with the body like a horse but many variations exist.

In Japanese it is pronounced "Kirin" as in "Kirin Ichiban" beer.

Kirin - Mythical Beast and Great Japanese Beer!
Notes:

1. 麒麟 is sometimes spelled as "kylin".

2. In Japanese, this is the only Kanji word for giraffe. Therefore in Japan, this word needs context to know whether you are talking about the mythical creature or the long-necked giraffe of Africa.

3. Apparently, this was the first word used for regular giraffes in China (some were brought from Africa to China during the Ming Dynasty - probably around the year 1400). Though the mythical creature may have existed before, the name "qilin" was given to the "new giraffe". 麒麟 is because, more than 600 years ago, giraffes somewhat matched the mythical creature's description when Chinese people saw them for the first time. Later, to avoid such an ambiguous title, a three-character word was devised to mean a "giraffe of Africa". The characters for "qilin" shown here are only for the mythological version in modern Chinese.

4. More information about the qilin / kirin from Wikipedia.

5. This creature is sometimes translated as the "Chinese Unicorn", even though it is generally portrayed with two horns. I think this is done more for the fantasy aspect of the unicorn and because most westerners don't know what a qilin or kirin is (this avoids a long explanation by the translator).

6. In Korean, this can mean kirin or simply giraffe (usually the mythological creature is what they would think of when seeing these characters alone on a wall scroll).

Misery Loves Company

tóng bìng xiāng lián
doubyou shou awaremu
Misery Loves Company Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "fellow sufferers empathize with each other" or to match it with a western idiom, "misery loves company". 同病相憐 is also somewhat known in Korean Hanja.

This could be two people who were just dumped by a girlfriend/boyfriend or just divorced. They're drawn together either by their misery, or because of the need to share their miserable experience with someone else.

同病相憐 is probably the saddest proverb in our collection.

Literally the characters mean:
同 together with
病 illness, sickness, disease (in this case, just the mental anguish after some kind of event or life issue)
相 mutual, reciprocal, each other
憐 pity, sympathize


In Japanese, this is written with two extra Hiragana on the end like this: 同病相憐れむ
If you want the Japanese version, don’t use the button above but click here instead: Misery Loves Company in Japanese

Flying Tigers

fēi hǔ
Flying Tigers Scroll

飛虎 is the short, or rather, Korean title of the "Flying Tigers".

This short title is not very often used in China but is a title used in Korea. At the time the Flying Tigers volunteers were in China, Korea was also occupied by Japanese forces. Because many Korean civilians were enslaved and killed at the hands of the Japanese soldiers, any group that fought against the Japanese at that time was held in high-esteem by Korean people.

Note: I suggest the other 3-character entry since this group was so strongly related with China.

飛虎 is also used as an adjective in Korean to describe a courageous person.

Heart / Mind / Spirit

xīn
kokoro
Heart / Mind / Spirit Scroll

心 would often be translated as "heart".

However, because it was believed in Chinese culture thousands of years that your consciousness and thoughts came from the big red organ in the middle of your chest, it also means "mind" or "spirit" and sometimes even "soul".

In Korean, beyond heart, mind, and spirit, this character can mean moral, nature, mind, affections, intentions, core, and center. In fact, it is used in Chinese to mean "center" as well but only with another character in front of it. For instance, "medical center" or even "shopping center". Separately and alone, it will not be read with that "center" meaning unless thought of as "the center of your soul".

Construction Crane

qǐ zhòng jī
kijuuki
Construction Crane Scroll

This refers to the huge machine that lifts materials high into the air as crews construct huge buildings.

A customer requested this specifically after a bit of confusion over the bird by the same name.

In an odd twist, while they don't know this name in English sounds like a bird, the building crane is jokingly called "The real national bird of China" because of the accelerated level of construction in Beijing and elsewhere ever since preparations began for the 2008 Olympics. As of 2018, construction has barely slowed.

If you want the type of construction crane that drives down the road, please note that the word is totally different for that kind of "vehicle crane".

zhèng zhí
shoujiki
Integrity Scroll

Integrity is living by your highest values. It is being honest and sincere. Integrity helps you to listen to your conscience, to do the right thing, and to tell the truth. You act with integrity when your words and actions match. Integrity gives you self-respect and a peaceful heart.

Japanese jikiPlease note that the second Kanji sometimes has an alternate form in Japanese. Let us know if you want the alternate form shown to the right.

Note: This entry is cross-listed as "honesty" because it also fits that definition.


Beyond Integrity, this word also means "upright" and "honest" in Chinese. Means "integrity," "honesty" or "frankness" in Japanese.


See Also:  Honor | Honesty | Truth | Trust

Light / Bright and Promising Future

guāng míng
kou mei / mitsu haru
Light / Bright and Promising Future Scroll

光明 is a nice way to say "light" in Chinese, and old Korean Hanja. 光明 is because the word also suggests a bright future or refers so someone who is very promising (great future potential).

The first character means light or bright.

The second character means bright and clear (in this context).

光明 appears in most Japanese dictionaries but it not the most common Japanese Kanji word for light (more commonly used for the name Mitsuharu).

In old Korean Hanja, this can have a meaning of brightness or brilliancy.

In the context of Buddhism, this means, "Light emanating from a Buddha or Bodhisattva, symbolizing their wisdom and compassion"

Five Red Bats

hóng wǔ fú
Five Red Bats Scroll

紅五蝠 is a play on words in Chinese because of some homophones.

The first thing you need to know is that the word for bat, 蝠, sounds exactly like the word for good fortune, 福. Thus, bats are often associated with good luck and good fortune in Chinese culture.

Five bats (五福 / 五蝠) means "five fortunes" referring to luck, prosperity, wealth, happiness, and longevity.

The word red, 红, has the same sound as 宏 meaning vast, great, or magnificent. Therefore, a red bat means "vast fortune".

Altogether, five red bats represent vast reaches of the five fortunes.

ei en no ai
Eternal Love Scroll

永遠の愛 is a great way to write "Eternal Love" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean eternal, eternity, perpetuity, forever, immortality, and permanence.

The third character is a possessive article which sort of makes this selection mean "Love, of the eternal kind".

