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Will-Power in Chinese / Japanese...

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Personalize your custom “Will-Power” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Will-Power” title below...


  1. Will-Power / Self-Control

  2. Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

  3. Perseverance / Will-Power

  4. Self-Discipline / Will-Power

  5. Determination

  6. Well-Disciplined / Orderly

  7. Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

  8. Discipline

  9. Self-Control

10. Discipline / Training / Tempering Character

11. Strength / Vigor / Energy

12. Perseverance

13. Control of Power

14. Power of Understanding and Wisdom

15. The Guts Theory

16. Destiny Determined by Heaven

17. Inner Strength / Self-Improvement

18. Past experience is the teacher for the future.

19. Dragon

20. Sword Saint

21. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

22. Cooperation

23. Beauty / Beautiful / Handsome

24. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

25. Better Late Than Never


Will-Power / Self-Control

yì zhì lì
ishi ryoku
Will-Power / Self-Control Scroll

意志力 is the form of will power or self-control is about having the determination or tenacity to keep going.

In Japanese, this is the power of will, strength of will, volition, intention, intent, or determination.

Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

yì zhì
ishi
Determination to Achieve / Will-Power Scroll

This Chinese, Korean, and Japanese word means, "determination to achieve". It can also be translated as: will; willpower; determination; volition; intention; intent.

In Japanese, this can also be the given name Ishi.

Perseverance / Will-Power

yì lì
Perseverance / Will-Power Scroll

These two characters are a way to express "perseverance" with the idea of "willpower" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean "strong willed".

The first character means "strong" and "persistent", while the second means "strength" and "power".

Self-Discipline / Will-Power

zì lǜ
jiritsu
Self-Discipline / Will-Power Scroll

自律 means self-discipline and self-control.

It is doing what you really want to do, rather than being tossed around by your feelings like a leaf in the wind. You act instead of react. You get things done in an orderly and efficient way. With self-discipline, you take charge of yourself.


Not sure if this one works for a Japanese audience.


See Also:  Discipline | Self-Control

Determination

jué xīn
kesshin
Determination Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word holds the dictionary definition of "determination" but literally means, "determined heart".

The first character means "to determine" or "determined".

The second character means "heart", "mind" or "soul", so you can imagine that this form of "determination" partially means to put your heart into something. It can also be translated as resolve, resolution, or decision (as in a decision made and followed).


See Also:  Devotion | Tenacious | Passion | Dedication | Will-Power

Well-Disciplined / Orderly

Special Military Term
yán zhěng
Well-Disciplined / Orderly Scroll

When reading an account of some battles in China, I came across this Chinese word. As it turns out, it's only used in military circles to describe neat, orderly, and well-disciplined troops. Perhaps this is actually closer to the meaning I was taught while in the U.S. Marines.

The first character literally means stern, serious, strict, or severe (it can also mean "air tight" or "water tight".
The second character means exact, in good order, whole, complete, and orderly.
Together, these two characters multiply each other into a word that expresses the highest military level of discipline.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

yì zhì jiān qiáng
Strong Hearted / Strong Willed Scroll

This phrase can mean either "strong hearted", "strong willed" or "determination".

The first two characters can be translated as "will", "willpower", "determination", "volition", "intention", or "intent". But, it should be noted that this first part possess the element of "heart" in the lower portion of both characters (they also partially carry the meaning "with whole heart").

The last two characters mean "strong" or "staunch".

Chinese word order and grammar is a bit different than English, so in this case, they are in reverse order of English but have the correct meaning in a natural form.


See Also:  Strong Willed | Discipline | Will-Power

Discipline

jì lǜ
Discipline Scroll

This Chinese and Korean word conveys the idea of extreme self-control and perhaps self-sacrifice, and obedience.

紀律 matches the kind of "discipline" I was in the Marine Corps. There is also an additional idea of maintaining order or being orderly in your tasks.

This idea would also fit an athlete training for the Olympics who gives up many pleasures to stay focused on their training.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Discipline

guī
kiritsu
Discipline Scroll

This Japanese word for discipline relays the ideas of keeping order, observance (of rules, laws, regulations).

規律 is also a word in Chinese and old Korean Hanja where it suggests that you are one who follows a certain law of behavior, or have a regular and dependable pattern of behavior, personal regime or rhythm.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Discipline

duàn liàn
tan ren
Discipline Scroll

鍛練 is the Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja word that is used for discipline.

