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The Way of Truth in Chinese / Japanese...

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Start your custom "The Way of Truth" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "The Way of Truth" title below...

  1. Thirst for Truth
  2. True Religion / Buddha Truth
  3. Walk in the Way
  4. In Wine there is Truth
  5. Appreciation of Truth by Meditation
  6. Comparison Leads to Truth and Enlightenment
  7. Daoism / Taoism
  8. Buddha Seeking
  9. Diamond
10. True / Real / Genuine
11. Believe / Faith / Trust
12. Avatar
13. Science
14. Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?

Thirst for Truth

China kě fǎ
Japan katsuhō
Thirst for Truth

渴法 means to thirst for the truth, or for the Buddha-way. 渴法 is the internal need to seek the way of the truth in Buddhism.

True Religion / Buddha Truth

The way of the truth
China shí dào
Japan jitsu dou
True Religion / Buddha Truth

This Buddhist title means, "The true way," "The true religion," "The way of the truth," or "The absolute Buddha-truth."

Walk in the Way

The Way of Buddha Truth
China xíng dào
Japan yukimichi
Walk in the Way

In Taoist and Buddhist context, this means to "Walk in the Way." In Buddhism, that further means to follow the Buddha truth. In some Buddhist sects, this can mean to make a procession around a statue of the Buddha (always with the right shoulder towards the Buddha).

Outside of that context, this can mean route (when going somewhere), the way to get somewhere, etc.

In Japanese, this can be the surname or given name Yukimichi.

In Wine there is Truth

China jiǔ hòu tǔ zhēn yán
In Wine there is Truth

This is a nice Asian proverb if you know a vintner or wine seller - or wine lover - although the actual meaning might not be exactly what you think or hope.

The literal meaning is that someone drinking wine is more likely to let the truth slip out. It can also be translated as, "People speak their true feelings after drinking alcohol."

It's long-believed in many parts of Asia that one can not consciously hold up a facade of lies when getting drunk, and therefore the truth will come out with a few drinks.

I've had the experience where a Korean man would not trust me until I got drunk with him (I was trying to gain access to the black market in North Korea which is tough to do as an untrusted outsider) - so I think this idea is still well-practiced in many Asian countries.

后 VS 後

Please note that there are two common ways to write the second character of this phrase. The way it's written will be left up to the mood of the calligrapher, unless you let us know that you have a certain preference.


See Also:  Honesty | Truth

Appreciation of Truth by Meditation

China xīn yìn
Japan shin nin
Appreciation of Truth by Meditation

心印 is a Buddhist concept that simply stated is "appreciation of truth by meditation."

It's a deep subject, but my understanding is that you can find truth through meditation, and once you've found the truth, you can learn to appreciate it more through further meditation. This title is not commonly used outside of the Buddhist community (your Asian friends may or may not understand it). The literal translation would be something like "the mind seal," I've seen this term translated this way from Japanese Buddhist poetry. But apparently, the seal that is stamped deep in your mind is the truth. You just have to meditate to find it.

Soothill defines it this way: Mental impression, intuitive certainty; the mind is the Buddha-mind in all, which can seal or assure the truth; the term indicates the intuitive method of the Chan (Zen) school, which was independent of the spoken or written word.


Reference: Soothill-Hodous Dictionary of Chinese Buddhism


See Also:  Zen

Comparison Leads to Truth and Enlightenment

China bù bǐ bù zhī dào yī bǐ xià yì tiào
Comparison Leads to Truth and Enlightenment

This Chinese proverb literally means: [If one not does] not make comparisons, [one will] not know [the truth] when [one] compares, [one will be] greatly surprised.

This goes to the idea that if you do not know bad times, you cannot know what good times are.
...And...
You can not know light without experiencing darkness.

Another way to translate this would be: If you wish to be enlightened, you need to make comparisons and analyze every aspect (of a situation, issue or problem).

Daoism / Taoism

Literally: The Way or Road
China dào
Japan michi / -do
Daoism / Taoism

道 is the character "dao" which is sometimes written as "tao" but pronounced like "dow" in Mandarin.

道 is the base of what is known as "Taoism." If you translate this literally, it can mean "the way" or "the path."

Dao is believed to be that which flows through all things, and keeps them in balance. It incorporates the ideas of yin and yang (e.g. there would be no love without hate, no light without dark, no male without female.)

The beginning of Taoism can be traced to a mystical man named
Lao Zi (604-531 BC), who followed, and added to the teachings of Confucius.

