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Number in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Number calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Number" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Number" title below...

  1. Best / Number One
  2. Two
  3. 17 Seventeen
  4. Five
  5. Ten
  6. Nine
  7. Three
  8. Eight
  9. Seven
10. Six
11. A Vast Sky Full of Stars
12. Moon
13. Day
14. Zero
15. Tai Chi Ball
16. Where There is a Will, There is a Way
17. Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls
18. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching
19. Holy Bible
20. Sky / Ether / Void / Emptiness / Unreality
21. Life Energy / Spiritual Energy
22. One

Best / Number One

Japan ichi ban
Best / Number One

一番 is often used to mean "best" or "the best" in Japanese. It actually means "number one" in Japanese.

Two

The number two
China èr
Japan ni / aru- / futa-
Two

二 is the number 2 in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji. I have no idea why you would want this as a calligraphy wall scroll but hundreds of visitors search for this number.

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced several different ways depending on context. It can be ni, aru-, futa-, and a few others when combined with other characters.

There's just one way to pronounce this in Chinese. Korean also has just one pronunciation.

17 Seventeen

China shí qī
Japan juunana / juushichi
17 Seventeen

十七 is the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean for the number seventeen (17).

Five

The number five
China
Japan go
Five

五 / 伍 is the number five in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. 五 / 伍 is a strange selection for a wall scroll, so it's here mostly for reference. I guess it's OK if the number five is important to you.


伍 Because this character is rather simple (just four strokes), there is an anti-fraud way to write three on bank documents. These variants are shown to the right. This version can also refer to a squad of five soldiers, or in Korean, refer to rank.

Ten

The number ten
China shí
Japan juu
Ten

十 / 拾 is the number ten in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. 十 / 拾 is a strange selection for a wall scroll, so it's here mostly for reference. I guess it's OK if the number ten is important to you.


拾 Because this character is rather simple (just two strokes), there is an anti-fraud way to write ten on bank documents. This variant is shown to the right.

Nine

The number nine
China jiǔ
Japan kyuu
Nine

九 / 玖 is the number nine in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. 九 / 玖 is a strange selection for a wall scroll, so it's here mostly for reference. I guess it's OK if the number nine is important to you.


玖 Because this character is rather simple (just two strokes), there is an anti-fraud way to write nine on bank documents. This version is shown to the right.

Three

The number three
China sān
Japan san
Three

三 / 參 is the number three in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. 三 / 參 is a strange selection for a wall scroll, so it's here mostly for reference. I guess it's OK if the number three is important to you.


參参 Because this character is rather simple (just three lines), there is an anti-fraud way to write three on bank documents. These variants are shown to the right.

Eight

The number eight
China
Japan hachi
Eight

八 is the number eight in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

八 is a strange selection for a wall scroll, so it's here mostly for reference. I guess it's OK if the number eight is important to you.


Because this character is rather simple (just two strokes), 捌 instead of 八 is an anti-fraud way to write eight on bank documents.

Seven

The number seven
China
Japan shichi / nana-
Seven

七 is the number 7 in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji. I have no idea why you would want this as a calligraphy wall scroll but hundreds of visitors search for this number.

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced several different ways depending on context. It can be shichi / nana-, and a few others when combined with other characters.

There's just one way to pronounce this in Chinese. Korean also has just one pronunciation.

Six

The number six
China liù
Japan ryuu / roku / muu
Six

六 / 陸 is the number 6 in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji. I have no idea why you would want this as a calligraphy wall scroll but hundreds of visitors search for this number.

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced several different ways depending on context. It can be ryu, roku, mu, and a few others when combined with other Kanji.

There's just one way to pronounce this in Chinese. Korean also has just one pronunciation.


Also written 陸 or 陆 as an anti-fraud banker's numeral.

A Vast Sky Full of Stars

China fán xīng
A Vast Sky Full of Stars

This title literally means a cluster or huge number of stars in the sky.