This has a meaning like "forging or creating something from lots of training and practice". My Japanese dictionary translates this as, "tempering, forging, hardening, disciplining, training".

鍛練 / 鍛錬 is for Japanese and Korean only. In Chinese, these characters might be translated as (physical) "exercise".


練
練'
錬

The modern form of the second Japanese Kanji looks like the first image to the right. There’s also an alternate modern form after that, and finally, an alternate traditional form. Because calligraphy is an art, the calligrapher could choose any of these possible forms. Let us know if you have a preference.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Self-Control

zì zhì
jisei
Self-Control Scroll

The short and sweet version of self-control.

Note: This can also mean self-restraint.


See Also:  Will-Power | Discipline

Self-Control

zì jǐ yì zhì
jikoyokusei
Self-Control Scroll

自己抑制 has a meaning like "to restrain oneself" in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

The first two characters mean "regarding oneself", and the second two mean "to refrain" or "to restrain".


See Also:  Discipline | Will-Power

Discipline / Training / Tempering Character

mó liàn
Discipline / Training / Tempering Character Scroll

This is a form of discipline which suggests training of the mind and character, aimed at producing self-control, obedience, etc.

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries even translates this as "tempering oneself" or turning yourself into hardened steel.


In old Korean Hanja, they use these characters in reverse order but with the same meaning. If you want the Korean version, please click this link instead of the button above: Korean version.

Strength / Vigor / Energy

Physical Strength
qì lì
kiryoku
Strength / Vigor / Energy Scroll

氣力 can mean any of the words in the title above, and in some context, can also mean, effort, will-power, or talent.

氣力 refers mostly to physical strength (as opposed to mental or spiritual).


気In modern Japan, they use a simplified first character for this word. If you want to order this title with that special Japanese version, click on the character to the right instead of the button above.

Perseverance

see note
Perseverance Scroll

毅 is the simplest way to express perseverance in Chinese and Korean Hanja.
This single-character version leaves a bit of mystery about what kind of perseverance you might want to convey.

In Korean, this is usually associated with "strength of character".

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced about a dozen different ways (so we have left out the Japanese pronunciation guide that normally appears above). In Japanese this Kanji would usually be translated "strong" (perhaps strong-willed).


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Control of Power

Him Cho Chung
lì cào zhèng
Control of Power Scroll

力操正 is a Korean martial arts title meaning, "Power Control".

It's most often cited as one of the 8 key concepts from Tang Soo Do.

This can be pronounced in Chinese but will only be recognized by those familiar with martial arts terms.

Power of Understanding and Wisdom

wù xìng
gosei
Power of Understanding and Wisdom Scroll

悟性 means the power of understanding and insight in Chinese.

It is often associated with Neo-Confucianism. In that regard, it means to realize, perceive, or have the perception of man's true nature. It can also mean to find your soul, the soul of others, or the soul of the world. Some will translate this simply as the state of being "savvy".

In Japanese, this is often translated as wisdom and understanding.

The Guts Theory

The belief that where there's a will there's a way.
kon jou ron
The Guts Theory Scroll

This Japanese title refers to the belief that where there's a will, there's a way.

Another way to translate this is, "The Guts Theory" or "The Doctrine of Will-Power". Maybe breaking down the meaning of the characters will help clarify this:
根性 = will-power; guts; temper; nature; spirit; nature and character; the nature of the powers of any sense.
論 = theory; doctrine; treatises on dogma, philosophy, discipline, etc.

Destiny Determined by Heaven

tiān yì
teni
Destiny Determined by Heaven Scroll

天意 is a way to express destiny in a slightly religious way.

Literally this means "Heaven's Wish" or "Heaven's Desire" with the idea of fate and destiny being derived as well. It suggests that your destiny comes from God / Heaven and that your path has already been chosen by a higher power.

My Japanese dictionary defines this word as "divine will" or "providence" but it also holds the meaning of "the will of the emperor". Therefore, I don't suggest this phrase if your audience is Japanese - it feels a little strange in Japanese anyway.

Inner Strength / Self-Improvement

zì qiáng
Inner Strength / Self-Improvement Scroll

自強 is the kind of inner-strength that applies to a person who has will-power and can inspire themselves to do great things.

自強 can also be the creed of a person that always pursues self-improvement.

Other translations: self-strengthening, striving for improvement, self-improvement, strive to become stronger, and self-renewal.

Past experience is the teacher for the future.

Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events.
qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
Past experience is the teacher for the future. Scroll

The most literal translation to English of this ancient Chinese proverb is:
"Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events".