The last character is "love".

Cultural note: Most of the time, it is taboo to use the word "love" in Japanese. For instance, a Japanese man will say, "I like you", rather than, "I love you", to his spouse/girlfriend. However, this entry for eternal love is acceptable because of the way it is composed.

This entry is only appropriate if your audience is Japanese. We also have a Chinese version of this eternal love.

Pillars of Marriage

Respect / Loyalty / Honesty
zūn zhòng zhōng chéng chéng shí
Pillars of Marriage Scroll

These are the pillars of marriage (at least they are for some - if you have a different set of pillars and want them on a wall scroll, just contact me).

This is actually a "word list" consisting of "Respect/Loyalty/Honesty". Word lists are not as common in Chinese as they are in English but leaving that concern behind, this has a good meaning.

If you want to customize it more, add an inscription with your wedding date or names (just a small extra fee for translation).

Note: Because these are three separate words, the calligrapher may be inclined to leave a small space between each two-character word. Let us know if you have any preference when you place your order.

jiān qiáng shēng huó
Live Strong Scroll

While hard to translate directly, this is the best way to write "Live Strong" in Chinese. If you are a cancer survivor, or simply support Lance Armstrong's ideas, this is a nice selection for a wall scroll.

The first two characters mean strong or staunch. The last two mean living or life (daily existence). While the Chinese version is the reverse order of "Live Strong" it is the only way to write it in a natural form that is also grammatically correct.

Note that we are in no way affiliated or connected to Lance, nor his foundation. This translation is offered because of multiple requests from customers whose philosophies or ideas match those of the Live Strong idea.

Home of the Auspicious Golden Dragon

jīn ruì xiáng lóng zhī jiā
Home of the Auspicious Golden Dragon Scroll

This "home golden auspicious dragon" title was added by special request of a customer.

The first character means gold or golden.
The second and third characters hold the meaning of auspiciousness and good luck.
The fourth character is dragon.
The fifth is a possessive modifier (like making "dragon" into "dragon's").
The last character means home (but in some context can mean "family" - however, here it would generally be understood as "home").

Note: The word order is different than the English title, because of grammar differences between English and Chinese. This phrase sounds very natural in Chinese in this character order. If written in the English word order, it would sound very strange and lose its impact in Chinese.


Note: Korean pronunciation is included above, but this has not been reviewed by a Korean translator.

Che Guevara

Latin American / Cuban Revolutionary
qiè gé wǎ lā
Che Guevara Scroll

切格瓦拉 is the name "Che Guevara", as written (transliterated) in Mandarin Chinese.

Che Guevara Once revered by Chinese people as a Socialist rebel, he's now just a historical figure that school children briefly learn about in China.

切格瓦拉 is because China used to be a truly-Communist/Socialist nation, and thus, other Communists and Socialists were heroes.

In modern China, with its free-market economy, those former heroes fade a little.

We are not offering the "Che" character alone, as few would associate it with Che Guevara, so you really need the full name to be clear (minus Ernesto, which is his real first name).

Earth

(Used in Japanese version of five elements)
chi / ji / tsushi / tsuchi
Earth Scroll

地 is the single-character element and title of the planet Earth in Chinese, old Korean Hanja and Japanese Kanji.

Because this is a single-character, the definition is a little ambiguous, and can have many meanings depending on the context in which it is used. These meanings include: earth, ground, land, soil, dirt, place, territory, bottom (of a package, book, etc.), earth (one of the Japanese five elements), the region in question, the local area, skin, texture, fabric, material, weave, base, background, one's true nature, narrative (i.e. descriptive part of a story), real life, actuality, etc.

In Japanese, this Kanji can be pronounced several ways, including chi, ji, tsushi, or tsuchi.
地 is also an element of the Japanese version of the five elements (the original Chinese version uses a different version of earth).

qīng
sei
Clarity Scroll

清 means clarity or clear in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Looking at the parts of this character, you have three splashes of water on the left, "life" on the top right, and the moon on the lower right.

Because of something Confucius said about 2500 years ago, you can imagine that this character means "live life with clarity like bright moonlight piercing pure water". The Confucian idea is something like "Keep clear what is pure in yourself, and let your pure nature show through". Kind of like saying, "Don't pollute your mind or body, so that they remain clear".

This might be stretching the definition of this single Chinese character but the elements are there, and "clarity" is a powerful idea.


Korean note: Korean pronunciation is given above but this character is written with a slight difference in the "moon radical" in Korean. However, anyone who can read Korean Hanja, will understand this character with no problem (this is considered an alternate form in Korean). If you want the more standard Korean Hanja form (which is an alternate form in Chinese), just let me know.

Japanese note: When reading in Japanese, this Kanji has additional meanings of pure, purify, or cleanse (sometimes to remove demons or "exorcise"). Used more in compound words in Japanese than as a stand-alone Kanji.

Live Laugh Love

xiào ài shēng huó
Live Laugh Love Scroll

In English, the word order shown in the title is the most natural or popular. In Chinese, the natural order is a little different:

The first character means laugh (sometimes means smile).

The second character means love.

The last two characters mean "live" as in "to be alive" or "pursue life".

Please note: 笑愛生活 is not a normal phrase, in that it does not have a subject, verb, and object. It is a word list. Word lists are not common in Asian languages/grammar (at least not as normal as they are in English). We only added this entry because so many people requested it.

We put the characters in the order shown above, as it almost makes a single word with the meaning, "A life of laughter and love". It's a made-up word but it sounds good in Chinese.


We removed the Japanese pronunciation guide from this entry, as the professional Japanese translator deemed it "near nonsense" from a Japanese perspective. Choose this only if your audience is Chinese and you want the fewest-possible characters to express this idea.

In Korean, this would be 소애생활 or "so ae saeng hwar" but I have not confirmed that this makes sense in Korean.

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

quán fǎ
kenpou
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa Scroll

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist", or even "law of the fist". The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist".

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense". I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

yuè
tsuki
Moon Scroll

月 is how to write the title for "moon" in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

月 is also used to refer to the month. 月 is because China traditionally uses a lunar calendar, so saying "next moon" is the same as saying "next month" etc.
In modern Chinese and Japanese and old Korean, the character for a number is put in front of this moon character to represent western months. So "one moon" is January "two moons" is February etc.

