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50 Years Old in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a 50 Years Old calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "50 Years Old" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "50 Years Old" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Retro / Old School
  2. Banzai
  3. Banzai / Wansui
  4. Confucius
  5. Shit / Defecate / Excrement / Feces / Poop
  6. Saturn
  7. Boar / Pig
  8. Black Eagle / Condor
  9. Concentration
10. Clarity
11. Archer
12. April
13. Blessings on this Home
14. December
15. February
16. Soccer / Football / Futbol
17. Hua Mulan
18. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa
19. Life is Short
20. The Month of May
21. Mercury
22. Mind, Body and Spirit
23. Where There is a Will, There is a Way
24. No one knows a son better than the father
25. One
26. Appreciation and Love for Your Parents
27. Star
28. Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan
29. Turtle
30. Wellness
31. Rat / Mouse
32. Ox / Bull / Cow
33. Tiger
34. Rabbit / Hare
35. Dragon
36. Snake / Serpent
37. Horse
38. Goat / Sheep
39. Rooster / Chicken
40. Dog
41. January
42. June


Retro / Old School

China fù gǔ
Japan fukko
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

The meaning of this title can vary depending on context. It used to just mean a return to the old ways.

It can also mean, "to turn back the clock," "retro" (fashion style based on nostalgia, esp. for 1960s), "revival," or "restoration."

The return to "the old ways" was also an aspiration of Confucius about 2500 years ago. This proves that "going retro" or "old school" has been cool since at least 500 B.C.

Banzai

Modern Japanese Version
China wàn suì
Japan banzai
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

We've made two almost identical entries for this word. This is the modern Japanese way to write banzai. In the last century, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. The new generation will expect it to be written this way but the old generation can still read the more traditional form. You must make your own determination as to what version is best for you. If your audience is mostly Japanese, I suggest this form.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. This is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Other translations: hurrah, long life, congratulations, cheers, live long.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Banzai / Wansui

Old Japanese / Traditional Chinese & Korean
China wàn suì
Japan banzai / manzai
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

We've made two almost identical entries for this word. This is the traditional Chinese, Korean Hanja, and ancient Japanese way to write banzai. In modern times, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. So you might want to select the other entry for more universal readability.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. This is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

Other translations include: Cheers! (not the drinking kind), hurrah!, long live [name]!, congratulations!

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Confucius

China kǒng zǐ
Japan koushi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is how to write the name of the great sage, known in the west as Confucius. His real name is Kongzi (The name Confucius is a westernized version of his name - his family name is Kong, and "zi" was added as a title of distinction). He lived some 2500 years ago in Qufu, a town in modern-day Shandong Province of Northern China (about 6 hours south of Beijing by bus). He was a consort to Emperors, and after his death, the impact of his philosophies still served to advise emperors, officials, and common people for generations. Also during these thousands of years, the Kong family remained powerful in China, and the Kong estate was much like the Vatican in Rome. The Kong estate existed as if on sovereign ground with its own small garrison of guards and privileges of a kingdom within an empire.

This was true up until the time the Kong family had to flee to Taiwan in 1949 when the Red Army took victory over the Nationalists during the Revolution. The home of Confucius was later razed and all statues defaced or stolen during the Cultural Revolution. Finally, after years of smearing his name and image, it is once again okay to celebrate the teachings of Confucius in mainland China.

NOT APPROPRIATE FOR
CUSTOM CALLIGRAPHY

Shit / Defecate / Excrement / Feces / Poop

China dà biàn
Japan dai ben
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

Seems a lot of you want to know how to write "shit" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Well, here it is.

Do not, under any circumstances, try to order this selection for a wall scroll. None of the calligraphers that I work with would dare to lower themselves to such a level, and actually write "shit" for you. This is only here for reference. This is not appropriate for custom calligraphy!

This word is thousands of years old, and was absorbed into both Japanese and Korean (if you note, the pronunciation is very similar in all three languages).

This version is sometimes used as a verb (when used with some other words).

Saturn

China tǔ xīng
Japan to shou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

土星 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for the planet Saturn.

The literal meaning of these characters is "earth star". The earth character is on of the five elements of Chinese culture. This earth character regards soil or dirt, not the planet Earth.

Saturn has been titled 土星 for at least 2000 years.

Boar / Pig

Year of the Pig / Zodiac Sign
China zhū
Japan inoshishi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for boar, pig, or swine in Chinese and old Korean.

If you were born in the year of the boar / year of the pig, you...

