Buddhism in Chinese / Japanese...

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  1. Buddhism

  2. Buddhism / Buddha

  3. Buddha / Buddhism

  4. Pure Land Buddhism / Jodo Buddhism

  5. Shin Buddhism

  6. Reincarnation

  7. Four Noble Truths

  8. The Principles of Buddhism

  9. Zen Buddhism

10. Three Treasures of Buddhism

11. Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

12. Appreciation of Truth by Meditation

13. 2. Right Resolve / Right Thought / Right Intention / Perfect Resolve

14. Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering

15. Pure Land / Jodo

16. Karma

17. 1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View

18. 3. Right Speech / Right Talk / Perfect Speech

19. 8. Right Concentration / Perfect Concentration

20. 6. Right Effort / Right Endeavor / Perfect Effort

21. 5. Right Living / Right Livelihood / Perfect Livelihood

22. 4. Right Action / Perfect Conduct

23. 7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness

24. Karma

25. Karma - Cause and Effect

26. Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment

27. Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment

28. Goddess of Mercy and Compassion

29. The Noble Eightfold Path

30. Fate / Opportunity / Chance

31. Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls

32. Goddess of Mercy and Compassion

33. Sangha

34. Truth Flashed Through The Mind

35. Meditation

36. Zen / Chan / Meditation

37. Zen Contemplation

38. Inner Bliss and Peace from Meditation

39. Sit in Meditation

40. Bodhisattva

41. Impermanence

42. Nothingness

43. Mercy / Compassion / Love

44. Dharma / The Law

45. Sangha / Order of Monks

46. Dharma / Buddhist Doctrine

47. Goddess of Compassion

48. Reach Peace and Calm by Meditation

49. Seeking Truth

50. Shakyamuni / The Buddha

51. Zen Understanding

52. Goddess of Compassion

53. Buddhist Monk

54. Nirvana

55. Shakyamuni / The Buddha

56. All Tenets of the Noble Eightfold Path


Buddhism

(2 characters)

fó jiào
Buddhism Scroll

佛教 is the more exact way to express the religion or lifestyle of Buddhism.

It can also be read as "Buddha's Teachings". 佛教 is Chinese only, as a different character is more commonly used in Japanese to express Buddhism. The same first character is used in Korea but a slight variation exists in the second character in Korean Hanja. However, it would be fully recognized by any Korean person who can read Hanja.

Buddhism

(2 Kanji)

bukkyou
Buddhism Scroll

仏教 can mean Buddha or Buddhism in Japanese.

Depending on context, this word can be used to refer to the religion and lifestyle of Buddhism, or in some cases, the Buddha himself.

Note: Until the 5th century, Japan did not have a written language. At that time, Japan absorbed Chinese characters to form their written language (these characters are known as "Kanji" in Japanese). The first character of this Buddhism title was actually a shorthand way to write 佛 (Buddha) in Chinese (popular around the 13th century). Somehow, this became the version of this character that was absorbed into Japanese, and thus became part of standard Kanji. Centuries later, this character is not recognized in Chinese at all.

仏 is also a rare form of Buddha Korean Hanja - though seldom used even when the Korean Hanja writing system was more common 100 years ago.

Buddhism / Buddha

hotoke
Buddhism / Buddha Scroll

佛 is the essence of the Buddha or Buddhism.

Depending on context, this word and character can be used to refer to the religion and lifestyle of Buddhism, or in some cases, the Buddha himself.

It is interesting to note that this word is separate from all others in the Chinese language. The sound of "fo" has only this meaning. 佛 is in contrast to many sounds in the Chinese language which can have one of four tones, and more than 20 possible characters and meanings. This language anomaly shows just how significant Buddhism has affected China since the ancient times.

More about Buddhism

佛 is also used with the same meaning in Korean Hanja.

It's used in the very religious context of Buddhism in Japan. It should be noted that there are two forms of this Kanji in use in Japan - this is the more formal/ancient version but it's rarely seen outside of religious artwork, and may not be recognized by all Japanese people.

It also acts as a suffix or first syllable for many Buddhist-related words in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.


See our Buddhism & Zen page


See Also:  Bodhisattva | Enlightenment

Buddha / Buddhism

Hotoke

hotoke / butsu
Buddha / Buddhism Scroll

仏 is the single Japanese Kanji can mean Buddha or Buddhism.

This Kanji was actually a shorthand way to write 佛 (Buddha) in Chinese (popular around the 13th century). Somehow, this became the version of this Chinese character that was absorbed into Japanese, and thus became part of standard Kanji. Centuries later, this character is not recognized in Chinese at all (except by those from China with a background in Chinese literature or language).

仏 is also a rare or derivative Korean Hanja form - but I doubt you will find any Korean that knows that.

Pure Land Buddhism / Jodo Buddhism

jìng tǔ zōng
jou do shuu
Pure Land Buddhism / Jodo Buddhism Scroll

淨土宗 is the title of Japanese "Pure Land Buddhism". This form is also romanized/known as "Jodo Shu" (jōdo shū).

Also known as Amidism for the fact that this is a branch of Mahayana (Mahāyāna) Buddhism which focuses on Amitabha (Amitābha) Buddha. This form of Buddhism, along with Chinese characters, came to Japan via China in the 5th century according to most historians.


Notes:
Pure Land Buddhism is also known as 浄土仏教 (jōdo bukkyō).
Some will just express it with just 浄土 (Pure Land).


See Also:  Shin Buddhism

Shin Buddhism

True Pure Land Buddhism

jou do shin shuu
Shin Buddhism Scroll

Known in the west as "Shin Buddhism", this is a school of Japanese "Pure Land Buddhism". This form is also known as "True Pure Land Buddhism" or "Jodoshinshu" (jōdoshinshū).

If you are looking for this title, you probably already know the rest of the story.


See Also:  Pure Land Buddhism

Reincarnation (Buddhism)

zhuǎn shì
ten sei
Reincarnation (Buddhism) Scroll

轉世 is the Buddhist idea of reincarnation or transmigration.