If you are wondering, in the east Asian way to write dates, the character for "sun" or "day" is used with a number in front of it to express the day of the month. So "ten moons, one sun" becomes "October 1st" or "10/1" (this date happens to be Chinese National Day - The equivalent of Independence Day in the USA, Canada Day, or the Queen's Birthday).

In Japanese, 月 can be a surname that romanizes as Tsuki, Tsukizaki, or Takagetsu.

rěn zhě
ninja
Ninja Scroll

In feudal Japan, ninja or shinobi (literally, "one who is concealed" or "one that endures") were sometimes assassins and agents of espionage. The ninja, like samurai, followed their own special code of conduct.

The role of the ninja has been romanticized in many American movies (and to a lesser extent in Japanese movies). Because the ninja-craze has taken off in the west, Japan has followed the trend and you'll see plenty of ninja-related imagery in Japan.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect that form. Our Chinese calligraphers can also write it in the Japanese form but only if you request it (in the special instructions about your order during checkout).


See Also:  Samurai | Warrior | Ninjitsu

Ronin / Masterless Samurai

làng rén
rou nin
Ronin / Masterless Samurai Scroll

The Ronin have no master - The most famous are the 47 ronin created after their Lord committed suicide. This term was not exactly a positive title for the Samurai of ancient Japan. However, in recent years, movies and video games have glorified the term Ronin.

In Chinese, this term has the original meaning of a hobo, vagabond or ruffian.
In Korean Hanja, these characters would be read as adventurer, wanderer, someone without a steady job, or someone who is wasting away time.

In modern Japan, this term is used as a nickname for a high school student who has failed a college entry exam (and is trying again).

In Chinese and Korean, the Japanese definition of "Masterless Samurai" is known because of the historical context, even in Japanese, the literal translation is closer to the Chinese and Korean definitions shown above.

This will make a fine wall scroll if you are a fan of the Ronin, or see yourself as a Ronin of sorts. However, please think twice before getting a Ronin tattoo!

huáng hòu
kou gou
Empress Scroll

皇后 is the title of empress or emperess, the female form of emperor.

皇后 is used in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

While the emperor's reign was for life, if he died, his wife would hold his power. In this case, a woman was the ultimate ruler of the greater part of East Asia (what is now China) until her death and the succession of the emperor's firstborn son to lead the empire. Numerous times in various Chinese dynasties, an empress took power in this way.

The first character means emperor by itself.

The second character alone can mean "wife of an emperor or king" (the first character clarifies that we are talking about an empress and not a queen). It can also mean sovereign or last offspring, depending on context.

Note: In some books, this word is translated as queen. While only incorrect if you get technical (because an empress is theoretically a higher level than a queen), the meaning is very similar.

皇后 is sometimes used for the title of queen but more technically, this is the wife of the emperor (a higher level than a queen).


See Also:  Emperor | King | Queen | Phoenix

Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance

nián nián yǒu yú
Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance Scroll

年年有餘 is a common proverb or wish of prosperity you'll hear around the time of Chinese New Years.

Directly translated character by character it means, "Year Year Have Surplus". A more natural English translation including the deeper meaning would be "Every Year may you Have Abundance in your life".

On a side note, this phrase often goes with a gift of something related to fish. 年年有餘 is because the last character "yu" which means surplus or abundance has exactly the same pronunciation in Mandarin as the word for "fish".

年年有餘 is also one of the most common titles for traditional paintings that feature koi fish.

In China, this phrase might make an odd wall scroll - a customer asked especially for this common phrase which is why it appears here. See my other abundance-related words if you want a wall scroll that will seem more comfortable in Chinese culture.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Prosperity | Good Fortune

Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo

shào lín sì quán fǎ
shourinji kenpou
Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo Scroll

少林寺拳法 is a specific type of martial arts in Japan that claims origins in the Kung Fu practiced in the original Shaolin Monastery of China.

The first three characters mean "Shaolin Monastery" and you might notice the Japanese is pronounced in a very similar way. 少林寺拳法 is because many words were "borrowed" from the original Chinese when Japan did not have a written language and simply absorbed Chinese characters into their language around the 5th century. When a Japanese word did not exist, the Chinese pronunciation was often absorbed as well as the written form.

The last two characters mean "fist law" or "method of the fist". It has long been argued as to whether the Japanese for these characters should be Romanized as "kempo" or "kenpo". The official method should be "kenpou" but it's common to drop the "u" that comes after the "o".

I imagine if you are looking for this title, you already know what it means, so the above is simply extra information that a student of Shorinji Kempo might want to know.

Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu

rěn shù
ninjutsu
Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu Scroll

忍術 is the "art of the ninja" in Japanese. Most Japanese people associate ninjas with some degree of romance and reverence to Japan's ancient past. But most will accept that the ninja is an idea or way of life whose time has passed. However, this has not stopped floods of movies about ninjas and dojos offering Ninjutsu training from keeping the idea of the ninja alive in modern times.

My modern Japanese dictionary defines this term as "assassination, stealth and combat techniques", or "fighting art of the ninja".

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. Because this is specifically a Japanese title, we only suggest our Japanese master calligrapher for this selection - and you will get the form shown to the right if you do that (please ignore the fact that some of the images you see during the following pages in the options process will be the Chinese/alternate form).

shén ài shì rén shèn zhì jiāng tā de dú shēng zǐ cì gè tā mén jiào yí qiè xìn tā de bú zhì miè wáng fǎn dé yǒng shēng
John 3:16 Scroll

神愛世人甚至將他的獨生子賜給他們叫一切信他的不至滅亡反得永生 is the full translation of John 3:16 into Chinese.

This is from the Chinese Union Bible which comes from a revised version of the King James. This Chinese Bible was originally translated and printed in 1919 (several revisions since then).

Because of the origin being the KJV, I'll say that in English, this would be, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish but have everlasting life".

As with any translation, there are interesting cultural and linguistic issues. For instance, the word used for "world" in Chinese can also mean "common people". So you could say that it means "For God so loved the common people..".
This does not take away from the text, as it will be understood with the same meaning and connotation.