Moon

China yuè
Japan tsuki
Moon

月 is how to write the title for "moon" in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

月 is also used to refer to the month. 月 is because China traditionally uses a lunar calendar, so saying "next moon" is the same as saying "next month" etc.
In modern Chinese and Japanese and old Korean, the character for a number is put in front of this moon character to represent western months. So "one moon" is January "two moons" is February etc.

If you are wondering, in the east Asian way to write dates, the character for "sun" or "day" is used with a number in front of it to express the day of the month. So "ten moons, one sun" becomes "October 1st" or "10/1" (this date happens to be Chinese National Day - The equivalent of Independence Day in the USA, Canada Day, or the Queen's Birthday).

Day

China
Japan hi / nichi
Day

日 is how to write "day" in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Hanja.

This can also mean "Sun," the star in the middle of the Solar system in which we live. In Japanese, it can also mean "sunshine" or even "Sunday."

When writing the date in modern Chinese and Japanese, putting a number in front of this character indicates the day of the month. Of course, you need to indicate the month too... The month is expressed with a number followed by the character for the moon. So "three moons ten suns" would be "March 10th" or "3/10."

Note: 日 is also the first character for the proper name of Japan. Remember that Japan is "The land of the rising sun"? Well, the first character for Japan means "sun" the second means "origin" so you get the real meaning now. Sometimes, in China, this sun character can be a short name for Japan or a suffix for something of or from Japan.

Zero

China líng
Japan rei / zero
Zero

零 is the number zero in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. 零 is a strange selection for a wall scroll, so it's here mostly for reference. I guess it's OK if zero is important to you.


Note: In modern Japan and China, they will often just write a circle to represent zero in lieu of this character.

Tai Chi Ball

China tài jí qiú
Japan tai kyoku kyuu
Tai Chi Ball

太極球 is the title "Tai Chi Ball."

This may refer to any number of variations of exercise balls, some with yin-yang themes, others strictly for taichi/taiji or qigong exercises.

Where There is a Will, There is a Way

Japan seishin ittou nanigoto ka nara zaran
Where There is a Will, There is a Way

This Japanese expression means, "Where there is a will, there is a way. There are other Japanese phrases with similar meaning but this one is the most commonly used (according to number of results on Japanese Google).

This can also be romanized as, "seshinittonanigotokanarazaran."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls

China lún huí
Japan rin ne
Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls

輪回 / 輪廻 is a universal word in Japanese and Chinese that expresses the Buddhist idea of "reincarnation," "transmigration of souls" or "the eternal cycle of birth and death."

In some context, this can also mean "karma," and others will say it represents "samsara."

The first character means wheel, ring, turn, circle, loop or rotate.
The second character can be thought of as a suffix meaning "-times." This second character can also refer to something that revolves, returns, goes back, or a counter for the number of occurrences of some event.
Together the sum supersedes the parts and it means reincarnation. But knowing the seeing the essence of each character may help you understand some of the meaning behind the word.


廻Shown to the right is the more common way to write the second character in Japanese. It's an alternate form of this character in Chinese (so neither way is technically wrong in either language). If you select a Japanese calligrapher, expect that is will look like the Kanji to the right.


See Also:  Buddhism | Rebirth

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

Except from Chapter 67
China yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

This is an except from the 67th Chapter of Lao Tzu's (Lao Zi's) Te-Tao Ching (Dao De Jing). This is the part where the three treasures are discussed. In English, we'd say these three treasures are compassion, frugality, and humility. Some may translate these as love, moderation, and lack of arrogance. I have also seen them translated as benevolence, modesty, and "Not presuming to be at the forefront in the world." You can mix them up the way you want, as translation is not really a science but rather an art.

I should also explain that the first two treasures are single-character ideas, yet the third treasure was written out in six characters (there are also some auxiliary characters to number the treasures).

If Lao Tzu's words are important to you, then a wall scroll with this passage might make a great addition to your home.

Holy Bible

China shèng jīng
Holy Bible

聖經 is how to write Bible in Chinese.

