Buy a Custom Hero Chinese or Japanese Calligraphy Wall Scroll

We have many options to create artwork with the Chinese characters / Asian symbols / Japanese Kanji for Hero on a wall scroll or portrait.
If you want to create a cool Hero Asian character tattoo, you can purchase that on our Chinese and Japanese Tattoo Image Service page and we'll help you select from many forms of ancient Asian symbols that express the idea of Hero.

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Hero
  2. Man of Remarkable Character...
  3. Woman of Strong Character...
  4. Heroic Spirit
  5. Heroic Spirit / Great Ambition
  6. Heroic Spirit / Heroism
  7. Warrior Soul / Heroic Spirit
  8. Woman Hero / Heroine
  9. Brave Warrior
10. Daredevil Warrior...
11. Dragon Warrior
12. Enlightened Warrior
13. Ghost Warrior
14. Guan Gong / Warrior Saint
15. Warrior of Heaven
16. Holy Warrior
17. Peaceful Warrior
18. Quiet Warrior
19. Silent Warrior
20. Spiritual Warrior
21. Warrior
22. Warrior for Peace
23. Value of Warrior Generals
24. Heart of a Warrior / Samurai Heart
25. Warrior of the Heavenly Realm
26. Warrior Monk / Soldier Priest
27. Warrior / Musha
28. Warrior of God / Soldier of God
29. Warrior Saint / Saint of War
30. Warrior / Fighter
31. Warrior Soul / Spirit of a Fighter
32. Warrior Within
33. The Warrior Within
34. The Warrior’s Word, Dependable as Gold and Steel
35. Soul of a Warrior
36. Warrior Essence / Warrior Spirit / Martial
37. Quiet Warrior
38. Active Duty Military
39. Advance Bravely...
40. Sun Tzu - Art of War
41. Mind of the Beginner
42. Berserker
43. Bushido / The Way of the Samurai
44. Death Before Dishonor
45. Diamond
46. Eishin-Ryu
47. Fighter
48. Fighter / Champion
49. Fighter for God
50. Fighting Spirit
51. Filial Piety
52. First Born
53. God of War
54. Guandi: God of War
55. Guan Yu
56. In Flowers the Cherry Blossom,...
57. Hua Mulan
58. Immovable Mind
59. Jing Mo / Jing Wu
60. Knight
61. Lingering Mind
62. Marine
63. Marine Corps
64. Marine / Soldier of the Sea
65. Martial Morality...
66. Martial Arts Master
67. Martial Arts Skills
68. Martial Arts / Budo
69. Morality of Deed
70. Morality of Mind
71. Ninja
72. No Mind / Mushin
73. Paladin
74. Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude
75. Ronin / Masterless Samurai
76. Samurai
77. Shogun / Japanese General
78. Chinese or Korean Army General
79. Soldier of the Gods
80. Soldiers
81. Superman
82. Sword
83. United States Marine Corps
84. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country
85. Zhuge Liang
86. Sasuke
87. Avenger


Hero

China yīng xióng
Japan ei yuu
Hero Wall Scroll

英雄 is the best way to write hero in Chinese and Japanese - especially for calligraphy. 英雄 is also the name of the Chinese movie titled Hero starring Jet Li.

The first character means brave (it can also mean British or English but not in this case).
The second character means heroic but also suggests a male person.
My Japanese dictionary also defines this as "a great man."

Man of Remarkable Character
Hero

Japan ketsubutsu
Man of Remarkable Character / Hero Wall Scroll

This Japanese title can mean, "great man," "heroic figure," or "remarkable character." You would be giving someone a great honor by presenting this wall scroll to them as a gift.

Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero

China nǚ jiá
Japan joketsu
Woman of Strong Character / Woman Hero Wall Scroll

This can mean brave woman, heroine, lady of character, distinguished woman, outstanding woman, and sometimes prominent woman.

In modern usage, some people might use this to give a title to women like Oprah Winfrey, Hillary Clinton, or Sarah Palin. I would rather use it for a woman like Araceli Segarra (the first woman from Spain to climb Mt. Everest).

