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Have Heart in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Have Heart calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Have Heart" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Have Heart" title below...

  1. Sincere Heart
  2. Peaceful Heart
  3. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible
  4. Follow Your Heart
  5. Mind, Body and Spirit
  6. Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind
  7. Caring
  8. Inner Peace
  9. Stay Strong / Iron Will
10. Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red,...
11. Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused
12. Strong Hearted / Strong Willed
13. Spirit
14. Heijoshin / Presence of Mind
15. Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo
16. Shingitai / Shin Gi Tai
17. Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism
18. Peace of Mind
19. Love and Honor
20. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

Sincere Heart

China xuě xīn
Sincere Heart

When you take this word apart, you find the sum is a little different than the parts. The first character means blood and the second means heart. It is important to note that for thousands of years, it was believed that your heart was both your soul and your mind in Asian culture. When you add blood to the heart, it is your whole being - it is pure and clean dedication with your whole soul.

Most Chinese dictionaries define this as sincerity of heart or a MEDICAL TERM!!!
Please think carefully before ordering this selection - it was only added as others have used this for coffee cups and other novelties (though perhaps naively).

Peaceful Heart

China jìng xīn
Japan shizugokoro / seishin
Peaceful Heart

靜心 is how to write "peaceful heart" in Chinese.

The first character means peaceful, calm, and quiet. The second means heart but can also mean mind, soul, or spirit.

Because the word for heart / mind / soul is interchangeable in Chinese, this can also be translated as "a peaceful soul" or "a quiet mind."

I have also seen this translated as "placid temperament" or "spirit of serenity," especially from Japanese.


静While they once used the same first character form in Japan, they now use a slightly-simplified version in modern Japan (after WWII). This version is shown to the right, and can be selected for your wall scroll by clicking on that Kanji instead of the button above.

To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way
China yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

This old Chinese proverb has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to do it.
A willful man will have his way.
If you wish it, you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible to a strong mind.


Follow Your Heart

Japan kimochi ni shitagau
Follow Your Heart

The first part of this Japanese proverb means, feeling, sensation, or mood. In this context, you could say it means your heart, as the whole proverb is suggesting that you follow the feelings that you have inside.
The second part suggests following, abiding by, or listening to this inner feeling.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Mind, Body and Spirit

China shēn xīn líng
Japan mi shin rei
Mind, Body and Spirit

This is probably the best way to express the idea of "Body, Mind and Spirit" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word for "heart" here because for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say "warm-hearted" or "I love you with all of my heart." In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is "body, heart & spirit" which could also be interpreted as "body mind & soul."

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply "feels" like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we have to be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).


霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind

China mào dì zhì duō
Japan boujiishitta
Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind

冒地質多 is a Chinese and Japanese way to write Bodhicitta.

冒地質多 is often translated as "the enlightened mind" or "enlightened heart."

This title is strictly Buddhist, and won't make sense to Chinese or Japanese people who do not have an expansive background in Buddhist terms, concepts, and scripture.

Caring

China guān xīn
Caring

關心 means caring in Chinese.

Caring is giving love and attention to people and things that matter to you and anyone who is in need of help. When you care about people, you help them. You do a careful job, giving your very best effort. You treat people and things gently and respectfully. Caring makes the world a safer place.

Note: 關心 is also a word in Korean Hanja but in Korean, it means taking interest or concern. In Korean it's still a good word but it doesn't quite have the "caring for a person" meaning that it does in Chinese.


See Also:  Benevolence | Altruism

Inner Peace

China nèi xīn píng jìng
Japan naishin heizyou
Inner Peace

This Chinese and Japanese phrase is a direct translation for the western idea of inner peace.

The first two characters contain the idea of "heart," "innermost being," or "deep in the/your inner mind."

The last two characters mean "tranquil" and "serene."

I have seen this phrase used as "inner peace" for art prints and even on the side of coffee cups. But I think the translation is too literal. It feels like a direct translation from English rather than a nicely composed Chinese or Japanese phrase. See my other entries for "inner peace."


See Also:  Serenity | Simplicity | Peace

Stay Strong / Iron Will

Japan tesshin sekichou
Stay Strong / Iron Will

鉄心石腸 is a Japanese proverb which suggest you should have the inner-strength and will as hard and steadfast as iron. It's the Japanese way to say, "stay strong." 鉄心石腸 is an especially uplifting thing to say to a person in distress or recovering from a disaster. It's kind of the survivor's creed.

