Many custom options...

Tan Paper and Copper Silk Love Wall Scroll
Red Paper and Ivory Silk Love Wall Scroll
Orange Paper Love Scroll
Crazy Blue and Gold Silk Love Scroll


And formats...

Love Vertical Portrait
Love Horizontal Wall Scroll
Love Vertical Portrait

The name Fear No Man in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Fear No Man calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Fear No Man” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Fear No Man” title below...


  1. 1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad

  2. Blue Lotus

  3. The Brave Have No Fears

  4. Bravery / Courage

  5. Confidence / Faithful Heart

  6. The Confident Helmsman Inspires Confidence in the Passengers

  7. Danger

  8. Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success

  9. Fear No Evil

10. Fear No Man / Fear Nothing

11. Fear God

12. Fearless / Daring

13. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

14. Joshua 1:9

15. Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles

16. Never Give Up

17. Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition

18. Do not fear poverty; Fear low ambitions

19. Do not fear being slow, fear standing still

20. No Fear

21. No Mind / Mushin

22. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

23. Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries

24. Preparation Yields No Regrets

25. Qi Gong / Chi Kung

26. One who is drenched in rain does not fear drops of dew

27. Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false

28. The Roar of the Lioness

29. Dana: Almsgiving and Generosity


1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad

 bú pà qiān zhāo huì zhǐ pà yī zhāo shú
1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad Scroll

不怕千招会只怕一招熟 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as: Do not worry about making a thousand clever moves; what [one has to] fear is one bad move.

Figuratively, this means: Even if you have made many clever moves before, one wrong move will ruin the whole game.

I compare this to the English saying, “It takes only one Aw-shit to wipe out a thousand Attaboys.”

 qing lián
 seiren
Blue Lotus Scroll

靑蓮 is a common title for Blue Lotus.

靑蓮 is often used in a Buddhist context for blue lotus from the Sanskrit “utpala.” This often refers to the clarity and purity of the lotus blue eyes possessed by a Living Buddha. It can also represent the purity of mind (without desire, suffering, fear, etc.).

The Brave Have No Fears

 yǒng zhě bú jù
 yuu sha fu ku
The Brave Have No Fears Scroll

This proverb means “Brave people [are] without fear,” or “The brave are without fear.”

勇者不懼 is a proverb credited to Confucius. It's one of three phrases in a set of things he said.

This phrase is originally Chinese but has penetrated Japanese culture as well (many Confucian phrases have) back when Japan borrowed Chinese characters into their language.


This phrase has also been converted into modern Japanese grammar when written as 勇者は懼れず. If you want this version just click on those characters.


See Also:  No Fear

Bravery / Courage

Courage in the face of Fear

 yǒng gǎn
 yuu kan
Bravery / Courage Scroll

勇敢 is about courage or bravery in the face of fear.

You do the right thing even when it is hard or scary. When you are courageous, you don't give up. You try new things. You admit mistakes. This kind of courage is the willingness to take action in the face of danger and peril.

勇敢 can also be translated as braveness, valor, heroic, fearless, boldness, prowess, gallantry, audacity, daring, dauntless, and/or courage in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. This version of bravery/courage can be an adjective or a noun. The first character means bravery and courage by itself. The second character means “daring” by itself. The second character emphasizes the meaning of the first but adds the idea that you are not afraid of taking a dare, and you are not afraid of danger.

勇敢 is more about brave behavior and not so much the mental state of being brave. You'd more likely use this to say, “He fought courageously in the battle,” rather than “He is very courageous.”

Confidence / Faithful Heart

 xìn xīn
 shin jin
Confidence / Faithful Heart Scroll

信心 is a Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word that means confidence, faith, or belief in somebody or something.

The first character means faith, and the second can mean heart or soul. Therefore, you could say this means “faithful heart” or “faithful soul.”

In Korean especially, this word has a religious connotation.

In the old Japanese Buddhist context, this was a word for citta-prasāda (clear or pure heart-mind).
In modern Japan (when read by non-Buddhists), this word is usually understood as “faith,” “belief,” or “devotion.”