Heroic Spirit

China yīng qì
Heroic Spirit Wall Scroll

英氣 is a way to write heroic spirit in Chinese.

This may be an arrogant thing to hang on your wall.

Heroic Spirit / Great Ambition

China xióng xīn
Japan yuushin
Heroic Spirit / Great Ambition Wall Scroll

雄心 is the Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji for great ambition, lofty aspiration, or heroic spirit.

Heroic Spirit / Heroism

China háo qì
Heroic Spirit / Heroism Wall Scroll

豪氣 is heroic spirit or heroism in Chinese and old Korean Hanja.

This might come across as a bit arrogant to hang on your wall.

Warrior Soul / Heroic Spirit

China yǒng shì jīng shén
Warrior Soul / Heroic Spirit Wall Scroll

This can be translated as the warrior's spirit or warrior's soul. The first two characters can be translated as "warrior" or literally "brave soldier/man" although some will translate this word as "hero." Therefore, this is also how to say "heroic spirit."

The second two characters mean vigor, vitality, drive, spirit, mind, heart, mental essence and psychological component. Basically "your soul."


We have two versions of this phrase. The only difference is the first two and last two characters are swapped. The version here suggests that you admire or like the idea of the spirit of a warrior. The other version suggests that you are the warrior or hero.

Woman Hero / Heroine

China jīn guó yīng xióng
Woman Hero / Heroine Wall Scroll

巾幗英雄 is a cool and somewhat ancient way to say woman hero in Chinese. 巾幗英雄 is used in modern times to refer to an outstanding woman or a woman with great accomplishments.

In the old days, it was a title for a woman warrior (oh, did I mention that there were great female generals who led huge armies into battle in ancient China?)

Brave Warrior

China yǒng shì
Japan yuu shi
Brave Warrior Wall Scroll

勇士 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for brave warrior, a brave person, hero, or brave man.

In Japanese, this can be a given name, Yuuji.

Daredevil Warrior
Soul of a Warrior

Japan oni mu sha
Daredevil Warrior / Soul of a Warrior Wall Scroll

鬼武者 is an unusual title that can be translated two ways. The most common is probably "daredevil warrior." However, the first character means demon, ghost, or soul of the departed. Therefore, it can kind of mean soul of a warrior, or demon warrior.


This title is Japanese only, and should not be used if your audience is Chinese.

Dragon Warrior

China lóng wǔ shì
Japan ryuu bu shi
Dragon Warrior Wall Scroll

龍武士 is a generic title for "Dragon Warrior." Just as in English, it's a bit ambiguous. It can mean one who fights against dragons, or the title of a warrior himself (imagine a warrior with a dragon symbol on his chest).

Dragon Warrior

China lóng zhàn shì
Dragon Warrior Wall Scroll

龍戰士 is another version of "Dragon Warrior." It's still a bit ambiguous. This one reads more like "Dragon Fighter" than "Dragon Warrior." Perhaps you can also translate this one as, "One who fights like a dragon."

Dragon Warrior

China dòu lóng zhàn shì
Dragon Warrior Wall Scroll

This "Dragon Warrior" is specifically one who fights against dragons. This can also be read as "Dragon Fighter."

Enlightened Warrior

China jué xǐng wǔ shì
Enlightened Warrior Wall Scroll

覺醒武士 is not a commonly used title in Chinese but sometimes used in Martial arts and military context to refer to a warrior who seems to always be fully aware, enlightened, knowledgeable, noble, and just.

The first two characters are a word that means: to awaken; to come to realize; awakened to the truth; the truth dawns upon one; scales fall from the eyes; to become aware.

The last two characters mean warrior but can also refer to a samurai, soldier, or fighter.

Ghost Warrior

China yōu líng zhàn shì
Ghost Warrior Wall Scroll

幽靈戰士 means Ghost Warrior or Ghost Soldier in Chinese.

This title is used for at least one movie, and a video game (about a sniper).

