All custom calligraphy items are made-to-order in our little Beijing artwork-mounting workshop.

Not what you want?

...Or search again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Standing in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Standing calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Standing" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Standing" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Outstanding
  2. Do not fear being slow, fear standing still
  3. Standing by Oneself / Walking by Oneself
  4. Impartial and Fair to the...
  5. Loyalty
  6. Glory and Honor
  7. Work Unselfishly for the Common Good
  8. Erin
  9. Corinthians 13:4
10. Best Friends
11. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis
12. American Football
13. Angel
14. Buddha / Buddhism
15. Keep Your Feet on the Ground
16. Hapkido
17. Independence
18. Indomitable / Unyielding
19. Isabella
20. Jin Ji Du Li
21. Joshua 24:15
22. Justice / Righteousness
23. Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do
24. Kata
25. Listen
26. Martial Arts Master
27. Mama / Mother / Mommy
28. Olivia
29. Personal Integrity
30. Proud Of One’s Name
31. Strength and Love in Unity
32. San Soo / San Shou
33. Physical Strength
34. Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children
35. Surely I come quickly
36. Sword
37. Sworn Friend / Ally
38. Wado-Ryu
39. A Traditional Warm Welcome
40. Wing Chun Fist
41. Buddhism
42. Diligence
43. Five Elements Tai Chi Fist


Outstanding

China chū lèi bá cuì
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This means "one who stands out from his/her peers," "stand out from the crowd," or "standing out from others." It can also mean, "leaving your peers behind."

A great way to tell yourself that you are outstanding (or give it to a friend that you want to encourage to excel).

Do not fear being slow, fear standing still

China bú pà màn jiù pà zhàn
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Don't worry about being slow; only worry about standing still.

Figuratively, this means: A slow progress holds some promise but to stand still promises failure.

Standing by Oneself / Walking by Oneself

Japan do kuritsu do ppo
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This Japanese proverb, Dokuritsu-Doppo, is an indication of your independence, self-reliance, standing on one's own two feet, or making one's own way in life.

Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

AKA: Universal Benevolence
China yí shì tóng rén
Japan isshidoujin
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is how to write "universal benevolence." This is also how to express the idea that you see all people the same.

If you are kind and charitable to all people, this is the best way to state that virtue. It is the essence of being impartial to all mankind, regardless of social standing, background, race, sex, etc. You do not judge others but rather you see them eye to eye on the same level with you.


See Also:  Benevolence | Compassion | Equality | Justice | Right Decision | Selflessness | Work Unselfishly For The Common

Loyalty

China zhōng chéng
Japan chuu sei
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

Loyalty is staying true to someone. It is standing up for something you believe in without wavering. It is being faithful to your family, country, school, friends or ideals, when the going gets tough as well as when things are good. With loyalty, you build relationships that last forever.

Notes:
1. This written form of loyalty is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

2. There is also a Japanese version that is part of the Bushido Code which may be more desirable depending on whether your intended audience is Japanese or Chinese.

3. This version of loyalty is sometimes translated as devotion, sincerity, fidelity, or allegiance.


See Also:  Honor | Trust | Integrity | Sincerity

Glory and Honor

China róng
Japan ei
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This character relates to giving someone a tribute or praise. It's a little odd as a gift, so this may not be the best selection for a wall scroll.

I've made this entry just because this character is often misused as "honorable" or "keeping your honor." It's not quite the same meaning, as this usually refers to a tribute or giving an honor to someone.

This is often found in tattoo books incorrectly listed as the western idea of personal honor or being honorable. Check with us before you get a tattoo that does not match the meaning you are really looking for. As a tattoo, this suggests that you either have a lot of pride in yourself or that you have a wish for prosperity for you and/or your family.

栄In modern Japanese Kanji, glory and honor looks like the image to the right.

There is a lot of confusion about this character, so here are some alternate translations for this character: prosperous, flourishing, blooming (like a flower), glorious beauty, proud, praise, rich, or it can be the family name "Rong." The context in which the character is used can change the meaning between these various ideas.

In the old days, this could be an honor paid to someone by the Emperor (basically a designation by the Emperor that a person has high standing).

To sum it up: This character has a positive meaning, however, it's a different flavor than the idea of being honorable and having integrity.

Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

China kè jǐ fèng gōng
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This can also mean: "Place Strict Standards on Oneself in Public Service."
This Chinese proverb is often used to express how one should act as a government official. Most of us wish our public officials would hold themselves to higher standards. I wish I could send this scroll, along with the meaning to every member of Congress, and the President (or if I was from the UK, all the members of Parliament, and the PM)

The story behind this ancient Chinese idiom:
A man named Cai Zun was born in China a little over 2000 years ago. In 24 AD, he joined an uprising led by Liu Xiu who later became the emperor of the Eastern Han Dynasty.

Later, the new emperor put Cai Zun in charge of the military court. Cai Zun exercised his power in strict accordance with military law, regardless of the offender's rank or background. He even ordered the execution of one of the emperor's close servants after the servant committed a serious crime.

Cai Zun led a simple life but put great demands on himself to do all things in an honorable way. The emperor rewarded him for his honest character and honorable nature by promoting him to the rank of General and granting him the title of Marquis.

Whenever Cai Zun would receive an award, he would give credit to his men and share the reward with them.
Cai Zun was always praised by historians who found many examples of his selfless acts that served the public interest.
Sometime, long ago in history, people began to refer to Cai Zun as "ke ji feng gong."


See Also:  Unselfish | Selflessness | Altruism

Erin

China ài lín
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is an alternate transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Erin.

This version uses "love" as the first character. This is not really the standard but popular, as the resulting meaning is "Love Gem"

Corinthians 13:4

All you need to know about LOVE
China ài shì héng jiǔ rěn nài yòu yǒu én cí ài shì bú jì dù ài shì bú zì kuā bù zhāng kuáng
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

愛是恆久忍耐又有恩慈愛是不嫉妒愛是不自誇不張狂 is 1st Corinthians 13:4 in Chinese.

Chinese Corinthians 13:4 Love

With large "love" character in Xing An-Ping's "Personal Lishu" style.

In English, this reads:

1st Corinthians 13:4 (KJV) Charity suffereth long, and is kind; charity envieth not; charity vaunteth not itself, is not puffed up...

1st Corinthians 13:4 (NIV) Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud.

1st Corinthians 13:4 (Basic English) Love is never tired of waiting; love is kind; love has no envy; love has no high opinion of itself, love has no pride.

The Chinese translation follows the love meaning, rather than the King James use of "charity." I was a little confused when writing this description with the significant differences between the NIV vs. KJV translations. After speaking to a Greek scholar about this, it would seem that the KJV has an almost errant translation with the use of "charity" in place of "love."

We used the most popular Christian Chinese Bible, which is the Chinese Union Version (CUV). The CUV was first published in 1919. We use this so that the Chinese translation would be as accurate and standard as possible. Any Chinese Christian worth their salt will easily be able to identify this verse when they see these characters.

If you want a big "love" character written above the verse on your artwork, just make a note in the "special instructions" tab when you are customizing your artwork. There is no extra charge for that service on this special verse.

Best Friends

China zhì jiāo
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This an alternate way to say best friend in Chinese.

The first character can mean "most," "extreme" or "best." The second character means "making friends" or "building friendship." There's sort of a suggestion with the second character that fate caused you to intersect in life and become friends (that character can mean intersection in some context).

This can also mean "most intimate friend," "very good friend of long standing," or "closest friend."


See Also:  Friendship | Soulmates

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

China dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
Japan dou ten chi shou hou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation.

It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb, and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu's writings would understand.

American Football

Japan ame futou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is a short word that means "American football" in Japanese.

It is supposed to sound like an abbreviated version, "ame futo" which sounds like "ah-may foot-oh" (American Football).

There's not a great standard way to say "football" in Japanese, as the sport is not popular in Japan. Other Japanese terms for football can be confused with soccer or rugby.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Soccer

Angel

(Name - Version 2)
China ān hè ěr
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is another common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Angel.

This one misses the mark too - It uses a hard "H" sound to simulate the "J" sound of the "G" in this name. I don't know who transliterated these first and how it became the standard.
Again, I recommend using the meaning of Angel above.

If anything, this is the more masculine form of Angel. This is also the form commonly used for the masculine Latin name Ángel.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Buddha / Buddhism

Hotoke
Japan hotoke / butsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This single Japanese Kanji can mean Buddha or Buddhism.

This Kanji was actually a shorthand way to write Buddha in Chinese (popular around the 13th century). Somehow, this became the version of this Chinese character that was absorbed into Japanese, and thus became part of standard Kanji. Centuries later, this character is not recognized in Chinese at all (except by those from China with a background in Chinese literature or language).

