Cause in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Cause calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Cause” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Cause” title below...


  1. Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause

  2. Karma - Cause and Effect

  3. Passion for a Cause

  4. Evil Cause, Evil Result

  5. Diligence

  6. Everything Happens for a Reason

  7. Enthusiasm

  8. Extreme Faithfulness

  9. Solidarity / Working Together as One

10. The Mysterious Bond Between People

11. Strive / Struggle

12. Karma Connection

13. Rago

14. Ardent / Fierce

15. Enjoy Life

16. Dim Mak

17. Dynamic

18. Sworn Friend / Ally

19. Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

20. Diligence

21. Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication

22. No Pain No Gain

23. Fate / Opportunity / Chance

24. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81

25. Better Late Than Never


Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause

qíng rè
jou netsu
Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause Scroll

情熱 is the Japanese word that means enthusiasm, or "passion for a cause".

In some context, this could have a meaning of being extremely fond of something, or having fondness for a cause or person.

Can also be translated as passion, zeal, ardour, or fervor.

Note: 情熱 order is not natural in Chinese. However, a typical Chinese person can guess that this is a Japanese or Korean word and also understand the intended the meaning. This selection is best if your audience is Japanese or old-school Korean.


See Also:  Persistence | Devotion | Tenacity | Commitment | Motivation

Karma - Cause and Effect

yīn guǒ
inga
Karma - Cause and Effect Scroll

因果 is a label that is used inside and outside of the Buddhist faith to speak of Karma.

Along with the meaning of Karma, this word can be translated as "retribution" or "chain of cause and effect".


See Also:  Buddhism

Passion for a Cause

rè qíng
netsujou
Passion for a Cause Scroll

Depending on context, this word can mean "cordial", "enthusiastic", "passionate" or "passionately".

This version is sometimes used in Japanese but the character order is more common in Chinese and Korean Hanja. The meaning in Japanese for this Kanji order is "ardour" or "zeal" but rarely used in modern Japan. I suggest you choose a different version of "passion" if your audience is Japanese.


See Also:  Persistence | Devotion | Tenacity | Commitment | Motivation

Evil Cause, Evil Result

Meaning: You reap what you sow
akuin akka
Evil Cause, Evil Result Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "Evil cause, evil effect" or "Bad causes bring bad results".

The English equivalent is probably, "Sow evil and reap evil" or more commonly, "You reap what you sow".

Note: 悪因悪果 is also considered to be a Buddhist phrase encompassing the idea of karmic retribution.

qín miǎn
kinben
Diligence Scroll

勤勉 can be translated as diligence, industrious, assiduity, assiduous, diligent, or sedulity.

Diligence is working hard and doing your absolute best. You take special care by doing things step by step. Diligence helps you to get things done with excellence and enthusiasm. Diligence leads to success.


See Also:  Hard Work | Tenacity | Commitment

Everything Happens for a Reason

wàn shì jiē yīn guǒ
Everything Happens for a Reason Scroll

The first two characters mean "all things" or "everything".

The middle character kind of means, "in all cases".

The last two characters create a complex word that can be defined many ways such as, "karma", "cause and effect", "fate", "every cause has its effect, as every effect arises from a cause".

Keep in mind, Chinese grammar is a bit different than English, so trust me that this makes a natural proverb that means, "Everything happens for a reason" in Chinese.

rè qíng
Enthusiasm Scroll

This Chinese and Korean word for enthusiasm can also be translated as passion (for a cause), ardency, ardour, enthusiasm, or zeal.

Enthusiasm is being warm, cheerful, happy, and full of spirit. It is doing something wholeheartedly and eagerly. When you are enthusiastic, you have a positive attitude.

In some context, this could have a meaning of being extremely fond of something or having a fondness for a cause or person.


This Chinese word can also be translated as "sincere and warm" or literally "warm sentiment / affection."


See Also:  Motivation | Passion | Commitment | Tenacity

Extreme Faithfulness

tei retsu
Extreme Faithfulness Scroll

貞烈 is the Japanese Kanji for, "Extreme Faithfulness".

The first Kanji means "firm adherence to one's principles", chastity (of a woman), chaste, etc.

The second Kanji means ardent, intense, fierce, stern, upright, to give one's life for a noble cause, exploits, achievements, virtuous, and in some contexts, heroic.

Now you get the idea why this refers to someone who is extremely faithful (to a cause, themselves, their religious beliefs, or their philosophy.

Solidarity / Working Together as One

icchidanketsu
Solidarity / Working Together as One Scroll

This Japanese phrase means solidarity, or "banding together and working as one for a common cause".