Guan Gong / Warrior Saint

China guān gōng
Guan Gong / Warrior Saint Wall Scroll

Guan Gong Warrior Saint

This Chinese title, Guan Gong means, Lord Guan (The warrior saint of ancient China).

While his real name was Guan Yu / 關羽, he is commonly known by this title of Guan Gong / 關公.

Some Chinese soldiers still pray to Guan Gong for protection. They would especially do this before going into battle. Statues of Guan Gong are seen throughout China.

Warrior of Heaven

China tiān lì shì
Japan ten riki shi
Warrior of Heaven Wall Scroll

天力士 means "Heavenly Warrior," or "Hero of Heaven," in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

Often used in a Buddhist context.

Holy Warrior

Japan sei senshi
Holy Warrior Wall Scroll

聖戦士 means, "Holy Warrior," in Japanese.

Peaceful Warrior

China píng hé de wǔ shì
Peaceful Warrior Wall Scroll

平和的武士 means "Peaceful Warrior" in Chinese. This does in fact sound like an oxymoron in Chinese - but many of you have asked for this special title.

Note, this is not the same thing as "warrior for peace."


See Also:  Peace

Peaceful Warrior

Japan hei wa no bu shi
Peaceful Warrior Wall Scroll

This can be read as "Peaceful Warrior" or "Warrior for Peace" in Japanese. This sounds like an oxymoron in Japanese, so it's a weird title. Expect Japanese people to be perplexed when they see it.

Character breakdown:
平和 (heiwa) peace; harmony.
の (no) possessive particle.
武士 (bushi) warrior; samurai; soldier.

Quiet Warrior

China jìng wǔ shì
Quiet Warrior Wall Scroll

靜武士 is the shortest way to write "Quiet Warrior" or "Tranquil Warrior" in Chinese.


See Also:  Peaceful Warrior

Quiet Warrior

Japan shizukana senshi
Quiet Warrior Wall Scroll

靜かな戦士 means "Quiet Warrior" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Silent Warrior

China chén mò de wǔ shì
Silent Warrior Wall Scroll

沉默的武士 is a way to write "silent warrior" in Chinese.

The first two characters mean "silent."

The middle character is a connecting or possessive particle.

The last two characters mean "warrior."

Silent Warrior

Japan seijakuna senshi
Silent Warrior Wall Scroll

靜寂な戦士 means, "silent warrior" or "quiet warrior," in Japanese.

Spiritual Warrior

Japan rei sen shi
Spiritual Warrior Wall Scroll

霊戦士 is a Japanese title that means, "Spiritual Warrior."

The first Kanji means spiritual.

The second Kanji means war, warfare, or battle.

The third Kanji means soldier, officer, man or pawn.

Warrior

China wǔ shì
Japan bu shi
Warrior Wall Scroll

The first character is the spirit or essence of a warrior. The second character means soldier, officer, or official. 武士 is also used appropriately enough to describe a piece of a chess game. This can also be translated as soldier, cavalier, palace guard, or samurai and sometimes as knight. I've occasionally seen this translated as strong man or tough man (gender not necessarily implied).

By far, this is the most common way to write warrior in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Note: In Japanese, this is Bushi, as in Bushido.


See Also:  Knight | Army | Marines | Samurai

Warrior for Peace

China hé píng wǔ shì
Warrior for Peace Wall Scroll

和平武士 means "Warrior for Peace" (warrior who fights for peace) in Chinese.

Note, this is not the same thing as "peaceful warrior."


See Also:  Peace

Value of Warrior Generals

China bīng zài jīng ér bú zài duō jiàng zài móu ér bú zài yǒng
Value of Warrior Generals Wall Scroll

This literally means: [Just as] soldiers/warriors [are valued for their] quality and not [just] for quantity, [so] generals [are valued] for their tactics, not [just] for [their] bravery.

This is a proverb that follows one about how it is better to have warriors of quality, rather than just a large quantity of warriors in your army/force.