This is also a rare or derivative Korean Hanja form - but I doubt you will find any Korean that knows that.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Keep Your Feet on the Ground

Be Down-to-Earth
China jiǎo tà shí dì
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This four-character proverb suggests that you should be practical, realistic, and grounded. Some translate this as a suggestion to be down-to-earth.

The first character means "feet."
The second means "step on" or "stand."
The third means "solid," "real," or "true."
The last character means "ground," "earth," or "terra."

Literally this means, "[keep your] Feet Standing [on] Solid Ground."


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Hapkido

Korean Martial Art of re-directing force
China hé qì dào
Japan ai ki do
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

Hapkido is a mostly-defensive martial art of Korea. It has some connection to Aikido of Japan. In fact, they are written with the same characters in both languages. However, it should be noted that the Korean Hanja characters shown here are the traditional Chinese form - but in modern Japan, the middle character was slightly simplified.
Note: You can consider this to be the older Japanese written form of Aikido. Titles on older books and signs about Aikido use this form.

The connection between Japanese Aikido and Korean Hapkido is a bit muddled in history. This is probably due to the relationship between the two countries - especially during WWII when many Koreans became virtual slaves for the Japanese (many Koreans are still bitter about that, so many things were disassociated from having any Japanese origin).

Looking at the characters, the first means "union" or "harmony."
The second character means "universal energy" or "spirit."
The third means "way" or "method."
One way to translate this into English is "Harmonizing Energy Method." This makes since, as Hapkido has more to do with redirecting energy, rather that fighting with strength against strength.

More Hapkido info

More notes:
1. Sometimes Hapkido is Romanized as "hap ki do," "hapki-do" "hab gi do" or "hapgido."

2. Korean Hanja characters are actually Chinese characters that usually hold the same meaning in both languages. There was a time when these characters were the standard and only written form of Korean. The development of modern Korean Hangul characters is a somewhat recent event in the greater scope of history. There was a time when Chinese characters were the written form of many languages in places known in modern times as North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mainland China, and a significant portion of Malaysia. Even today, more people in the world can read Chinese characters than can read English.

3. While these Korean Hanja characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Independence

China dú lì
Japan dokuritsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

Besides meaning "to be independent," this can also mean "to stand alone," self-reliance or self-support.


独Modern Japanese use a simplified version of the first character of independence. It's the same simplified version currently used in mainland China, so understood by most Chinese and all Japanese people. Click on the character to the right if you want the simplified/Japanese version.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

不屈不撓 means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding."

This is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means "bendable."

The last means "scratched" or "bothered."

So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered." I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit." This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable."

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Isabella

China yī shā bèi lā
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the most common/standard transliteration into Mandarin Chinese for the name Isabella.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Jin Ji Du Li

China jīn jī dú lì
Japan kin kei doku ritsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

"Jin Ji Du Li," means "golden rooster stands on one leg."

This also called "crane stance" in English. This is used in wushu, karate and other forms of martial arts.

This can be pronounced, "kinkei dokuritsu" in Japanese but it's rarely a title used in Japanese.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Joshua 24:15

This House Serves the LORD
China zhì yú wǒ hé wǒ jiā wǒ men bì dìng shì fèng yē hé huá
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is Joshua 24:15 in Chinese.

Joshua 24:15 in Chinese

What your
calligraphy
might look like
from our
Chinese Master
Calligrapher

Joshua 24:15 (KJV) And if it seem evil unto you to serve the LORD, choose you this day whom ye will serve; whether the gods which your fathers served that were on the other side of the flood, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell: but as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD.

Joshua 24:15 (NIV) But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your forefathers served beyond the River, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD.

These characters here just dwell on the last line of the verse, "...as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD."

We used the only official Christian Chinese Bible that I know of so that the translation would be as accurate and standard as possible. Any Chinese Christian worth their salt will easily be able to identify this verse from the Chinese words on this scroll.

I think it is a bit like having a secret code on your wall that quietly expresses to whom your are faithful.

A great gift for your devout Christian or Jewish friend if they happen to be fond of Asian art.

Or perhaps a wonderful "conversation starter" for your own home.

Note: If you are curious, the last three characters represent they way "LORD" is used in most English Bibles. In Chinese, this is actually the phonetic name in Mandarin Chinese for "Jehovah."


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Justice / Righteousness

China zhèng yì
Japan sei gi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

Practicing justice and righteousness is being fair. It is solving problems so everyone wins. You don't prejudge. You see people as individuals. You don't accept it when someone acts like a bully, cheats or lies. Being a champion for justice takes courage. Sometimes when you stand for justice, you stand alone.