See Also:  Self-Confidence

The Confident Helmsman Inspires Confidence in the Passengers

 bǎ tuò de bù huāng chéng chuán de wěn dang
The Confident Helmsman Inspires Confidence in the Passengers Scroll

把舵的不慌乘船的稳当 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as: [If the] helmsman is not nervous, the passengers [will feel] secure.

Figuratively, this means: If the leader appears confident, his/her followers will gain confidence also.

This is a great suggestion that a confident leader inspires confidence in his/her troops or followers. Of course, a nervous leader will create fear in troops or followers.

Danger

A dangerous character in every way

 wēi
 ki
 
Danger Scroll

危 means danger, peril, or “to endanger” in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

If you live a dangerous life or want to subtly warn others that you are a dangerous person, this may be the selection for you.

This also means “danger” and sometimes “fear” in Japanese and Korean but is seldom seen outside of compound words in those languages (as a single character, it's kind of like an abbreviation for danger in Japanese and Korean). 危 is also a rather odd selection for a wall scroll anyway. It's only here because people search for danger on our website.

Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success

Do not fear strong winds waves; just be sure to row in unison

 bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success Scroll

不怕风浪大就怕桨不齐 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as: Do not fear strong winds [and] high waves; what [one should] worry about whether or not you're rowing in unison.

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the task, the key to success lies in making collective efforts.

I like to translate this as “Don't sweat the details, just get together and get it done.”

Fear No Evil

 bú pà xié è
Fear No Evil Scroll

不怕邪惡 literally means “no fear of evil” in Chinese.

Chinese grammar and word order are a little different than English. 不怕邪惡 is the best way to write something that means “fear no evil” in Chinese.

The first character means “not,” “don't” or “no.”
The second means “fear.”
The last two mean “evil” but can also be translated as sinister, vicious, wickedness, or just “bad.”

Fear No Evil

 aku o osore nai
Fear No Evil Scroll

悪を恐れない is “Fear No Evil” in Japanese.

Japanese grammar and phrase construction is different than English, so this literally reads, “Evil Fear Not.”

The “evil” Kanji can also be translated as “wickedness.”


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Fear No Man / Fear Nothing

 wú suǒ wèi jù
Fear No Man / Fear Nothing Scroll

無所畏懼 means “fear nothing,” but it's the closest thing in Chinese to the phrase “fear no man” which many of you have requested.

This would also be the way to say “fear nobody” and can be translated simply as “undaunted.”

 jìng wèi shàng dì
Fear God Scroll

敬畏上帝 is probably the best way to translate the Christian English phrase “Fear God” into Chinese.

The first two characters mean to revere, be in awe of, or a general term of reverence. It can mean fear, but only in the context of respect or fear of authority.

Fearless / Daring

 dai tan fu teki
Fearless / Daring Scroll

大胆不敵 is a Japanese word that can mean a few things depending on how you read it.

Popular translations include fearless, audacity (the attitude of a) daredevil, or daring.

The first two Kanji create a word that means: bold, fearless, or daring; audacious.

The last two Kanji create a word meaning: no match for, cannot beat, daring, fearless, intrepid, bold, or tough.

As with many Japanese words, the two similar-meaning words work together to multiply the meaning and intensity of the whole 4-Kanji word.

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black

 wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100 Scroll

五十步笑百步 is a Chinese proverb that means the one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one who retreats 100 paces.

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, “I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?”

Mencius answered, “Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, “Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces.”

Mencius then said, “You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people, but you are so fond of war that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there any difference?”

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, “The pot calls the kettle black,” or the Biblical phrase, “Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye.”

Joshua 1:9

Do not be afraid, God is always with you

 anata ga doko e iku ni mo anata no kami omo ga tomoni ora reru yue osorete wa naranai ononoite wa naranai
Joshua 1:9 Scroll

あなたがどこへ行くにもあなたの神主が共におられるゆえ恐れてはならないおののいてはならない is a Japanese translation of a large portion of Joshua 1:9.

The Japanese passage includes, “The Lord God is with you wherever you are; Therefore do not fear or be discouraged.”


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles

 teki o shi ri o no o shi re ba hya ku sen aya u ka ra zu
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles Scroll

敵を知り己を知れば百戦危うからず is the longer/full Japanese version of this proverb. This means “Know your enemy, know yourself, and you will not fear a hundred battles.”