Other definitions of this term: "Attainer of Nirvana from within the desire realm", "A practitioner who enters directly into Nirvana from the desire realm, without traversing the form and formless realms. One of the 27 kinds of Hinayana sages", or simply, "to return again to this life".

轉世 is also a Japanese title but the first Kanji was slightly simplified after WWII. Just let us know if you want the modern Japanese version when you order.


See Also:  Buddhism | Rebirth

Four Noble Truths (Buddhism)

sì dì
shitai
Four Noble Truths (Buddhism) Scroll

四諦 is the title of the Four Noble Truths as taught in virtually all sects of Buddhism.

These truths are suffering (dukkha), desire/attachment (samudaya), release from desire/attachment (nirodha), and the path leading away from suffering (magga).

The suggestion behind these truths is that all things in nature suffer. All things in nature have desire and attachment for things in the physical world. The enlightened can release themselves from the bonds of desire and attachment. And finally, once they release all desire and attachment, the enlightened will find a path that leads away from suffering.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese, Chinese, and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

The Principles of Buddhism

fó yì
butsu gi
The Principles of Buddhism Scroll

In short, 佛義 is the Principles of Buddhism, but there is more (especially for the second character):

佛 is the character for the Buddha and Buddhism.

義 has deeper meanings including: Justice, righteousness, morality, honour/honor, teachings, doctrine, right, proper, righteous, loyalty, significance object, purpose, and/or meaning. So the single word "principles" is often used to encompass all of these ideas.

Zen Buddhism

chán zōng
zen shuu
Zen Buddhism Scroll

禪宗 is one way to title "Zen Buddhism". Because the original pronunciation of Zen in Chinese is Chan, you'll also see this expressed as Chan Buddhism.

From the Buddhist Dictionary:
The Chan, meditative or intuitional, sect usually said to have been established in China by Bodhidharma, the twenty-eighth patriarch, who brought the tradition of the Buddha-mind from India. This sect, believing in direct enlightenment, disregarded ritual and sūtras and depended upon the inner light and personal influence for the propagation of its tenets, founding itself on the esoteric tradition supposed to have been imparted to Kāśyapa by the Buddha, who indicated his meaning by plucking a flower without further explanation. Kāśyapa smiled in apprehension and is supposed to have passed on this mystic method to the patriarchs. The successor of Bodhidharma was 慧可 Huike, and he was succeeded by 僧璨 Sengcan; 道信 Daoxin; 弘忍 Hongren; 慧能 Huineng, and 神秀 Shenxiu, the sect dividing under the two latter into the southern and northern schools: the southern school became prominent, producing 南嶽 Nanyue and 靑原 Qingyuan, the former succeeded by 馬祖 Mazu, the latter by 石頭 Shitou. From Mazu's school arose the five later schools.

Three Treasures of Buddhism

The Triple Gem

sān bǎo
san bou
Three Treasures of Buddhism Scroll

三寶 is the title for "Three Precious Treasures of Buddhism" or "The Triple Gem".

These three treasures are the Buddha 佛, the Dharma 法 (teachings or the law of the Buddha), and the Sangha 僧 (the community of monks or followers).

This term is used by most (perhaps not all) Buddhists in China, Japan, and South Korea (written the same it the original form, but pronounced differently in each language). Non-Buddhists may just read this as, "Three Treasures", without the religious context. For instance, there is also a, "Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine", that is sometimes titled the same way.


In modern Japanese and Simplified Chinese, this is written 三宝 instead of 三寶.

Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyou na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba houshi to omoi yari no seishin
Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism Scroll

人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神 is the Triple Truth of Buddhism in Japanese.

The Buddha ordered that all should know this triple truth...
A generous heart, kind speech, and a life of service and compassion are the things which renew humanity.

人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神 is the English translation most commonly used for this Japanese Buddhist phrase. You might have seen this on a coffee cup or tee-shirt.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Appreciation of Truth by Meditation

xīn yìn
shin nin
Appreciation of Truth by Meditation Scroll

心印 is a Buddhist concept that simply stated is "appreciation of truth by meditation".

It's a deep subject, but my understanding is that you can find truth through meditation, and once you've found the truth, you can learn to appreciate it more through further meditation. This title is not commonly used outside of the Buddhist community (your Asian friends may or may not understand it). The literal translation would be something like "the mind seal", I've seen this term translated this way from Japanese Buddhist poetry. But apparently, the seal that is stamped deep in your mind is the truth. You just have to meditate to find it.

Soothill defines it this way: Mental impression, intuitive certainty; the mind is the Buddha-mind in all, which can seal or assure the truth; the term indicates the intuitive method of the Chan (Zen) school, which was independent of the spoken or written word.


Reference: Soothill-Hodous Dictionary of Chinese Buddhism


See Also:  Zen

2. Right Resolve / Right Thought / Right Intention / Perfect Resolve

Samyak Samkalpa / Samma Sankappa

zhèng sī wéi
sei shi yui
2. Right Resolve / Right Thought / Right Intention / Perfect Resolve Scroll

正思唯 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Thought, along with Right View constitute the path to Wisdom.

In Buddhism, Right Thought in simple terms means to free yourself from having ill-will towards anyone or anything. It also suggests that you remain harmless to other living creatures.

This can also be defined as, "Resolve in favor of renunciation, good will, and non-harming of sentient beings".


惟There is an ancient/alternate version of the third character for this selection. You can see that alternation third character to the right. If you want your selection to use that older character, just click on the character to the right, instead of the button above.

Note: This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering

Magga

dào dì
doutai
Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering Scroll

Once you have dealt with your desires and left all desire and attachment behind, only then are on you the path away from suffering (and on your way to enlightenment).

道諦 is also called the path to liberation in some English texts on Buddhism.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Chinese, Japanese and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Pure Land / Jodo

Also a sect of Buddhism

jìng tǔ
jou do
Pure Land / Jodo Scroll

This literally means "pure land" or "clean earth".