Note: This is also considered to be one of the Seven Heavenly Virtues.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do

China táng shǒu dào
Japan kara te do
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the alternate title for Karate-do. This title uses a character which represents the Tang Dynasty of China. Thus, this is often translated as the "Tang Hand Way" or incorrectly, "Tang Fist Way." I have also seen some call it "China Hand Way."

There is not a lot of information on this title but some believe that a simplified form of Kung Fu that started in China, and ended up very popular in Japan used this title initially. It was later changed in Japan to a different Karate title which means "Empty Hand" (as in, without weapons).

In Korean, this title represents a certain style of martial arts. From Korean, this is often romanized as "Tang Soo Do," "Tangsudo," "Dang Su Do," or "Dangsudo." The last two romanizations on that list are the official Korean government romanization, though martial arts schools tend to use other non-standard versions.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Kata

China xíng
Japan kata
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is often used in Japanese martial arts to mean a certain set of movements and techniques.

The meaning in other context (and in Chinese or Korean) can be model, type, style, pattern, mold, mould, template, or form.

One Japanese dictionary defines it as, "standard form of a movement, posture, etc. in martial arts, sport, etc."


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Listen

China tīng
Japan chou / ki
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This character means to listen, hear, and obey (depending on context).

This character is a stand-alone word in Chinese but is usually seen in compound words in Korean. Therefore, this title is best for a Chinese audience.

聴The ancient form of this character is shown in the upper left. However, there is a modern Japanese Kanji version shown to the right. If you want this modern Japanese version, please let us know when you place your order.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Martial Arts Master

China wǔ yún zhě
Japan bugeisha
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the Japanese Kanji title for "Martial Arts Master." It suggests that you have reached at least the level of black belt, and are probably to the level where you are ready to become an instructor.

Please consider carefully where you stand before ordering this phrase on a wall scroll. If you are not a master, this will make you look a bit foolish.

If you want to get this as a gift for your master at the dojo. Try to discreetly make sure this term is used in your school. Different schools and styles of Japanese martial arts use different terms. You may notice in the Romaji and the characters, this has the same characters as "geisha" which means "person skilled in arts" (what a geisha girl really is). The title here has the character for "martial," "warrior," and/or "military" in front of it. Therefore the literal translation is "martial art person."

These Kanji are valid Chinese characters and Korean Hanja but this title does not really make sense in Chinese and not often used in Korean, though a Chinese or Korean would be able to guess the meaning by looking at the first and last characters.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Mama / Mother / Mommy

China
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the oral way that most Chinese people refer to their mothers. Often, they will put this together twice (two of the same character in a row) to create a word that sounds like "Mama." That's absolutely what little kids call their mothers in China. This Chinese "Mama" is the rough equivalent of "Mommy" in English. Beyond a certain age, Chinese will start to just say "Ma," which is like saying "Mom."

This entry is just here for a language lesson. This would make a strange wall scroll by Chinese standards. In Chinese, there are sometimes oral words that don't seem appropriate when written in calligraphy, and this is one of them. See our entry for "Loving Mother" for a better selection.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Loving Mother | Family

Olivia

China ào lì wéi yà
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the most standard transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Olivia.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Personal Integrity

China zhì cāo
Japan shi sou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is personal integrity - basically, holding yourself to a higher standard of honesty and reliability. These two characters also contain the ideas of constancy, principles, and faithfulness.

Note: In Japanese, this just means "principle."


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Proud Of One’s Name

China xíng bù gēng míng zuò bù gǎi xìng
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This Chinese proverb means, "I am who I am (and I'm not ashamed)."

Figuratively, it means to be proud of one's name and stand by one's actions.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strength and Love in Unity

Japan riki ai fu ni
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This proverb literally means:
"Strength [and] Love [are] Not Two [separate ideas/concepts/things]."

You'll find this proverb translated from Japanese to English as:
Love and strength are not separate.
Power and love are indivisible.
Strength and love in harmony.
Strength and love stand together.

Old Japanese grammar is quite different than English, and so this proverb says a lot within the brevity of just 4 characters. If you just read these characters directly as, "Strength Love Not Two," you'd probably miss the real meaning.


According to the Swedish Shorinji Kempo Federation, this is the second characteristic of Shorinji Kempo.