The Mysterious Bond Between People

The invisible force that brings people together forever
yuán
en
The Mysterious Bond Between People Scroll

緣 represents the fate that brings and bonds people together.

緣 is a complicated single character. It can mean a lot of different things depending on how you read it.

In Japanese, it can mean fate, destiny, a mysterious force that binds two people together, a relationship between two people, bond, link, connection, family ties, affinity, opportunity, chance (to meet someone and start a relationship). It can also mean "someone to rely on", relative, reminder, memento, or the female given name, Yori.

It's basically the same in Chinese, where it's defined as cause, reason, karma, fate, or predestined affinity.

In the Buddhist context, it's Pratyaya. 緣 / 縁 is the concept of indirect conditions, as opposed to direct causes. It's when something happens (meeting someone) by circumstance or a contributing environment. Instead of a direct cause or act, it is a conditioning cause without direct input or action by the involved people.

Occasionally, this character is used in a facetious way to say hem, seam, or edge of clothing. In this case, it's the seam that brings or holds the clothing together.


縁Note: Japanese will tend to use the variant of this Kanji shown to the right. If you want this version (and are ordering this from the Japanese master calligrapher), click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above.

Strive / Struggle

fèn dòu
Strive / Struggle Scroll

奮鬥 means strive (as in to put great effort into something or a cause).

It can also be translated as a struggle.


斗 The second character of this word can also be written as shown to the right. Yes. it’s very different. If you want this alternate version, just let us know when you place your order (in the special instructions).

Strive / Struggle

fun tou
Strive / Struggle Scroll

奮闘 is the Japanese version of a word that means strive (as in to put great effort into something or a cause).

It can also be translated as struggle. There's a very similar version used in Chinese with same meaning.

Karma Connection

yǒu yuán
uen
Karma Connection Scroll

有緣 means: related; brought together by fate; same karma; those who have the cause, link, or connection.

有緣 is a common word in Chinese but usually only used in the context of Buddhism in Japanese.

Buddhists will say this refers to those that are influenced by and responsive to the Buddha.

luó hóu
ragou
Rago Scroll

羅喉 is a Japanese personal name, Rago.

The meaning can be the intersection of the Moon's orbit with the ecliptic in Vedic astronomy (from Sanskrit Rāhu). In Buddhist context, this can be, "the demon who is supposed to seize the sun and moon and thus cause eclipses".

羅喉 is a variant of the Chinese 羅睺. It can also be written 羅護 or 羅虎. If you need the more ancient Chinese version, just let me know.

Ardent / Fierce

liè
retsu
Ardent / Fierce Scroll

This Chinese word means ardent; intense; fierce; stern; upright; to give one's life for a noble cause.

In another context, this character can refer to one's exploits or achievements.

In Buddhist context, this is burning, fierce, virtuous and/or heroic.

While technically, it had the same meaning in Japanese, it's usually a female given name, Retsu in Japanese these days.

jin sei o tano shi mi ni shi te i ru
Enjoy Life Scroll

This is one way to write "enjoy life" in Japanese.

The character breakdown:
人生 (jinsei) life (i.e. conception to death) human lifetime, living.
を (o) connecting particle.
楽しみ (tanoshimi) enjoyment; pleasure; anticipation; looking forward to.
に (ni) connecting particle.
し (shi) to do; to cause; to become; to make (into).
て (te) connecting particle.
いる (iru) indicates continuing action or resulting state.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

diǎn mài
dim mak
Dim Mak Scroll

Dim Mak or 點脈 is a martial arts term that refers to hitting a pressure point.

It is often theorized that hitting just the right (or wrong) pressure point can cause instant death. Hence, I have seen Dim Mak mistranslated as "death punch" or "touch of death". But really, this is just the point (點) of pulse or meridian (脈) - aka pressure point.


See Also:  點穴

Dynamic

Moving / Motion / Ever-Changing
dòng
dou
Dynamic Scroll

動 is the only Chinese/Japanese/Korean word that can encompass the idea of "dynamic" into one character.

動 can also mean:
to use; to act; to move; to change; motion; stir.

In Buddhist context, it means: Movement arises from the nature of wind which is the cause of motion.

The key point of this word is that it represents motion or always moving. Some might say "lively" or certainly the opposite of something that is stagnant or dead.

Note: In Japanese, this can also be a female given name, Yurugi.

Sworn Friend / Ally

méng yǒu
meiyuu
Sworn Friend / Ally Scroll

盟友 means a sworn friend or ally. If you stand on the same side of an issue with someone, and perhaps fight for the same cause together, this is the term you would use to describe such a partner.