See Also:  兵在精而不在多

Heart of a Warrior / Samurai Heart

China wǔ shì xīn
Japan bu shi kokoro
Heart of a Warrior / Samurai Heart Wall Scroll

This reads, "Warrior Heart." This is more a Japanese title than Chinese but it is understood in both languages.

Warrior of the Heavenly Realm

China tiān jiè lì shì
Japan ten kai riki shi
Warrior of the Heavenly Realm Wall Scroll

This means "warrior of the heavenly realm" in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

This is also known as Narayana in Buddhism.

Warrior Monk / Soldier Priest

China sēng bīng
Japan sou hei
Warrior Monk / Soldier Priest Wall Scroll

藩士 is a strange title for a wall scroll but it may suit you if you see yourself as a warrior monk. This title is not commonly used but will be understood in both Chinese and Japanese. It can also be read as "armed monks."

Warrior / Musha

Japan mu sha
Warrior / Musha Wall Scroll

武者 is an alternate title for a warrior or samurai in Japanese. It is often romanized as "Musha."

The literal meaning of these Kanji is "war person," "military person," or "martial person."

Warrior of God / Soldier of God

Japan kami no heishi
Warrior of God / Soldier of God Wall Scroll

神の兵士 means, "Warrior of God" or "Soldier of God" in Japanese.

Warrior Saint / Saint of War

China wǔ shèng
Warrior Saint / Saint of War Wall Scroll

This Chinese title, Wusheng means, Saint of War.

This is usually a reference to Guan Yu (關羽), also known as Guan Gong (關公).

Some Chinese soldiers still pray to Wusheng for protection. They would especially do this before going into battle.

Warrior / Fighter

Senshi
Japan sen shi
Warrior / Fighter Wall Scroll

戦士 is an alternate title for warrior, soldier, fighter, warrior, guardian, or combatant in Japanese.

From Japanese, this is often romanized as "Senshi."


See Also:  Knight | Army | Marines | Samurai

Warrior Soul / Spirit of a Fighter

Japan senshi damashii
Warrior Soul / Spirit of a Fighter Wall Scroll

戦士魂 is "warrior soul" or "warrior spirit" in Japanese.

Here's the breakdown of the Kanji:

戦士 (senshi) warrior; soldier; combatant; fighter.

魂 (damashii/tamashii) soul; spirit; can sometimes mean "ghost."

Warrior Within

China wǔ zhě zhī xīn
Warrior Within Wall Scroll

This title means, "Warrior Within" from the Chinese video game title, "Prince of Persia: Warrior Within."

This more literally means "warrior or the heart," or "warrior of the soul/mind."

The Warrior Within

Japan chuu no senshi
The Warrior Within Wall Scroll

中の戦士 means "The Warrior Within" in Japanese.

The Warrior’s Word, Dependable as Gold and Steel

Japan bushi no ichigon kintetsu no gotoshi
The Warrior’s Word, Dependable as Gold and Steel Wall Scroll

This is an old Japanese proverb about the value of the word of a warrior. Here's a couple versions of how this can be translated:

A warrior's single word is as unchanging and reliable as gold and steel.
A warrior's promise is as dependable as gold, and his [scabbard contains] untarnished steel (a sword).


Note: Sometimes this phrase is written as 男子の一言、金鉄の如し (danshi no ichigon kintetsu no gotoshi)


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Soul of a Warrior

China jīng shén yǒng shì
Soul of a Warrior Wall Scroll

This can be translated as the spirit or soul of a warrior. The first two characters can be translated as vigor, vitality, drive, spirit, mind, heart, mental essence and psychological component. Basically "your soul."

The second two characters mean "warrior" or literally "brave soldier/man" although some will translate this word as "hero." Therefore, this is also how to say "soul of a hero."

Note: This title is best for Chinese and old Korean. It does make sense in Japanese but is not a common or natural Kanji combination in Japanese.


We have two versions of this phrase. The only difference is the first two and last two characters are swapped. The version here suggests that you are the warrior or hero. The other version suggests that you admire or like the idea of the spirit of a warrior.