This post really explains the concept best in my opinion: Bushido by MS: Riki Ai Fu Ni, which states: "Riki Ai Funi" is the philosophy that power (Riki) and love (Ai) are indivisible. More concretely, a person, who is powerful but does not have love, cannot control and misuse his/her power; on the other hand, a person, who has loved ones but is not powerful enough, cannot protect himself/herself nor loved ones.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

San Soo / San Shou

China sàn shǒu
HK saan sau
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is a martial arts title sometimes spelled in English as "San Soo" or "San Shou."

Mandarin version romanizes as "San Shou." Mandarin Chinese is the most common dialect in China (literally 99% of Chinese people speak standard Mandarin along with their local dialect).

There is another martial arts style that spells this "San Soo." My guess is, this was supposed to approximate Cantonese pronunciation for which the scholarly romanization is generally agreed to be "Saan Sau." However, only about 5% of Chinese people in China can speak the Cantonese dialect. A lot of theories exist as to why Cantonese is more common outside of China than inside.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Physical Strength

China tǐ lì
Japan tairyoku
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

Means "physical strength" or "physical power."

The first character was first simplified in Japan. Then that simplified version became the standard in mainland China. Just in case you want this version, it is offered here. I suggest it if you audience is Japanese. Most Chinese know the older traditional version.

This word can also be defined: stamina; endurance; physical strength; resilience; resistance to disease; clout; stability.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children

China shì cù rú yīng ér gù kě yǐ yú zhī fù shēn xī shì cù rú ài zǐ gù kě yú zhī jū sǐ
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is an entry from the 10th section within the Earth/Terrain chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War.

This is often translated as, "Regard your soldiers as your children, and they will follow you into the deepest valleys. Look upon them as your own beloved sons, and they will stand by you even unto death."


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Surely I come quickly

Part of Revelation 22:20
China shì le wǒ bì kuài lái
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is an excerpt from Revelations 22:20. It says "Surely, I am coming quickly" or "Surely I come quickly" depending on which Bible translation you use.

The Chinese translation here comes from the Chinese Union Bible which has been around for almost 100 years and it the standard for Chinese Christians.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Sword

China jiàn
Japan ken
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is another way to write sword. This form is commonly used in Japan, though as usual, this Kanji character comes from original Chinese. This form would also be understood in Chinese (there are often several ways to write the same character) but I suggest this one only if your audience is Japanese (because they've settled on a slightly different form as the standard in China).

In Japanese, this character also means saber/sabre, blade, bayonet, stinger and even clock hand (clock hands are the "swords" of the clock).


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Katana

Sworn Friend / Ally

China méng yǒu
Japan meiyuu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This means a sworn friend or ally. If you stand on the same side of an issue with someone, and perhaps fight for the same cause together, this is the term you would use to describe such a partner.

There may not be a personal relationship, as this term is also used to describe whole countries that make a coalition, or fight against a common enemy.

This would be most appropriate if you are a high-level military officer, giving this wall scroll to an officer of another country as you join forces together, and go to war.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Wado-Ryu

Style of Karate or Jujitsu
Japan wa dou ryuu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

Wado-Ryu is a style of Karate or Jujutsu (Jujitsu).
Note: Many will argue as to whether this is a style of Karate or Jujutsu.

While some find Wado-Ryu similar to Shotokan Karate, enough differences exist in perspective and technique that it stands by itself.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou ryuu" or "wa dō ryū." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Style" or "Peace Method Style." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Wado-Kai

A Traditional Warm Welcome

China huān yíng guāng lín
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This would be the ultimate Chinese "welcome mat." Except it will be on your wall, and people will not step on it.

In a somewhat literal translation, you could say it means, "I feel happiness as I welcome you, as you have brought a shining light to this place with your arrival" or in a more simple way, "I am happy you've come as your presents really brightens up the place."

It has become common for this greeting to be announced by the staff upon the arrival of any customer in to a fancy store in China. You will also see these characters on the "welcome mats" in front of 4 and 5 star hotels in China.

Having this on a wall scroll is an extra nice touch. I have seen a few horizontal scrolls with this phrase on the wall behind the reception desk of better hotels, or near the front door of fine shops. At the most fancy department stores and restaurants in China, several greeters (almost always young women) will stand by the front door all wearing sashes with this phrase embroidered on them. As you walk in, they will bow and say "huan ying guang lin" to welcome you to the establishment.

Note: The first two and last two characters do make words in Korean Hanja but seldom used as a sentence like this in Korean.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Wing Chun Fist

China yǒng chūn quán
HK wing chun kuen
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the title for the "Wing Chun" school of martial arts but with the addition of the character for "fist" on the end. So this is "Wing Chun Fist" or literally "Singing Spring Fist."

