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I Give Up in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an I Give Up calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “I Give Up” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “I Give Up” title below...

  1. Never Give In / Never Succumb...

  2. Never Give Up

  3. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

  4. Drink Up! / Cheers!

  5. Always Try to do Better

  6. Tenacious / Tenacity

  7. No Fear

  8. Shoganai

  9. Horse

10. Better to sacrifice your life than your principles

11. Perseverance

12. Broken Hearted

13. Bravery / Courage

14. Tea Fate


Never Give In / Never Succumb
Never Lose

Japan kesshite akirameruna
Never Give In / Never Succumb / Never Lose Vertical Wall Scroll

決して諦めるな is a Japanese term that informally means "never give up."

It's also a Japanese way to say "never surrender."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Tenacity | Perseverance | Hope

Never Give Up

China yǒng bù fàng qì
Never Give Up Vertical Wall Scroll

The first character means "eternal" or "forever," the second means "not" (together they mean "never"). The last two characters mean "give up" or "abandon." Altogether, you can translate this proverb as "never give up" or "never abandon."

Depending on how you want to read this, it is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family or friends.


See Also:  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
Chinai zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Drink Up! / Cheers!

China gān bēi
Japan kan pai
Drink Up! / Cheers! Vertical Wall Scroll

乾杯 is the common way to say "cheers" or give a toast in Chinese, Japanese and old Korean (written the same in all three languages, though pronounced differently).

乾杯 is an appropriate wall scroll for a bar, pub, or another drinking area.

The first character literally means "dry" or "parched."
The second character means "cup" or "glass."

Together the meaning is to drink up (empty your glass).

Always Try to do Better

Japan sara ni ue o me za su
Always Try to do Better Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb literally translates as: [After having achieved a fair degree of success,] one should still try to do better.

Others may translate this as, "Always try to improve," or "Always try to be better."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Never Give Up

Tenacious / Tenacity

China wán qiáng
Japan gan kyou
Tenacious / Tenacity Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters together mean "Tenacious," "Hard to Defeat," or "Dogged."

Alone, the first character means mischievous, obstinate or stubborn. But it loses some of the mischievous meaning when the second character is added.

The second character means strength, force, powerful or better.


See Also:  Determination | Dedication | Devotion | Never Give Up

No Fear

(2 characters)
China wú wèi
Japan mui
No Fear Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means "No Fear." But perhaps not the most natural Chinese phrase (see our other "No Fear" phrase for a more complete thought). However, this two-character version of "No Fear" seems to be a very popular way to translate this into Chinese, when we checked Chinese Google.

Note: This also means "No Fear" in Japanese and Korean but this character pair is not often used in Japan or Korea.

This term appears in various Chinese dictionaries with definitions like "without fear," intrepidity, fearless, dauntless, and bold.

In Buddhist context, this is a word derived from abhaya meaning: Fearless, dauntless, secure, nothing and nobody to fear. Also from vīra meaning: courageous, bold.


See Also:  Never Give Up | No Worries | Undaunted | Bravery | Courage | Fear No Man

Shoganai

Accepting Your Fate
Japan shouganai / shiyouganai
Shoganai Vertical Wall Scroll

仕様が無い is a Japanese phrase that means, "it can't be helped," "it is inevitable," "nothing can be done."

Some will see this as a negative (just give up), and others will see it as a suggestion to avoid futile effort.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Horse

Year of the Horse / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan uma
Horse Vertical Wall Scroll

馬 is the character for horse in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the horse, you . . .


Are outgoing and active.
Don't give up easily.
Are known to have a bad temper.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Better to sacrifice your life than your principles

China shě shēng qǔ yì
Better to sacrifice your life than your principles Vertical Wall Scroll

捨生取義 is a Chinese proverb that comes from the philosopher Mencius.

It can be translated a few different ways:
To give up life for righteousness.
To choose honor over life
Better to sacrifice one's life than one's principles.

Perseverance

China jiān rèn bù bá
Perseverance Vertical Wall Scroll

Perseverance is being steadfast and persistent. You commit to your goals and overcome obstacles, no matter how long it takes. When you persevere, you don't give up...you keep going. Like a strong ship in a storm, you don't become battered or blown off course. You just ride the waves.

The translation of this proverb literally means, "something so persistent or steadfast, that it is not uprootable / movable / surpassable."


See Also:  Tenacious | Devotion | Persistence | Indomitable

Broken Hearted

China shī liàn
Japan shitsuren
Broken Hearted Vertical Wall Scroll

In Chinese, this can mean to lose one's love; to break up (in a romantic relationship); to feel jilted.

In Japanese Kanji, this means disappointed love, broken heart, unrequited love, or being lovelorn.

失戀 is also valid in old Korean Hanja, where is means unrequited love, unreturned love, a disappointment in love, or a broken heart.

Note: In modern Japan, they will tend to write the more simple 失恋 form instead of 失戀. If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect the more simple modern version to be written (unless you give us instructions to use the older or more traditional version).