Others will translate this as “Know thy enemy, know thyself, yields victory in one hundred battles.”


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Never Give Up

 yǒng bù fàng qì
Never Give Up Scroll

The first character means “eternal” or “forever,” and the second means “not” (together, they mean “never”). The last two characters mean “give up” or “abandon.” Altogether, you can translate this proverb as “never give up” or “never abandon.”

Depending on how you want to read this, 永不放棄 is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family, or friends.


See Also:  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition

 bú pà lù yuǎn zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition Scroll

不怕路遠隻怕志短 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as “Fear not long roads; fear only short ambition,” or “Don't fear that the road is long, only fear that your will/ambition/aspiration is short.”

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the goal is, one can achieve it as long as one is determined to do so.

Others may translate the meaning as “Don't let a lack of willpower stop you from pressing onward in your journey.”

Do not fear poverty; Fear low ambitions

 bú pà rén qióng zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
Do not fear poverty; Fear low ambitions Scroll

不怕人窮隻怕志短 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as: It is not poverty that is to be feared; It is low ambition.

Figuratively, this means: It is not poverty but a lack of lofty aspiration that is to be regretted.

Do not fear being slow, fear standing still

 bú pà màn jiù pà zhàn
Do not fear being slow, fear standing still Scroll

不怕慢就怕站 is a Chinese proverb that translates as: Don't worry about being slow; only worry about standing still.

Figuratively, this means: A slow progress holds some promise but to stand still promises failure.

No Fear

(2 characters)

 wú wèi
 mui
No Fear Scroll

無畏 literally means “No Fear.” But perhaps not the most natural Chinese phrase (see our other “No Fear” phrase for a complete thought). However, this two-character version of “No Fear” seems to be a very popular way to translate this into Chinese when we checked Chinese Google.

Note: This also means “No Fear” in Japanese and Korean, but this character pair is not often used in Japan or Korea.

This term appears in various Chinese dictionaries with definitions like “without fear,” intrepidity, fearless, dauntless, and bold.

In the Buddhist context, this is a word derived from the word Abhaya, meaning: Fearless, dauntless, secure, nothing, and nobody to fear. Also, from vīra meaning: courageous, bold.


See Also:  Never Give Up | No Worries | Undaunted | Bravery | Courage

No Fear

(four-character version)

 yǒng zhě wú wèi
No Fear Scroll

勇者無畏 is a complete sentence that means “Brave People Have No Fear” or “A Brave Person Has No Fear” (plural or singular is not implied).

We translated “No Fear” into the two variations that you will find on our website. Then we checked Chinese Google and found that others had translated “No Fear” in the exact same ways. Pick the one you like best. A great gift for your fearless friend.

 oso re zu
No Fear Scroll

恐れず is probably the best way to express “No Fear” in Japanese.

The first Kanji and the following Hiragana character create a word that means: to fear, to be afraid of, frightened, or terrified.

The last Hiragana character serves to modify and negate the first word (put it in negative form). Basically, they carry a meaning like “without” or “keeping away.” 恐れず is almost like the English modifier “-less.”

Altogether, you get something like “Without Fear” or “Fearless.”

Here's an example of using this in a sentence: 彼女かのじょは思い切ったことを恐れずにやる。
Translation: She is not scared of taking big risks.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Bravery | Courage

No Mind / Mushin

 wú xīn
 mu shin
No Mind / Mushin Scroll

In Japanese, 無心 means innocent or without knowledge of good and evil. It literally means “without mind.”

無心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo) and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: “No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and dos not judge.” The original term was “mushin no shin,” meaning “mind of no mind.” It is a state of mind without fear, anger, or anxiety. Mushin is often described by the phrase “Mizu no Kokoro,” which means “mind like water.” The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects its surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

This has a good meaning in conjunction with Chan / Zen Buddhism in Japan. However, out of that context, it means mindlessness or absent-mindedness. To non-Buddhists in China, this is associated with doing something without thinking.
In Korean, this usually means indifference.

Use caution and know your audience before ordering this selection.