There are lots of alternate Cantonese romanizations for this such as "Wing Chun Kuen," "Wing Tsun Cheun," "Eng Chun Pai," and "Wing Ceon Kyun." The characters are the same, just the lack of a standard Cantonese romanization means that people make up their own based on what they think it sounds like.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Buddhism

(2 Kanji)
Japan bukkyou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This can mean Buddha or Buddhism. Depending on context, this word can be used to refer to the religion and lifestyle of Buddhism, or in some cases, the Buddha himself.

Note: Until the 5th century, Japan did not have a written language. At that time, Japan absorbed Chinese characters to form their written language (these characters are known as "Kanji" in Japanese). The first character of this Buddhism title was actually a shorthand way to write Buddha in Chinese (popular around the 13th century). Somehow, this became the version of this character that was absorbed into Japanese, and thus became part of standard Kanji. Centuries later, this character is not recognized in Chinese at all.

The first character is also a rare form of Korean Hanja - though seldom used even when the Korean Hanja writing system was more common 100 years ago.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Diligence

China qín
Japan kin
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This single-character means diligence or "sense of duty" in Chinese and Korean (also understood in Japanese but not commonly-seen as a stand-alone Kanji).

As a single character on a wall scroll, this will only be seen with this meaning. However, it can also mean industrious, hardworking, frequent, regular, constant, energy, zeal, fortitude, or virility.

In Buddhism this can represent vīrya (viriya), the idea of energy, diligence, enthusiasm, or effort. It can be defined as an attitude of gladly engaging in wholesome activities, and it functions to cause one to accomplish wholesome or virtuous actions. Some Buddhists may even define this as "manliness" (a definition from a hundred years ago, before equality).

If you, or someone you know is a hard-worker (or needs a reminder to be diligent), then this is the wall scroll to have in your/their office.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Tenacity | Undaunted

Five Elements Tai Chi Fist

China wǔ xíng tài jí quán
Japan go gyou tai kyoku ken
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is a certain school or style of Tai Chi (Taiji). The characters literally mean "Five Elements Tai Chi Fist."

Notes:
In Taiwan, it would be Romanized as "Wu Hsing Tai Chi Chuan" - see the standard Mandarin method above in the gray box (used in mainland China and the official Romanization used by the Library of Congress).

The last three characters are sometimes translated as "Grand Ultimate Fist," so the whole thing can be "Five Elements Grand Ultimate Fist" if you wish.

I have not confirmed the use of this title in Korean but if it is used, it's probably only by martial arts enthusiasts. The pronunciation is correct as shown above for Korean.


Note: Because this is all Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Check dictionary for standing


Buy some related in-stock artwork?

Compare: $60.00

Your Price: $33.88


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Angel
Autumn
Beautiful
Commitment
Compassion
Compassion Heart
Confidence
Continent
Courage Commitment
Crazy
Dance
Determination
Determination to Achieve
Discipline
Disco
Dojo
Endurance
Family
Family First
Fire
Forever Love
Goju Ryu Karate Do
Grant
Happiness
Happiness and Joy
Happy Birthday
Health
Humble
I Love You
I Miss You
Indestructable
Karate
Kiss
Live Love
Lotus
Lotus Flower
Love
Love and Live
Luck
Mary
Masterless
Paris
Peace
Peace of Mind
Perserverance
Purple
Pursue Your Dreams
Rabbit
Remember
Sana
Soulmates
Strong Mind Strong Body
Strong Will
Success
Tiger
Unbroken
Water
Wealth
Woman Hero

