"Never Give Up" Chinese / Japanese Wall Scrolls

You can buy Never Give Up characters on a custom wall scroll or portrait here.
Start by clicking on the button next to your favorite title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Never Give Up
  2. Never Give In / Never Succumb...
  3. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks
  4. Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight
  5. Stamina / Tenacity
  6. Tenacious / Tenacity
  7. Advance Bravely...
  8. Always Try to do Better
  9. Bounce Back...
10. Brave the Waves
11. Death Before Surrender
12. Death Before Dishonor
13. Dedication
14. Determination to Achieve
15. Diligence
16. Realize Your Ambitions...
17. Enthusiasm
18. Fortitude / Strength of Character
19. Indomitable Spirit / Indomitable Attitude
20. Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude
21. Indomitable / Unyielding
22. Indomitable Spirit
23. One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils
24. Better Late Than Never
25. No Fear
26. No Pain No Gain
27. Passion for a Cause
28. Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause
29. Perseverance
30. Perseverance / Indomitable / Invincible Fortitude
31. Even an iron bar can be ground to a needle
32. There is no pleasure without pain
33. One who is drenched in rain, does not fear drops of dew
34. Resilience / Restoration / Recovery
35. Spare No Effort
36. Strong bones come from hard knocks
37. Tempering Makes Strong Steel
38. Unbreakable
39. Unwavering
40. Overcome: Regardless of the Rain and Wind
41. Regardless of the Weather,...
42. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible
43. Where there’s a will there’s a way
44. Stay Strong / Iron Will
45. Determination to Achieve / Will-Power
46. Will-Power / Self-Control


Never Give Up

China yǒng bù fàng qì
Never Give Up Wall Scroll

The first character means "eternal" or "forever," the second means "not" (together they mean "never"). The last two characters mean "give up" or "abandon." Altogether, you can translate this proverb as "never give up" or "never abandon."

Depending on how you want to read this, it is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family or friends.


See Also:  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

Never Give In / Never Succumb
Never Lose

Japan kesshite akirameruna
Never Give In / Never Succumb / Never Lose Wall Scroll

決して諦めるな is a Japanese term that informally means "never give up." It's also a Japanese way to say "never surrender."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Tenacity | Perseverance | Hope

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

Always rising after a fall or repeated failures
Japan shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb relays the vicissitudes of life, with the meaning "seven times down eight times up."

Some would more naturally translate it into English as "Always rising after a fall or repeated failures" or compare it to the English, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again."

The first Kanji is literally "7." The second means "fall down" (sometimes this Kanji means "turn around," "revolve" or "turn over" but in this case, it holds the meaning of "fall"). The third is "8." And the last is "get up," "rouse," or "rise."

Basically, if you fail 7 times, you should recover from those events and be prepared to rise an 8th time. This also applies if it is the world or circumstances that knock you down seven times...
...just remember that you have the ability to bounce back from any kind of adversity.

Note: This can be pronounced two ways. One is "shichi ten hakki" or "shichitenhakki." The other is "nana korobi ya oki" also written, "nanakorobi-yaoki."

Special Note: The second character is a Kanji that is not used in China. Therefore, please only select our Japanese master calligrapher for this selection.

Stamina / Tenacity

Japan jikyuuryoku
Stamina / Tenacity Wall Scroll

持久力 means tenacity or stamina in Japanese Kanji.

Tenacious / Tenacity

China wán qiáng
Japan gan kyou
Tenacious / Tenacity Wall Scroll

These two characters together mean "Tenacious," "Hard to Defeat," or "Dogged."

Alone, the first character means mischievous, obstinate or stubborn. But it loses some of the mischievous meaning when the second character is added.

The second character means strength, force, powerful or better.


See Also:  Determination | Dedication | Devotion

Advance Bravely
Indomitable Spirit

China yǒng wǎng zhí qián
Advance Bravely / Indomitable Spirit Wall Scroll

This proverb creates an image of a warrior bravely advancing against an enemy regardless of the odds.

This proverb can also be translated as "indomitable spirit" or "march fearlessly onward."