淨土 is also the abbreviated title of a Buddhist sect which involves faith in rebirth of Buddha Amitabha (Amitābha) in the Western Heaven. Sometimes this sect is translated as "Paradise of the West". Other titles of this school of Buddhism include Amidism or Elvsium.


See Also:  Nirvana | Shin Buddhism

Karma

Single character for Buddhist Karma

gou
Karma Scroll

業 is the simplest way to express the idea of Karma. 業 is the Buddhist concept of actions committed in a former life affecting the present and future.

Out of the context of Buddhism, this Karma character means one's profession in life, trade, occupation, business, study, or career.

The Karma definition applies to both Chinese and Japanese for this character. This also works as Korean Hanja as Karma; although the meaning can vary depending on context (my Korean dictionary gives the definition of profession/occupation).


See Also:  Buddhism

1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View

Samyag Dristhi / Samyag Drsti / Samma Ditthi

zhèng jiàn
sei ken
1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View Scroll

正見 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right View, along with Right Thought constitutes the path to Wisdom.

To get to the right view of the world, you must first understand and follow Four Noble Truths.


Note: This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

3. Right Speech / Right Talk / Perfect Speech

Samyag Vaca / Samma Vaca / Samma Vacha

zhèng yǔ
sei go
3. Right Speech / Right Talk / Perfect Speech Scroll

正語 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Speech, along with Right Action and Right Living constitute the path to Virtue.

Simply stated, Right Speech is abstaining from lying, abstaining from divisive speech, abstaining from abusive speech, abstaining from idle chatter, abstaining from slander, abstaining from gossip, or any form of harmful or wrong speech.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

8. Right Concentration / Perfect Concentration

Samyak Samadhi / Samma Samadhi

zhèng dìng
sei jou
8. Right Concentration / Perfect Concentration Scroll

正定 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Concentration, along with Right Effort and Right Mindfulness constitute the path to Concentration or Perfect Thought.

Right Concentration has to do with leaving behind sensuality, unwholesome states, as well as pleasure and pain. 正定 is a complex idea but once you have achieved the shedding of worldly sensation, you can truly concentrate and find a higher level of awareness.

Another definition: Concentration of mind that finds its highpoint in the four absorptions.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

6. Right Effort / Right Endeavor / Perfect Effort

Samyag Vyayama / Samma Vayama

zhèng jīng jìn
sei shou jin
6. Right Effort / Right Endeavor / Perfect Effort Scroll

正精進 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Effort, along with Right Mindfulness and Right Concentration constitute the path to Concentration or Perfect Thought.

Proper effort is not the effort to make something particular happen. It is the effort to be aware and awake in each moment, the effort to overcome laziness and defilement, the effort to make each activity of our day meditation. This concept is about pursuing wholesome things that promote good karma.

Another definition: Cultivation of what is karmically wholesome and avoidance of what is karmically unwholesome.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

5. Right Living / Right Livelihood / Perfect Livelihood

Samyag Ajiva / Samma Ajiva

zhèng mìng
sei myou
5. Right Living / Right Livelihood / Perfect Livelihood Scroll

正命 (right living) is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism.

Right Living, along with Right Speech and Right Action constitute the path to Virtue.

Right Living means that a Buddhist should only take a job or pursue a career in a field that does no harm. Buddhists should not work in the arms trade, as pimps or in the field of prostitution, as a butcher or in a shop that kills or sells meat, in a laboratory that does animal research, or any other business that involves scheming or unethical behavior.

Another definition: Avoidance of professions that are harmful to sentient beings, such as slaughterer, hunter, dealer in weaponry or narcotics, etc.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

4. Right Action / Perfect Conduct

Samyak Karmanta / Samma Kammanta

zhèng yè
sei gyou
4. Right Action / Perfect Conduct Scroll

正業 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Action, along with Right Speech and Right Living constitute the path to Virtue.

The five precepts of Right Action are:
1. To refrain from destroying living beings (no murder, or any form of taking a life).
2. To refrain from stealing.
3. To refrain from sexual misconduct (adultery, rape, etc.).
4. To refrain from false speech (lying or trickery).
5. To refrain from intoxicants which lead to heedlessness (no drugs or alcohol).

This concept can be summarized as, "Avoidance of actions that conflict with moral discipline".

Note: In Japanese, when read by a non-Buddhist, this will mean "the right job/vocation".


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness

Samyak Smriti / Samyak Smrti / Samma Sati

zhèng niàn
sei nen
7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness Scroll

正念 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Mindfulness, along with Right Effort and Right Concentration constitute the path to Concentration or Perfect Thought.

Right Mindfulness is about remaining focused on one's body, feelings, mind and mental qualities. It's also about being ardent, aware, and mindful, and supposes that you've already put aside worldly desire and aversion.

Monk Bhikkhu Bodhi described this as: The mind is deliberately kept at the level of bare attention, a detached observation of what is happening within us and around us in the present moment. In the practice of right mindfulness the mind is trained to remain in the present, open, quiet, and alert, contemplating the present event.

Another definition: Ongoing mindfulness of body, feelings, thinking, and objects of thought.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

Karma (of your past lives)

sù yè
shukugou
Karma (of your past lives) Scroll

宿業 is the Buddhist concept of Past Karma. To put it simply, it's the sum of all the good and bad from all previous lives (and perhaps earlier in your current life). This term is not commonly used outside of the Buddhist faith (you'll have a tough time finding a non-Buddhist Asian person that knows this word).

Other ways to translate this: "The karma of previous existence", "The karma remaining from prior existences", or simply "Former karma".


See Also:  Buddhism

Karma - Cause and Effect

yīn guǒ
inga
Karma - Cause and Effect Scroll

因果 is a label that is used inside and outside of the Buddhist faith to speak of Karma.