Warrior Essence / Warrior Spirit / Martial

China
Japan bu
Warrior Essence / Warrior Spirit / Martial Wall Scroll

武 is the essence or spirit of a warrior. 武 is part of the word "wu shu" which is sometimes translated as "martial arts" or "kung fu."

In more modern speech and other context, this can mean military, martial, warlike, fierce, and perhaps violent but usually as a prefix for a longer word or phrase.

Quiet Warrior

China jìng mì wǔ shì
Quiet Warrior Wall Scroll

靜謐武士 means "Quiet Warrior" in Chinese.

靜謐 means quiet or tranquil.
武士 means warrior or soldier.


See Also:  Peaceful Warrior

Active Duty Military

Person on Active Duty
China xiàn yì jūn rén
Japan geneki gunjin
Active Duty Military Wall Scroll

現役軍人 means "Active Duty Soldier" or literally "Active Duty Military Person."

This title is a great way to show your pride in being an active duty member of the armed forces.

The first two characters mean "active duty" and the second two characters can be translated as "military personnel," "soldier," or "serviceman" (it is unisex, so male or female is not indicated).


If anyone is looking for "reservist" just post your request on our Asian calligraphy forum.


See Also:  Military

Advance Bravely
Indomitable Spirit

China yǒng wǎng zhí qián
Advance Bravely / Indomitable Spirit Wall Scroll

This proverb creates an image of a warrior bravely advancing against an enemy regardless of the odds.

This proverb can also be translated as "indomitable spirit" or "march fearlessly onward."


See Also:  Indomitable | Fortitude

Sun Tzu - Art of War

military strategy, tactics, and procedure
China sūn zǐ bīng fǎ
Japan son shi hyou hou
Sun Tzu - Art of War Wall Scroll

孫子兵法 is the full title of the most famous book of military proverbs about warfare.

The English title is "Sun Tzu's The Art of War."

The last two characters have come to be known in the west as "The Art of War" but a better translation would be, "military strategy and tactics," "military skills" or "army procedures."

Note: Sometimes the author's name is Romanized as "Sun Zi" or "Sunzi."

It's written the same in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja.


See Also:  Military | Warrior

Mind of the Beginner

Shoshin
China chū xīn
Japan sho shin
Mind of the Beginner Wall Scroll

初心 is often translated in Japanese as "beginner’s mind" or "beginner’s spirit."

In Chinese, the dictionary definition is "one’s original intention."

The first character means first, initial, primary, junior, beginning, or basic.

The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

初心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The state of shoshin is that of a beginners mind. It is a state of awareness the remains always fully conscious, aware, and prepared to see things for the first time. The attitude of shoshin is essential to continued learning.

Berserker

China kuáng zhàn shì
Berserker Wall Scroll

狂戰士 is the most popular way to write berserker in Chinese. This title kind of mean Norse warrior but often refers to the berserker in a fantasy role-playing game. There is another way to write berserker in Chinese, which is 狂暴者.

Bushido / The Way of the Samurai

China wǔ shì dào
Japan bu shi do
Bushido / The Way of the Samurai Wall Scroll

武士道 is the title for, "The Code of the Samurai."

Sometimes called "The Seven Virtues of the Samurai," "The Bushido Code," or "The Samurai Code of Chivalry."

This would be read in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja as "The Way of the Warrior," "The Warrior's Way," or "The Warrior's Code."

It's a set of virtues that the Samurai of Japan and ancient warriors of China and Korea had to live and die by. However, while known throughout Asia, this title is mostly used in Japan, and thought of as being of Japanese origin.

The seven commonly-accepted tenets or virtues of Bushido are: Benevolence 仁, Courage 勇, Honesty 誠, Honour 名誉, Loyalty 忠実, Respect 礼(禮), and Rectitude 義. These tenets were part of an oral history for generations, thus, you will see variations in the list Bushido tenets depending on who you talk to.