See Also:  Indomitable | Fortitude

Always Try to do Better

Japan sara ni ue o me za su
Always Try to do Better Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb literally translates as: [After having achieved a fair degree of success,] one should still try to do better.

Others may translate this as, "Always try to improve," or "Always try to be better."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Bounce Back
Stage a Comeback

China dōng shān zài qǐ
Bounce Back / Stage a Comeback Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "make a comeback," or "resuming after a failure." It's sometimes used in terms of losing a job and then getting it back. However, it applies to any kind of comeback after difficulty.

The literal meaning of this Chinese idiom is, "[The] Eastern Mountain Again [will] Rise."

Brave the Waves

China pò làng
Japan ha rou
Brave the Waves Wall Scroll

This can be translated from Chinese as "braving the waves" or "bravely setting sail." It literally means: "break/cleave/cut [the] waves."

破浪 is a great title to encourage yourself or someone else not to be afraid of problems or troubles.

Because of the context, this is especially good for sailors or yachtsmen and surfers too.

Note: While this can be understood in Japanese, it's not commonly used in Japan. Therefore, please consider this to be primarily a Chinese proverb.

Death Before Surrender

Rather die than compromise
China níng sǐ bù qū
Death Before Surrender Wall Scroll

寧死不屈 is often translated as "Death Before Dishonor."

The literal translation is more like, "Better die than compromise." The last two characters mean "not to bend" or "not to bow down." Some might even say that it means "not to surrender." Thus, you could say this proverb means, "Better to die than live on my knees" or simply "no surrender" (with the real idea being that you would rather die than surrender).

Death Before Dishonor

You can die or kill, but never dishonor or disgrace yourself
China kě shā bù kě rǔ
Death Before Dishonor Wall Scroll

This almost directly matches the idea of "Death Before Dishonor," while also being an ancient Chinese proverb.

The direct meaning is, "[you] can die/kill [but you] cannot [allow] dishonor/disgrace [upon yourself]." Chinese grammar, and especially ancient grammar, is a little different than English. Not nearly as many articles are needed, and a lot is implied.

There are a lot of ways to express ideas similar to "Death Before Dishonor" in Chinese, and I would rate this one in the top two.

Death Before Dishonor

A soldier can die or kill, but never dishonor or disgrace himself
China shì kě shā bù kě rǔ
Death Before Dishonor Wall Scroll

This almost directly matches the military idea of "Death Before Dishonor," while also being an ancient Chinese proverb.

The direct meaning is, "[A] soldier/warrior can die/kill [but he/she] cannot [allow] dishonor/disgrace [upon himself/herself]." Chinese grammar, and especially ancient grammar, is a little different than English. Not nearly as many articles are needed, and a lot is implied.

There are a lot of ways to express ideas similar to "Death Before Dishonor" in Chinese, and I would rate this one in the top two.

士可殺不可辱 is the original form of this proverb with the character for "soldier/warrior" at the beginning. Most of the time, this character is dropped, and this becomes a five-character proverb (the soldier/warrior part is implied, even without the character being present in the proverb). We also offer the shorter version.

Dedication

Dedicated to One Thing
China zhuān yòng
Dedication Wall Scroll

專用 is the kind of dedication you might have to your job, or a person.

Trivia: It is the same word used as an adjective in front of the word for "network" to say "dedicated network" in Chinese.

Please note: While this is a word in Korean, the meaning is private or "exclusive use." So this is best if your audience is Chinese.


See Also:  Devotion | Passion | Tenacious | Commitment

Determination to Achieve

Japan ichi nen ho kki
Determination to Achieve Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb, "Ichinen Hokki," suggests being resolved to do something or having a wholehearted intention to accomplish something.

Some will translate this as, "the determination to accomplish something," "turning over a new leaf and being determined to find success."

Diligence

China qín miǎn
Japan kinben
Diligence Wall Scroll

Diligence is working hard and doing your absolute best. You take special care by doing things step by step. Diligence helps you to get things done with excellence and enthusiasm. Diligence leads to success.

These characters can also be translated as industry, industrious, assiduity, assiduous, diligent, or sedulity.


