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The name Self-Discipline in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Self-Discipline calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “Self-Discipline” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Self-Discipline” title below...


  1. 4. Right Action / Perfect Conduct

  2. Discipline

  3. Discipline / Training / Tempering Character

  4. Discipline

  5. Exercise

  6. The Guts Theory

  7. Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu

  8. Kyokushin

  9. Love Your Children, But Discipline Them Too

10. Military Discipline

11. Moderation / Temperance

12. Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart

13. Self-Control

14. Self-Restraint / Self-Control

15. Self-Discipline / Will-Power

16. Self-Improvement

17. Shugyo

18. Spare the Rod, Spoil the Child

19. Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

20. Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

21. Training / Drill

22. Warriors: Quality Over Quantity

23. Well-Disciplined / Orderly

24. Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

25. Will-Power / Self-Control

26. Shitsuke


4. Right Action / Perfect Conduct

Samyak Karmanta / Samma Kammanta

 zhèng yè
 sei gyou
4. Right Action / Perfect Conduct Scroll

正業 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Action, along with Right Speech and Right Living, constitute the path to Virtue.

The five precepts of Right Action are...
1. Refrain from destroying living beings (no murder or any form of taking a life).
2. Refrain from stealing.
3. Refrain from sexual misconduct (adultery, rape, etc.).
4. Refrain from false speech (lying or trickery).
5. Refrain from intoxicants that lead to heedlessness (no drugs or alcohol).

This concept can be summarized as “Avoidance of actions that conflict with moral discipline.”

Note: In Japanese, when read by a non-Buddhist, this will mean “the right job/vocation.”


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

 jì lǜ
Discipline Scroll

紀律 is a Chinese and Korean word that conveys the idea of extreme self-control and perhaps self-sacrifice, and obedience.

This word matches the kind of “discipline” I was in the Marine Corps. There is also an additional idea of maintaining order or being orderly in your tasks.

This idea would also fit an athlete training for the Olympics who gives up many pleasures to stay focused on their training.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

 guī
 kiritsu
Discipline Scroll

規律 is a Japanese word for discipline that relays the ideas of keeping order, and observance (of rules, laws, regulations).

This is also a word in Chinese and old Korean Hanja where it suggests that you are one who follows a certain law of behavior or has a regular and dependable pattern of behavior, personal regime, or rhythm.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Discipline / Training / Tempering Character

 mó liàn
Discipline / Training / Tempering Character Scroll

磨鍊 is a form of discipline which suggests training of the mind and character, aimed at producing self-control, obedience, etc.

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries even translates this as “tempering oneself” or turning yourself into hardened steel.


In old Korean Hanja, they use these characters in reverse order but with the same meaning. If you want the Korean version, please click this link instead of the button above: Korean version.

 duàn liàn
 tan ren
Discipline Scroll

鍛練 is the Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja word used for discipline.

This has a meaning like “forging or creating something from lots of training and practice.” My Japanese dictionary translates this as “tempering, forging, hardening, disciplining, training.”

This is for Japanese and Korean only. In Chinese, these characters might be translated as (physical) “exercise.”


練
練'
錬

The modern form of the second Japanese Kanji looks like the first image to the right. There’s also an alternate modern form after that, and finally, an alternate traditional form. Because calligraphy is an art, the calligrapher could choose any of these possible forms. Let us know if you have a preference.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Exercise

(for body or mind)

 duàn liàn
Exercise Scroll

鍛煉/鍛鍊 means to exercise in much the same way we use the word exercise in English.

This can be exercising your body at the gym or exercising your mind in studies. Most of the time, this refers to physical exercise.

This can also be translated as to temper, to toughen, to train, to drill, to forge, or simply discipline.

The Guts Theory

The belief that where there's a will, there's a way.

 kon jou ron
The Guts Theory Scroll

根性論 is a Japanese title that refers to the belief that where there's a will, there's a way.