If you literally translate this, it means, "iron will, stone guts" or "iron heart, rock-hard bowels."

Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red,
Gold Turns a Heart Black

China bái jiǔ hóng rén miàn huáng jīn hēi shì xīn
Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red, / Gold Turns a Heart Black

Literally this says: [Just as] white liquor makes people's faces turn red, [So] yellow gold makes people's hearts turn black.

This is a warning about the nature of greed. The suggestion is that one who lusts for gold and riches, will eventually have a black heart (or become a heartless greedy bastard). As a wall scroll, this is a reminder and warning to keep yourself from following the greedy path.

Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused

China zhuān xīn
Japan sen shin
Devotion / Dedication / Attentive / Focused

The first character means "for a particular person, occasion, or purpose," "focused on one single thing," "concentrated" and sometimes, "special."

The second character means "heart" or "mind" by itself.

Together, these two characters make a word that means, "paying attention with your heart." It's often translated as, "dedication," as in "be absorbed in" or "concentrate one's efforts." It's also used to mean, "with single mind," "whole-heartedly," "paying attention," "undivided attention," "concentration (-ed)," "engrossed," "devotionally (listening/watching)," and/or "attentive."

My favorite translation, which comes from the Oxford Advanced Chinese/English Dictionary is, "wholehearted devotion."

If it seems like the meaning of this word is quite open, you are correct. The context in which the word is used matters a lot. It can mean different things depending on how you use it. This makes it kind of nice as you can decide what this means to you (within some limits). This word is always positive in meaning, so even if a Chinese person reads it differently than you, it will still have a good meaning.


専In Japanese, they tend to use a variation of the second character which has one less stroke. If you want your calligraphy written this Japanese form, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Note: Japanese and Chinese people will recognize either form.


See Also:  Faith | Devotion

Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

China yì zhì jiān qiáng
Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

This phrase can mean either "strong hearted," "strong willed" or "determination."

The first two characters can be translated as "will," "willpower," "determination," "volition," "intention," or "intent." But, it should be noted that this first part possess the element of "heart" in the lower portion of both characters (they also partially carry the meaning "with whole heart").

The last two characters mean "strong" or "staunch."

Chinese word order and grammar is a bit different than English, so in this case, they are in reverse order of English but have the correct meaning in a natural form.


See Also:  Strong Willed | Discipline | Will-Power

Spirit

China jīng shén
Japan sei shin
Spirit

精神 is the kind of spirit that you have if you perform well in sports or competition. It is the idea of having a good attitude, and putting your all into something - so much so that others can see or feel your spirit. It is the essence of your being that can only be subjectively described because there are no words that can fully explain what "spirit" really is.

For your information:
My Japanese dictionary further tries to explain this word by comparing it to mind, soul, heart or intention.
My Chinese dictionary compares these characters to meanings like vigor, vitality, drive and mentality.
My Korean dictionary defines this as mind, spirit and soul.


See Also:  Vitality | Heart | Soul

Heijoshin / Presence of Mind

China píng cháng xīn
Japan hei jou shin
Heijoshin / Presence of Mind

平常心 is the title Heijoshin, as associated with Kendo and Aikido schools of Japanese martial arts.

平常心 is also a word in Japanese which can be translated as "one's self-possession" or "presence of mind."

In Chinese and Korean, this means "simplicity heart," "composure," "calmness," or a "sense of orderliness." In Chinese and Korean, this implies that you enjoy what you have, keep your heart in balance, and have no over-blown ambitions.

Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo

Japan shi ken ha ra mitsu dai kou myou
Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo

This is "shiken haramitsu daikōmyō," a famous Japanese Buddhist mantra.

四拳 = shi-ken = four fist (many translate this as "four hearts").
波羅蜜 = ha-ra-mitsu = A loanword representing pāramitā, or entrance into Nirvana. Awkwardly, it also means jackfruit.
大光明 = dai-kou-myo = big/great light bright (great bright light).