See Also:  Hard Work | Tenacity | Commitment | Passion for a Cause

Diligence

China qín
Japan kin
Diligence Wall Scroll

This single-character means diligence or "sense of duty" in Chinese and Korean (also understood in Japanese but not commonly-seen as a stand-alone Kanji).

As a single character on a wall scroll, this will only be seen with this meaning. However, it can also mean industrious, hardworking, frequent, regular, constant, energy, zeal, fortitude, or virility.

In Buddhism this can represent vīrya (viriya), the idea of energy, diligence, enthusiasm, or effort. It can be defined as an attitude of gladly engaging in wholesome activities, and it functions to cause one to accomplish wholesome or virtuous actions. Some Buddhists may even define this as "manliness" (a definition from a hundred years ago, before equality).

If you, or someone you know is a hard-worker (or needs a reminder to be diligent), then this is the wall scroll to have in your/their office.


See Also:  Tenacity | Undaunted

Realize Your Ambitions
Embrace Your Ambition

Japan taishi wo Idaku
Realize Your Ambitions / Embrace Your Ambition Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb suggests that you should embrace, pursue, and realize your ambitions.

The first part means ambitions or aspirations.

The last part means to embrace, or to hold in your arms.

Here's the character breakdown:
大志 (taishi) ambition; aspiration.
を (o) particle
抱く (idaku) to embrace; to hold in the arms (e.g. a baby); to hug; to harbor (harbour); to bear (e.g. a grudge); to entertain (e.g. suspicion); to sleep with; to sit on eggs.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Enthusiasm

China rè qíng
Enthusiasm Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Korean word for enthusiasm can also be translated as "Passion for a cause."

Enthusiasm is being cheerful, happy, and full of spirit. It is doing something wholeheartedly and eagerly. When you are enthusiastic, you have a positive attitude.

In some context, this could have a meaning of being extremely fond of something or having a fondness for a cause or person.


This Chinese word can also be translated as "sincere and warm" or literally "warm sentiment / affection."


See Also:  Motivation | Passion | Commitment | Tenacity | Happiness

Fortitude / Strength of Character

China gāng yì
Japan gouki
Fortitude / Strength of Character Wall Scroll

This Japanese and Chinese word means, "resolute and firm," "fortitude," "firmness of character," "hardihood," "manliness" or "macho."


See Also:  Perseverance | Strength | Tenacity

Indomitable Spirit / Indomitable Attitude

Fukutsu no Seishin
Japan fu kutsu no sei shin
Indomitable Spirit / Indomitable Attitude Wall Scroll

不屈の精神 is one of several versions or ways to write "Indomitable Spirit" in Japanese.

This one is the famous, "Fukutsu no Seishin" phrase.

Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude

China bù qū
Japan fukutsu
Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude Wall Scroll

不屈 is the short form of a longer Chinese word, and also a word used in Korean and Japanese to express the idea of being indomitable. It literally means, "will not bend," "will not crouch," "will not yield," "will not flinch," or "will not submit."

Note: Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
Indomitable / Unyielding Wall Scroll

不屈不撓 means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding."

不屈不撓 is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means "bendable."

The last means "scratched" or "bothered."

So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered." I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit." This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable."

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Indomitable Spirit

Japan ma ke ji damashii
Indomitable Spirit Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means "indomitable spirit" or "unyielding spirit."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Indomitable Spirit

Korean Only
China bǎi shé bù qū
Indomitable Spirit Wall Scroll

This Korean proverb means "indomitable spirit," at least, that is the way it is commonly translated in martial arts circles (Taekwondo, Hapkido, etc.).

The literal translation is "[one] hundred [times] broken [still] don't succumb."
Or more naturally translated, "Even if attacked/beaten one hundred times, still be undaunted/indomitable."

Notes:
Some will say this is one long word rather than a proverb.
百折不屈 is also a proverb/word in Chinese though rarely used in modern times.

One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils

China yī zhèng yā bǎi xié
One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils Wall Scroll

This ancient "One Justice Can Overpower a Hundred Evils" idiom and proverb is famous in China. But it has been around so long that its origins have long been forgotten.