Are optimistic.
Have good luck with wealth and money.
Are honest, generous, and warm-hearted.


猪The character shown to the right is the Japanese Kanji for "wild boar."
It's an alternate/simplified form of pig/boar in Chinese (can be read by both Chinese and Japanese people). Click on that character instead of the button above if you want this version.

See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Black Eagle / Condor

China jiù
Japan washi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the way to write black eagle, or condor in Chinese. It means eagle (sometimes vulture) in Japanese Kanji. This character hasn't been in common use in Korean for hundreds of years, so it's hard to say what bird it represented in old Korean Hanja.

There are other multi-character words which express different specific species of birds of prey (bald eagle, osprey, golden eagle, etc).


If you need a more specific title, just post a special Asian calligraphy title request on our forum.

Concentration

Japan seishintouitsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This means concentration of mind, or mental concentration in old Korean Hanja and Japanese.

This concentration title is one of the 8 Key Concepts of Tang Soo Do.

You'll often see this romanized from Korean as "Chung Shin Tong Il."

If you want to order the modern Korean Hangul version, click on the Hangul in the pronunciation box. Otherwise, this title is valid Korean Hanja (from the 1600 years that Korea used Chinese characters).

Clarity

China qīng
Japan sei
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This word means clarity or clear in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Looking at the parts of this character, you have three splashes of water on the left, "life" on the top right, and the moon on the lower right.

Because of something Confucius said about 2500 years ago, you can imagine that this character means "live life with clarity like bright moonlight piercing pure water." The Confucian idea is something like "Keep clear what is pure in yourself, and let your pure nature show through." Kind of like saying, "Don't pollute your mind or body, so that they remain clear."

This might be stretching the definition of this single Chinese character but the elements are there, and "clarity" is a powerful idea.


Korean note: Korean pronunciation is given above but this character is written with a slight difference in the "moon radical" in Korean. However, anyone who can read Korean Hanja, will understand this character with no problem (this is considered an alternate form in Korean). If you want the more standard Korean Hanja form (which is an alternate form in Chinese), just let me know.

Japanese note: When reading in Japanese, this Kanji has additional meanings of pure, purify, or cleanse (sometimes to remove demons or "exorcise"). Used more in compound words in Japanese than as a stand-alone Kanji.

Archer

China shè shǒu
Japan i te / sha shu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This means archer, shooter, or marksman in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Depending on context, it can also mean "goal getter" in Chinese. This would also be the word for bowman.

This word is kind of modern in Asia, meaning that it's only been in use for a few hundred years. However, the more ancient version of archer is often not even recognized by the current generation of Chinese and Japanese people.

The first character means "shoot" or "fire" (in the context of a gun or bow). It's also a suffix for radioactive things (in the context of chemistry) - radioactive things "fire off" electrons. In Japanese, that first Kanji is a short name and suffix for archery.

The second character means "hand" but hand can also mean a person, in the same way, that "farmhand" is a person in English.

April

Fourth Month
China sì yuè
Japan shi gatsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is April in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This was originally the fourth month of the Chinese lunar year, now used for the fourth month of the Gregorian calendar (also known as the Western or Christian calendar). These characters literally mean "fourth month" or "fourth moon."

Blessings on this Home

China wǔ fú lín mén
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This literally means, "five good-fortunes arrive [at the] door." It is understood to mean, "may the five blessings descend upon this home."

These blessing are known in ancient China to be: longevity, wealth, health, virtue, and a natural death (living to old age). This is one of several auspicious sayings you might hear during Chinese New Years.

December

Twelfth Month
China shí èr yuè
Japan juu ni gatsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is December, the twelfth month of the year, in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

February

China èr yuè
Japan futatsuki / nigatsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for the month of February.

This literally means the "second month" or "second moon" (of the year).

Soccer / Football / Futbol

Japan shuu kyuu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This the title for football or soccer in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja. The sport is very popular in both Japan and Korea (Korea and Japan co-hosted the football World Cup in 2002 - a world-class sporting event held every four years that rivals the Olympics).

In Japan, they sometimes say サッカ (sakka) or フットボール (futto bouru) in place of the pronunciation shown above. This is supposed to sound like the English word "soccer" and "football / futbol" respectively.

The first Kanji means "kick" and the second means "ball." So technically, this means "kick ball" in Japanese and Korean (this is just an educational note - this will always be understood as the game of soccer / football).


FYI: This game would never be confused with American Football in Japan or Korea. Unlike the game of American basketball and baseball (both quite popular in Japan and Korea), there is only a vague awareness of a rugby-like game that is also called football in the USA.