More info: Wikipedia: Mushin

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges

 bǎi zhé bù náo
 hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Scroll

百折不撓 is a Chinese proverb that means “Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks.”

More directly translated, it reads, “[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching.” 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan, and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose the corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and the common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career, a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest, he resigned from his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads “Bai Zhe Bu Nao” which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strong will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as “keep on fighting despite all setbacks,” “be undaunted by repeated setbacks,” and “be indomitable.”

Our translator says it can mean “never give up” in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as “repeated setbacks,” the literal meaning is “100 setbacks” or “a rope that breaks 100 times.” The last two characters can mean “do not yield” or “do not give up.”
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries

 yǒu bèi wú huàn
Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries Scroll

有備無患 means “When you are well-prepared, you have nothing to fear.”

Noting that the third character means “no” or “without” and modifies the last... The last character can mean misfortune, troubles, worries, or fears. It could even be stretched to mean sickness. Therefore you can translate this proverb in a few ways. I've also seen it translated as “Preparedness forestalls calamities.”

有備無患 is comparable to the English idiom, “Better safe than sorry,” but does not directly/literally mean this.

Preparation Yields No Regrets

 sona e a re ba ure i na shi
Preparation Yields No Regrets Scroll

備え有れば憂い無し is as proverb that means “When you are well-prepared, you have nothing to regret” in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Qi Gong / Chi Kung

 qì gōng
 ki kou
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll

氣功 or Qigong is the title of a technique that is somewhere between medical practice, meditation, and in some cases, religion.

The definition is blurred depending on which school of Qigong you are following. In some cases, it is even incorporated with martial arts.

Some people (even Chinese people) mix this title with Tai Chi (Tai Qi) exercises.

Lately, in China, people will claim to practice Tai Chi rather than Qigong because the Qigong title was recently used as a cover for an illegal pseudo-religious movement in China with the initials F.G. or F.D. (I can not write those names here for fear of our website being banned in China).

You can learn those names and more here: Further info about Qigong

If you are wondering why I wrote “Qi Gong” and “Chi Kung” as the title of this calligraphy entry, I should teach you a little about the various ways in which Chinese can be Romanized. One form writes this as “Chi Kung” or “Chikung” (Taiwan). In the mainland and elsewhere, it is Romanized as “Qi Gong” or “Qigong.” The pronunciation is the same in Taiwan, mainland, and Singapore Mandarin. Neither Romanization is exactly like English. If you want to know how to say this with English rules, it would be something like “Chee Gong” (but the “gong” has a vowel sound like the “O” in “go”).

Romanization is a really confusing topic and has caused many Chinese words to be mispronounced in the west. One example is “Kung Pao Chicken,” which should actually be more like “Gong Bao” with the “O” sounding like “oh” for both characters. Neither the Romanization system in Taiwan nor the Mainland is perfect, in my opinion, and leads to many misunderstandings.


In modern Japan, you may see this written as 気功, but the original 氣功 is still recognized. If you need the Japanese version, please contact me.

One who is drenched in rain does not fear drops of dew

 bèi yǔ lín guò de rén bù pà lù shuǐ
One who is drenched in rain does not fear drops of dew Scroll

被雨淋過的人不怕露水 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as “One who has been drenched by the rain is not afraid of dew drops.”

Figuratively, this means:
One who has gone through hardships is not afraid of (minor)setbacks.

Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false

 dǎ pà de rén shì jiǎ de jìng pà de rén shì zhēn de
Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false Scroll

打怕的人是假的敬怕的人是真的 is a proverb that seems to be aimed at world leaders or others in power. Perhaps a suggestion to avoid the practice of “fear-mongering” opting instead for a policy of benevolence and justice.

An example: When the Bush administration told Pakistan they could either join America in the “war on terror,” or expect some bombs to be coming their way, Bush gained this kind of “less-than-genuine respect” from Pakistanis.
Leaders in places like North Korea and even Saudi Arabia reap the same bogus respect from their own citizens.


Note that calligraphers do not like to repeat the same characters in exactly the same way in the same piece of artwork. So expect the characters that are repeated to be written in different forms in the real artwork (unlike the way they are displayed to the left).