Along with the meaning of Karma, this word can be translated as "retribution" or "chain of cause and effect".


See Also:  Buddhism

Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment

Samudaya

jí dì
jittai
Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment Scroll

At the core of suffering is often the concept of desire or attachment.

This can be carnal desire, monetary desire, or the attachment you have to something that you are unwilling to part with (such as a fancy car). 集諦 is a simplification of the second noble truth which is really and exploration into the root causes of suffering - it's deeper than I can go in a few sentences.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Chinese, Japanese and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment

Nirodha

miè dì
mettai
Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment Scroll

Once you eliminate desire or attachment to worldly things, only then can you achieve enlightenment.

Realize that things are impermanent. That fancy car, beautiful spouse, big house, and impressive career are things you can't take with you. These things are a flash in the pan compared to the infinite span of history, generations to come, time, and space.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese, Korean, and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Goddess of Mercy and Compassion

This is the long or more formal version of this title

guān shì yīn
Goddess of Mercy and Compassion Scroll

觀世音 is the longer, and perhaps more formal title for the Buddhist deity known as the Goddess of Mercy or Bodhisattva of Compassion.

The longer title of this bodhisattva is Romanized in the following ways:
Mandarin Chinese: Guanshi Yin, Kuan-shih Yin.
Japanese: Kanzeon.
Sanskrit: Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara.
Korean: Gwan-se-eum.
Vietnamese: Quan Thế Âm.
Thai: Prah Mae Kuan Eim.
English: Bodhisattva of Mercy and Salvation, Goddess of Compassion, Buddha of Mercy, et al.

Please view our more common and shorter version "Guan Yin" before you make a decision. Also, note that the first character has a slight variation in Japanese. If your audience is specifically Japanese, you may want to select that version.


See Also:  Buddhism | Goddess

The Noble Eightfold Path

Ashtangika Marga / Astangika-Marga / Atthangika Magga

bā zhèng dào
hasshoudou
The Noble Eightfold Path Scroll

八正道 is a complex set of steps that Buddhists much take to cleanse karma, achieve enlightenment, eventually cease the cycle of rebirth and live in a state of Nirvana.


Note: This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term and remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people. Sometimes written as 八聖道.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Fate / Opportunity / Chance

Buddhist idea of Fate

yīn yuán
in nen
Fate / Opportunity / Chance Scroll

因緣 is the Buddhist concept of a chance meeting or an opportunity that presents itself by fate.

Sometimes this is used to describe a cosmic chain of events or cause and effect.

It also is used to describe predestined relationships between people - and sometimes married couples (although if you want one about marriage, try this: Fate / Destiny of Lovers.

因緣 can also be translated as origin, karma, destiny, affinity, connection, and relation. This all depends on context - seen alone on a wall scroll, this will be read with a "fate / chance" meaning by a Chinese person, or a Korean person who can read Hanja.

The more complex definition of this word would be, "Direct causes and indirect conditions, which underlie the actions of all things".

This concept is known as nidana in the original Sanskrit. Also sometimes presented as hetupratyaya (or "hetu and prataya") which I believe is Pali.


Note: Japanese will tend to use this version of the second Kanji: 縁
If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect that you’ll get this version. However, this word often carries a negative connotation in Japanese (bad things happen), as it is used that way in a certain Japanese idiom. Therefore, this may not be the best choice if Japanese is your target language.


See Also:  Buddhism | Opportunity

Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls

lún huí
rin ne
Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls Scroll

輪回 / 輪廻 is a universal word in Japanese and Chinese that expresses the Buddhist idea of "reincarnation", "transmigration of souls" or "the eternal cycle of birth and death".

In some context, this can also mean "karma", and others will say it represents "samsara".

The first character means wheel, ring, turn, circle, loop or rotate.
The second character can be thought of as a suffix meaning "-times". This second character can also refer to something that revolves, returns, goes back, or a counter for the number of occurrences of some event.
Together the sum supersedes the parts and it means reincarnation. But knowing the seeing the essence of each character may help you understand some of the meaning behind the word.


廻Shown to the right is the more common way to write the second character in Japanese. it’s an alternate form of this character in Chinese (so neither way is technically wrong in either language). If you select a Japanese calligrapher, expect that is will look like the Kanji to the right.


See Also:  Buddhism | Rebirth

Goddess of Mercy and Compassion

guān yīn
kwun yum
kan non
Goddess of Mercy and Compassion Scroll

觀音 / 観音 is the Buddhist deity known as the Goddess of Mercy or Bodhisattva of Compassion.

In Chinese, the proper name of this being is Guan Yin. There is some debate as to whether Guan Yin is female. The argument comes from some scripture that suggests Buddhist deities take on the male form. Others say that Guan Yin has no sex. And still others are okay with the female representation of Guan Yin.

This bodhisattva is also known or Romanized in the following ways:
Mandarin Chinese: Guan Yin, Kuan Yin, Kwan Yin.
Japanese: Kannon, Kwannon.
Sanskrit: Bodhisattva Avalokitesvara.
Korean: Gwan-eum.
Vietnamese: Quan Âm.
Thai: Kuan Eim.
English: Bodhisattva of Mercy and Salvation, Goddess of Compassion, Buddha of Mercy, et al.

Note: The first character has a slight variation in Japanese. If your audience is specifically Japanese, you may want to select that version.


See Also:  Buddhism | Goddess | Namo Amitabha | Bodhisattva

sēng qié
sougya
Sangha Scroll

In Buddhism, this term refers to a community of monks and/or nuns (one of the "Three Jewels"). In general terms, it can simply mean "all followers of the Buddha".

Notes: Though there are not vast numbers of Chinese Hindus, in the Hindu faith, this term means "community together".
The original Sanskrit word is also Romanized as samgha.
The first character means "monk". The second character means Buddha or Shakyamuni.
僧伽 is really a transliteration of the original Sanskrit but it uses two very profound Chinese characters related to Buddhism.