It could be something that Confucius or one of his disciples said but no one can say for sure.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

No Fear

(2 characters)
China wú wèi
Japan mui
No Fear Wall Scroll

This literally means "No Fear." But perhaps not the most natural Chinese phrase (see our other "No Fear" phrase for a more complete thought). However, this two-character version of "No Fear" seems to be a very popular way to translate this into Chinese, when we checked Chinese Google.

Note: This also means "No Fear" in Japanese and Korean but this character pair is not often used in Japan or Korea.

This term appears in various Chinese dictionaries with definitions like "without fear," intrepidity, fearless, dauntless, and bold.

In Buddhist context, this is a word derived from abhaya meaning: Fearless, dauntless, secure, nothing and nobody to fear. Also from vīra meaning: courageous, bold.


See Also:  No Worries | Undaunted | Bravery | Courage | Fear No Man

No Pain No Gain

Literally: No Pain, No Strength
China bú tòng bù qiáng
No Pain No Gain Wall Scroll

This proverb is close to our idea of "no pain, no gain" in English. It holds this meaning in the context of working out at the gym etc.

This literally means, "no pain, no strength," meaning that if you don't experience a little pain, you will not gain any strength.

No Pain No Gain

Japan itami naku shite erumono wa nashi
No Pain No Gain Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase means "no pain, no gain."

Literally, this suggests that with pain, a gain must follow.

The pain Kanji here can also be translated as sorrow or suffering. The gain can also mean profit, advantage, or benefit. In Japanese Buddhist context, that gain Kanji can mean rebirth in paradise, entering nirvana.

The character break down:
痛みなく (itami naku) pain; ache; sore; grief; distress. The naku part adds a meaning of "a lot of" or "extended"
して (shite) and then. (indicates a causative expression; acts as a connective particle)
得る (eru) to get; to acquire; to obtain; to procure; to earn; to win; to gain; to secure; to attain.
もの (mono) conjunctive particle indicating a cause or reason.
なし (nashi) none of; -less; without; no.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Passion for a Cause

China rè qíng
Japan netsujou
Passion for a Cause Wall Scroll

Depending on context, this word can mean "cordial," "enthusiastic," "passionate" or "passionately."

This version is sometimes used in Japanese but the character order is more common in Chinese and Korean Hanja. The meaning in Japanese for this Kanji order is "ardour" or "zeal" but rarely used in modern Japan. I suggest you choose a different version of "passion" if your audience is Japanese.


See Also:  Persistence | Devotion | Tenacity | Commitment | Motivation

Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause

China qíng rè
Japan jou netsu
Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause Wall Scroll

情熱 is the Japanese word that means enthusiasm, or "passion for a cause."

In some context, this could have a meaning of being extremely fond of something, or having fondness for a cause or person.

Can also be translated as passion, zeal, ardour, or fervor.

Note: This character order is not natural in Chinese. However, a typical Chinese person can guess that this is a Japanese or Korean word and also understand the intended the meaning. This selection is best if your audience is Japanese or old-school Korean.


See Also:  Persistence | Devotion | Tenacity | Commitment | Motivation

Perseverance

China jiān rèn bù bá
Perseverance Wall Scroll

Perseverance is being steadfast and persistent. You commit to your goals and overcome obstacles, no matter how long it takes. When you persevere, you don't give up...you keep going. Like a strong ship in a storm, you don't become battered or blown off course. You just ride the waves.

The translation of this proverb literally means, "something so persistent or steadfast, that it is not uprootable / movable / surpassable."


See Also:  Tenacious | Devotion | Persistence | Indomitable

Perseverance

China
Japan see note
Perseverance Wall Scroll

毅 is the simplest way to express perseverance in Chinese and Korean Hanja.
This single-character version leaves a bit of mystery about what kind of perseverance you might want to convey.

In Korean, this is usually associated with "strength of character."

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced about a dozen different ways (so we have left out the Japanese pronunciation guide that normally appears above). In Japanese this Kanji would usually be translated "strong" (perhaps strong-willed).