There may not be a personal relationship, as this term is also used to describe whole countries that make a coalition, or fight against a common enemy.

This would be most appropriate if you are a high-level military officer, giving this wall scroll to an officer of another country as you join forces together, and go to war.

Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself

zì ài
ji ai
Self-Love / Love Yourself / Love Onself Scroll

This title means: self-love; self-regard; regard for oneself; to cherish one's good name; taking care of oneself.

In Buddhist context, this is the cause of all pursuit or seeking, which in turn causes all suffering. All Buddhas discharge themselves from self-love and all pursuits of personal gratification. Such elimination of self-love is a step towards nirvāṇa.

This title can be taken as positive or negative, depending on how you read it. Some will see it as arrogant, others will read it as a token of self-respect. Because of this ambiguity, I do not recommend this title for a wall scroll.

qín
kin
Diligence Scroll

This single-character means diligence or "sense of duty" in Chinese and Korean (also understood in Japanese but not commonly-seen as a stand-alone Kanji).

As a single character on a wall scroll, this will only be seen with this meaning. However, it can also mean industrious, hardworking, frequent, regular, constant, energy, zeal, fortitude, or virility.

In Buddhism this can represent vīrya (viriya), the idea of energy, diligence, enthusiasm, or effort. It can be defined as an attitude of gladly engaging in wholesome activities, and it functions to cause one to accomplish wholesome or virtuous actions. Some Buddhists may even define this as "manliness" (a definition from a hundred years ago, before equality).

If you, or someone you know is a hard-worker (or needs a reminder to be diligent), then this is the wall scroll to have in your/their office.


See Also:  Tenacity | Undaunted

Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication

(complete bodily devotion)
xiàn shēn
ken shin
Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication Scroll

獻身 is used to describe being so devoted to something that you will make sacrifices for that goal/thing/person.

You can also translate this word as any of the following:

Give one's life for...
Sacrifice one's life for...
To dedicate oneself to...
Self-devotion
Dedication
Commit ones energy to...
Devote to...
Self-sacrifice
Giving your whole body to...

This can be a dedication to or for someone but more often is used in reference to a dedication or making sacrifices for your country, public service, or a cause. For instance, an Olympic athlete makes great sacrifices to train in his/her sport for their country and compatriots.


献
身
While the form shown to the upper-left is considered an ancient Japanese version, in modern Japan, they use the simplified version of the first Kanji (shown to the right). Click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version.

If you are looking for a more religious meaning of devotion, see Faith.


See Also:  Confidence | Dedication

No Pain No Gain

itami naku shite erumono wa nashi
No Pain No Gain Scroll

This Japanese phrase means "no pain, no gain".

Literally, this suggests that with pain, a gain must follow.

The pain Kanji here can also be translated as sorrow or suffering. The gain can also mean profit, advantage, or benefit. In Japanese Buddhist context, that gain Kanji can mean rebirth in paradise, entering nirvana.

The character break down:
痛みなく (itami naku) pain; ache; sore; grief; distress. The naku part adds a meaning of "a lot of" or "extended"
して (shite) and then. (indicates a causative expression; acts as a connective particle)
得る (eru) to get; to acquire; to obtain; to procure; to earn; to win; to gain; to secure; to attain.
もの (mono) conjunctive particle indicating a cause or reason.
なし (nashi) none of; -less; without; no.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Fate / Opportunity / Chance

Buddhist idea of Fate
yīn yuán
in nen
Fate / Opportunity / Chance Scroll

因緣 is the Buddhist concept of a chance meeting or an opportunity that presents itself by fate.

Sometimes this is used to describe a cosmic chain of events or cause and effect.

It also is used to describe predestined relationships between people - and sometimes married couples (although if you want one about marriage, try this: Fate / Destiny of Lovers.

因緣 can also be translated as origin, karma, destiny, affinity, connection, and relation. This all depends on context - seen alone on a wall scroll, this will be read with a "fate / chance" meaning by a Chinese person, or a Korean person who can read Hanja.

The more complex definition of this word would be, "Direct causes and indirect conditions, which underlie the actions of all things".

This concept is known as nidana in the original Sanskrit. Also sometimes presented as hetupratyaya (or "hetu and prataya") which I believe is Pali.


Note: Japanese will tend to use this version of the second Kanji: 縁
If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect that you’ll get this version. However, this word often carries a negative connotation in Japanese (bad things happen), as it is used that way in a certain Japanese idiom. Therefore, this may not be the best choice if Japanese is your target language.