Some may pronounce this as "seng qie" or "seng jia" in Mandarin (two possible pronunciations for second character). Note that "qie" would sound a bit like "chee-ah" using typical English pronunciation. Chinese Romanization is not actually designed to match English sounds.


僧僧Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this special Kanji form. However, it should also be noted that this is not a common term in Japanese (except by certain sects of Buddhism or perhaps devout Buddhists in Japan).

Truth Flashed Through The Mind

cān wù
Truth Flashed Through The Mind Scroll

參悟 is a Chan / Zen Buddhism concept that means "to understand (mystery) from meditation", or "to see truth flash through the mind".

參悟 is a pretty deep idea, therefore, your own study and contemplation may be required before you can fully appreciate it.

míng xiǎng
mei sou
Meditation Scroll

This encompasses the idea of meditation.

It's also a term used to describe a deep form of day-dreaming, exploring one's imagination, the act of contemplating, or the idea of contemplation. 冥想 is often associated with Buddhism, however, the word "Zen" in Japanese (or "Chan" in Chinese) is probably more commonly used (or better known in the west).


See Also:  Zen

Zen / Chan / Meditation

...as in Zen Buddhism

chán
zen
Zen / Chan / Meditation Scroll

First let's correct something: The Japanese romanization for this character, "Zen" has penetrated the English language. In English, it's almost always incorrectly used for phrases like "That's so zen". Nobody says "That's so meditation" - right? As the title of a sect, this would be like saying, "That's soooo Baptist!"

禪 by itself just means "meditation". In that context, it should not be confined to use by any one religion or sect.

Regardless of the dictionary definition, more often than not, this character is associated with Buddhism. And here is one of the main reasons:
Zen is used as the title of a branch of Mahayana Buddhism which strongly emphasizes the practice of meditation.
However, it should be noted that Buddhism came from India, and "Chan Buddhism" evolved and developed in medieval China. The Chinese character "Chan" was eventually pronounced as "Zen" in Japanese. Chan Buddhists in China have a lot in common with Zen Buddhists in Japan.

More about the history of Zen Buddhism here.

Please also note that the Japanese Kanji character for Zen has evolved a little in Japan, and the two boxes (kou) that you see at the top of the right side of the character have been replaced by three dots with tails. Japanese Zen Kanji The original character would still be generally understood and recognized in Japanese (it's considered an ancient version in Japan) but if you want the specifically modern Japanese version, please click on the zen Kanji to the right. Technically, there is no difference in Tensho and Reisho versions of Zen since they are ancient character styles that existed long before Japan had a written language.

Chinese Zen/Chan CharacterThere is also an alternate/shorthand/simplified Chinese version which has two dots or tails above the right-side radical. This version is also popular for calligraphy in China. If you want this version, just click the character to the right.


Further notes: Zen is just one of seven sects of Buddhism practiced in Japan. The others are 律 Ritsu (or Risshū), 法相 Hossō, 論 Sanron 華嚴 Kegon, 天台 Tendai, and 眞言 Shingon.

Zen Contemplation

rù dìng
Zen Contemplation Scroll

This title can be defined as Zen contemplation in Japanese, or sit quietly in (Buddhist) meditation in Chinese. It also carries a similar meaning in Korean Hanja. Therefore, this is a rather universal term for meditation in the context of Buddhism throughout the Orient.

Can also be translated as "Meditatively equipoised" or "enter into meditation by stilling the karmic activities of deed, speech, and thought".

The original Sanskrit word is samapanna. In Tibetan: snyoms par zhugs pa.

Inner Bliss and Peace from Meditation

chán yuè
Inner Bliss and Peace from Meditation Scroll

This title refers to the inner bliss and peace that you can achieve from meditation.

This term transcends a few religions, including Taoism and Buddhism. It can also be translated as "joy of the mystic trance" or simply "meditative bliss".

Amazing that such a complex idea can be expressed in just two Chinese characters. Note that the first character is Chan/Zen (Chinese/Japanese) which means "meditation" in both languages.

Sit in Meditation

Zazen

zuò chán
za zen
Sit in Meditation Scroll

This describes the act of sitting in the state of deep meditation. You'll notice that the second character is Chan/Zen, which is often used to title the meditative form of Buddhism. In Korean Hanja, this means "religious meditation" (basically the same as the Chinese definition). This can also be defined as abstract meditation, fixed abstraction, or contemplation.

Buddhists may define this as, sitting in dhyāna, abstract meditation, fixed abstraction, or contemplation.


座禅Japanese note: This will make sense in Japanese but the Kanji shown to the left are partially in ancient/traditional Japanese form. Japanese Buddhists may use 坐禪, 坐禅, 座禪, or 座禅. The most standard/modern Japanese form of this word is shown to the right. Click on the Kanji to the right (instead of the button above) if you want this specifically Japanese version.

pú sà
bosatsu
Bodhisattva Scroll

菩薩 is the title of a deity in Buddhism that exists to help you reach enlightenment.

In Buddhist beliefs, a bodhisattva (bodhisatta) is a being who is dedicated to helping us achieve enlightenment. Bodhisattva literally means enlightenment truth which is bodhi sattva in Sanskrit.

This term is sometimes used to refer to a kindhearted person, one who will sacrifice himself/herself for others, and lacks ego or desire but is instead devoted to the good and well-being of others.


See Also:  Buddha | Namo Amitabha

Impermanence

wú cháng
mujou
Impermanence Scroll

無常 is the state of being "not permanent", "not enduring", transitory, or evolving.

It can also mean variable or changeable. In some context, it can refer to a ghost that is supposed to take a soul upon death. Following that, this term can also mean to pass away or die.

In the Buddhist context, this is a reminder that everything in this world is ever-changing, and all circumstances of your life are temporary.
If you take the Buddhist philosophy further, none of these circumstances are real, and your existence is an illusion anyway. Thus, the idea of the eternal soul is perhaps just the attachment you have to your ego. Once you release your attachment to all impermanent things, you will be on your way to enlightenment and Buddhahood.