There is no direct Greek to Chinese translation in print (that I know of), so this is the best available. Of course, you can ask any Greek person of faith, and they will claim that a bit is lost from the original Greek of the New Testament to any of the English versions of the Bible in print.

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty". More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country".

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country". Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country".

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

Double Happiness

(Happy wedding and marriage)
Double Happiness Scroll

囍 is a common gift for Chinese couples getting married or newly married couples.

As we say in the west, "Two heads are better than one" Well, in the east, two "happinesses" are certainly better than one.

Some will suggest this is a symbol of two happinesses coming together. Others see it as a multiplication of happiness because of the union or marriage.

囍 is not really a character that is pronounced very often - it's almost exclusively used in written form. However, if pressed, most Chinese people will pronounce this "shuang xi" (double happy) although literally there are two "xi" characters combined in this calligraphy (but nobody will say "xi xi").

Double Happiness Portrait Red If you select this character, I strongly suggest the festive bright red paper for your calligraphy. Part of my suggestion comes from the fact that red is a good luck color in China, and this will add to the sentiment that you wish to convey with this scroll to the happy couple.

chán zōng
zen shuu
Zen Buddhism Scroll

禪宗 is one way to title "Zen Buddhism". Because the original pronunciation of Zen in Chinese is Chan, you'll also see this expressed as Chan Buddhism.

From the Buddhist Dictionary:
The Chan, meditative or intuitional, sect usually said to have been established in China by Bodhidharma, the twenty-eighth patriarch, who brought the tradition of the Buddha-mind from India. This sect, believing in direct enlightenment, disregarded ritual and sūtras and depended upon the inner light and personal influence for the propagation of its tenets, founding itself on the esoteric tradition supposed to have been imparted to Kāśyapa by the Buddha, who indicated his meaning by plucking a flower without further explanation. Kāśyapa smiled in apprehension and is supposed to have passed on this mystic method to the patriarchs. The successor of Bodhidharma was 慧可 Huike, and he was succeeded by 僧璨 Sengcan; 道信 Daoxin; 弘忍 Hongren; 慧能 Huineng, and 神秀 Shenxiu, the sect dividing under the two latter into the southern and northern schools: the southern school became prominent, producing 南嶽 Nanyue and 靑原 Qingyuan, the former succeeded by 馬祖 Mazu, the latter by 石頭 Shitou. From Mazu's school arose the five later schools.

Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark Scroll

兼聽則明偏聽則暗 is an ancient Chinese proverb about getting all the information from all sides so that you truly understand a situation.

Wei Zheng

Wei Zheng

A man named Wei Zheng lived between 580-643 AD. He was a noble and wise historian and minister in the court of the early Tang Dynasty.The emperor once asked him, "What should an emperor do to understand the real-world situation and what makes an emperor out-of-touch with reality?"

Wei Zheng replied, "Listen to both sides and you will be enlightened; listen to only one side and you will be left in the dark".

Then Wei Zheng went on to cite examples of leaders in history that were victorious after heeding both sides of the story, and other leaders that met their doom because they believed one-sided stories which often came from flattering lips.

Please note that there is an unwritten rule when the same character appears twice in the same phrase, the calligrapher will alter the appearance so that no two characters are exactly alike in the same piece. This calligraphy has two repeating characters that will be written differently than they appear here.

Glory and Honor

róng
ei
Glory and Honor Scroll

榮 relates to giving someone a tribute or praise.

It's a little odd as a gift, so this may not be the best selection for a wall scroll.

I've made this entry just because this character is often misused as "honorable" or "keeping your honor". It's not quite the same meaning, as this usually refers to a tribute or giving an honor to someone.

榮 is often found in tattoo books incorrectly listed as the western idea of personal honor or being honorable. Check with us before you get a tattoo that does not match the meaning you are really looking for. As a tattoo, this suggests that you either have a lot of pride in yourself or that you have a wish for prosperity for you and/or your family.

栄In modern Japanese Kanji, glory and honor looks like the image to the right.

There is a lot of confusion about this character, so here are some alternate translations for this character: prosperous, flourishing, blooming (like a flower), glorious beauty, proud, praise, rich, or it can be the family name "Rong". The context in which the character is used can change the meaning between these various ideas.

In the old days, this could be an honor paid to someone by the Emperor (basically a designation by the Emperor that a person has high standing).

To sum it up: 榮 has a positive meaning, however, it's a different flavor than the idea of being honorable and having integrity.

Turtle

...also means tortoise
guī
kame
Turtle Scroll

龜 is the generic term for turtle in Chinese, and old Korean Hanja. It's like saying "turtle" (or "tortoise") without being specific about species of turtle.

Please note that there are many special characters in Chinese and a few in Japanese that denote specific species of turtle, and do not include this character. We can't possibly cover all of these species but if you want a certain one, such as "loggerhead" or a "leatherback", just contact me and I'll do my best to research your special species.

If you noticed, I said species names that do not include this character. 龜 is because, in much the same way we can do it in English by just saying, "loggerhead", instead of "loggerhead turtle", the same can be done in Chinese and Japanese.

亀This may be hard to believe but the image shown to the right is an alternate version of this character, which is currently used in Japan. This was originally an alternate form in ancient China for turtle - but it's so obscure now, that most Chinese people would just think this is the Japanese version of turtle (I did a lot of research on this). The version shown in the upper left is traditional Chinese (also used in Korea, prior to 100 years ago). It will generally not be recognized by the new generation of Japanese people. If your audience is Japanese, please click on the Kanji image shown to the right to have the calligrapher write that version (instead of clicking the button above).


Note: In Japanese, this Kanji is also a representation of long life. This is related to the fact that a tortoise can live for hundreds of years.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins".

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation". The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence".

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Kung Fu / Gong Fu

gōng fu
gung fu
kan fu / ku fu
Kung Fu / Gong Fu Scroll

One of the most famous types of martial arts in the world - and not just because of Bruce Lee.