Bravery / Courage

Courage in the face of Fear
China yǒng gǎn
Japan yuu kan
Bravery / Courage Vertical Wall Scroll

勇敢 is about courage is bravery in the face of fear. You do the right thing even when it is hard or scary. When you are courageous, you don't give up. You try new things. You admit mistakes. This kind of courage is the willingness to take action in the face of danger and peril.

勇敢 can also be translated as: braveness, valor, heroic, fearless, boldness, prowess, gallantry, audacity, daring, dauntless and/or courage in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. This version of bravery/courage can be an adjective or a noun. The first character means bravery and courage by itself. The second character means "daring" by itself. The second character just emphasizes the meaning of the first but adds an idea that you are not afraid of taking a dare, and you are not afraid of danger.

勇敢 is about brave behavior versus the mental state of being brave. You'd more likely use this to say, "He fought courageously in the battle," rather than "He is very courageous."

Tea Fate

China chá yuán
Tea Fate Vertical Wall Scroll

茶緣 is a special title for the tea lover. This kind of means "tea fate" but it's more spiritual and hard to define. Perhaps the tea brought you in to drink it. Perhaps the tea will bring you and another tea-lover together. Perhaps you were already there, and the tea came to you. Perhaps it's the ah-ha moment you will have when drinking the tea.

I've been told not to explain this further, as it will either dilute or confuse the purposefully-ambiguous idea embedded in this enigma.

I happen to be the owner of a piece of calligraphy written by either the son or nephew of the last emperor of China, and this is the title he wrote. It was given to me at a Beijing tea house in 2001. 茶緣 is where I learned to love tea after literally spending weeks tasting and studying everything I could about Chinese tea. I did not understand the significance of the authorship, or meaning of the title at all. Some 10 years later, I realized the gift was so profound and had such providence. Only now I realize the value of a gift that it is too late to give proper thanks for. It was also years later that I ended up in this business, and could have the artwork properly mounted as a wall scroll. It has been borrowed for many exhibitions and shows, and always amazes native Chinese and Taiwanese who read the signature. This piece of calligraphy which I once thought just a bit of ink on a thin and wrinkled piece of paper is now one of my most valued possessions. And by fate, it has taught me to be more thankful of seemingly simple gifts.

Many custom options...


Tea Fate Vertical Wall Scroll
Tea Fate Vertical Wall Scroll
Tea Fate Vertical Wall Scroll
Tea Fate Vertical Wall Scroll


And formats...

Tea Fate Vertical Portrait
Tea Fate Horizontal Wall Scroll
Tea Fate Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup I Give Up in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Never Give In
Never Succumb
Never Lose
決して諦めるなkesshite akirameruna
kesshiteakirameruna
keshite akirameruna
keshiteakirameruna
Never Give Up永不放棄
永不放弃
yǒng bù fàng qì
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yong bu fang qi
yongbufangqi
yung pu fang ch`i
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
hyakusetsusuto
i zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
Drink Up!
Cheers!
乾杯kan pai / kanpaigān bēi / gan1 bei1 / gan bei / ganbeikan pei / kanpei
Always Try to do Better更に上を目指すsara ni ue o me za su
saraniueomezasu
Tenacious
Tenacity
頑強
顽强
gan kyou / gankyou / gan kyo / gankyowán qiáng
wan2 qiang2
wan qiang
wanqiang
wan ch`iang
wanchiang
wan chiang
No Fear無畏
无畏
muiwú wèi / wu2 wei4 / wu wei / wuwei
Shoganai仕様が無いshouganai / shiyouganai
shoganai / shiyoganai
shoganai/shiyoganai
Horse
umamǎ / ma3 / ma
Better to sacrifice your life than your principles捨生取義
舍生取义
shě shēng qǔ yì
she3 sheng1 qu3 yi4
she sheng qu yi
sheshengquyi
she sheng ch`ü i
sheshengchüi
she sheng chü i
Perseverance堅韌不拔
坚韧不拔
jiān rèn bù bá
jian1 ren4 bu4 ba2
jian ren bu ba
jianrenbuba
chien jen pu pa
chienjenpupa
Broken Hearted失戀
失恋
shitsurenshī liàn / shi1 lian4 / shi lian / shilianshih lien / shihlien
Bravery
Courage
勇敢yuu kan / yuukan / yu kan / yukanyǒng gǎn / yong3 gan3 / yong gan / yongganyung kan / yungkan
Tea Fate茶緣
茶缘
chá yuán / cha2 yuan2 / cha yuan / chayuanch`a yüan / chayüan / cha yüan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as I Give Up Kanji, I Give Up Characters, I Give Up in Mandarin Chinese, I Give Up Characters, I Give Up in Chinese Writing, I Give Up in Japanese Writing, I Give Up in Asian Writing, I Give Up Ideograms, Chinese I Give Up symbols, I Give Up Hieroglyphics, I Give Up Glyphs, I Give Up in Chinese Letters, I Give Up Hanzi, I Give Up in Japanese Kanji, I Give Up Pictograms, I Give Up in the Chinese Written-Language, or I Give Up in the Japanese Written-Language.

1 people have searched for I Give Up in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
I Give Up was last searched for by someone else on Jan 3rd, 2019