Language notes for this word when used outside the context of Buddhism:
In Korean Hanja, this means uncertainty, transiency, mutability, or evanescent.
In Japanese, the definition orbits closer to the state of being uncertain.

kōng wú
kuu mu
Nothingness Scroll

空無 is "nothingness" in a Buddhist context.

The first character means empty but can also mean air or sky (air and sky have no form).

The second character means have not, no, none, not or to lack.

Together these characters reinforce each other into a word that means "absolute nothingness".

I know this is a term used in Buddhism but I have not yet figured out the context in which it is used. I suppose it can be the fact that Buddhists believe that the world in a non-real illusion, or perhaps it's about visualizing yourself as "nothing" and therefore leaving behind your desire and worldliness.
Buddhist concepts and titles often have this element of ambiguity or rather "mystery". Therefore, such ideas can have different meanings to different people, and that's okay. If you don't get it right in this lifetime, as there will be plenty more lifetimes to master it (whatever "it" is, and if "it" really exists at all).

Soothill defines this as "Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature".

Mercy / Compassion / Love

ji
Mercy / Compassion / Love Scroll

慈 is the simplest way to express the idea of compassion.

This can also mean love for your fellow humans, humanity, or living creatures. Sometimes this is extended to mean charity.

This term is often used with a Buddhist or Christian context. The concept was also spoken of by Laozi (Lao Tzu) in the Dao De Jing (Tao Te Ching).

慈 is considered the direct translation of the Sanskrit word मैत्री (maitrī) Pali word मेत्ता (mettā). In this context, it means benevolence, loving-kindness, and goodwill.

This Chinese character is understood in Japanese but is usually used in compound words (not seen alone). Also used in old Korean Hanja, so it's very universal.


See Also:  Mercy | Benevolence | Forgiveness | Kindness

Dharma / The Law

hou
Dharma / The Law Scroll

法 is the simple way to write "law" or in a Buddhist context "Dharma".

This can also mean method, way or Buddhist teaching. It's also an abbreviation for the country of France.

The Buddhist context exists in Chinese and Korean Hanja but I have not yet confirmed that this means more than "law" when used alone in Japanese.

Sangha / Order of Monks

sēng
sou
Sangha / Order of Monks Scroll

僧 is the single-character or short form of Sangha, the Buddhist idea of community or order (of monks, nuns, or followers of the Buddha).

Alone, this character can simply mean "monk" (Just means monk in Japanese).


僧僧 Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write this in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this special Kanji form.

Dharma / Buddhist Doctrine

fó fǎ
Dharma / Buddhist Doctrine Scroll

This can be defined as "The Law of Buddha", "The Power of Buddha", or simply "Dharma".

Goddess of Compassion

guān yīn
kan non
Goddess of Compassion Scroll

観音 is the specifically Japanese version of Bodhisattva of Compassion or Guan Yin.

In Japanese, this is pronounced Kannon, and occasionally spelled Kwannon. The Chinese version is a bit more commonly-seen in Asia. However, in Japanese, there is a slight variation with the first character.

Some time ago, a camera company in Japan named their company after this Buddhist deity. That camera company is still known as Canon (they chose a "C" instead of a "K" when they Romanized this name).

Reach Peace and Calm by Meditation

ān chán
an zen
Reach Peace and Calm by Meditation Scroll

These two Chinese characters create a title that means to reach peace and calm through meditation.

安禪 is an excellent wall scroll for your relaxation or meditation room.

安禪 is also a Buddhist-related term that encompasses the idea of entering into dhyana meditation.

安禪 is also used in Japanese, but in modern times, the second character has changed, so it's 安禅 now. If you want the modern Japanese version, just choose a Japanese calligrapher, and let me know when you place your order.

Seeking Truth

qiú dào
gu dou
Seeking Truth Scroll

求道 means seeking for truth, or to seek (practice for, strive for) enlightenment.

求道 is used mostly in a Buddhist context, so some non-Buddhists may not recognize it.

Shakyamuni / The Buddha

shì jiā
sha ka
Shakyamuni / The Buddha Scroll

釈迦 is the way to write Shakyamuni in Japanese.

It's just two Kanji, the first is a simplified version of the one used in Chinese for Shakyamuni, and the second one is identical to the Chinese.
This refers to the Buddha (Siddhartha Gautama, 563 BCE-483 BCE) also known as Sakyamuni and Gautama Buddha.

This has very good meaning in Japanese but is an odd selection for a wall scroll. It appears here more for reference.

Zen Understanding

cān chán
Zen Understanding Scroll

This title speaks of reaching an understanding (of Zen or the world). It also means "to practice meditation". The two concepts lead you to the idea that meditation leads to understanding. 參禪 is pretty deep, so you can do your own research, or decide what this means for you.

This can also be defined in a more complex way as "thoroughly penetrating with meditative insight".

Goddess of Compassion

Long or more formal Japanese version of this title

guān shì yīn
kan ze on
Goddess of Compassion Scroll

観世音 is the longer and more formal Japanese version of Bodhisattva of Compassion or Guan Yin.

In Japanese, this is pronounced Kanzeon. The Chinese version is a bit more common in Asia but in Japanese they use a slight variation of the first character. Choose this version only if your intended audience is specifically Japanese.

Buddhist Monk

sou ryo
Buddhist Monk Scroll

僧侶 / 僧侶 is a Japanese title for a Buddhist monk.

The first Kanji means Buddhist priest or monk by itself.
The second Kanji means follower or companion.


僧Note, if you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, the first character will look a bit more like the Kanji shown to the right than the Kanji shown above. Let us know if you have a preference, as both versions are technically-correct in both Chinese and Japanese.

niè pán
ne han
Nirvana Scroll

These are the Chinese characters that mean Nirvāṇa. I will let you decide what Nirvana means to you.