More about Taoism / Daoism here.

Note that this is pronounced "dou" and sometimes "michi" when written alone in Japanese but pronounced "do" in word compounds such as Karate-do and Bushido. It's also "do" in Korean.

Alternate translations and meanings: road, way, path; truth, principle province.

Important Japanese note: In Japanese, this will generally be read with the road, way, or path meaning. Taoism is not as popular or well-known in Japan, so that Daoist/Taoist philosophy is not the first thing a Japanese person will think of then they read this character.


See our Taoism Page

Buddha Seeking

China qín qiú
Japan gongu
Buddha Seeking

勤求 is a complex word. In the simplest terms, it means inquiring the Buddha way. To put it another way, it is seeking something in the right way, at the right time, and diligently seeking only truth or the good.

Diamond

China jīn gāng
Japan kon gou
Diamond

金剛 is a common way to call diamonds in Chinese and Japanese. Traditionally, there were not that many diamonds that made their way to Asia, so this word does not have the deep cultural significance that it does in the west (thanks mostly to De Beers marketing). Therefore, this word was kind of borrowed from other uses.

This title can also refer to vajra (a Sanskrit word meaning both thunderbolt and diamond that originally refers to an indestructible substance); hard metal; pupa of certain insects; Vajrapani, Buddha's warrior attendant; King Kong; adamantine; Buddhist symbol of the indestructible truth.

True / Real / Genuine

China zhēn
Japan shin / makoto
True / Real / Genuine

真 is a simple way to express the idea that something is real, true, truth or genuine.

Occasionally, this character is used to refer to a Buddhist sect that originated in the 13th century.

真 is commonly used as a compound with other characters to create ideas like "true love." It's also used like the English "really" or "truly," to say "really good" or "He is really knowledgeable." Those phrases start with "他真的是..." (note second character is this one).


There are two ways to write this character, shown here is the most common way in China; however, a slight stroke variation is used in Korean Hanja. If you want that version, just let us know when you place your order.


See Also:  Honesty

Believe / Faith / Trust

śraddhā
China xìn
Japan shin
Believe / Faith / Trust

信 can mean to believe, truth, faith, fidelity, sincerity, trust and confidence in Chinese, old Korean Hanja and Japanese Kanji.

This single character is often part of other words with similar meanings.

It is one of the five basic tenets of Confucius.

In Chinese, it sometimes has the secondary meaning of a letter (as in the mail) depending on context but it will not be read that way when seen on a wall scroll.

In Buddhist context, this is śraddhā (faith through hearing or being taught).


See Also:  Faith | Trust | Confucius

Avatar

China huà shēn
Japan keshin
Avatar

化身 is a way to say avatar in Chinese characters, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

化身 is the original Buddhist idea of avatar (not the movie). 化身 can also mean: incarnation; reincarnation; embodiment; personification; impersonation.

化身 is the Chinese word used for the original Sanskrit, nirmāṇakāya. Alternates for nirmāṇakāya include 應身, 應化身, or 變化身. In the context of Buddhism, this is a Buddha's metamorphosic body, which has the power to assume any shape to propagate the Truth. This title, 化身, is used for the appearance of a Buddha's many forms.

Science

The rules of life, the universe, and everything.
China
Japan kotowari
Science

At essence, this word means science. But it's a very ambiguous and open term. 理 speaks to the reason that all things exist, and how things work from the microscopic to the cosmic level.

There are many translations for this word, including: inner essence; intrinsic order; reason; logic; truth; science; natural science (esp. physics); principle; the underlying principles of the cosmos; way of things; ruling principle; fundamental law; intrinsicality; universal basis; essential element.

If you are a scientist, or just searching for, "the answer to life, the universe, and everything," this could be the character for you.

Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?

China wēi jī
Japan kiki
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?

Separately, the first character here does mean "danger" or "to endanger" and the second character can mean "opportunity."

However, I want to debunk a myth that was propagated by some westerners who did not have a clear understanding of Asian languages...

While often, Chinese/Japanese/Korean compound words (words of two or more characters) are the sum of their parts, this is not always the case. The compound is often understood with a completely different meaning than the two characters individually.

Many have said that the Chinese/Japanese/Korean word for Crisis is made up of the characters for "danger" and "opportunity." 危機 is true when phrased this way.
However, it's not absolutely correct to say that "danger + opportunity = crisis" in Asian cultures.