However, it's been translated several ways:
Don't forget past events, they can guide you in future.
Benefit from past experience.
Past experience, if not forgotten, is a guide for the future.
Past calamity is my teacher.
A good memory for the past is a teacher for the future.
The remembrance of the past is the teacher of the future.
If one remembers the lessons of the past; They will serve as a guide to avoid mistakes in the future.

The origin:
This proverb comes from the 5th century B.C. just before the Warring States Period in the territory now known as China.
The head of the State of Jin, Zhi Bo, seized power in a coup. He did this with help from the armies of the State of Han and Wei. Instead of being grateful for the help from Han and Wei, he treacherously took the land of Han and Wei. Never satisfied, Zhi Bo employed the armies of Han and Wei to attack and seize the State of Zhao.

The king of Zhao took advice from his minister Zhang Mengtan and secretly contacted the Han and Wei armies to reverse their plans and attack the army of Zhi Bo instead. The plan was successful, and the State of Zhao was not only saved but was set to become a powerful kingdom in the region.

Zhang Mengtan immediately submitted his resignation to a confused king of Zhao. When asked why, Zhang Mengtan said, "I've done my duty to save my kingdom but looking back at past experience, I know sovereign kings are never satisfied with the power or land at hand. They will join others and fight for more power and more land. I must learn from past experiences, as those experiences are the teachers of future events".
The king could not dispute the logic in that statement and accepted Zhang Mengtan's resignation.

For generations, the State of Zhao continued to fight for power and land until finally being defeated and decimated by the State of Qin (which lead to the birth of the Qin Dynasty in 221 B.C.).

Dragon

Year of the Dragon / Zodiac Sign
lóng
ryuu / tatsu
Dragon Scroll

龍 is the character for dragon in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

The dragon is the creature of myth and legend that dominates Chinese, Japanese, and even European folklore. In China, the dragon is the symbol of the Emperor, strength and power, and the Chinese dragon is known as the god of water.

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the Dragon, you . . .

Have a strong body and spirit.
Are full of energy.
Have vast goals.
Have a deep level of self-awareness.
Will do whatever you can to "save face".


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Dragon Calligraphy pages.

Sword Saint

jiàn shèng
kensei
Sword Saint Scroll

This can be translated as "Sword Saint", "God of the Sword" or "Saint of the Sword". 剣聖 / 剣聖 is an ancient Japanese title bestowed on a master with the greatest of skills in swordsmanship.

Keep in mind that this is an antiquated term. It will only be understood in the context of martial arts. The pronunciation "kensei" also applies to other words like "constitutional government" and power (these words have different kanji and are completely unrelated).

Notes: 剣聖 / 剣聖 is sometimes Romanized as "kensei", "ken sei", and incorrectly as "Kensai".

Chinese Note: This title is pronounceable in Chinese but seldom, if ever used in Chinese. Also, the first character is an alternate character form for sword, currently only used in Japan.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33 Scroll

This is referred to as passage or chapter 33 of the Dao De Jing (often Romanized as "Tao Te Ching").

These are the words of the philosopher Laozi (Lao Tzu).

The following is one translation of this passage:
To know others is wisdom;
To know oneself is acuity/intelligence.
To conquer others is power,
To conquer oneself is strength.
To know contentment is to have wealth.
To act resolutely is to have purpose.
To stay one's ground is to be enduring.
To die and yet not be forgotten is to be long-lived.
Another translation:
To understand others is to be knowledgeable;
To understand yourself is to be wise.
To conquer others is to have strength;
To conquer yourself is to be strong.
To know when you have enough is to be rich.
To go forward with strength is to have ambition.
To not lose your place is to be long lasting.
To die but not be forgotten -- that's true long life.
A third translation of the second half:
He who is content is rich;
He who acts with persistence has will;
He who does not lose his roots will endure;
He who dies physically but preserves the Dao
will enjoy a long after-life.


Notes:

During our research, the Chinese characters shown here are probably the most accurate to the original text of Laozi. These were taken for the most part from the Mawangdui 1973 and Guodan 1993 manuscripts which pre-date other Daodejing texts by about 1000 years.

Grammar was a little different in Laozi’s time. So you should consider this to be the ancient Chinese version. Some have modernized this passage by adding, removing, or swapping articles and changing the grammar (we felt the oldest and most original version would be more desirable). You may find other versions printed in books or online - sometimes these modern texts are simply used to explain to Chinese people what the original text really means.