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Perseverance / Indomitable / Invincible Fortitude

China jiān rěn bù bá
Japan kenninfubatsu
Perseverance / Indomitable / Invincible Fortitude Wall Scroll

堅忍不抜 / 堅忍不拔 means determined, steadfast, unswerving, or unshakable in Japanese.

堅忍不抜 / 堅忍不拔 is the Japanese version of an old Chinese 4-character perseverance proverb.
This would be understood in Chinese but it's not commonly written this way in Chinese.


忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese calligraphers sometimes write the second Kanji in the form shown to the right. Yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in this alternate Japanese Kanji form. If you have a preference, let us know when you order.

Due to some odd computer coding conventions, these two character forms were combined/merged into the same code point - thus, you will not see Kanji images of more Japanese form as you select options for your scroll.

Even an iron bar can be ground to a needle

China mó chǔ chéng zhēn
Even an iron bar can be ground to a needle Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "to grind an iron bar down to a fine needle," or "Even a bar of iron can be ground down to a needle [with perseverance]."

Figuratively, this means to persevere in a difficult task or to study diligently.

There is no pleasure without pain

No pain, no gain
Japan ku wa raku no tane
There is no pleasure without pain Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "One cannot have pleasure without pain." It's one of a few Japanese ways to say, "No pain, no gain."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

One who is drenched in rain, does not fear drops of dew

China bèi yǔ lín guò de rén bù pà lù shuǐ
One who is drenched in rain, does not fear drops of dew Wall Scroll

被雨淋過的人不怕露水 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as, "One who has been drenched by the rain is not afraid of dew drops."

Figuratively, this means:
One who has gone through hardships is not afraid of (minor)setbacks.

Resilience / Restoration / Recovery

China huī fù lì
Resilience / Restoration / Recovery Wall Scroll

This title suggests having the power to recover, restore, rehabilitate. This can refer to yourself, someone else, or even to something, like rehabilitating a burned forest. 恢復力 is the essence of resilience in life.

The first two characters are a word that means to reinstate, to resume, to restore, to recover, to regain, to rehabilitate, restoration, rehabilitation, recovery, return, improvement, recovery (from an illness), recuperation, or convalescence.

The last character means strength or power.


See Also:  Tenacity | Perseverance

Spare No Effort

China bù yí yú lì
Spare No Effort Wall Scroll

不遺餘力 / 不遺余力 is a Chinese proverb that can be translated many ways. Here's some of them: go to any lengths; with all one's might; spare no pain; do one's utmost.

If you feel hard work and holding nothing back is your philosophy, then this is the phrase for you.

Strong bones come from hard knocks

China bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
Strong bones come from hard knocks Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Without being knocked around a bit, [one's] bones won't become hard.

Figuratively, this means: One can't become strong without first being tempered by "hard knocks."

While true for everyone, this sounds like the "Iron Body" form of Kung Fu, where practitioners bodies are beaten (and often bone fractured) in order to become stronger.
For the rest of us, this is just about how we can be tempered and build character through the hardships in our lives.

不磕不碰骨頭不硬 is not a common title for a wall scroll in China.

Tempering Makes Strong Steel

Hardship Develops Strong Character
China bǎi liàn cái chéng gāng
Tempering Makes Strong Steel Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Only after much tempering is steel produced.

Figuratively, this means: True character must be tested in hardship.

百煉才成鋼 / 百煉纔成鋼 is a mild form of saying, "Whatever doesn't kill me, makes me stronger."

Unbreakable

Japan kowa re na i
Unbreakable Wall Scroll

壊れない means unbreakable in Japanese. The first two characters mean to be broken; to break; to fall through; to come to nothing. But the last two characters create a negative meaning (like adding "un-" to "breakable").


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Indomitable Spirit

Unwavering

Japan haragasuwaru
Unwavering Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means to have guts, or to be unwavering in one's resolution.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Overcome: Regardless of the Rain and Wind

China fēng yǔ wú zǔ
Overcome: Regardless of the Rain and Wind Wall Scroll

This proverb is often translated as, "Go ahead as planned regardless of the weather" or, "[Overcome] despite the rain and wind."