The Roar of the Lioness

 hé dōng shī hǒu
The Roar of the Lioness Scroll

河東獅吼 is actually a proverb and joke about the plight and fear of a hen-pecked husband.

In ancient times, it was used to describe a wife who would berate her husband or go into jealous rages. However, this phrase currently brings about ideas of a husband that cowers in fear and cringes when his wife screams (or roars) at him.

Please only purchase this as a good-natured joke. If your wife or husband does not have a good sense of humor, it's probably not a good idea to hang this on your wall to irritate your mate.

Dana: Almsgiving and Generosity

 bù shī
 fuse
Dana: Almsgiving and Generosity Scroll

布施 is the Buddhist practice of giving known as Dāna or दान from Pali and Sanskrit.

Depending on the context, this can be alms-giving, acts of charity, or offerings (usually money) to a priest for reading sutras or teachings.

Some will put Dāna in these two categories:
1. The pure or unsullied charity, which looks for no reward here but only in the hereafter.
2. The sullied almsgiving whose object is personal benefit.
The first kind is, of course, the kind that a liberated or enlightened person will pursue.

Others will put Dāna in these categories:
1. Worldly or material gifts.
2. Unworldly or spiritual gifts.

You can also separate Dāna into these three kinds:
1. 財布施 Goods such as money, food, or material items.
2. 法布施 Dharma, as an act to teach or bestow the Buddhist doctrine onto others.
3. 無畏布施 Courage, as an act of facing fear to save someone or when standing up for someone or standing up for righteousness.

The philosophies and categorization of Dāna will vary among various monks, temples, and sects of Buddhism.

Breaking down the characters separately:
(sometimes written ) means to spread out or announce, but also means cloth. In ancient times, cloth or robs were given to the Buddhist monks annually as a gift of alms - I need to do more research, but I believe there is a relationship here.
means to grant, to give, to bestow, to act, to carry out, and by itself can mean Dāna as a single character.

Dāna can also be expressed as 檀那 (pronounced “tán nà” in Mandarin and dan-na or だんな in Japanese). 檀那 is a transliteration of Dāna. However, it has colloquially come to mean some unsavory or unrelated things in Japanese. So, I think 布施 is better for calligraphy on your wall to remind you to practice Dāna daily (or whenever possible).