See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Samurai | Warrior

Death Before Dishonor

A soldier can die or kill, but never dishonor or disgrace himself
China shì kě shā bù kě rǔ
Death Before Dishonor Wall Scroll

This almost directly matches the military idea of "Death Before Dishonor," while also being an ancient Chinese proverb.

The direct meaning is, "[A] soldier/warrior can die/kill [but he/she] cannot [allow] dishonor/disgrace [upon himself/herself]." Chinese grammar, and especially ancient grammar, is a little different than English. Not nearly as many articles are needed, and a lot is implied.

There are a lot of ways to express ideas similar to "Death Before Dishonor" in Chinese, and I would rate this one in the top two.

This is the original form of this proverb with the character for "soldier/warrior" at the beginning. Most of the time, this character is dropped, and this becomes a five-character proverb (the soldier/warrior part is implied, even without the character being present in the proverb). We also offer the shorter version.

Diamond

China jīn gāng
Japan kon gou
Diamond Wall Scroll

金剛 is a common way to call diamonds in Chinese and Japanese. Traditionally, there were not that many diamonds that made their way to Asia, so this word does not have the deep cultural significance that it does in the west (thanks mostly to De Beers marketing). Therefore, this word was kind of borrowed from other uses.

This title can also refer to vajra (a Sanskrit word meaning both thunderbolt and diamond that originally refers to an indestructible substance); hard metal; pupa of certain insects; Vajrapani, Buddha's warrior attendant; King Kong; adamantine; Buddhist symbol of the indestructible truth.

Eishin-Ryu

Japan ei shin ryuu
Eishin-Ryu Wall Scroll

英信流 is the Japanese martial arts term, Eishin-ryu. This can also be pronounced Hidenobu-ryu. The direct meaning is something like, hero faith school (or school of heroic faith).

Fighter

Warrior / Soldier
China zhàn shì
Japan sen shi
Fighter Wall Scroll

The first character means war, warfare, or battle.
The second character means soldier, officer, man or pawn.

This is how to write "fighter" in Chinese, ancient Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja. This word can also mean soldier or warrior but there are better terms for those two ideas. This one is more specifically "fighter" or "one who fights." This is an odd selection for a wall scroll, unless you are a boxer, ultimate fighter, or otherwise participate in combat sports.

Other translations include combatant or champion.


戦Note that after WWII, the first Kanji was reformed/simplified. This modern Japanese version is shown to the right. If you want this version, click on the Kanji to the right, instead of the button above.

Fighter / Champion

China dòu shì
Japan tou shi
Fighter / Champion Wall Scroll

鬪士 / 闘士 is how to write "fighter" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja.

Chinese: 鬪士 / 闘士 is usually used to mean "fighter" in Chinese. It can also be translated as "warrior" or "activist."

Korean: 鬪士 / 闘士 means fighter or champion (in terms of a fighter) in Korean Hanja.


鬥斗闘Note: The first character can also be written in three alternate ways, as shown to the right. Give us a note if you have a certain preference when you place your order.

Fighter for God

China shàng dì de dòu shì
Fighter for God Wall Scroll

上帝的鬥士 means "God's Fighter."

While a lot of people search for "Warrior of God," or "Soldier of God," this is actually the most natural way to say something like this in Chinese.

Fighting Spirit

The Will to Fight
China dòu zhì
Fighting Spirit Wall Scroll

This literally means fighting spirit. As in the spirit that a warrior, soldier, athlete or fighter must possess.

斗Note: There is more than one way to write the first character of this word. It is sometimes written like the version shown to the right (yes, it's completely different but has the same meaning & pronunciation). If you have a preference, please let us know in the special instructions about your order.

Fighting Spirit

Japan tou shi
Fighting Spirit Wall Scroll

This literally means "fighting spirit" or "the will to fight." As in the spirit that a warrior, soldier, athlete or fighter must possess.

Filial Piety

China xiào
Japan kou
Filial Piety Wall Scroll

This character represents filial piety. Some will define this in more common English as "respect for your parents and ancestors."

This is a subject deeply emphasized by the ancient philosophy and teachings of Confucius.