The first character means Holy, sacred, saint, or sage.
The second character means sacred book or scripture.

Each Sunday morning, if you are near a Catholic or Protestant Church, you will see plenty of Chinese people carrying their Bibles. Virtually every large or medium city in China has, at least, one Christian church. Beijing has about 14 Christian churches of Catholic and various Protestant denominations. That number doubles if you count all the church services that are for foreigners only, and doubles again if you count all of the underground Christian Churches. Many Embassies (Canadian, Italian, French, etc.) offer Protestant and Catholic services. However, the U.S. Embassy is the most unfriendly Embassy in all of China, and offers no such religious services and regularly denies entry and kicks out Americans and others, whether or not they have official business.


See Also:  Christian | Disciple

Sky / Ether / Void / Emptiness / Unreality

(Used in Japanese version of five elements)
China kōng
Japan kuu / kara / sora / ron
Sky / Ether / Void / Emptiness / Unreality

This single character means empty, void, hollow, vacant, vacuum, blank, nonexistent, vacuity, voidness, emptiness, non-existence, immateriality, unreality, the false or illusory nature of all existence, being unreal.

In Buddhist context, this relates to the doctrine that all phenomena and the ego have no reality but are composed of a certain number of skandhas or elements, which disintegrate. The void, the sky, space. The universal, the absolute, complete abstraction without relativity. The doctrine further explains that all things are compounds, or unstable organisms, possessing no self-essence, i.e. are dependent, or caused, come into existence only to perish. The underlying reality, the principle of eternal relativity, or non-infinity, i.e. śūnya, permeates all phenomena making possible their evolution.

From Sanskrit and/or Pali, this is the translation to Chinese and Japanese of the title śūnya or śūnyatā.

In Japanese, when pronounced as "ron" (sounds like "roan") this can be a given name. It should be noted that this Kanji has about 5 different possible pronunciations in Japanese: kuu, kara, sora, ron, and uro. 空 is also an element in the Japanese version of the five elements.

Life Energy / Spiritual Energy

Chi Energy: Essence of Life / Energy Flow
China
Japan ki
Life Energy / Spiritual Energy

This energy flow is a fundamental concept of traditional Asian culture.

氣 is romanized as "Qi" or "Chi" in Chinese, "Gi" in Korean, and "Ki" in Japanese.
Chi is believed to be part of everything that exists, as in "life force" or "spiritual energy". It is most often translated as "energy flow," or literally as "air" or "breath". Some people will simply translate this as "spirit" but you have to take into consideration the kind of spirit we're talking about. I think this is weighted more toward energy than spirit.

The character itself is a representation of steam (or breath) rising from rice. To clarify, the character for rice looks like this: 米
Steam was apparently seen as visual evidence of the release of "life energy" when this concept was first developed. The Qi / Chi / Ki character is still used in compound words to mean steam or vapor.
The etymology of this character is a bit complicated. It's suggested that the first form of this character from bronze script (about 2500 years ago) looked like these samples: 氣氣
However, it was easy to confuse this with the character for the number three. So the rice radical was added by 221 B.C. (the exact time of this change is debated). This first version with the rice radical looks like this: 氣
The idea of Qi / Chi / Ki is really a philosophical concept. It's often used to refer to the "flow" of metaphysical energy that sustains living beings. Yet there is much debate that has continued for thousands of years as to whether Qi / Chi / Ki is pure energy, or consists partially, or fully of matter.

You can also see the character for Qi / Chi / Ki in common compound words such as Tai Chi / Tai Qi, Aikido, Reiki and Qi Gong / Chi Kung.

In the modern Japanese Kanji, the rice radical has been changed into two strokes that form an X.

気 The original and traditional Chinese form is still understood in Japanese but we can also offer that modern Kanji form in our custom calligraphy. If you want this Japanese Kanji, please click on the character to the right, instead of the “Select and Customize” button above.