This Chinese proverb suggests that you are willing (or should be willing) to overcome any adversity, and accomplish your task at hand.

There is a second/optional part to this phrase which suggests that you should do this together with someone (see our other 8-character version if you want the full phrase).

Regardless of the Weather,
We Overcome Troubles Together

China fēng yǔ wú zǔ tóng zhōu gòng jì
Regardless of the Weather, / We Overcome Troubles Together Wall Scroll

The first four characters are often translated as, "Go ahead as planned regardless of the weather" or, "[Overcome] despite the rain and wind." The last four characters can mean, "Stick together" but literally means "Take the same boat [together]."

This Chinese proverb suggests that you are willing (or should be willing) to overcome any adversity, and accomplish your task at hand. The second part (last four characters) is sometimes left off but this second part strongly suggests that you should overcome that adversity together.

To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way
China yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible Wall Scroll

This old Chinese proverb has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to do it.
A willful man will have his way.
If you wish it, you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible to a strong mind.


Where there’s a will there’s a way

persevere and you will succeed
China yǒu zhì jìng chéng
Where there’s a will there’s a way Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "persevere and you will succeed."

It's very much like the English idiom, "where there's a will, there's a way."

Stay Strong / Iron Will

Japan tesshin sekichou
Stay Strong / Iron Will Wall Scroll

鉄心石腸 is a Japanese proverb which suggest you should have the inner-strength and will as hard and steadfast as iron. It's the Japanese way to say, "stay strong." 鉄心石腸 is an especially uplifting thing to say to a person in distress or recovering from a disaster. It's kind of the survivor's creed.

If you literally translate this, it means, "iron will, stone guts" or "iron heart, rock-hard bowels."

Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

China yì zhì
Japan ishi
Determination to Achieve / Will-Power Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Korean, and Japanese word means, "determination to achieve." It can also be translated as: will; willpower; determination; volition; intention; intent.

In Japanese, this can also be the given name Ishi.

Will-Power / Self-Control

China yì zhì lì
Japan ishi ryoku
Will-Power / Self-Control Wall Scroll

意志力 is the form of will power or self-control is about having the determination or tenacity to keep going.

In Japanese, this is the power of will, strength of will, volition, intention, intent, or determination.




Buy some related in-stock artwork?

Compare: $400.00

Your Price: $168.88

Compare: $160.00

Your Price: $88.88

Compare: $160.00

Your Price: $88.88

Compare: $160.00

Your Price: $88.88

Compare: $150.00

Your Price: $58.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Never Give Up 永不放棄
永不放弃
yǒng bù fàng qì
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yong bu fang qi
yongbufangqi
yung pu fang ch`i
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
Never Give In
Never Succumb
Never Lose
決して諦めるなkesshite akirameruna
kesshiteakirameruna
keshite akirameruna
keshiteakirameruna
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks 百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
hyakusetsusuto
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight 七転八起shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
shichi ten haki / nana korobi ya oki
shichitenhaki/nanakorobiyaoki
Stamina
Tenacity
持久力jikyuuryoku
jikyuryoku
Tenacious
Tenacity
頑強
顽强
gan kyou / gankyou / gan kyo / gankyowán qiáng
wan2 qiang2
wan qiang
wanqiang
wan ch`iang
wanchiang
wan chiang
Advance Bravely
Indomitable Spirit
勇往直前yǒng wǎng zhí qián
yong3 wang3 zhi2 qian2
yong wang zhi qian
yongwangzhiqian
yung wang chih ch`ien
yungwangchihchien
yung wang chih chien
Always Try to do Better 更に上を目指すsara ni ue o me za su
saraniueomezasu
Bounce Back
Stage a Comeback
東山再起
东山再起
dōng shān zài qǐ
dong1 shan1 zai4 qi3
dong shan zai qi
dongshanzaiqi
tung shan tsai ch`i
tungshantsaichi
tung shan tsai chi
Brave the Waves 破浪ha rou / harou / ha ro / haropò làng / po4 lang4 / po lang / polang p`o lang / polang / po lang
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.