English example:
If I tell you that...
Bovine creature + Guy behind the plate in baseball = Locomotive protection
...you would think I was mad. But consider that "cow + catcher = cowcatcher," which is the device that used to be found on steam engines to protect them if they hit an animal on the tracks. When we hear the word "cowcatcher" we don't separate the words into their individual meanings (necessarily).
The same is true with the word for crisis in Chinese/Japanese/Korean. While you can separate the characters, few Asian people would automatically do so in their minds.

The final answer:
It is a half-truth to say, "danger plus opportunity equals crisis" in Chinese/Japanese/Korean. Use this statement and concept with caution.

Also, the second character can mean "secret" or "machine" depending on context so I guess you have to say "a dangerous machine = crisis" or "danger + a secret = crisis." Both of these are only slightly more ridiculous than the first premise.

PS: 危機 is probably not a great word for a scroll, unless you have a special use for it.

Search for The Way of Truth in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Thirst for Truth渴法katsuhōkě fǎ / ke3 fa3 / ke fa / kefak`o fa / kofa / ko fa
True Religion
Buddha Truth
實道
实道
jitsu dou / jitsudou / jitsu do / jitsudoshí dào / shi2 dao4 / shi dao / shidaoshih tao / shihtao
Walk in the Way行道yukimichixíng dào / xing2 dao4 / xing dao / xingdaohsing tao / hsingtao
In Wine there is Truth酒后吐真言 / 酒後吐真言
酒后吐真言
jiǔ hòu tǔ zhēn yán
jiu3 hou4 tu3 zhen1 yan2
jiu hou tu zhen yan
jiuhoutuzhenyan
chiu hou t`u chen yen
chiuhoutuchenyen
chiu hou tu chen yen
Appreciation of Truth by Meditation心印shin nin / shinninxīn yìn / xin1 yin4 / xin yin / xinyinhsin yin / hsinyin
Comparison Leads to Truth and Enlightenment不比不知道一比嚇一跳
不比不知道一比吓一跳
bù bǐ bù zhī dào yī bǐ xià yì tiào
bu4 bi3 bu4 zhi1 dao4 yi1 bi3 xia4 yi4 tiao4
bu bi bu zhi dao yi bi xia yi tiao
pu pi pu chih tao i pi hsia i t`iao
pu pi pu chih tao i pi hsia i tiao
Daoism
Taoism
michi / -dodào / dao4 / daotao
Buddha Seeking勤求gonguqín qiú / qin2 qiu2 / qin qiu / qinqiuch`in ch`iu / chinchiu / chin chiu
Diamond金剛
金刚
kon gou / kongou / kon go / kongojīn gāng / jin1 gang1 / jin gang / jingangchin kang / chinkang
True
Real
Genuine
真 or 眞
shin / makotozhēn / zhen1 / zhenchen
Believe
Faith
Trust
shinxìn / xin4 / xinhsin
Avatar化身keshinhuà shēn / hua4 shen1 / hua shen / huashen
Sciencekotowarilǐ / li3 / li
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?危機
危机
kikiwēi jī / wei1 ji1 / wei ji / weijiwei chi / weichi
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Angel
Balance
Bear
Bushido Code
Diamond
Dragon Soul
Dream
Energy
Enso
Family
Father
Fire Dragon
Follow Your Dreams
Follow Your Heart
Forever
Friendship
Future
Generation
Good Fortune
Grace
Hanawa
Harmony
Heaven
Honor
Independence
Inner Peace and Serenity
Justice
Kung Fu
Love
Loyalty
Mixed Martial Arts
Nature
Ninpo
Nirvana
Noble
Pain
Peace and Happiness
Peach
Power
Protect
Responsibility
River
Samurai
Shadow
Shogun
Spiritual Strength
Strength
Strong Will
Sword
Tiger
Trust
Truth
Vitality
Water
Wing Chun
Winter

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When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as The Way of Truth Kanji, The Way of Truth Characters, The Way of Truth in Mandarin Chinese, The Way of Truth Characters, The Way of Truth in Chinese Writing, The Way of Truth in Japanese Writing, The Way of Truth in Asian Writing, The Way of Truth Ideograms, Chinese The Way of Truth symbols, The Way of Truth Hieroglyphics, The Way of Truth Glyphs, The Way of Truth in Chinese Letters, The Way of Truth Hanzi, The Way of Truth in Japanese Kanji, The Way of Truth Pictograms, The Way of Truth in the Chinese Written-Language, or The Way of Truth in the Japanese Written-Language.