This language issue can be compared in English by thinking how the King James (known as the Authorized version in Great Britain) Bible from 1611 was written, and comparing it to modern English. Now imagine that the Daodejing was probably written around 403 BCE (2000 years before the King James Version of the Bible). To a Chinese person, the original Daodejing reads like text that is 3 times more detached compared to Shakespeare’s English is to our modern-day speech.

Extended notes:

While on this Biblical text comparison, it should be noted, that just like the Bible, all the original texts of the Daodejing were lost or destroyed long ago. Just as with the scripture used to create the Bible, various manuscripts exist, many with variations or copyist errors. Just as the earliest New Testament scripture (incomplete) is from 170 years after Christ, the earliest Daodejing manuscript (incomplete) is from 100-200 years after the death of Laozi.

The reason that the originals were lost probably has a lot to do with the first Qin Emperor. Upon taking power and unifying China, he ordered the burning and destruction of all books (scrolls/rolls) except those pertaining to Chinese medicine and a few other subjects. The surviving Daodejing manuscripts were either hidden on purpose or simply forgotten about. Some were not unearthed until as late as 1993.

We compared a lot of research by various archeologists and historians before deciding on this as the most accurate and correct version. But one must allow that it may not be perfect, or the actual and original as from the hand of Laozi himself.

Cooperation

xié lì
kyouryoku
Cooperation Scroll

協力 is a Japanese word that means cooperation.

If you look at the second character, which means "strength" or "power", and then you look at the first character, you will see that the first character seems to represent multiple "strengths" together. Thus, you can visually see the meaning of this word as "stronger when working together". The combination of characters that form this word is commonly seen in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja but not used in China (however, a Chinese person could probably guess the meaning, and it can be pronounced in Chinese).

It is implied that you are cooperating to create some project or product.

This can also be translated as "joint effort".


See Also:  Partnership

Beauty / Beautiful / Handsome

měi
bi
Beauty / Beautiful / Handsome Scroll

美 is often used to describe the beauty of a woman.

However, when applied to a man, it can mean handsome. It's also the first character in the word for "beauty salon" which you will see all over China and Japan.

This can be used as the given name for a girl (spell it or say it as "Mei" or "May").

For a bit of trivia: The title for the "USA" in Chinese is "Mei Guo" which literally means "Beautiful Country". This name was bestowed at a time before Chairman Mao came to power and decided that China didn't like the USA anymore (even though we fought together against the Japanese in WWII). But these days, Chinese people love Americans (but have distaste for American politics and policy). But I digress...

美 is also how "Beautiful" is written in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja. 美 can also mean: very satisfactory; good; to be pleased with oneself; abbreviation for the USA; fine; handsome; admirable; madhura; sweet; pleasant.


See Also:  Beautiful Woman | Beautiful Girl

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
bǎi zhé bù náo
hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks".

More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching". 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose the corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and the common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career, a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks", "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable".

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks", the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times". The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up".
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins".

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation". The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence".