涅槃 / 涅盤 can also be translated as "Buddha's death and salvation" or "death of a Buddhist monk" depending on context. However, this is not seen with any bad meaning. You could replace "death" with "moving on", as that is how it's seen in a Buddhist context.


More info from our dictionary: Nirvana

Shakyamuni / The Buddha

shì jiā móu ní
sha ka mu ni
Shakyamuni / The Buddha Scroll

釋迦牟尼 is a transliteration of "Shakyamuni" or "Sakyamuni" in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

The perceived meaning of the name is roughly translated as, "Sage of the Sakyas".
This same Buddha is also known as "Siddhartha Gautama", "Gotama Buddha", "Tathagata", or simply, "The Supreme Buddha".

釋迦牟尼 is the legendary man and prince who eventually established the Buddhist religion.

Note: Occasionally Romanized as "Siddhattha Gotama".

This combination of characters is sometimes seen and used in South Korea and Japan as well (with the same meaning).


Note: 釋迦牟尼 came from the Sanskrit शाक्यमुनि and can also be romanized with diuretics as Śākyamuni.

All Tenets of the Noble Eightfold Path

zhèng jiàn zhèng sī wéi zhèng yǔ zhèng yè zhèng mìng zhèng jīng jìn zhèng niàn zhèng dìng

shouken shoushiyui shougo shougo shoumyou shoushoujin shounen shoujou
All Tenets of the Noble Eightfold Path Scroll

These are the eight tenets of the Buddhist Noble Eightfold Path written altogether.

Here's this list of tenets in English:
1. Right View / Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Perfect View
2. Right Resolve / Right Thought / Right Intention / Perfect Resolve
3. Right Speech / Right Talk / Perfect Speech
4. Right Action / Perfect Conduct
5. Right Living / Right Livelihood / Perfect Livelihood
6. Right Effort / Right Endeavor / Perfect Effort
7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness
8. Right Concentration / Perfect Concentration




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Buddhism佛教fó jiào / fo2 jiao4 / fo jiao / fojiaofo chiao / fochiao
Buddhism仏教bukkyou / bukyo
Buddhism
Buddha
hotokefó / fo2 / fo
Buddha
Buddhism
仏 / 佛
hotoke / butsu
Pure Land Buddhism
Jodo Buddhism
淨土宗
浄土宗
jou do shuu
joudoshuu
jo do shu
jìng tǔ zōng
jing4 tu3 zong1
jing tu zong
jingtuzong
ching t`u tsung
chingtutsung
ching tu tsung
Shin Buddhism浄土真宗jou do shin shuu
joudoshinshuu
jo do shin shu
Reincarnation (Buddhism)轉世
转世
ten sei / tenseizhuǎn shì
zhuan3 shi4
zhuan shi
zhuanshi
chuan shih
chuanshih
Four Noble Truths (Buddhism)四諦
四谛
shitaisì dì / si4 di4 / si di / sidissu ti / ssuti
The Principles of Buddhism佛義
佛义
butsu gi / butsugifó yì / fo2 yi4 / fo yi / foyifo i / foi
Zen Buddhism禪宗
禅宗
zen shuu / zenshuu / zen shuchán zōng
chan2 zong1
chan zong
chanzong
ch`an tsung
chantsung
chan tsung
Three Treasures of Buddhism三寶
三宝
san bou / sanbou / san bosān bǎo / san1 bao3 / san bao / sanbaosan pao / sanpao
Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyou na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba houshi to omoi yari no seishin
ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyo na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba hoshi to omoi yari no seishin
Appreciation of Truth by Meditation心印shin nin / shinninxīn yìn / xin1 yin4 / xin yin / xinyinhsin yin / hsinyin
2. Right Resolve
Right Thought
Right Intention
Perfect Resolve
正思唯sei shi yui
seishiyui
zhèng sī wéi
zheng4 si1 wei2
zheng si wei
zhengsiwei
cheng ssu wei
chengssuwei
Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering道諦
道谛
doutai / dotaidào dì / dao4 di4 / dao di / daoditao ti / taoti
Pure Land
Jodo
淨土
净土
jou do / joudo / jo dojìng tǔ / jing4 tu3 / jing tu / jingtuching t`u / chingtu / ching tu
Karma
gou / goyè / ye4 / yeyeh
1. Right Understanding
Right Perspective
Right View
Perfect View
正見
正见
sei ken / seikenzhèng jiàn
zheng4 jian4
zheng jian
zhengjian
cheng chien
chengchien
3. Right Speech
Right Talk
Perfect Speech
正語
正语
sei go / seigozhèng yǔ / zheng4 yu3 / zheng yu / zhengyucheng yü / chengyü
8. Right Concentration
Perfect Concentration
正定sei jou / seijou / sei jozhèng dìng
zheng4 ding4
zheng ding
zhengding
cheng ting
chengting
6. Right Effort
Right Endeavor
Perfect Effort
正精進
正精进
sei shou jin
seishoujin
sei sho jin
zhèng jīng jìn
zheng4 jing1 jin4
zheng jing jin
zhengjingjin
cheng ching chin
chengchingchin
5. Right Living
Right Livelihood
Perfect Livelihood
正命sei myou / seimyou / sei myozhèng mìng
zheng4 ming4
zheng ming
zhengming
cheng ming
chengming
4. Right Action
Perfect Conduct
正業
正业
sei gyou / seigyou / sei gyozhèng yè / zheng4 ye4 / zheng ye / zhengyecheng yeh / chengyeh
7. Right Mindfulness
Right Memory
Perfect Mindfulness
正念sei nen / seinenzhèng niàn
zheng4 nian4
zheng nian
zhengnian
cheng nien
chengnien
Karma (of your past lives)宿業
宿业
shukugou / shukugosù yè / su4 ye4 / su ye / suyesu yeh / suyeh
Karma - Cause and Effect因果ingayīn guǒ / yin1 guo3 / yin guo / yinguoyin kuo / yinkuo
Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment集諦
集谛
jittaijí dì / ji2 di4 / ji di / jidichi ti / chiti
Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment滅諦
灭谛
mettaimiè dì / mie4 di4 / mie di / miedimieh ti / miehti
Goddess of Mercy and Compassion觀世音
观世音
guān shì yīn
guan1 shi4 yin1
guan shi yin
guanshiyin
kuan shih yin
kuanshihyin
The Noble Eightfold Path八正道hasshoudou / hashodobā zhèng dào
ba1 zheng4 dao4
ba zheng dao
bazhengdao
pa cheng tao
pachengtao
Fate
Opportunity
Chance
因緣
因缘 / 因縁
in nen / innenyīn yuán / yin1 yuan2 / yin yuan / yinyuanyin yüan / yinyüan
Reincarnation
Transmigration of Souls
輪回 / 輪廻
轮回
rin ne / rinnelún huí / lun2 hui2 / lun hui / lunhui
Goddess of Mercy and Compassion觀音 / 観音
观音
kan non / kannonguān yīn / guan1 yin1 / guan yin / guanyinkuan yin / kuanyin
Sangha僧伽sougya / sogyasēng qié / seng1 qie2 / seng qie / sengqieseng ch`ieh / sengchieh / seng chieh
Truth Flashed Through The Mind參悟
参悟
cān wù / can1 wu4 / can wu / canwuts`an wu / tsanwu / tsan wu
Meditation冥想mei sou / meisou / mei somíng xiǎng
ming2 xiang3
ming xiang
mingxiang
ming hsiang
minghsiang
Zen
Chan
Meditation