Shiken represents four hearts:
1. The Merciful Heart - Love and caring for all living things.
2. The Sincere Heart - Pursues righteousness, or the right path - sincerely trying to do what is right.
3. The Attuned Heart - Knows that nature and fate have their ways, and thus stays in tune with the universe.
4. The Dedicated Heart - Steadfast on the chosen path to the end.

Shingitai / Shin Gi Tai

China xīn jì tǐ
Japan shin gi tai
Shingitai / Shin Gi Tai

心技体 is the Japanese title "shin gi tai" or "shingitai."

This can refer to the three elements of Sumo wrestlers or martial artists, "heart-technique-physique."

Here is what each character represents:

心 shin) mind, heart and spirit.

技 (gi) skill, knowledge and experience.

体 (ti) body and physical effort.

心技体 have the same meanings in Chinese, though this title is used much more often in Japanese.

Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

Japan ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyou na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba houshi to omoi yari no seishin
Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism

The Buddha ordered that all should know this triple truth...
A generous heart, kind speech, and a life of service and compassion are the things which renew humanity.

This is the English translation most commonly used for this Japanese Buddhist phrase. You might have seen this on a coffee cup or tee-shirt.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Peace of Mind

(five character version)
China nèi xīn de níng jìng
Peace of Mind

內心的寧靜 is the longer way to express the idea of "peace of mind" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean heart or "innermost being."
The middle character is a connecting modifier.
The last two characters mean peace, tranquility, or serenity.

Some may also translate this as "inner peace" but I like our other inner-peace options for that idea.

This kind of makes sense in Korean but will have an archaic read - even by those who can understand Korean Hanja.

Love and Honor

China qíng yì
Love and Honor

情義 means to love and honor in Chinese. 情義 is more or less the kind of thing you'd find in marriage vows.

The first character suggests emotions, passion, heart, humanity, sympathy, and feelings.

In this context, the second character means to honor your lover's wishes, and treat them justly and righteously (fairly). That second character can also be translated as "obligation," as in the obligation a husband and wife have to love each other even through difficult times.

In the context outside of a couple's relationship, this word can mean "comradeship."

Japanese may see this more as "humanity and justice" than "love and honor." It's probably best if your target is Chinese.


This is the short and sweet form, there is also a longer poetic form (you can find it here: Love and Honor if it's not on the page you are currently viewing).


See Also:  Love and Honor

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty. It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.

Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds peoples homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.

Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.

