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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Marine"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Marine
  2. United States Marine Corps
  3. Marine Corps
  4. Marine / Soldier of the Sea
  5. Training / Drill
  6. Army / Military
  7. Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body
  8. Discipline
  9. Gung Ho
10. The More We Sweat in Training,...
11. Maintain An Army For 1000 Days, Use It For An Hour
12. Improvise Adapt Overcome


Marine

Amphibious Warrior
China hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì yuán
Marine Wall Scroll

海軍陸戰隊員 is the Chinese way to express "Marine." (as in a member of the Marine Corps). It is not country-specific, so it could be the Royal Marines, U.S. Marines, Chinese Marines, etc.
In Australian English, they would translate this as "Naval Infantryman."

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea military/arms shore/land fighting/war/battle corps/team/group person/member." Note that the first two characters presented together but outside of this phrase mean "navy" (sea military).


See Also:  Warrior | Military | Navy | Art of War

United States Marine Corps

Japan bei kai hei tai
United States Marine Corps Wall Scroll

米海兵隊 is the Japanese way to write "United States Marine Corps" or simply "U.S. Marines."

Breaking down each Kanji, this means:
"rice (American) ocean/sea soldiers/army/military corps/regiment/group."

This title will only make sense in Japanese, it is not the same in Chinese! Make sure you know your audience before ordering a custom wall scroll.

If you are wondering about the rice, America is known as "rice country" or "rice kingdom" when literally translated. The Kanji for rice is often used as an abbreviation in front of words (like a sub-adjective) to make something "American." Americans say "rice-burner" for a Japanese car, and "rice-rocket" for a Japanese motorcycle. If you did the same in Japanese, it would be exactly the opposite meaning.


Note: I have not verified this but I've found this title used for U.S. Marines in Korean articles, so it's most likely a normal Korean term as well (but only in Korean Hanja).


See Also:  Navy | Army | Art of War | Warrior | Military

Marine Corps

China hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì
Marine Corps Wall Scroll

海軍陸戰隊 is the Chinese way to express "Marine Corps." This could be the Marine Corps of virtually any country that has an amphibious military force.

Let me know you want a more specific title such as British Royal Marines or U.S. Marine Corps.

The Chinese title for Marines is very verbose...
Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea military/arms shore/land fighting/war/battle corps/team/group."


See Also:  Military

Marine Corps

Japan kaiheitai
Marine Corps Wall Scroll

海兵隊 is the Japanese and Korean way to express "Marine Corps" or simply "Marines." It is not specific, so this can be the Marine Corps of any country, such as the British Royal Marines to the U.S. Marines.

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea soldiers/army corps/regiment/group."


See Also:  Military

Marine / Soldier of the Sea

Japan kai hei
Marine / Soldier of the Sea Wall Scroll

This way to express "Marine" as in an individual "Soldier of the Sea" in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja characters (not to be confused with Korean Hangul).

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea soldier/army/warrior."

Please note that this Japanese/Korean version kind of means "sailor" or "navy" in Chinese.


See Also:  Military

Training / Drill

China xùn liàn
Japan kunren
Training / Drill Wall Scroll

If training or drill is important to you (especially for military drill and training), this might be just the thing for a drill master to hang behind his/her desk.

This term is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean practice or exercise, depending on context.

Army / Military

China jūn
Japan gun
Army / Military Wall Scroll

This character means army, military, or arms.

軍 is also a character used in the compound word that means "army general." It's the "gun" in the well-known Japanese title "Shogun" which means general.


See Also:  Shogun | Navy | Military

Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body

Japan itami wa karada kara nukeru yowasa
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body Wall Scroll

I remember this being shouted a lot during U.S. Marine Corps boot camp. 痛みは體から抜ける弱さ is how to write that phrase in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body

China téng tòng jiù shì shuāi ruò lí nǐ ér qù de shí hòu
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body Wall Scroll

I remember this being shouted a lot during U.S. Marine Corps boot camp. 疼痛就是衰弱離你而去的時候 is how to write that phrase in Chinese. At least, this is as close as we could compose/translate it, and hold the full original meaning and connotations.

The version shown here is really, "Pain is weakness leaving your body." Although, it's said in English both ways (the or your), it works better in Chinese with "your."

Discipline

China jì lǜ
Discipline Wall Scroll

Discipline: There are a few different ways to define this word in English. This Asian word conveys the idea of extreme self-control and perhaps self-sacrifice, and obedience. This matches what I was taught as the meaning of "discipline" when I was in the Marine Corps. There is also an additional idea of maintaining order or being orderly in your tasks.

This idea would also fit an athlete training for the Olympics who gives up many pleasures to stay focused on their training.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Gung Ho

Working Together
China gōng hé
Japan guai
Gung Ho Wall Scroll

工合 is one of those Asian words that is used more in English than it is in the original Chinese.

Gung Ho was originally used to speak of Carlson's Raiders, a group of "Gung Ho" U.S. Marines who went on an island-hopping campaign of death during WWII.

A movie called Gung Ho came out in the mid-1940s and was later re-released in the 1950s depicting the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, and brought this word to the mainstream.

It is still sometimes used today within the U.S. Marine Corps brotherhood to refer to a unit or group that works well together, or is otherwise efficient and motivated (has good moral).