Another way to translate this is “The Guts Theory” or “The Doctrine of Will-Power.” Maybe breaking down the meaning of the characters will help clarify this:
根性 = will-power; guts; temper; nature; spirit; nature and character; the nature of the powers of any sense.
論 = theory; doctrine; treatises on dogma, philosophy, discipline, etc.

Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu

 jiàn shù
 kenjutsu
Kenjutsu / Kenjitsu Scroll

In Japanese, the modern definition, using simple terms, 剣術 is “A martial art involving swords” or “The art of the sword.”

However, in Chinese, this is the word for fencing (as in the Olympic sport).

I will suppose that you want this for the Japanese definition, which comes from skills and techniques developed in the 15th century. At that time, Kenjutsu (or swordsmanship) was a strictly military art taught to Samurai and Bushi (soldiers). The fact that swords are rarely used in military battles anymore, and with the pacification of Japan after WWII, Kenjutsu is strictly a ceremonial practice often studied as a form of martial art (more for the discipline aspect rather than practical purpose).

Language note: The Korean definition is close to the Japanese version described above. However, it should be noted that this can mean “fencing” depending on the context in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean.

術 術Character variation notes: There are slight variations possible with the second character. Either way is correct and understood by both Japanese and Chinese folks.

Since there are about 5 common ways to write the sword character, if you are particular about which version you want, please note that in the “special instructions” when you place your order.

Romanization note: This term is often Romanized as Kenjitsu; however, following the rules of Japanese Romaji, it should be Kenjutsu.

 kyoku shin
Kyokushin Scroll

極真 is the Japanese title Kyokushin.

The literal meaning is “great truth” or “ultimate truth.” However, 極真 is usually associated with the style of stand-up, full-contact karate, founded in 1964 by Masutatsu Oyama (大山倍達).

Practitioners of the Kyokushinkai Karate follow a philosophy of discipline and self-improvement.

Love Your Children, But Discipline Them Too

 ài zài xīn lǐ hèn zài miàn pì
Love Your Children, But Discipline Them Too Scroll

爱在心里狠在面皮 literally translates as “Love [your] children in [your] heart, [but] be stern [with them] in [your] manner.”

This is a little like saying “Love your child but don't spare the switch.”

Military Discipline

 jūn jì
 gun ki
Military Discipline Scroll

軍紀 means military discipline or military principles.

If maintaining your military discipline is important to you personally or important to your military unit, this is the wall scroll to have up behind your desk. In fact, it's the kind of thing I expect to see behind the desk of a First Sergeant or maybe a hardcore NCO.

Note: In some rare contexts, it could be extended to mean “morale,” but “discipline” is much closer to the commonly-held definition.

Note: This term is not well-known outside the military services in Asia (not used by the common person).


See Also:  Self-Discipline

Moderation / Temperance

 jié zhì
 sessei
Moderation / Temperance Scroll

節制 means moderation or temperance in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Moderation is creating a healthy balance in your life between work and play, rest and exercise. You don't overdo or get swept away by the things you like. You use your self-discipline to take charge of your life and your time.

節制 can also be translated as sobriety or self-restraint.

This is often used as part of the Seven Heavenly Virtues to represent sobriety and/or temperance.


See Also:  Prudence | Ethics | Humble | Humility

Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart

 zì zūn xīn
 ji son shin
Prideful Mind / Self-Respecting Heart Scroll

自尊心 is a Japanese and Korean word that means “pride” or “self-respect.”

The first Kanji/Hanja means oneself. The second can mean revered, valuable, precious, noble, or exalted. And the last Kanji/Hanja means heart, mind, and/or spirit.


While these characters make sense and hold the same general meaning in Chinese, this is not a normal Chinese word. This selection should only be used if your audience is Japanese or Korean.


See Also:  Respect | Pride | Self-Reliance | Self-Control | Self-Discipline

Self-Control

 zì zhì
 jisei
Self-Control Scroll

The short and sweet version of self-control.

Note: This can also mean self-restraint.