Search for Have Heart in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Sincere Heart血心xuě xīn / xue3 xin1 / xue xin / xuexinhsüeh hsin / hsüehhsin
Peaceful Heart靜心
静心
shizugokoro / seishinjìng xīn / jing4 xin1 / jing xin / jingxinching hsin / chinghsin
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible有志者事竟成 / 有誌者事竟成
有志者事竟成
yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
you3 zhi4 zhe3 shi4 jing4 cheng2
you zhi zhe shi jing cheng
youzhizheshijingcheng
yu chih che shih ching ch`eng
yuchihcheshihchingcheng
yu chih che shih ching cheng
Follow Your Heart気持ちに従うkimochi ni shitagau
kimochinishitagau
Mind, Body and Spirit身心靈 / 身心霊
身心灵
mi shin rei
mishinrei
shēn xīn líng
shen1 xin1 ling2
shen xin ling
shenxinling
shen hsin ling
shenhsinling
Bodhicitta: Enlightened Mind冒地質多
冒地质多
boujiishitta
bojishitta
mào dì zhì duō
mao4 di4 zhi4 duo1
mao di zhi duo
maodizhiduo
mao ti chih to
maotichihto
Caring關心
关心
guān xīn / guan1 xin1 / guan xin / guanxinkuan hsin / kuanhsin
Inner Peace內心平靜
内心平静
naishin heizyou
naishinheizyou
naishin heizyo
naishinheizyo
nèi xīn píng jìng
nei4 xin1 ping2 jing4
nei xin ping jing
neixinpingjing
nei hsin p`ing ching
neihsinpingching
nei hsin ping ching
Stay Strong
Iron Will
鉄心石腸tesshin sekichou
tesshinsekichou
teshin sekicho
teshinsekicho
Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red, Gold Turns a Heart Black白酒紅人面黃金黑世心
白酒红人面黄金黑世心
bái jiǔ hóng rén miàn huáng jīn hēi shì xīn
bai2 jiu3 hong2 ren2 mian4 huang2 jin1 hei1 shi4 xin1
bai jiu hong ren mian huang jin hei shi xin
pai chiu hung jen mien huang chin hei shih hsin
Devotion
Dedication
Attentive
Focused
專心 / 専心 / 耑心
专心
sen shin / senshinzhuān xīn
zhuan1 xin1
zhuan xin
zhuanxin
chuan hsin
chuanhsin
Strong Hearted
Strong Willed
意志堅強
意志坚强
yì zhì jiān qiáng
yi4 zhi4 jian1 qiang2
yi zhi jian qiang
yizhijianqiang
i chih chien ch`iang
ichihchienchiang
i chih chien chiang
Spirit精神sei shin / seishinjīng shén
jing1 shen2
jing shen
jingshen
ching shen
chingshen
Heijoshin
Presence of Mind
平常心hei jou shin
heijoushin
hei jo shin
heijoshin
píng cháng xīn
ping2 chang2 xin1
ping chang xin
pingchangxin
p`ing ch`ang hsin
pingchanghsin
ping chang hsin
Shiken Haramitsu Daikomyo四拳波羅蜜大光明shi ken ha ra mitsu dai kou myou
shi ken ha ra mitsu dai ko myo
shikenharamitsudaikomyo
Shingitai
Shin Gi Tai
心技体shin gi tai
shingitai
xīn jì tǐ
xin1 ji4 ti3
xin ji ti
xinjiti
hsin chi t`i
hsinchiti
hsin chi ti
Triple Truth of Japanese Buddhism人間性を再生するのは寛容な心親切な言葉奉仕と思いやりの精神ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyou na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba houshi to omoi yari no seishin
ningensei o saisei suruno wa kanyo na kokoro shinsetsu na kotoba hoshi to omoi yari no seishin
ningenseiosaiseisurunowakanyonakokoroshinsetsunakotobahoshitoomoiyarinoseishin
Peace of Mind內心的寧靜
内心的宁静
nèi xīn de níng jìng
nei4 xin1 de ning2 jing4
nei xin de ning jing
neixindeningjing
nei hsin te ning ching
neihsinteningching
Love and Honor情義
情义
qíng yì / qing2 yi4 / qing yi / qingyich`ing i / chingi / ching i
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu遠上寒山石徑斜白雲生處有人家停車坐愛楓林晚霜葉紅於二月花
远上寒山石径斜白云生处有人家停车坐爱枫林晚霜叶红于二月花
yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
yuan3 shang4 han2 shan1 shi2 jing4 xia2 bai2 yun2 sheng1 chu4 you3 ren2 jia1 ting2 che1 zuo4 ai4 feng1 lin2 wan3 shuang4 ye4 hong2 yu2 er4 yue4 hua1
yuan shang han shan shi jing xia bai yun sheng chu you ren jia ting che zuo ai feng lin wan shuang ye hong yu er yue hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng ch`u yu jen chia t`ing ch`e tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng chu yu jen chia ting che tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki Jujutsu
Archangel
Aster
Berserk
Bushido
Christ
Create
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon
Energy
Enlighten
Enlightened
Enso
Faith in God
Family
Father
Fortune
Heart of a Warrior
House
Iaido
Jesus
Keep Fighting
Kung Fu
Love
Loyalty
Mind Body Soul Spirit
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Mushin
Music
Overcome
Peach
Pleasure
Protector
Rain
Rebirth
Right Intention
Rooster
Samurai
Strength
Strength of Spirit
Strong Heart
Sword
The Red String
The Way
The Way of the Warrior
Thunder Lightning in Kanji
Trust in God
Trust No Man
Victory
Wedding
White
Winter
Wolf
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Have Heart Kanji, Have Heart Characters, Have Heart in Mandarin Chinese, Have Heart Characters, Have Heart in Chinese Writing, Have Heart in Japanese Writing, Have Heart in Asian Writing, Have Heart Ideograms, Chinese Have Heart symbols, Have Heart Hieroglyphics, Have Heart Glyphs, Have Heart in Chinese Letters, Have Heart Hanzi, Have Heart in Japanese Kanji, Have Heart Pictograms, Have Heart in the Chinese Written-Language, or Have Heart in the Japanese Written-Language.