Some translate the meaning as "Accomplishment by Great Effort". I think this is partially true but directly translated it literally means "Merit/Achievement/Accomplishment Man". The word "fu" can sometimes mean "husband" or "porter" but in this case, it can only mean "man". However, few in China will think "man" when they hear the word "Gong Fu" spoken.

This term is also used for things other than martial arts. In fact, it's used to refer to a person with excellent skills in crafts that require a great deal of effort such as cooking, tea ceremonies, and calligraphy.

What a lot of people don't know is that the spelling of "Kung Fu" was actually taken from the old Wade Giles form of Romanization. Using this method, the sounds of the English "G" and "K" were both written as "K" and an apostrophe after the "K" told you it was supposed to sound like a "G". Nobody in the west knew this rule, so most people pronounce it with a "K-sound". And so Gong Fu will always be Kung Fu for most westerners.

Also, just to educate you a little more, the "O" in "Gong" has a sound like the English word "oh".

The popular Chinese dish "Kung Pao Chicken" suffers from the same problem. It should actually be "Gong Bao Chicken".

Historical note: Many will claim that Kung Fu was invented by the monks of the Shaolin monastery. This fact is argued in both directions by scholars of Chinese history. Perhaps it is more accurate to say that the Shaolin Monks brought the original fame to Kung Fu many generations ago.


Japanese note: While most Japanese martial artists will recognize these characters, Katakana is more often used to approximate the pronunciation of "Kung Fu" with "カンフー." Some will argue as to whether this should be considered a Japanese word at all.


See Also:  Bruce Lee

Wing Chun Fist Maxims

Wing Chun Kuen Kuit
Wing Chun Fist Maxims Scroll

This text is the chant or poem of Wing Chun.

I call it a "chant" because it was meant to be a somewhat rhythmic poem to help practitioners memorize many aspects of Wing Chun.

The Chinese text:
1 有手黐手,無手問手
2 來留區送, 甩手直沖
3 怕打終歸打, 貪打終被打
4 粘連迫攻, 絕不放鬆
5 來力瀉力, 借力出擊
6 步步追形, 點點朝午
7 以形補手, 敗形不敗馬
8 腰馬一致, 心意合一
9 拳由心發, 動法無形
10 活人練活死功夫

You will see this referred to as, "Wing Chun Kuem Kuit". This Cantonese romanization is popular in the west (and there is no official way to romanize Cantonese, so many variations exist). In Mandarin, it would be, "Yong Chun Quan Jue". The last character (kuit or kyut from Cantonese, jue or chüeh from Mandarin) kind of means "secrets of the art". It's a short way to write 口訣, meaning "mnemonic chant" or "rhyme for remembering".

In the west (especially in the military), we often use acronyms to remember things. There are no initials to make acronyms in Chinese, so in ancient times, chants like this are used to remember vast amounts of information. I will presume you already know the meaning of the 10 maxims, so I will skip that to keep this calligraphy entry from getting too large.

Some think 练拳者必记 is the title but that just says, "(When) training (the) fist, people should remember:". Therefore, I've not included that in the calligraphy. However, you can put a note in the special instructions if you want it added.

Note: On a traditional calligraphy wall scroll, the characters will be written in vertical columns, starting from the right, and proceeding left.


Note: This is an except and variation from a huge 口訣. These 10 maxims are used extensively in Wing Chun training, and you’ll find them all over the internet. Just know there is a much longer version out there, along with several variations and excepts like this one. If you know of, or want a different version, just contact me, and I will add it for you.

Body and Earth in Unity

shindofuni / shindofuji
Body and Earth in Unity Scroll

身土不二 (Shindofuni) is originally a Buddhist concept or proverb referring to the inseparability of body-mind and geographical circumstances.

身土不二 literally reads, "Body [and] earth [are] not two".

Other translations or matching ideas include:
Body and land are one.
Body and earth can not be separated.
Body earth sensory curation.
You are what you eat.
Indivisibility of the body and the land (because the body is made from food and food is made from the land).

Going further, this speaks of our human bodies and the land from which we get our food being closely connected. This phrase is used often when talking about natural and organic vegetables coming directly from the farm to provide the healthiest foods in Japan.

Character notes: 身(shin) in this context does not just mean your physical body rather a concept including both body and mind.
土 (do) refers to soil, earth, clay, land, or in some cases, locality. It's not the proper name of Earth, the planet. However, in can refer to the land or realm we live in.

Japanese note: This has been used in Japan, on and off since 1907 as a slogan for a governmental healthy eating campaign (usually pronounced as shindofuji instead of the original shindofuni in this context). It may have been hijacked from Buddhism for this propaganda purpose, but at least this is "healthy propaganda".

Korean note: The phrase 身土不二 was in use by 1610 A.D. in Korea where it can be found in an early medical journal.
In modern South Korea, it's written in Hangul as 신토불이. Korea used Chinese characters (same source for Japanese Kanji) as their only written standard form of the language until about a hundred years ago. Therefore, many Koreans will recognize 身土不二 as a native phrase and concept.


See Also:  Strength and Love in Unity

Qi Gong / Chi Kung

qì gōng
kikou
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll

Qigong is the title of a technique that is somewhere between a medical practice, meditation, and in some cases a religion. The definition is blurred depending on which school of Qigong you are following. In some cases, it is even incorporated with martial arts.

Some people (even Chinese people) mix this title with Tai Chi (Tai Qi) exercises.

Lately in China, people will claim to practice Tai Chi rather than Qigong because the Qigong title was recently used as a cover for an illegal pseudo-religious movement in China with the initials F.G. or F.D. (I can not write those names here for fear of our website being banned in China).

You can learn those names and more here: Further info about Qigong

If you are wondering about why I wrote "Qi Gong" and "Chi Kung" as the title of this calligraphy entry, I should teach you a little about the various ways in which Chinese can be Romanized. One form writes this as "Chi Kung" or "Chikung" (Taiwan). In the mainland and elsewhere, it is Romanized as "Qi Gong" or "Qigong". The actual pronunciation is the same in Taiwan, mainland, and Singapore Mandarin. Neither Romanization is exactly like English. If you want to know how to say this with English rules, it would be something like "Chee Gong" (but the "gong" has a vowel sound like the "O" in "go").