See Also:  Will-Power | Discipline

Self-Control

 zì jǐ yì zhì
 jikoyokusei
Self-Control Scroll

自己抑制 has a meaning like “to restrain oneself” in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

The first two characters mean “regarding oneself,” and the second two mean “to refrain” or “to restrain.”


See Also:  Discipline | Will-Power

Self-Restraint / Self-Control

 kè jǐ
 kokki
Self-Restraint / Self-Control Scroll

克己 can be translated as “self-denial,” “self-abnegation,” “self-restraint,” “self-discipline,” “self-mastery,” or selflessness.

As a tenet of Korean taekwondo, and other martial arts, this is often used with the title “self-control.”

Self-Discipline / Will-Power

 zì lǜ
 jiritsu
Self-Discipline / Will-Power Scroll

自律 means self-discipline and self-control.

It is doing what you really want to do rather than being tossed around by your feelings like a leaf in the wind. You act instead of reacting. You get things done in an orderly and efficient way. With self-discipline, you take charge of yourself.


Not sure if this one works for a Japanese audience.


See Also:  Discipline | Self-Control

Self-Improvement

 xiū yǎng
 shuuyou / shuyo
Self-Improvement Scroll

修養 means self-improvement in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Other translations for this word include accomplishment, training, self-cultivation, (mental) training, self-discipline, cultivation, or cultivating moral character.

 xiū xíng
 shu gyou
Shugyo Scroll

修行 is shugyō or shugyou in Japanese. It refers to ascetic practices, training, practice, discipline, and study.

修行 is also a word in the original Chinese, referring more to religious studies and practices.

In the Buddhist context, this represents caryā. In Buddhism, this relates to one's conduct, observing and doing, cultivating oneself in the right practice, and/or being pious.

Spare the Rod, Spoil the Child

 bàng tóu chū xiào zǐ zhù tóu chū wǔ nì
Spare the Rod, Spoil the Child Scroll

棒頭出孝子箸頭出忤逆 literally translates as:
A stick (or switch) produces filial sons; chopsticks produce disobedient [ones].

Figuratively, this means:
Strict discipline produces dutiful children, whereas indulgence produces disobedient ones.

This proverb is very similar to this English proverb:
“Spare the rod and spoil the child.”

Strong Hearted / Strong Willed

 yì zhì jiān qiáng
Strong Hearted / Strong Willed Scroll

意志堅強 can mean either “strong-hearted,” “strong-willed” or “determination.”

The first two characters can be translated as “will,” “willpower,” “determination,” “volition,” “intention,” or “intent.” But, it should be noted that this first part possesses the element of “heart” in the lower portion of both characters (they also partially carry the meaning “with the whole heart”).

The last two characters mean “strong” or “staunch.”

Chinese word order and grammar are a bit different than English, so in this case, they are in reverse order of English but have the correct meaning in a natural form.


See Also:  Strong Willed | Discipline | Will-Power

Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

 tài jí quán
 tai kyoku ken
Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan Scroll

太極拳 is the famous Taoist meditation and martial art exercise. The direct translation of these characters would be something like “grand ultimate fist,” but that does not quite hit the mark for what this title really means.

An early-morning walk through any city in China near a park or an open area will yield a view of Chinese people practicing this ancient technique.

A typical scene is an old man of no less than 80 years on this earth, with a wispy white beard and perhaps a sword in one hand. He makes slow moves that are impossibly smooth. He is steady-footed and always in balance. For him, time is meaningless and proper form, and technique is far more important than speed.

For the younger generation, faster moves may look impressive and seem smooth to the casual observer. But more discipline and mental strength are needed to create perfectly smooth moves in virtual slow motion.

Note: There are two ways to Romanize these Chinese characters, as seen in the title above. The pronunciation and actual characters are the same in Chinese. If you really used English sounds/words to pronounce this, it would be something like “tie jee chew-on” (make the “chew-on” one flowing syllable).