See Also:  Buddhism | Opportunity

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81 Scroll

信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭 is the Mawangdui version of Daodejing chapter 81.

It can be translated this way:
Credible words are not eloquent;
Eloquent words are not credible.

The wise are not erudite;
The erudite are not wise.

The adept are not all-around;
The all-around are not adept.
The sages do not accumulate things.
Yet the more they have done for others,
The more they have gained themselves;
The more they have given to others,
The more they have gotten themselves.

Thus, the way of tian (heaven) is to benefit without harming;
The way of sages is to do without contending.
Another translation:
Sincere words are not showy;
showy words are not sincere.
Those who know are not "widely learned";
those "widely learned" do not know.
The good do not have a lot;
Those with a lot are not good.
The Sage accumulates nothing.
Having used what he had for others,
he has even more.
Having given what he had to others,
what he has is even greater.
Therefore, the Way of Heaven is to benefit and not cause any harm,
The Way of Man is to act on behalf of others and not to compete with them.
And a third translation:
True words aren't charming,
charming words aren't true.
Good people aren't contentious,
contentious people aren't good.
People who know aren't learned,
learned people don't know.
Wise souls don't hoard;
the more they do for others the more they have,
the more they give the richer they are.
The Way of heaven provides without destroying.
Doing without outdoing
is the Way of the wise.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins".

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation". The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence".

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Enthusiasm
Passion for a Cause
情熱
情热
jou netsu / jounetsu / jo netsu / jonetsuqíng rè / qing2 re4 / qing re / qingrech`ing je / chingje / ching je
Karma - Cause and Effect因果ingayīn guǒ / yin1 guo3 / yin guo / yinguoyin kuo / yinkuo
Passion for a Cause熱情
热情
netsujou / netsujorè qíng / re4 qing2 / re qing / reqingje ch`ing / jeching / je ching
Evil Cause, Evil Result悪因悪果akuin akka / akuinakka / akuin aka / akuinaka
Diligence勤勉kinbenqín miǎn / qin2 mian3 / qin mian / qinmianch`in mien / chinmien / chin mien
Everything Happens for a Reason萬事皆因果
万事皆因果
wàn shì jiē yīn guǒ
wan4 shi4 jie1 yin1 guo3
wan shi jie yin guo
wanshijieyinguo
wan shih chieh yin kuo
wanshihchiehyinkuo
Enthusiasm熱情
热情
rè qíng / re4 qing2 / re qing / reqingje ch`ing / jeching / je ching
Extreme Faithfulness貞烈tei retsu / teiretsu
Solidarity
Working Together as One
一致団結icchidanketsu
ichidanketsu
The Mysterious Bond Between People緣 / 縁
enyuán / yuan2 / yuanyüan
Strive
Struggle
奮鬥 / 奮斗
奋斗 / 奋鬥
fèn dòu / fen4 dou4 / fen dou / fendoufen tou / fentou
Strive
Struggle
奮闘 / 奮鬥
奋斗 / 奋鬥
fun tou / funtou / fun to / funto
Karma Connection有緣
有缘
uenyǒu yuán / you3 yuan2 / you yuan / youyuanyu yüan / yuyüan
Rago羅喉ragou / ragoluó hóu / luo2 hou2 / luo hou / luohoulo hou / lohou
Ardent
Fierce
retsuliè / lie4 / lielieh
Enjoy Life人生を楽しみにしているjin sei o tano shi mi ni shi te i ru
Dim Mak點脈
点脉
diǎn mài / dian3 mai4 / dian mai / dianmaitien mai / tienmai
Dynamic
dou / dodòng / dong4 / dongtung
Sworn Friend
Ally
盟友meiyuu / meiyuméng yǒu / meng2 you3 / meng you / mengyoumeng yu / mengyu
Self-Love
Love Yourself
Love Onself
自愛
自爱
ji ai / jiaizì ài / zi4 ai4 / zi ai / ziaitzu ai / tzuai
Diligencekinqín / qin2 / qinch`in / chin
Sacrifice
Devotion
Dedication
獻身
献身
ken shin / kenshinxiàn shēn
xian4 shen1
xian shen
xianshen
hsien shen
hsienshen
No Pain No Gain痛みなくして得るものなしitami naku shite erumono wa nashi
Fate
Opportunity
Chance
因緣
因缘 / 因縁
in nen / innenyīn yuán / yin1 yuan2 / yin yuan / yinyuanyin yüan / yinyüan
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善圣人无积既以为人己愈有既以予人矣已愈多故天之道利而不害圣人之道为而不争
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


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Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll


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Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Better Late Than Never Horizontal Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

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