Romanization is a really confusing topic and has caused many Chinese words to be mispronounced in the west. One example is "Kung Pao Chicken" which should actually be more like "Gong Bao" with the "O" sounding like "oh" for both characters. Neither system of Romanization in Taiwan or the Mainland is perfect in my opinion and lead to many misunderstandings.

Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde

dōng fāng zì zūn
dung fong chi juen
tou hou zi son
Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde Scroll

東方自尊 is the most universal way to write "Asian Pride".

We worked on this one for a long time. The effort involved both Chinese and Japanese translators and lengthy discussions. If you have been searching for this term, there is a reason that it's hard to find the way to write "Asian Pride" in Chinese and Japanese - it's because of the inherent difficulties in figuring out a universal combination of characters that can be read in all languages that use forms of Chinese characters.

This final solution that you see to the left creates a reasonable title in Chinese, and an exotic (perhaps unusual) title in Japanese (This could be read as "Eastern Self-Respect" in Japanese").
Although not as natural, it does have the same meaning in Korean Hanja and the older-generation of Vietnamese people will be able to read it too.

The first two characters literally mean "Oriental" and the second two mean "pride", "self-esteem", or "self-respect" (we chose the most non-arrogant way to say "pride"). If you have "Asian Pride" (sometimes spelled Asian Pryde) these are the characters for you.

Note: For those of you that wonder, there is nothing technically wrong with the word "Oriental". It is a correct word, and any bad meanings were created by so-called "Asian Americans" and Caucasians in the United States. To say "Asian" would not completely correct to the intended meaning, since that would include people from Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, India, and portions of Russia.

For further proof, if you were of East Asian ancestry and born in England, you would be known as a "British Oriental" (The "Oriental stigma" is basically an American creation and, therefore, applies mostly to the American English language - where they get a bit overzealous with political correctness).

Further, since the Chinese and Japanese word for Oriental is not English, it can not be construed having ill-meaning. One trip to China or Japan, and you will find many things titled with these two characters such as malls, buildings, and business names. These places also use "Oriental" as their English title (much as we do, since our Chinese business name starts with these same two characters).

In short, the first two character have the meaning that Americans attach to "Asian" but is more technically correct.

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty.

It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.


Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds, people's homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.


Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present-day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Shawシャーshaa / sha
Keegan吉根jí gēn / ji2 gen1 / ji gen / jigenchi ken / chiken
Lonロンron
Happiness
Joy
xǐ / xi3 / xihsi
Kintsukuroi金繕いkintsukuroi
Acceptance受諾judaku
Andi安迪ān dí / an1 di2 / an di / andian ti / anti
Andy安迪ān dí / an1 di2 / an di / andian ti / anti
Mind, Body and Spirit身心靈 / 身心霊
身心灵
mi shin rei
mishinrei
shēn xīn líng
shen1 xin1 ling2
shen xin ling
shenxinling
shen hsin ling
shenhsinling
Queen Bee蜂王fēng wáng
feng1 wang2
feng wang
fengwang
Kishan吉尚jí shàng / ji2 shang4 / ji shang / jishangchi shang / chishang
Beijing Opera京劇
京剧
Kyougeki / Kyogekijīng jù / jing1 ju4 / jing ju / jingjuching chü / chingchü
Gabriela蓋布里艾拉
盖布里艾拉
gài bù lǐ ài lā
gai4 bu4 li3 ai4 la1
gai bu li ai la
gaibuliaila
kai pu li ai la
kaipuliaila
Justice
Rectitude
Right Decision

giyì / yi4 / yii
Live Laugh Love愛と笑いの生活ai to warai no seikatsu
aitowarainoseikatsu
Unbreakable
Indestructible
堅不可摧
坚不可摧
jiān bù kě cuī
jian1 bu4 ke3 cui1
jian bu ke cui
jianbukecui
chien pu k`o ts`ui
chienpukotsui
chien pu ko tsui
Holy Man
Saint
聖人
圣人
seijinshèng rén
sheng4 ren2
sheng ren
shengren
sheng jen
shengjen
Tai Chi
Tai Ji
太極
太极
taikyokutài jí / tai4 ji2 / tai ji / taijit`ai chi / taichi / tai chi
Schooled by Experience and Hard Knocks百戦錬磨hyakusenrenma
Penis陰莖 / 陰茎
阴茎
in kei / inkeiyīn jīng / yin1 jing1 / yin jing / yinjingyin ching / yinching
Honesty正直shoujiki / shojikizhèng zhí
zheng4 zhi2
zheng zhi
zhengzhi
cheng chih
chengchih
Benevolent Heart慈悲の心ji hi no kokoro
jihinokokoro
Happy Birthday祝誕生日shuku tan jou bi
shukutanjoubi
shuku tan jo bi
shukutanjobi
Smriti傳承
传承
denshou / denshochuán chéng
chuan2 cheng2
chuan cheng
chuancheng
ch`uan ch`eng
chuancheng
chuan cheng
Kill
Massacre
Mass Killing
殺戮
杀戮
satsurikushā lù / sha1 lu4 / sha lu / shalu
Rai
Rei
rei / relíng / ling2 / ling
Divine Protection加護
加护
ka go / kagojiā hù / jia1 hu4 / jia hu / jiahuchia hu / chiahu
Happy New Year新年快樂
新年快乐
xīn nián kuài lè
xin1 nian2 kuai4 le4
xin nian kuai le
xinniankuaile
hsin nien k`uai le
hsinnienkuaile
hsin nien kuai le
Rose Flower薔薇
蔷薇
bara / shoubi
bara / shobi
bara / shobi
qiáng wēi
qiang2 wei1
qiang wei
qiangwei
ch`iang wei
chiangwei
chiang wei
Xavier澤維爾
泽维尔
zé wéi ěr
ze2 wei2 er3
ze wei er
zeweier
tse wei erh
tseweierh
Crystal水晶suishou / suishoshuǐ jīng
shui3 jing1
shui jing
shuijing
shui ching
shuiching
Happy Birthday生日快樂
生日快乐
shēng rì kuài lè
sheng1 ri4 kuai4 le4
sheng ri kuai le
shengrikuaile
sheng jih k`uai le
shengjihkuaile
sheng jih kuai le
Fujin夫人fu jin / fujinfū ren / fu1 ren5 / fu ren / furenfu jen / fujen
Lioness雌獅
雌狮
cí shī / ci2 shi1 / ci shi / cishitz`u shih / tzushih / tzu shih
Brave the Waves破浪ha rou / harou / ha ro / haropò làng / po4 lang4 / po lang / polangp`o lang / polang / po lang
Destiny
Fate
命運
命运
mìng yùn / ming4 yun4 / ming yun / mingyunming yün / mingyün
Bamboo Moon月竹tsuki take / tsukitakeyuè zhú / yue4 zhu2 / yue zhu / yuezhuyüeh chu / yüehchu
Sword
kenjiàn / jian4 / jianchien
Kill
Slaughter
Murder
Butcher