Hua Mulan

China huā mù lán
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

花木蘭 is the name of the famous Chinese woman warrior Hua Mulan.

She was made famous in the west by Disney's animated movie, "Mulan."

Most of the historical information about her comes from an ancient poem. It starts with a concerned Mulan, as she is told a man from each family is to serve conscription in the army. Her father is too old, and her brother is too young. Mulan decides to take the place of her father. After twelve years of war, the army returns and the best warriors are awarded great posts in the government and riches. Mulan turns down all offers, and asks only for a good horse for the long trip home. When Mulan greets visiting comrades wearing her old clothes, they are shocked to find the warrior they rode into battle with for years was actually a woman.

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

China quán fǎ
Japan kenpou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist," or even "law of the fist." The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist."

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense." I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

Life is Short

Even a 100-year-old is but a traveler passing through this life
China bǎi suì guāng yīn rú guò kè
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

百歲光陰如過客 directly translates as: [Even a] hundred-year-old [person] is [just a] traveler passing by.

The simple message is, "Human life is short." Of course, there is an unspoken suggestion that you should make the best of the time you have here on earth.

The Month of May

Fifth Month
China wǔ yuè
Japan satsuki / go gatsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the month of May in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This was originally the fifth month of the Chinese lunar year, now used for the fifth month of the Gregorian calendar (also known as the Western or Christian calendar). These characters literally mean "fifth month" or "fifth moon."


Note: Sometimes Japanese parents will use this as a female given name, and use "Mei" (the sound of May in English) as the pronunciation.

Mercury

China shuǐ xīng
Japan sui shou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is title for the planet Mercury in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The literal meaning is "water star." This title has been used to refer to Mercury in much of Asia for the past 2200 years or longer.

Mind, Body and Spirit

China shēn xīn líng
Japan mi shin rei
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is probably the best way to express the idea of "Body, Mind and Spirit" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word for "heart" here because for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say "warm-hearted" or "I love you with all of my heart." In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is "body, heart & spirit" which could also be interpreted as "body mind & soul."

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply "feels" like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we have to be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).


霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

Where There is a Will, There is a Way

China yú gōng yí shān
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the Chinese proverb (also somewhat known in Japan and Korea) for, "the silly old man moves a mountain."

Figuratively, this means, "where there's a will, there's a way."

Based on a fable of Lord Yu (愚公). He moved the soil of the mountain in front of his house. After years of effort, he finally moved the entire mountain.

The moral of the story: Anything can be accomplished if one works at it ceaselessly.


The Japanese version of this is 愚公山を移す (gu kou yama wo utsu su). But better to get the Chinese version, since this is originally a Chinese proverb.


See Also:  Nothing Is Impossible

No one knows a son better than the father

China zhī zǐ mò ruò fù
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This can be translated as "No one knows a son better than his father."

This idiom is based on the idea that after spending many years together, family members know everything about each other. Better than anyone else, a father knows the qualities and shortcomings of his son.

If you are looking for something about "father and son," this is probably the best selection.

This is the original proverb (very old) but others have been composed about various combinations of mothers, sons, daughters, and fathers.

One

The number one
China
Japan ichi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is "one" or "1" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

People keep searching for "one" but I'm not sure what you want. This would be a strange selection for a wall scroll, so please don't order it. Post a request on our forum if you want a phrase with "one" in it that you can't find on our site.

The "one" character is really simple, it's just one stroke. Two is two strokes and three is three strokes, from four and above, the characters get more complicated.

In some ways, the "one" character is too simple, it could be a stray mark, or added to a banking document. Therefore, the following banking anti-fraud character for "one" have developed over the last 1500 years in China and Japan:
壱 壹 弌

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

China shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parent's or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is "You Zi Yin" which means "The Traveler's Recite."

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sun light which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt which you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

Star

China xīng
Japan hoshi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is how "star" is written in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

Thousands of years ago, when this character was first developed, there was belief that you could see remnants of stars in everything. In fact, some early Chinese men of science suggested that all living things came from "stardust" or cosmic debris. This could explain why the upper portion of this character mans "sun" (a star itself) and the lower portion means "birth" or "life."

Oddly enough, modern-day scientists suggest that we are all made up of cosmic dust. Seems they were getting it right in China at a time when the western world thought the Earth was flat and the Church was claiming that the sun and all cosmic bodies revolved around the Earth.

Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

China tài jí quán
Japan tai kyoku ken
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the famous Taoist meditation and martial art exercise. The direct translation of these characters would be something like "grand ultimate fist" but that does not quite hit the mark for what this title really means.

An early-morning walk through any city in China near a park or open area will yield a view of Chinese people practicing this ancient technique.

The typical scene is an old man of no less than 80 years on this earth, with a wispy white beard and perhaps a sword in one hand. He makes slow moves that are impossibly smooth. He is steady-footed, and always in balance. For him, time is meaningless and proper form and technique is far more important than speed.

For the younger generation, faster moves may look impressive and seem smooth to the casual observer. But far more discipline and mental strength is needed to create perfectly smooth moves in virtual slow motion.

Note: There are two ways to Romanize these Chinese characters as seen in the title above. The pronunciation and actual characters are the same in Chinese. If you really used English sounds/words to pronounce this, it would be something like "tie jee chew-on" (just make the "chew-on" as one flowing syllable).

Turtle

...also means tortoise
China guī
Japan kame
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the generic term for turtle in Chinese, and old Korean Hanja. It's like saying "turtle" (or "tortoise") without being specific about species of turtle.

Please note that there are many special characters in Chinese and a few in Japanese that denote specific species of turtle, and do not include this character. We can't possibly cover all of these species but if you want a certain one, such as "loggerhead" or a "leatherback," just post your request for a special Chinese / Japanese Kanji / Korean Hanja calligraphy word and we'll do our best to research your special species.

If you noticed, I said species names that do not include this character. This is because, in much the same way we can do it in English by just saying, "loggerhead," instead of "loggerhead turtle," the same can be done in Chinese and Japanese.

亀This may be hard to believe but the image shown to the right is an alternate version of this character, which is currently used in Japan. This was originally an alternate form in ancient China for turtle - but it's so obscure now, that most Chinese people would just think this is the Japanese version of turtle (I did a lot of research on this). The version shown in the upper left is traditional Chinese (also used in Korea, prior to 100 years ago). It will generally not be recognized by the new generation of Japanese people. If your audience is Japanese, please click on the Kanji image shown to the right to have the calligrapher write that version (instead of clicking the button above).


Note: In Japanese, this Kanji is also a representation of long life. This is related to the fact that a tortoise can live for hundreds of years.

Wellness

China shēn tǐ jiàn kāng
Japan shin tai ken kou
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is how to express "wellness" in Chinese. The meaning is not much different than the idea of "good health." In fact, the first two characters alone are often translated as "health." Some will also translate this title as "physical health."

If you want to fill your room with a feeling of wellness, this is the wall scroll for you.

This is also the ancient way to express wellness in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja. The modern Japanese form is only different on the second Kanji but Koreans have completely changed their common writing system in the last 100 years.


See Also:  Health | Vitality

Rat / Mouse

Year of the Rat / Zodiac Sign
China shǔ
Japan nezumi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for rat (and sometimes mouse) in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the Rat, you . . .


Are sensitive and smart.
Easily to adapt to the new environments.
Have a curious nature.
Are good at using the opportunities that are presented to you.

In some contexts, this character could mean "mouse."


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Ox / Bull / Cow

Year of the Ox / Bull - Zodiac Sign
China niú
Japan ushi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for bull, cow, ox, or bovine creature in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the ox / bull / cow, you . . .


Are dedicated to your work.
Are discrete, careful and conscientious.
Value work and family.

Note that in this Chinese character, there is no distinction between bull and cow. All bovine creatures fit into the definition of this character. To distinguish between male and female, another sex-designating character is added in front of this character. Therefore, in China, the energy drink "Red Bull" (Hong Niu) is often translated in the minds of Chinese people as "Red Cow" or even "Red Ox."


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Tiger

Year of the Tiger / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan tora
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for tiger in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

Since you already know what a tiger is, here's some trivia: If you look at the Japanese pronunciation, you might remember a movie called "Tora Tora Tora" which was the code word used to initiate the attack on Pearl Harbor. It simply means "Tiger Tiger Tiger."

In Chinese culture, the tiger is considered to be the king of all animals (in much the way we see the lion in western culture).

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the tiger, you . . .

Have a strong personality.
Are full of self-confidence.
Love adventure
Don't like to obey others.


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Tiger Calligraphy pages.

Rabbit / Hare

Year of the Rabbit / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan usagi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for rabbit or hare in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the rabbit, you . . .


