Asian Art Gallery

Adventures in Asian Art



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Buy an I Love You Chinese Calligraphy Wall Scroll

We have many options to create artwork with the Chinese characters / Asian symbols / Japanese Kanji for I Love You on a wall scroll or portrait.

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. I Love You
  2. Love
  3. I Miss You
  4. I Need You
  5. I Love You
  6. I Need You


I Love You

China wǒ ài nǐ
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This directly translates as "I love you" from English to Chinese characters. This "I love you" phrase is very commonly-used between lovers in China.

Note: While the Japanese language uses the same characters, this phrase would not be spoken - it's kind of taboo in Japan. A man might tell a woman that he likes her with the phrase "Watashi wa anata ga suki-desu" (I regarding you have liking). If your audience is Japanese, avoid this "I love you" phrase. If you need something special, we have a Japanese translator on call.

Love

China ài
Japan ai
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This is a very universal character. It means love in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, old Korean Hanja, and old Vietnamese.

This is one of the most recognized Asian symbols in the west, and is often seen on tee-shirts, coffee mugs, tattoos, and more.

This character can also be defined as affection, to be fond of, to like, or to be keen on. It often refers to romantic love, and is found in phrases like, "I love you". But in Chinese, one can say, "I love that movie" using this character as well.

This can also be a pet-name or part of a pet-name in the way we say "dear" or "honey" in English.


It's very common for couples to say "I love you" in Chinese. However, in Japanese, "love" is not a term used very often. In fact, a person is more likely to say "I like you" rather than "I love you" in Japanese. So this word is well-known, but seldom spoken.


More about this character:

This may be hard to imagine as a westerner, but the strokes at the top of this love character symbolize family & marriage.

心The symbol in the middle is a little easier to identify. It is the character for "heart" (it can also mean "mind" or "soul"). I guess you can say that no matter if you are from the East or the West, you must put your heart into your love.

友The strokes at the bottom create a modified character that means "friend" or "friendship".

I suppose you could say that the full meaning of this love character is to love your family, spouse, and friends with all of your heart, since all three elements exist in this character.


See Also...   Caring | Benevolence | Friendliness | Double Happiness Happy Marriage Wall Scroll

I Miss You

China wǒ xiǎng nǐ
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This is the Chinese way to say "I miss you". It is said in the same word order in both English and Chinese.

I Need You

China wǒ xū yào nǐ
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Some people like to say, "I love you", but others might want to say "I need you". That is what this phrase is all about.

The first character means "I". The second and third create a compound word that means "need" and "want" at the same time. The last character means "you".

I Love You

Japanese only
Japan ai shi te ru
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It's very uncommon (some will say taboo) to say, "I love you" in Japanese culture. It's especially awkward for a man to tell a woman this in Japanese. Everyone is more likely to say "Watashi wa anata ga suki desu" or "I like you" (literally, "I regarding you, have like".

If you have to say, "I love you" in Japanese, this selection of Kanji and Hiragana shown to the left is the way.

I Need You

Japanese
Japan ana ta ga hitsu you
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Some people like to say, "I love you", but others might want to say "I need you". This is "I need you" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean "You".

The middle character is a connecting particle. In this case, it more or less means "are".

The last two characters mean necessary, needed, essential, indispensable, or necessity.

The "I" in the title is implied. Effectively this means "I need you".



All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.



The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Japanese Romaji
(Romanized Japanese)
Various forms of Romanized Chinese
I Love You我爱你
我愛你
n/awǒ ài nǐ
wo ai ni
wo3 ai4 ni3
woaini
Love
aiài
ai
ai4
I Miss You我想你
我想你
n/awǒ xiǎng nǐ
wo xiang ni
wo hsiang ni
wo3 xiang3 ni3
woxiangni
I Need You我需要你
我需要你
n/awǒ xū yào nǐ
wo xu yao ni
wo hsü yao ni
wo3 xu1 yao4 ni3
woxuyaoni
I Love You愛してる
愛してる
ai shi te ru
aishiteru
n/a
I Need You貴方が必要
貴方が必要
ana ta ga hitsu you
anatagahitsuyou
ana ta ga hitsu yo
n/a

If you have not set up your computer to display Chinese, the characters in this table probably look like empty boxes or random text garbage.
This is why I spent hundreds of hours making images so that you could view the characters in the "I Love You" listings above.
If you want your Windows computer to be able to display Chinese characters you can either head to your Regional and Language options in your Win XP control panel, select the [Languages] tab and click on [Install files for East Asian Languages]. This task will ask for your Win XP CD to complete in most cases. If you don't have your Windows XP CD, or are running Windows 98, you can also download/run the simplified Chinese font package installer from Microsoft which works independently with Win 98, ME, 2000, and XP. It's a 2.5MB download, so if you are on dial up, start the download and go make a sandwich.

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