Training / Drill

 xùn liàn
 kunren
Training / Drill Scroll

If training or drill is important to you (especially for military drill and training), 訓練 might be just the thing for a drill master to hang behind his/her desk.

This term is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean practice or exercise, depending on context.

Warriors: Quality Over Quantity

 bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō
Warriors: Quality Over Quantity Scroll

兵在精而不在多 is a Chinese proverb that means: [The value of] soldiers/warriors lies in [their] quality, not [just] in [their] quantity.

In simple terms, this says that regarding warriors, quality is better than quantity.

Most tacticians will agree that this can aid in the factor known as “force multiplication.” Having good troops of high morale, excellent training, and good discipline is like having a force that is three times larger.


See Also:  兵在精

Well-Disciplined / Orderly

Special Military Term

 yán zhěng
Well-Disciplined / Orderly Scroll

When reading an account of some battles in China, I came across the Chinese word, 嚴整. As it turns out, 嚴整 is only used in military circles to describe neat, orderly, and well-disciplined troops. Perhaps this is actually closer to the meaning I was taught while in the U.S. Marines.

The first character literally means stern, serious, strict, or severe (it can also mean airtight or watertight.
The second character means exact, in good order, whole, complete, and orderly.
Together, these two characters multiply each other into a word that expresses the highest military level of discipline.


See Also:  Self-Control | Will-Power

Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

 yì zhì
 ishi
Determination to Achieve / Will-Power Scroll

意志 is a Chinese, Korean, and Japanese word that means “determination to achieve.” It can also be translated as: will; willpower; determination; volition; intention; or intent.

In Japanese, this can also be the given name, Ishi.

Will-Power / Self-Control

 yì zhì lì
 ishi ryoku
Will-Power / Self-Control Scroll

意志力 is a form of willpower or self-control and is about having the determination or tenacity to keep going.

In Japanese, this is the power of will, the strength of will, volition, intention, intent, or determination.

 shitsuke
 
Shitsuke Scroll

躾 is shitsuke which means to discipline, to train, training, or teach manners in Japanese.