More language notes: This is pronounced like “chee” in Mandarin Chinese, and like “key” in Japanese.
This is also the same way to write this in Korean Hanja where it is Romanized as “gi” and pronounced like “gee” but with a real G-sound, not a J-sound.
Though Vietnamese no longer use Chinese characters in their daily language, this character is still widely known in Vietnam.


See Also:  Energy | Life Force | Vitality | Life | Birth | Soul

One

The number one
China
Japan ichi
One

一 is "one" or "1" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

People keep searching for "one" but I'm not sure what you want. This would be a strange selection for a wall scroll, so please don't order it. Post a request on our forum if you want a phrase with "one" in it that you can't find on our site.

The "one" character is really simple, it's just one stroke. Two is two strokes and three is three strokes, from four and above, the characters get more complicated.

In some ways, the "one" character is too simple, it could be a stray mark, or added to a banking document. Therefore, the following banking anti-fraud character for "one" have developed over the last 1500 years in China and Japan:
壱 壹 弌

Search for Number in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Best
Number One
一番ichi ban / ichiban
Twoni / aru- / futa-èr / er4 / er / ererh
17 Seventeen十七juunana / juushichi
junana / jushichi
junana/jushichi
shí qī / shi2 qi1 / shi qi / shiqishih ch`i / shihchi / shih chi
Five五 / 伍
gowǔ / wu3 / wu
Ten十 / 拾
juu / jushí / shi2 / shishih
Nine九 / 玖kyuu / kyujiǔ / jiu3 / jiuchiu
Three三 / 參
三 / 参
sansān / san1 / san
Eighthachibā / ba1 / bapa
Sevenshichi / nana-qī / qi1 / qich`i / chi
Six六 / 陸
六 / 陆
ryuu / roku / muu
ryu / roku / mu
ryu/roku/mu
liù / liu4 / liu
A Vast Sky Full of Stars繁星fán xīng / fan2 xing1 / fan xing / fanxingfan hsing / fanhsing
Moontsukiyuè / yue4 / yueyüeh
Dayhi / nichirì / ri4 / rijih
Zero
零 / 〇
rei / zerolíng / ling2 / ling
Tai Chi Ball太極球
太极球
tai kyoku kyuu
taikyokukyuu
tai kyoku kyu
taikyokukyu
tài jí qiú
tai4 ji2 qiu2
tai ji qiu
taijiqiu
t`ai chi ch`iu
taichichiu
tai chi chiu
Where There is a Will, There is a Way精神一到何事か成らざらんseishin ittou nanigoto ka nara zaran
seishin itto nanigoto ka nara zaran
seishinittonanigotokanarazaran
Reincarnation
Transmigration of Souls
輪回 / 輪廻
轮回
rin ne / rinnelún huí / lun2 hui2 / lun hui / lunhui
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching
一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先
一曰慈二曰俭三曰不敢为天下先
yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
yi1 yue1 ci2 er4 yue1 jian3 san1 yue1 bu4 gan3 wei2 tian1 xia4 xian1
yi yue ci er yue jian san yue bu gan wei tian xia xian
i yüeh tz`u erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei t`ien hsia hsien
i yüeh tzu erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei tien hsia hsien
Holy Bible聖經
圣经
shèng jīng
sheng4 jing1
sheng jing
shengjing
sheng ching
shengching
Sky
Ether
Void
Emptiness
Unreality
kuu / kara / sora / ron
ku / kara / sora / ron
ku/kara/sora/ron
kōng / kong1 / kongk`ung / kung
Life Energy
Spiritual Energy

气 / 気
kiqì / qi4 / qich`i / chi
Oneichiyī / yi1 / yii
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Number Kanji, Number Characters, Number in Mandarin Chinese, Number Characters, Number in Chinese Writing, Number in Japanese Writing, Number in Asian Writing, Number Ideograms, Chinese Number symbols, Number Hieroglyphics, Number Glyphs, Number in Chinese Letters, Number Hanzi, Number in Japanese Kanji, Number Pictograms, Number in the Chinese Written-Language, or Number in the Japanese Written-Language.