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Will-Power
Self-Control
意志力ishi ryoku / ishiryokuyì zhì lì
yi4 zhi4 li4
yi zhi li
yizhili
i chih li
ichihli
Determination to Achieve
Will-Power
意志ishiyì zhì / yi4 zhi4 / yi zhi / yizhii chih / ichih
Perseverance
Will-Power
毅力yì lì / yi4 li4 / yi li / yilii li / ili
Self-Discipline
Will-Power
自律jiritsuzì lǜ / zi4 lv4 / zi lv / zilvtzu lü / tzulü
Determination決心
决心
kesshin / keshinjué xīn / jue2 xin1 / jue xin / juexinchüeh hsin / chüehhsin
Well-Disciplined
Orderly
嚴整
严整
yán zhěng
yan2 zheng3
yan zheng
yanzheng
yen cheng
yencheng
Strong Hearted
Strong Willed
意志堅強
意志坚强
yì zhì jiān qiáng
yi4 zhi4 jian1 qiang2
yi zhi jian qiang
yizhijianqiang
i chih chien ch`iang
ichihchienchiang
i chih chien chiang
Discipline紀律
纪律
jì lǜ / ji4 lv4 / ji lv / jilvchi lü / chilü
Discipline規律
规律
kiritsuguī / gui1 lu:4 / gui lu: / guilu:kuei lü / kueilü
Discipline鍛練 / 鍛錬
锻练
tan ren / tanrenduàn liàn
duan4 lian4
duan lian
duanlian
tuan lien
tuanlien
Self-Control自制jiseizì zhì / zi4 zhi4 / zi zhi / zizhitzu chih / tzuchih
Self-Control自己抑制jikoyokuseizì jǐ yì zhì
zi4 ji3 yi4 zhi4
zi ji yi zhi
zijiyizhi
tzu chi i chih
tzuchiichih
Discipline
Training
Tempering Character
磨練 / 磨鍊 / 磨鍊
磨练
mó liàn / mo2 lian4 / mo lian / molianmo lien / molien
Strength
Vigor
Energy
氣力
气力 / 気力
kiryokuqì lì / qi4 li4 / qi li / qilich`i li / chili / chi li
Perseverancesee note / seenote / se note / senoteyì / yi4 / yii
Control of Power力操正lì cào zhèng
li4 cao4 zheng4
li cao zheng
licaozheng
li ts`ao cheng
litsaocheng
li tsao cheng
Power of Understanding and Wisdom悟性goseiwù xìng / wu4 xing4 / wu xing / wuxingwu hsing / wuhsing
The Guts Theory根性論kon jou ron
konjouron
kon jo ron
konjoron
Destiny Determined by Heaven天意tenitiān yì / tian1 yi4 / tian yi / tianyit`ien i / tieni / tien i
Inner Strength
Self-Improvement
自強
自强
zì qiáng / zi4 qiang2 / zi qiang / ziqiangtzu ch`iang / tzuchiang / tzu chiang
Past experience is the teacher for the future.前事不忘后事之師
前事不忘后事之师
qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
qian2 shi4 bu2 wang4 hou4 shi2 zhi1 shi1
qian shi bu wang hou shi zhi shi
ch`ien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
chien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
Dragon
ryuu / tatsu
ryu / tatsu
ryu / tatsu
lóng / long2 / longlung
Sword Saint剣聖 / 剣聖
剣圣
kenseijiàn shèng
jian4 sheng4
jian sheng
jiansheng
chien sheng
chiensheng
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33
知人者知也自知者明也勝人者有力也自勝者強也知足者富也強行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者壽也
知人者知也自知者明也胜人者有力也自胜者强也知足者富也强行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者寿也
zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
zhi1 ren2 zhe3 zhi1 ye3 zi4 zhi1 zhe3 ming2 ye3 sheng4 ren2 zhe3 you3 li4 ye3 zi4 sheng4 zhe3 qiang2 ye3 zhi1 zu2 zhe3 fu4 ye3 qiang2 xing2 zhe3 you3 zhi4 ye3 bu4 zhi1 qi2 suo3 zhe3 jiu3 ye3 si3 er2 bu4 wang2 zhe3 shou4 ye3
zhi ren zhe zhi ye zi zhi zhe ming ye sheng ren zhe you li ye zi sheng zhe qiang ye zhi zu zhe fu ye qiang xing zhe you zhi ye bu zhi qi suo zhe jiu ye si er bu wang zhe shou ye
chih jen che chih yeh tzu chih che ming yeh sheng jen che yu li yeh tzu sheng che ch`iang yeh chih tsu che fu yeh ch`iang hsing che yu chih yeh pu chih ch`i so che chiu yeh ssu erh pu wang che shou yeh
chih jen che chih yeh tzu chih che ming yeh sheng jen che yu li yeh tzu sheng che chiang yeh chih tsu che fu yeh chiang hsing che yu chih yeh pu chih chi so che chiu yeh ssu erh pu wang che shou yeh
Cooperation協力
协力
kyouryoku / kyoryokuxié lì / xie2 li4 / xie li / xielihsieh li / hsiehli
Beauty
Beautiful
Handsome
biměi / mei3 / mei
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
hyakusetsusuto
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll


And formats...

Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Better Late Than Never Horizontal Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Will-Power in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Will-Power Kanji, Will-Power Characters, Will-Power in Mandarin Chinese, Will-Power Characters, Will-Power in Chinese Writing, Will-Power in Japanese Writing, Will-Power in Asian Writing, Will-Power Ideograms, Chinese Will-Power symbols, Will-Power Hieroglyphics, Will-Power Glyphs, Will-Power in Chinese Letters, Will-Power Hanzi, Will-Power in Japanese Kanji, Will-Power Pictograms, Will-Power in the Chinese Written-Language, or Will-Power in the Japanese Written-Language.

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