satsushā / sha1 / sha
Phoenix (male)
ootori / otorifèng / feng4 / feng
Isshin Ryu Karate Do一心流空手道i sshin ryuu kara te dou
isshinryuukaratedou
i shin ryu kara te do
ishinryukaratedo
Peaceful Heart靜心
静心
shizugokoro / seishinjìng xīn / jing4 xin1 / jing xin / jingxinching hsin / chinghsin
John 14:15你們若愛我就必遵守我的命令
你们若爱我就必遵守我的命令
nǐ mén ruò ài wǒ jiù bì zūn shǒu wǒ de mìng lìng
ni3 men2 ruo4 ai4 wo3 jiu4 bi4 zun1 shou3 wo3 de ming4 ling4
ni men ruo ai wo jiu bi zun shou wo de ming ling
ni men jo ai wo chiu pi tsun shou wo te ming ling
Leopard
Panther
Jaguar
hyou / hyobào / bao4 / baopao
Dangerkiwēi / wei1 / wei
John 14:18我不撇下你們為孤兒我必到你們這里來
我不撇下你们为孤儿我必到你们这里来
wǒ bù piě xià nǐ mén wéi gū ér wǒ bì dào nǐ mén zhè lǐ lái
wo3 bu4 pie3 xia4 ni3 men2 wei2 gu1 er2 wo3 bi4 dao4 ni3 men2 zhe4 li3 lai2
wo bu pie xia ni men wei gu er wo bi dao ni men zhe li lai
wo pu p`ieh hsia ni men wei ku erh wo pi tao ni men che li lai
wo pu pieh hsia ni men wei ku erh wo pi tao ni men che li lai
Contentment知足chisokuzhī zú / zhi1 zu2 / zhi zu / zhizuchih tsu / chihtsu
Heaven Blesses the Diligent天道酬勤tiān dào chóu qín
tian1 dao4 chou2 qin2
tian dao chou qin
tiandaochouqin
t`ien tao ch`ou ch`in
tientaochouchin
tien tao chou chin
Narutoナルトna ru to / naruto
Self-Love
Love Yourself
Love Onself
自愛
自爱
ji ai / jiaizì ài / zi4 ai4 / zi ai / ziaitzu ai / tzuai
Spirit精神sei shin / seishinjīng shén
jing1 shen2
jing shen
jingshen
ching shen
chingshen
Strength: Strong and Solid強固
强固
kyouko / kyokoqiáng gù / qiang2 gu4 / qiang gu / qiangguch`iang ku / chiangku / chiang ku
Kirin
Giraffe
Mythical Creature
麒麟kirinqí lǐn / qi2 lin3 / qi lin / qilinch`i lin / chilin / chi lin
Misery Loves Company同病相憐
同病相怜
doubyou shou awaremu
doubyoushouawaremu
dobyo sho awaremu
dobyoshoawaremu
tóng bìng xiāng lián
tong2 bing4 xiang1 lian2
tong bing xiang lian
tongbingxianglian
t`ung ping hsiang lien
tungpinghsianglien
tung ping hsiang lien
Flying Tigers飛虎
飞虎
fēi hǔ / fei1 hu3 / fei hu / feihu
Heart
Mind
Spirit
kokoroxīn / xin1 / xinhsin
Construction Crane起重機
起重机
kijuuki / kijukiqǐ zhòng jī
qi3 zhong4 ji1
qi zhong ji
qizhongji
ch`i chung chi
chichungchi
chi chung chi
Integrity正直shoujiki / shojikizhèng zhí
zheng4 zhi2
zheng zhi
zhengzhi
cheng chih
chengchih
Light
Bright and Promising Future
光明kou mei / mitsu haru
koumei / mitsuharu
ko mei / mitsu haru
komei / mitsuharu
guāng míng
guang1 ming2
guang ming
guangming
kuang ming
kuangming
Five Red Bats紅五蝠
红五蝠
hóng wǔ fú
hong2 wu3 fu2
hong wu fu
hongwufu
hung wu fu
hungwufu
Eternal Love永遠の愛ei en no ai
eiennoai
Pillars of Marriage尊重忠誠誠實
尊重忠诚诚实
zūn zhòng zhōng chéng chéng shí
zun1 zhong4 zhong1 cheng2 cheng2 shi2
zun zhong zhong cheng cheng shi
tsun chung chung ch`eng ch`eng shih
tsun chung chung cheng cheng shih
Live Strong堅強生活
坚强生活
jiān qiáng shēng huó
jian1 qiang2 sheng1 huo2
jian qiang sheng huo
jianqiangshenghuo
chien ch`iang sheng huo
chienchiangshenghuo
chien chiang sheng huo
Home of the Auspicious Golden Dragon金瑞祥龍之家
金瑞祥龙之家
jīn ruì xiáng lóng zhī jiā
jin1 rui4 xiang2 long2 zhi1 jia1
jin rui xiang long zhi jia
jinruixianglongzhijia
chin jui hsiang lung chih chia
Che Guevara切格瓦拉qiè gé wǎ lā
qie4 ge2 wa3 la1
qie ge wa la
qiegewala
ch`ieh ko wa la
chiehkowala
chieh ko wa la
Earthchi / ji / tsushi / tsuchidì / di4 / diti
Clarityseiqīng / qing1 / qingch`ing / ching
Live Laugh Love笑愛生活
笑爱生活
xiào ài shēng huó
xiao4 ai4 sheng1 huo2
xiao ai sheng huo
xiaoaishenghuo
hsiao ai sheng huo
hsiaoaishenghuo
Kenpo
Kempo
Quan Fa
Chuan Fa
拳法kenpou / kenpoquán fǎ / quan2 fa3 / quan fa / quanfach`üan fa / chüanfa / chüan fa
Moontsukiyuè / yue4 / yueyüeh
Ninja忍者ninjarěn zhě / ren3 zhe3 / ren zhe / renzhejen che / jenche
Ronin
Masterless Samurai
浪人rou nin / rounin / ro nin / roninlàng rén / lang4 ren2 / lang ren / langrenlang jen / langjen
Empress皇后kou gou / kougou / ko go / kogohuáng hòu
huang2 hou4
huang hou
huanghou
Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance年年有餘
年年有馀
nián nián yǒu yú
nian2 nian2 you3 yu2
nian nian you yu
niannianyouyu
nien nien yu yü
niennienyuyü
Shorinji Kempo