躾 means the same thing in Chinese, but not as commonly used.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
4. Right Action
Perfect Conduct
正業
正业
sei gyou / seigyou / sei gyozhèng yè / zheng4 ye4 / zheng ye / zhengyecheng yeh / chengyeh
Discipline紀律
纪律
jì lǜ / ji4 lv4 / ji lv / jilvchi lü / chilü
Discipline規律
规律
kiritsuguī / gui1 lu:4 / gui lu: / guilu:kuei lü / kueilü
Discipline
Training
Tempering Character
磨練 / 磨鍊 / 磨鍊
磨练
mó liàn / mo2 lian4 / mo lian / molianmo lien / molien
Discipline鍛練 / 鍛錬
锻练
tan ren / tanrenduàn liàn
duan4 lian4
duan lian
duanlian
tuan lien
tuanlien
Exercise鍛煉 / 鍛鍊
锻炼
duàn liàn
duan4 lian4
duan lian
duanlian
tuan lien
tuanlien
The Guts Theory根性論kon jou ron
konjouron
kon jo ron
Kenjutsu
Kenjitsu
剣術
剑术
kenjutsujiàn shù / jian4 shu4 / jian shu / jianshuchien shu / chienshu
Kyokushin極真kyoku shin / kyokushin
Love Your Children, But Discipline Them Too愛在心里狠在面皮 / 愛在心里狠在麵皮
爱在心里狠在面皮
ài zài xīn lǐ hèn zài miàn pì
ai4 zai4 xin1 li3 hen4 zai4 mian4 pi4
ai zai xin li hen zai mian pi
aizaixinlihenzaimianpi
ai tsai hsin li hen tsai mien p`i
ai tsai hsin li hen tsai mien pi
Military Discipline軍紀
军纪
gun ki / gunkijūn jì / jun1 ji4 / jun ji / junjichün chi / chünchi
Moderation
Temperance
節制
节制
sessei / seseijié zhì / jie2 zhi4 / jie zhi / jiezhichieh chih / chiehchih
Prideful Mind
Self-Respecting Heart
自尊心ji son shin
jisonshin
zì zūn xīn
zi4 zun1 xin1
zi zun xin
zizunxin
tzu tsun hsin
tzutsunhsin
Self-Control自制jiseizì zhì / zi4 zhi4 / zi zhi / zizhitzu chih / tzuchih
Self-Control自己抑制jikoyokuseizì jǐ yì zhì
zi4 ji3 yi4 zhi4
zi ji yi zhi
zijiyizhi
tzu chi i chih
tzuchiichih
Self-Restraint
Self-Control
克己 / 剋己
克己
kokki / kokikè jǐ / ke4 ji3 / ke ji / kejik`o chi / kochi / ko chi
Self-Discipline
Will-Power
自律jiritsuzì lǜ / zi4 lv4 / zi lv / zilvtzu lü / tzulü
Self-Improvement修養
修养
shuuyou / shuyo
shuyo / shuyo
xiū yǎng / xiu1 yang3 / xiu yang / xiuyanghsiu yang / hsiuyang
Shugyo修行shu gyou / shugyou / shu gyoxiū xíng / xiu1 xing2 / xiu xing / xiuxinghsiu hsing / hsiuhsing
Spare the Rod, Spoil the Child棒頭出孝子箸頭出忤逆bàng tóu chū xiào zǐ zhù tóu chū wǔ nì
bang4 tou2 chu1 xiao4 zi3 zhu4 tou2 chu1 wu3 ni4
bang tou chu xiao zi zhu tou chu wu ni
pang t`ou ch`u hsiao tzu chu t`ou ch`u wu ni
pang tou chu hsiao tzu chu tou chu wu ni
Strong Hearted
Strong Willed
意志堅強
意志坚强
yì zhì jiān qiáng
yi4 zhi4 jian1 qiang2
yi zhi jian qiang
yizhijianqiang
i chih chien ch`iang
ichihchienchiang
i chih chien chiang
Tai Chi Chuan
Tai Ji Quan
太極拳
太极拳
tai kyoku ken
taikyokuken
tài jí quán
tai4 ji2 quan2
tai ji quan
taijiquan
t`ai chi ch`üan
taichichüan
tai chi chüan
Training
Drill
訓練
训练
kunrenxùn liàn / xun4 lian4 / xun lian / xunlianhsün lien / hsünlien
Warriors: Quality Over Quantity兵在精而不在多bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō
bing1 zai4 jing1 er2 bu2 zai4 duo1
bing zai jing er bu zai duo
bingzaijingerbuzaiduo
ping tsai ching erh pu tsai to
pingtsaichingerhputsaito
Well-Disciplined
Orderly
嚴整
严整
yán zhěng
yan2 zheng3
yan zheng
yanzheng
yen cheng
yencheng
Determination to Achieve
Will-Power
意志ishiyì zhì / yi4 zhi4 / yi zhi / yizhii chih / ichih
Will-Power
Self-Control
意志力ishi ryoku / ishiryokuyì zhì lì
yi4 zhi4 li4
yi zhi li
yizhili
i chih li
ichihli
Shitsukeshitsuke
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Dictionary

Lookup Self-Discipline in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

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A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Self-Discipline Kanji, Self-Discipline Characters, Self-Discipline in Mandarin Chinese, Self-Discipline Characters, Self-Discipline in Chinese Writing, Self-Discipline in Japanese Writing, Self-Discipline in Asian Writing, Self-Discipline Ideograms, Chinese Self-Discipline symbols, Self-Discipline Hieroglyphics, Self-Discipline Glyphs, Self-Discipline in Chinese Letters, Self-Discipline Hanzi, Self-Discipline in Japanese Kanji, Self-Discipline Pictograms, Self-Discipline in the Chinese Written-Language, or Self-Discipline in the Japanese Written-Language.

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