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Outstanding 出類拔萃
出类拔萃
chū lèi bá cuì
chu1 lei4 ba2 cui4
chu lei ba cui
chuleibacui
ch`u lei pa ts`ui
chuleipatsui
chu lei pa tsui
Do not fear being slow, fear standing still 不怕慢就怕站bú pà màn jiù pà zhàn
bu2 pa4 man4 jiu4 pa4 zhan4
bu pa man jiu pa zhan
bupamanjiupazhan
pu p`a man chiu p`a chan
pupamanchiupachan
pu pa man chiu pa chan
Standing by Oneself / Walking by Oneself 獨立獨步
独立独步
do kuritsu do ppo
dokuritsudoppo
do kuritsu do po
dokuritsudopo
Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World
一視同仁
一视同仁
isshidoujin
ishidojin
yí shì tóng rén
yi2 shi4 tong2 ren2
yi shi tong ren
yishitongren
i shih t`ung jen
ishihtungjen
i shih tung jen
Loyalty 忠誠
忠诚
chuu sei / chuusei / chu sei / chuseizhōng chéng
zhong1 cheng2
zhong cheng
zhongcheng
chung ch`eng
chungcheng
chung cheng
Glory and Honor
荣 / 栄
eiróng / rong2 / rong jung
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good 克己奉公kè jǐ fèng gōng
ke4 ji3 feng4 gong1
ke ji feng gong
kejifenggong
k`o chi feng kung
kochifengkung
ko chi feng kung
Erin 愛琳
爱琳
ài lín / ai4 lin2 / ai lin / ailin
Corinthians 13:4 愛是恆久忍耐又有恩慈愛是不嫉妒愛是不自誇不張狂
爱是恒久忍耐又有恩慈爱是不嫉妒爱是不自夸不张狂
ài shì héng jiǔ rěn nài yòu yǒu én cí ài shì bú jì dù ài shì bú zì kuā bù zhāng kuáng
ai4 shi4 heng2 jiu3 ren3 nai4 you4 you3 en2 ci2 ai4 shi4 bu2 ji4 du4 ai4 shi4 bu2 zi4 kua1 bu4 zhang1 kuang2
ai shi heng jiu ren nai you you en ci ai shi bu ji du ai shi bu zi kua bu zhang kuang
ai shih heng chiu jen nai yu yu en tz`u ai shih pu chi tu ai shih pu tzu k`ua pu chang k`uang
ai shih heng chiu jen nai yu yu en tzu ai shih pu chi tu ai shih pu tzu kua pu chang kuang
Best Friends 至交zhì jiāo / zhi4 jiao1 / zhi jiao / zhijiao chih chiao / chihchiao
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis 道天地將法
道天地将法
dou ten chi shou hou
doutenchishouhou
do ten chi sho ho
dotenchishoho
dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dao4 tian1 di4 jiang4 fa3
dao tian di jiang fa
daotiandijiangfa
tao t`ien ti chiang fa
taotientichiangfa
tao tien ti chiang fa
American Football アメフトame futou / amefutou / ame futo / amefuto
Angel 安赫爾
安赫尔
ān hè ěr
an1 he4 er3
an he er
anheer
an ho erh
anhoerh
Buddha / Buddhism 仏 / 佛
hotoke / butsu
Keep Your Feet on the Ground 腳踏實地
脚踏实地
jiǎo tà shí dì
jiao3 ta4 shi2 di4
jiao ta shi di
jiaotashidi
chiao t`a shih ti
chiaotashihti
chiao ta shih ti
Hapkido 合氣道
合气道
ai ki do / aikidohé qì dào
he2 qi4 dao4
he qi dao
heqidao
ho ch`i tao
hochitao
ho chi tao
Independence 獨立
独立
dokuritsudú lì / du2 li4 / du li / duli tu li / tuli
Indomitable / Unyielding 不屈不撓
不屈不挠
fukutsu futou
fukutsufutou
fukutsu futo
fukutsufuto
bù qū bù náo
bu4 qu1 bu4 nao2
bu qu bu nao
buqubunao
pu ch`ü pu nao
puchüpunao
pu chü pu nao
Isabella 伊莎貝拉
伊莎贝拉
yī shā bèi lā
yi1 sha1 bei4 la1
yi sha bei la
yishabeila
i sha pei la
ishapeila
Jin Ji Du Li 金雞獨立
金鸡独立
kin kei doku ritsu
kinkeidokuritsu
jīn jī dú lì
jin1 ji1 du2 li4
jin ji du li
jinjiduli
chin chi tu li
chinchituli
Joshua 24:15 至於我和我家我們必定事奉耶和華
至于我和我家我们必定事奉耶和华
zhì yú wǒ hé wǒ jiā wǒ men bì dìng shì fèng yē hé huá
zhi4 yu2 wo3 he2 wo3 jia1 wo3 men bi4 ding4 shi4 feng4 ye1 he2 hua2
zhi yu wo he wo jia wo men bi ding shi feng ye he hua
chih yü wo ho wo chia wo men pi ting shih feng yeh ho hua
Justice / Righteousness 正義
正义