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $79.00

Your Price: $43.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad不怕千招會隻怕一招熟
不怕千招会只怕一招熟
bú pà qiān zhāo huì zhǐ pà yī zhāo shú
bu2 pa4 qian1 zhao1 hui4 zhi3 pa4 yi1 zhao1 shu2
bu pa qian zhao hui zhi pa yi zhao shu
pu p`a ch`ien chao hui chih p`a i chao shu
pu pa chien chao hui chih pa i chao shu
Blue Lotus靑蓮
靑莲
seirenqing lián / qing lian2 / qing lian / qinglianch`ing lien / chinglien / ching lien
The Brave Have No Fears勇者不懼
勇者不惧
yuu sha fu ku
yuushafuku
yu sha fu ku
yǒng zhě bú jù
yong3 zhe3 bu2 ju4
yong zhe bu ju
yongzhebuju
yung che pu chü
yungchepuchü
Bravery
Courage
勇敢yuu kan / yuukan / yu kanyǒng gǎn / yong3 gan3 / yong gan / yongganyung kan / yungkan
Confidence
Faithful Heart
信心shin jin / shinjinxìn xīn / xin4 xin1 / xin xin / xinxinhsin hsin / hsinhsin
The Confident Helmsman Inspires Confidence in the Passengers把舵的不慌乘船的穩當
把舵的不慌乘船的稳当
bǎ tuò de bù huāng chéng chuán de wěn dang
ba3 tuo4 de bu4 huang1 cheng2 chuan2 de wen3 dang
ba tuo de bu huang cheng chuan de wen dang
pa t`o te pu huang ch`eng ch`uan te wen tang
pa to te pu huang cheng chuan te wen tang
Dangerkiwēi / wei1 / wei
Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success不怕風浪大就怕槳不齊
不怕风浪大就怕桨不齐
bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
bu4 pa4 feng1 lang4 da4 jiu4 pa4 jiang3 bu4 qi2
bu pa feng lang da jiu pa jiang bu qi
pu p`a feng lang ta chiu p`a chiang pu ch`i
pu pa feng lang ta chiu pa chiang pu chi
Fear No Evil不怕邪惡
不怕邪恶
bú pà xié è
bu2 pa4 xie2 e4
bu pa xie e
bupaxiee
pu p`a hsieh o
pupahsieho
pu pa hsieh o
Fear No Evil悪を恐れないaku o osore nai
akuoosorenai
Fear No Man
Fear Nothing
無所畏懼
无所畏惧
wú suǒ wèi jù
wu2 suo3 wei4 ju4
wu suo wei ju
wusuoweiju
wu so wei chü
wusoweichü
Fear God敬畏上帝jìng wèi shàng dì
jing4 wei4 shang4 di4
jing wei shang di
jingweishangdi
ching wei shang ti
chingweishangti
Fearless
Daring
大膽不敵
大胆不敵
dai tan fu teki
daitanfuteki
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100五十步笑百步wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
wu4 shi2 bu4 xiao4 bai3 bu4
wu shi bu xiao bai bu
wushibuxiaobaibu
wu shih pu hsiao pai pu
wushihpuhsiaopaipu
Joshua 1:9あなたがどこへ行くにもあなたの神主が共におられるゆえ恐れてはならないおののいてはならないanata ga doko e iku ni mo anata no kami omo ga tomoni ora reru yue osorete wa naranai ononoite wa naranai
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles敵を知り己を知れば百戦危うからずteki o shi ri o no o shi re ba hya ku sen aya u ka ra zu
Never Give Up永不放棄
永不放弃
yǒng bù fàng qì
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yong bu fang qi
yongbufangqi
yung pu fang ch`i
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition不怕路遠隻怕志短
不怕路远只怕志短
bú pà lù yuǎn zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
bu2 pa4 lu4 yuan3 zhi3 pa4 zhi4 duan3
bu pa lu yuan zhi pa zhi duan
bupaluyuanzhipazhiduan
pu p`a lu yüan chih p`a chih tuan
pu pa lu yüan chih pa chih tuan
Do not fear poverty; Fear low ambitions不怕人窮隻怕志短
不怕人穷只怕志短
bú pà rén qióng zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
bu2 pa4 ren2 qiong2 zhi3 pa4 zhi4 duan3
bu pa ren qiong zhi pa zhi duan
buparenqiongzhipazhiduan
pu p`a jen ch`iung chih p`a chih tuan
pu pa jen chiung chih pa chih tuan
Do not fear being slow, fear standing still不怕慢就怕站bú pà màn jiù pà zhàn
bu2 pa4 man4 jiu4 pa4 zhan4
bu pa man jiu pa zhan
bupamanjiupazhan
pu p`a man chiu p`a chan
pupamanchiupachan
pu pa man chiu pa chan
No Fear無畏
无畏
muiwú wèi / wu2 wei4 / wu wei / wuwei
No Fear勇者無畏
勇者无畏
yǒng zhě wú wèi
yong3 zhe3 wu2 wei4
yong zhe wu wei
yongzhewuwei
yung che wu wei
yungchewuwei
No Fear恐れずoso re zu / osorezu
No Mind
Mushin
無心
无心
mu shin / mushinwú xīn / wu2 xin1 / wu xin / wuxinwu hsin / wuhsin
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries有備無患
有备无患
yǒu bèi wú huàn
you3 bei4 wu2 huan4
you bei wu huan
youbeiwuhuan
yu pei wu huan
yupeiwuhuan
Preparation Yields No Regrets備え有れば憂い無しsona e a re ba ure i na shi
sonaearebaureinashi
Qi Gong
Chi Kung
氣功
气功
ki kou / kikou / ki koqì gōng / qi4 gong1 / qi gong / qigongch`i kung / chikung / chi kung
One who is drenched in rain does not fear drops of dew被雨淋過的人不怕露水
被雨淋过的人不怕露水
bèi yǔ lín guò de rén bù pà lù shuǐ
bei4 yu3 lin2 guo4 de ren2 bu4 pa4 lu4 shui3
bei yu lin guo de ren bu pa lu shui
pei yü lin kuo te jen pu p`a lu shui
pei yü lin kuo te jen pu pa lu shui
Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false打怕的人是假的敬怕的人是真的dǎ pà de rén shì jiǎ de jìng pà de rén shì zhēn de
da3 pa4 de ren2 shi4 jia3 de jing4 pa4 de ren2 shi4 zhen1 de
da pa de ren shi jia de jing pa de ren shi zhen de
ta p`a te jen shih chia te ching p`a te jen shih chen te
ta pa te jen shih chia te ching pa te jen shih chen te
The Roar of the Lioness河東獅吼
河东狮吼
hé dōng shī hǒu
he2 dong1 shi1 hou3
he dong shi hou
hedongshihou
ho tung shih hou
hotungshihhou
Dana: Almsgiving and Generosity布施fusebù shī / bu4 shi1 / bu shi / bushipu shih / pushih
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Dictionary