Are gentle and full of sympathy.
Love to help others.
Enjoy a quiet life.
Are a good worker.
Are however, a bit of a pushover.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Dragon

Year of the Dragon / Zodiac Sign
China lóng
Japan ryuu / tatsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for dragon in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

The dragon is the creature of myth and legend that dominates Chinese, Japanese, and even European folklore. In China, the dragon is the symbol of the Emperor, strength and power, and the Chinese dragon is known as the god of water.

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the Dragon, you . . .

Have a strong body and spirit.
Are full of energy.
Have vast goals.
Have a deep level of self-awareness.
Will do whatever you can to "save face."


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Dragon Calligraphy pages.

Snake / Serpent

Year of the Snake / Zodiac Sign
China shé
Japan hebi
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for snake or serpent in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the snake, you . . .


Are calm.
Are and inspiration to others.
Have a stubborn nature like a mule (you do not like to concede).


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Horse

Year of the Horse / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan uma
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for horse in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the horse, you . . .


Are outgoing and active.
Don't give up easily.
Are known to have a bad temper.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Goat / Sheep

Year of the Goat / Zodiac Sign
China yáng
Japan hitsuji
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for goat or sheep in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the goat (sheep), you . . .


Are sophisticated and considerate
Can always find the best solution to problems.
Are tolerant.
Are not afraid of hardship.
Know how to save money (thrifty).


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Rooster / Chicken

Year of the Rooster / Zodiac Sign
China
Japan niwatori
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for rooster or chicken in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the rooster (chicken), you . . .


Have a unique sense of color.
Are high principled and responsible.
Have persuasive power.
Are honest.
Have a great ability to communicate.

Common Chinese chicken Alternate Chinese chicken #1 Alternate Chinese chicken #2

Please note: There are a few different ways to write rooster / chicken as shown to the right. If you are particular about the form, please let us know when you place your order.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Dog

Year of the Dog / Zodiac Sign
China gǒu
Japan inu / ku
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the character for dog, canine or hound in Chinese.

If you were born in the year of the dog, you . . .


Are strong-willed
Loyal to your friends and mate.
Never compromise when you think you are right.

Note: Can be pronounced, and means dog in Japanese but feels like a very old word (see our other dog if you need a Japanese dog).


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

January

First Month
China yī yuè
Japan ichi gatsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the month of January, first month of the year, in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

June

Sixth Month
China liù yuè
Japan roku gatsu
Mockup of Calligraphy Artwork

This is the month of June in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This was originally the sixth month of the Chinese lunar year, now used for the sixth month of the Gregorian calendar (also known as the Western or Christian calendar). These characters literally mean "sixth month" or "sixth moon."


Check dictionary for 50 years old


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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aikido
Angel
Autumn
Be True to Yourself
Beautiful
Boxing
Brave Warrior
Bushi
Compassion
Compassion Heart
Dance
Dojo
Dream
Endurance
Family
Family First
Fighter
Follow Your Dreams
Forever Love
Future
Gentle
God Give Me Strength
Goju Ryu Karate Do
Good Deed
Grant
Happiness
Health
Honor
In God We Trust
Integrity
Karma
Life is Beautiful
Live Laugh Love
Live Love
Lotus
Lotus Flower
Love
Luck
Mary
Metal
Mind Body Spirit
Mother
Nature
Never Forget
No Pain No Gain
Peace
Pride
Protect
Pursue Your Dreams
Rebel
Remember
Sana
Shotokan Karate
Strength
Success
Tiger
Unbroken
Warm