In 1986, there was a movie called Gung Ho, about a Japanese company taking over an American automotive factory. They completely ignored the fact that this was a Chinese title.

It should be noted that this title actually means a condition, state, manner, or health of something in Japanese.

Language and pronunciation notes:
Like many Asian words absorbed into common use in English, this one is drastically mispronounced. The official Romanization is "gong he" but that doesn't tell you enough. The vowel sound on the first character is like the English word "own," now just add the g-sounds to the beginning and end. The second character is misleading, as you might think it is like the English word "he." In reality, the vowel sound is more like the "u" in "up."

It should also be noted, that the current generation in China no longer uses, or recognizes this as a common word or slogan.


Note: This can be pronounced and is a word in Japanese, though seldom used. Japanese will use a variation of "具合" instead. But still, not common.

The More We Sweat in Training,
The Less We Bleed in Battle

China píng shí duō liú hàn zhàn shí shǎo liú xuè
The More We Sweat in Training, / The Less We Bleed in Battle Wall Scroll

There is more than one way to translate this ancient Chinese military proverb. Here are a few interpretations:

A drop of sweat spent in a drill is a drop of blood saved in war.

More practice will give one a better chance of success in real situation.

The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in battle.

I heard this many times when I was a U.S. Marine but I had no idea at the time that it was actually an old Chinese proverb.

Maintain An Army For 1000 Days, Use It For An Hour

China yǎng bīng qiān rì, yàng bīng yì shí
Maintain An Army For 1000 Days, Use It For An Hour Wall Scroll

Nothing could be more true. When I was in the Marine Corps, we trained for years for combat that often lasts only hours.

This Chinese proverb also reminds me of a common phrase used in the military to describe combat: "Weeks of total boredom, punctuated with five minutes of shear terror."

This may have some roots in Sun Tzu's The Art of War. Though I can not find this passage in his writings.

On the subject of the Art of War, if you have a favorite passage, we can create a custom calligraphy scroll with that phrase.

Improvise Adapt Overcome

China jí xìng fā huī jí kè shì yìng jí shí kè fú
Improvise Adapt Overcome Wall Scroll

即興發揮即刻適應即時克服 is the coolest way to put together this famous word list, "Improvise Adapt Overcome."

There are shorter ways to write "adapt," and "overcome", but "improvise" needs a four-character word to be expressed accurately in Chinese. To match them up, the other two are using four-character words as well. This makes it sound more natural in Chinese (though word lists are not a natural construct in Chinese grammar).

The words break down like this: 即興發揮, 即刻適應, 即時克服. I suggest the 3-column option when you customize your wall scroll. That way, the words will occupy one column each.

A great gift for a U.S. Marine, or anyone who follows this mantra.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Marine 海軍陸戰隊員
海军陆战队员
hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì yuán
hai3 jun1 lu4 zhan4 dui4 yuan2
hai jun lu zhan dui yuan
haijunluzhanduiyuan
hai chün lu chan tui yüan
haichünluchantuiyüan
United States Marine Corps 米海兵隊bei kai hei tai
beikaiheitai
Marine Corps 海軍陸戰隊
海军陆战队
hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì
hai3 jun1 lu4 zhan4 dui4
hai jun lu zhan dui
haijunluzhandui
hai chün lu chan tui
haichünluchantui
Marine Corps 海兵隊
海兵队
kaiheitai
Marine
Soldier of the Sea
海兵kai hei / kaihei
Training
Drill
訓練
训练
kunrenxùn liàn / xun4 lian4 / xun lian / xunlian hsün lien / hsünlien
Army
Military

gunjūn / jun1 / jun chün
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body 痛みは體から抜ける弱さ
痛みは体から抜ける弱さ
itami wa karada kara nukeru yowasa
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body 疼痛就是衰弱離你而去的時候
疼痛就是衰弱离你而去的时候
téng tòng jiù shì shuāi ruò lí nǐ ér qù de shí hòu
teng2 tong4 jiu4 shi4 shuai1 ruo4 li2 ni3 er2 qu4 de shi2 hou4
teng tong jiu shi shuai ruo li ni er qu de shi hou
t`eng t`ung chiu shih shuai jo li ni erh ch`ü te shih hou
teng tung chiu shih shuai jo li ni erh chü te shih hou
Discipline 紀律
纪律
jì lǜ / ji4 lv4 / ji lv / jilv chi lü / chilü
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Anurag
Crane
Double Happiness
Dragon
Endurance
Fighter
Guardian
Happiness
Hector
Honesty
Honor
Imagination
Indomitable Spirit
Jerry
Jesus Christ
Josh
Joshua
Kaizen
Katrina
Love
Maggie
Markus
Marvin
Nelly
Never Give Up
Nick
Peaceful Warrior
Protector
Riley
Sultan
Tami
Teacher
Tracy
Trust
Warrior
Water Tiger

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Marine Kanji, Marine Characters, Marine in Mandarin Chinese, Marine Characters, Marine in Chinese Writing, Marine in Japanese Writing, Marine in Asian Writing, Marine Ideograms, Chinese Marine symbols, Marine Hieroglyphics, Marine Glyphs, Marine in Chinese Letters, Marine Hanzi, Marine in Japanese Kanji, Marine Pictograms, Marine in the Chinese Written-Language, or Marine in the Japanese Written-Language.