Lookup Fear No Man in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

1 Corinthians 13:4-8A Journey of a Thousand MilesAadonAaronAbbiAbbieAbhishekAbiolaAbirAbramAbubakarAdelinAdriannaAdrielAguilarAhnaAikoAileeAilsaAimanAimeeAizaAjmalAkashAkemiAkiraAlaraAliaAliceAlinAlishaAlone Solitary ExistenceAloraAlvinAlways Striving for Inner StrengthAlways Try to Do BetterAlyxAlyzeaAmanAmbroseAmnaAmparoAnahiAnalynAndyAngelAngelicaAngelieAnjaliAnjiAnnabelleAnthonyAnupArchieAriaAriesArinaArleneArminArmstrongArnaArt of WarArunArvanAshantiAsheAshleyAsserAudreyAvengerAveryAyanAyeshaAzureAzzyBe Like WaterBe True to YourselfBeautiful MindBeccaBellaBenaBennyBhumikaBibekBibiBlacksmithBlessed by GodBlessingsBlood Sweat and TearsBrave the Wind and the WavesBritneyBrockBrotherhoodBruce LeeBrysonBubbaBuddhaBujinkanBushido CodeCainCalmCalm and Open MindCalm MindCancerCao Kusa GrassCarlCarleneCarolCarolineCarolynCatherineCathyCelestialCharleneChaudharyChesterChristianityChristineChristopherChristyCillianCleoCompassionConnieCosmoCraneDaleDalenDamionDaniaDanisDaodejingDarnellDarumaDe LeonDeath Before DishonorDeath Before SurrenderDebbieDedicationDeepikaDelilahDennisDennyDestinyDeterminationDevil DogDevinDiamondDickinsonDisneyDonatelloDoodDougDouglasDragon FistDragon HeartDragon WarriorDream BigDuranDwayneEarth DragonEgorElenaEliasEliesElisaElizaEllaEllieEmilyEmma-RoseEmperorEmptinessEnjoy LifeEnso CircleErwinEshaEternal FriendshipEternal LifeEternal PeaceEuniceEverleighEverything Happens for a ReasonEvil Cause Evil ResultFailure is Not an OptionFaithFaith in GodFalineFall Down 7 Times Get Up 8Fall in Love With Yourself FirstFamily FirstFamily is My StrengthFamily Over EverythingFear No EvilFelixFernandoFire and Water Have No MercyFire DragonFire SnakeFischl

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Fear No Man Kanji, Fear No Man Characters, Fear No Man in Mandarin Chinese, Fear No Man Characters, Fear No Man in Chinese Writing, Fear No Man in Japanese Writing, Fear No Man in Asian Writing, Fear No Man Ideograms, Chinese Fear No Man symbols, Fear No Man Hieroglyphics, Fear No Man Glyphs, Fear No Man in Chinese Letters, Fear No Man Hanzi, Fear No Man in Japanese Kanji, Fear No Man Pictograms, Fear No Man in the Chinese Written-Language, or Fear No Man in the Japanese Written-Language.

369 people have searched for Fear No Man in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Fear No Man was last searched for by someone else on Feb 22nd, 2024