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Retro / Old School 復古
复古
fukko / fukofù gǔ / fu4 gu3 / fu gu / fugu fu ku / fuku
Banzai 萬歲
万岁
banzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Banzai / Wansui 萬歲
万岁
banzai / manzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Confucius 孔子koushi / koshikǒng zǐ / kong3 zi3 / kong zi / kongzi k`ung tzu / kungtzu / kung tzu
Shit / Defecate / Excrement / Feces / Poop 大便dai ben / daibendà biàn / da4 bian4 / da bian / dabian ta pien / tapien
Saturn 土星to shou / toshou / to sho / toshotǔ xīng / tu3 xing1 / tu xing / tuxing t`u hsing / tuhsing / tu hsing
Boar / Pig
inoshishizhū / zhu1 / zhu chu
Black Eagle / Condor
washijiù / jiu4 / jiu chiu
Concentration 精神統一seishintouitsu
seishintoitsu
Clarity seiqīng / qing1 / qing ch`ing / ching
Archer 射手i te / sha shu
ite / shashu
shè shǒu / she4 shou3 / she shou / sheshou
April 四月shi gatsu / shigatsusì yuè / si4 yue4 / si yue / siyue ssu yüeh / ssuyüeh
Blessings on this Home 五福臨門
五福临门
wǔ fú lín mén
wu3 fu2 lin2 men2
wu fu lin men
wufulinmen
December 十二月juu ni gatsu
juunigatsu
ju ni gatsu
junigatsu
shí èr yuè
shi2 er4 yue4
shi er yue
shieryue
shih erh yüeh
shiherhyüeh
February 二月futatsuki / nigatsuèr yuè / er4 yue4 / er yue / eryue erh yüeh / erhyüeh
Soccer / Football / Futbol 蹴球shuu kyuu / shuukyuu / shu kyu / shukyu
Hua Mulan 花木蘭
花木兰
huā mù lán
hua1 mu4 lan2
hua mu lan
huamulan
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa 拳法kenpou / kenpoquán fǎ / quan2 fa3 / quan fa / quanfa ch`üan fa / chüanfa / chüan fa
Life is Short 百歲光陰如過客
百岁光阴如过客
bǎi suì guāng yīn rú guò kè
bai3 sui4 guang1 yin1 ru2 guo4 ke4
bai sui guang yin ru guo ke
baisuiguangyinruguoke
pai sui kuang yin ju kuo k`o
paisuikuangyinjukuoko
pai sui kuang yin ju kuo ko
The Month of May 五月satsuki / go gatsu
satsuki / gogatsu
wǔ yuè / wu3 yue4 / wu yue / wuyue wu yüeh / wuyüeh
Mercury 水星sui shou / suishou / sui sho / suishoshuǐ xīng
shui3 xing1
shui xing
shuixing
shui hsing
shuihsing
Mind, Body and Spirit 身心靈 / 身心霊
身心灵
mi shin rei
mishinrei
shēn xīn líng
shen1 xin1 ling2
shen xin ling
shenxinling
shen hsin ling
shenhsinling
Where There is a Will, There is a Way 愚公移山yú gōng yí shān
yu2 gong1 yi2 shan1
yu gong yi shan
yugongyishan
yü kung i shan
yükungishan
No one knows a son better than the father 知子莫若父zhī zǐ mò ruò fù
zhi1 zi3 mo4 ruo4 fu4
zhi zi mo ruo fu
zhizimoruofu
chih tzu mo jo fu
chihtzumojofu
One ichiyī / yi1 / yi i
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents 誰言寸草心報得三春暉
谁言寸草心报得三春晖
shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
shui2 yan2 cun4 cao3 xin1 bao4 de2 san1 chun1 hui1
shui yan cun cao xin bao de san chun hui
shui yen ts`un ts`ao hsin pao te san ch`un hui
shui yen tsun tsao hsin pao te san chun hui
Star hoshixīng / xing1 / xing hsing
Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan 太極拳
太极拳
tai kyoku ken
taikyokuken
tài jí quán
tai4 ji2 quan2
tai ji quan
taijiquan
t`ai chi ch`üan
taichichüan
tai chi chüan
Turtle
龟 / 亀
kameguī / gui1 / gui kuei
Wellness 身體健康
身体健康
shin tai ken kou
shintaikenkou
shin tai ken ko
shintaikenko
shēn tǐ jiàn kāng
shen1 ti3 jian4 kang1
shen ti jian kang
shentijiankang
shen t`i chien k`ang
shentichienkang
shen ti chien kang
Rat / Mouse nezumishǔ / shu3 / shu
Ox / Bull / Cow ushiniú / niu2 / niu
Tiger torahǔ / hu3 / hu
Rabbit / Hare usagitù / tu4 / tu t`u / tu
Dragon
ryuu / tatsu
ryu / tatsu
ryu/tatsu
lóng / long2 / long lung
Snake / Serpent hebishé / she2 / she
Horse
umamǎ / ma3 / ma
Goat / Sheep hitsujiyáng / yang2 / yang
Rooster / Chicken 鷄 or 雞
鸡 or 鶏
niwatorijī / ji1 / ji chi
Dog inu / kugǒu / gou3 / gou kou
January 一月ichi gatsu / ichigatsuyī yuè / yi1 yue4 / yi yue / yiyue i yüeh / iyüeh
June 六月roku gatsu / rokugatsuliù yuè / liu4 yue4 / liu yue / liuyue liu yüeh / liuyüeh

In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line. In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.










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