sei gi / seigizhèng yì / zheng4 yi4 / zheng yi / zhengyi cheng i / chengi
Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do 唐手道kara te do / karatedotáng shǒu dào
tang2 shou3 dao4
tang shou dao
tangshoudao
t`ang shou tao
tangshoutao
tang shou tao
Kata kataxíng / xing2 / xing hsing
Listen
听 / 聴
chou / ki / cho / ki / cho/kitīng / ting1 / ting t`ing / ting
Martial Arts Master 武芸者bugeishawǔ yún zhě
wu3 yun2 zhe3
wu yun zhe
wuyunzhe
wu yün che
wuyünche
Mama / Mother / Mommy
mā / ma1 / ma
Olivia 奧利維亞
奥利维亚
ào lì wéi yà
ao4 li4 wei2 ya4
ao li wei ya
aoliweiya
Personal Integrity 志操 / 誌操
志操
shi sou / shisou / shi so / shisozhì cāo / zhi4 cao1 / zhi cao / zhicao chih ts`ao / chihtsao / chih tsao
Proud Of One’s Name 行不更名坐不改姓xíng bù gēng míng zuò bù gǎi xìng
xing2 bu4 geng1 ming2 zuo4 bu4 gai3 xing4
xing bu geng ming zuo bu gai xing
hsing pu keng ming tso pu kai hsing
Strength and Love in Unity 力愛不二
力爱不二
riki ai fu ni
rikiaifuni
San Soo / San Shou 散手sàn shǒu / san4 shou3 / san shou / sanshou
Physical Strength 體力
体力
tairyokutǐ lì / ti3 li4 / ti li / tili t`i li / tili / ti li
Sun Tzu: Regard Your Soldiers as Children 視卒如嬰兒故可以與之赴深溪視卒如愛子故可與之俱死
视卒如婴儿故可以与之赴深溪视卒如爱子故可与之俱死
shì cù rú yīng ér gù kě yǐ yú zhī fù shēn xī shì cù rú ài zǐ gù kě yú zhī jū sǐ
shi4 cu4 ru2 ying1 er2 gu4 ke3 yi3 yu2 zhi1 fu4 shen1 xi1 shi4 cu4 ru2 ai4 zi3 gu4 ke3 yu2 zhi1 ju1 si3
shi cu ru ying er gu ke yi yu zhi fu shen xi shi cu ru ai zi gu ke yu zhi ju si
shih ts`u ju ying erh ku k`o i yü chih fu shen hsi shih ts`u ju ai tzu ku k`o yü chih chü ssu
shih tsu ju ying erh ku ko i yü chih fu shen hsi shih tsu ju ai tzu ku ko yü chih chü ssu
Surely I come quickly 是了我必快來
是了我必快来
shì le wǒ bì kuài lái
shi4 le wo3 bi4 kuai4 lai2
shi le wo bi kuai lai
shilewobikuailai
shih le wo pi k`uai lai
shihlewopikuailai
shih le wo pi kuai lai
Sword
kenjiàn / jian4 / jian chien
Sworn Friend / Ally 盟友meiyuu / meiyuméng yǒu / meng2 you3 / meng you / mengyou meng yu / mengyu
Wado-Ryu 和道流wa dou ryuu
wadouryuu
wa do ryu
wadoryu
A Traditional Warm Welcome 歡迎光臨
欢迎光临
huān yíng guāng lín
huan1 ying2 guang1 lin2
huan ying guang lin
huanyingguanglin
huan ying kuang lin
huanyingkuanglin
Wing Chun Fist 詠春拳
咏春拳
yǒng chūn quán
yong3 chun1 quan2
yong chun quan
yongchunquan
yung ch`un ch`üan
yungchunchüan
yung chun chüan
Buddhism 仏教bukkyou / bukyo
Diligence kinqín / qin2 / qin ch`in / chin
Five Elements Tai Chi Fist 五行太極拳
五行太极拳
go gyou tai kyoku ken
gogyoutaikyokuken
go gyo tai kyoku ken
gogyotaikyokuken
wǔ xíng tài jí quán
wu3 xing2 tai4 ji2 quan2
wu xing tai ji quan
wuxingtaijiquan
wu hsing t`ai chi ch`üan
wuhsingtaichichüan
wu hsing tai chi chüan

In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line. In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Some people may refer to this entry as Standing Kanji, Standing Characters, Standing in Mandarin Chinese, Standing Characters, Standing in Chinese Writing, Standing in Japanese Writing, Standing in Asian Writing, Standing Ideograms, Chinese Standing symbols, Standing Hieroglyphics, Standing Glyphs, Standing in Chinese Letters, Standing Hanzi, Standing in Japanese Kanji, Standing Pictograms, Standing in the Chinese Written-Language, or Standing in the Japanese Written-Language.










This page of standing Chinese calligraphy dictionary search results was generated in 0.2053 seconds.