Kenpo
少林寺拳法shourinji kenpou
shourinjikenpou
shorinji kenpo
shorinjikenpo
shào lín sì quán fǎ
shao4 lin2 si4 quan2 fa3
shao lin si quan fa
shaolinsiquanfa
shao lin ssu ch`üan fa
shaolinssuchüanfa
shao lin ssu chüan fa
Ninjutsu
Ninjitsu
忍術
忍术
ninjutsurěn shù / ren3 shu4 / ren shu / renshujen shu / jenshu
John 3:16神愛世人甚至將他的獨生子賜給他們叫一切信他的不至滅亡反得永生
神爱世人甚至将他的独生子赐给他们叫一切信他的不至灭亡反得永生
shén ài shì rén shèn zhì jiāng tā de dú shēng zǐ cì gè tā mén jiào yí qiè xìn tā de bú zhì miè wáng fǎn dé yǒng shēng
shen2 ai4 shi4 ren2 shen4 zhi4 jiang1 ta1 de du2 sheng1 zi3 ci4 gei3 ta1 men2 jiao4 yi2 qie4 xin4 ta1 de bu2 zhi4 mie4 wang2 fan3 de2 yong3 sheng1
shen ai shi ren shen zhi jiang ta de du sheng zi ci gei ta men jiao yi qie xin ta de bu zhi mie wang fan de yong sheng
shen ai shih jen shen chih chiang t`a te tu sheng tzu tz`u kei t`a men chiao i ch`ieh hsin t`a te pu chih mieh wang fan te yung sheng
shen ai shih jen shen chih chiang ta te tu sheng tzu tzu kei ta men chiao i chieh hsin ta te pu chih mieh wang fan te yung sheng
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
Double Happiness
喜喜
xǐ / xi3 / xihsi
Zen Buddhism禪宗
禅宗
zen shuu / zenshuu / zen shu / zenshuchán zōng
chan2 zong1
chan zong
chanzong
ch`an tsung
chantsung
chan tsung
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark兼聽則明偏聽則暗
兼听则明偏听则暗
jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
jian1 ting1 ze2 ming2, pian1 ting1 ze2 an4
jian ting ze ming, pian ting ze an
chien t`ing tse ming, p`ien t`ing tse an
chien ting tse ming, pien ting tse an
Glory and Honor
荣 / 栄
eiróng / rong2 / rongjung
Turtle
龟 / 亀
kameguī / gui1 / guikuei
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
Kung Fu
Gong Fu
功夫kan fu / ku fu
kanfu / kufu
gōng fu / gong1 fu / gong fu / gongfukung fu / kungfu
Wing Chun Fist Maxims有手黐手無手問手來留區送甩手直沖怕打終歸打貪打終被打粘連迫攻絕不放鬆來力瀉力借力出擊步步追形點點朝午以形補手敗形不敗馬腰馬一致心意合一拳由心發動法無形活人練活死功夫
有手黐手无手问手来留区送甩手直冲怕打终归打贪打终被打粘连迫攻绝不放松来力泻力借力出击步步追形点点朝午以形补手败形不败马腰马一致心意合一拳由心发动法无形活人练活死功夫
Body and Earth in Unity身土不二shindofuni / shindofuji
Qi Gong
Chi Kung
氣功
气功
kikou / kikoqì gōng / qi4 gong1 / qi gong / qigongch`i kung / chikung / chi kung
Asian Pride
Oriental Pride
AZN Pryde
東方自尊
东方自尊
tou hou zi son
touhouzison
to ho zi son
tohozison
dōng fāng zì zūn
dong1 fang1 zi4 zun1
dong fang zi zun
dongfangzizun
tung fang tzu tsun
tungfangtzutsun
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu遠上寒山石徑斜白雲生處有人家停車坐愛楓林晚霜葉紅於二月花
远上寒山石径斜白云生处有人家停车坐爱枫林晚霜叶红于二月花
yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
yuan3 shang4 han2 shan1 shi2 jing4 xia2 bai2 yun2 sheng1 chu4 you3 ren2 jia1 ting2 che1 zuo4 ai4 feng1 lin2 wan3 shuang4 ye4 hong2 yu2 er4 yue4 hua1
yuan shang han shan shi jing xia bai yun sheng chu you ren jia ting che zuo ai feng lin wan shuang ye hong yu er yue hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng ch`u yu jen chia t`ing ch`e tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng chu yu jen chia ting che tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Scroll
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Scroll
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Scroll
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Scroll


And formats...

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Vertical Portrait
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Horizontal Wall Scroll
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Because in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Because Kanji, Because Characters, Because in Mandarin Chinese, Because Characters, Because in Chinese Writing, Because in Japanese Writing, Because in Asian Writing, Because Ideograms, Chinese Because symbols, Because Hieroglyphics, Because Glyphs, Because in Chinese Letters, Because Hanzi, Because in Japanese Kanji, Because Pictograms, Because in the Chinese Written-Language, or Because in the Japanese Written-Language.

5 people have searched for Because in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Because was last searched for by someone else on Oct 10th, 2021