zenchán / chan2 / chanch`an / chan
Zen Contemplation入定rù dìng / ru4 ding4 / ru ding / rudingju ting / juting
Inner Bliss and Peace from Meditation禪悅
禅悦
chán yuè / chan2 yue4 / chan yue / chanyuech`an yüeh / chanyüeh / chan yüeh
Sit in Meditation坐禪
坐禅
za zen / zazenzuò chán / zuo4 chan2 / zuo chan / zuochantso ch`an / tsochan / tso chan
Bodhisattva菩薩
菩萨
bosatsupú sà / pu2 sa4 / pu sa / pusap`u sa / pusa / pu sa
Impermanence無常
无常
mujou / mujowú cháng / wu2 chang2 / wu chang / wuchangwu ch`ang / wuchang / wu chang
Nothingness空無
空无
kuu mu / kuumu / ku mukōng wú / kong1 wu2 / kong wu / kongwuk`ung wu / kungwu / kung wu
Mercy
Compassion
Love
jicí / ci2 / citz`u / tzu
Dharma
The Law
hou / hofǎ / fa3 / fa
Sangha
Order of Monks
sou / sosēng / seng1 / seng
Dharma
Buddhist Doctrine
佛法fó fǎ / fo2 fa3 / fo fa / fofa
Goddess of Compassion観音kan non / kannonguān yīn / guan1 yin1 / guan yin / guanyinkuan yin / kuanyin
Reach Peace and Calm by Meditation安禪
安禅
an zen / anzenān chán / an1 chan2 / an chan / anchanan ch`an / anchan / an chan
Seeking Truth求道gu dou / gudou / gu doqiú dào / qiu2 dao4 / qiu dao / qiudaoch`iu tao / chiutao / chiu tao
Shakyamuni
The Buddha
釈迦sha ka / shakashì jiā / shi4 jia1 / shi jia / shijiashih chia / shihchia
Zen Understanding參禪
参禅
cān chán / can1 chan2 / can chan / canchants`an ch`an / tsanchan / tsan chan
Goddess of Compassion観世音kan ze on / kanzeonguān shì yīn
guan1 shi4 yin1
guan shi yin
guanshiyin
kuan shih yin
kuanshihyin
Buddhist Monk僧侶 / 僧侶
僧侶
sou ryo / souryo / so ryo
Nirvana涅槃 / 涅盤
涅盘
ne han / nehanniè pán / nie4 pan2 / nie pan / niepannieh p`an / niehpan / nieh pan
Shakyamuni
The Buddha
釋迦牟尼
释迦牟尼
sha ka mu ni
shakamuni
shì jiā móu ní
shi4 jia1 mou2 ni2
shi jia mou ni
shijiamouni
shih chia mou ni
shihchiamouni
All Tenets of the Noble Eightfold Path正見正思唯正語正業正命正精進正念正定
正见正思唯正语正业正命正精进正念正定
shouken shoushiyui shougo shougo shoumyou shoushoujin shounen shoujou
shoken shoshiyui shogo shogo shomyo shoshojin shonen shojo
zhèng jiàn zhèng sī wéi zhèng yǔ zhèng yè zhèng mìng zhèng jīng jìn zhèng niàn zhèng dìng
zheng4 jian4 zheng4 si1 wei2 zheng4 yu3 zheng4 ye4 zheng4 ming4 zheng4 jing1 jin4 zheng4 nian4 zheng4 ding4
zheng jian zheng si wei zheng yu zheng ye zheng ming zheng jing jin zheng nian zheng ding
cheng chien cheng ssu wei cheng yü cheng yeh cheng ming cheng ching chin cheng nien cheng ting
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


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Lookup Buddhism in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Buddhism Kanji, Buddhism Characters, Buddhism in Mandarin Chinese, Buddhism Characters, Buddhism in Chinese Writing, Buddhism in Japanese Writing, Buddhism in Asian Writing, Buddhism Ideograms, Chinese Buddhism symbols, Buddhism Hieroglyphics, Buddhism Glyphs, Buddhism in Chinese Letters, Buddhism Hanzi, Buddhism in Japanese Kanji, Buddhism Pictograms, Buddhism in the Chinese Written-Language, or Buddhism in the Japanese Written-Language.

107 people have searched for Buddhism in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Buddhism was last searched for by someone else on Jan 17th, 2022