Some have included this in the list for the Bushido, although generally not considered part of the 7 core virtues of the warrior.

Note: This character is not the best of meanings when seen along as a single character. Some will read the single character form to mean "missing my dead ancestors." However, when written at part of Confucian tenets, or in the two-character word that means filial piety, the meaning is better or read differently (context is important for this character).

We suggest one of our other two-character filial piety entries instead of this one.


See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Filial Piety | Confucius

First Born

Japan souryou
First Born Wall Scroll

惣領 is a Japanese title for the eldest child, the oldest child, first born child, or child who carries on the family name.

In more ancient times, this was used to refer to the head of a warrior clan. It can also be a place name or given name "Souryou" or "Soryo" in Japanese.

God of War

Japan gunjin / gunshin / ikusagami
God of War Wall Scroll

軍神 is a Japanese title meaning god of war, or war hero.

This can also be the surname Gunshin.

Guandi: God of War

China Guān dì
Japan kan tei
Guandi: God of War Wall Scroll

關帝 is the title, "Guandi," the God of War, a deified hero of the Three Kingdoms, a protector of Buddhism.

Guan Yu

China guān yǔ
Guan Yu Wall Scroll

關羽 is the name Guan Yu, Army General for the Kingdom of Shu.

He is also known as Guan Gong (like saying Duke Guan or Sir Guan)

He was immortalized in the novel, "Romance of the Three Kingdoms."

He was a fearsome fighter, also famous for his virtue and loyalty. He is worshiped by some modern-day soldiers and has the title "Warrior Saint" in China. Some believe he offers safety and protection for military servicemen.

Guan Yu lived until 219 A.D.

In Flowers the Cherry Blossom,
In Men the Samurai

Japan hana wa sakuragi hito wa bushi
In Flowers the Cherry Blossom, / In Men the Samurai Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb simply reads, "[In] Flowers it's Cherry Blossoms, [In] Men it's Warriors."

This is meant to say that of all the flowers in the world, the cherry blossom is the best. And of all men in the world, the Samurai or Warrior is the best

This proverb has been around for a long time. It's believed to have been composed sometime before the Edo Period in Japan (which started in 1603).

Some will drop one syllable and pronounce this, "hana wa sakura hito wa bushi." That's "sakura" instead of "sakuragi," which is like saying "cherry blossom" instead of "cherry tree."


The third character was traditionally written as 櫻. But in modern Japan, that became 桜. You may still see 櫻 used from time to time on older pieces of calligraphy. We can do either one, so just make a special request if you want 櫻.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Hua Mulan

China huā mù lán
Hua Mulan Wall Scroll

花木蘭 is the name of the famous Chinese woman warrior Hua Mulan.

She was made famous in the west by Disney's animated movie, "Mulan."

Most of the historical information about her comes from an ancient poem. It starts with a concerned Mulan, as she is told a man from each family is to serve conscription in the army. Her father is too old, and her brother is too young. Mulan decides to take the place of her father. After twelve years of war, the army returns and the best warriors are awarded great posts in the government and riches. Mulan turns down all offers, and asks only for a good horse for the long trip home. When Mulan greets visiting comrades wearing her old clothes, they are shocked to find the warrior they rode into battle with for years was actually a woman.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin
Japan fu dou shin
Immovable Mind Wall Scroll

不動心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet.

Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigidity and inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include imperturbability, steadfastness, keeping a cool head in an emergency, or keeping one's calm (during a fight).

The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title that is defined as "immovable mind" within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese it would mean "motionless heart" and in Korean Hanja, "wafting heart" or "floating heart."

Jing Mo / Jing Wu

China jīng wǔ
HK jing mo
Jing Mo / Jing Wu Wall Scroll

This two-character title is used for a certain type of martial arts. You can translate this roughly as "Excellent Marital Arts" or "Excellence in Martial Arts." You will notice that the second character is "wu" as in wushu (martial arts) and wushi (warrior).

More information can be found at the Jing Mo website. You should probably only order this if you are a member of this association.

Note that "jing mo" is the Cantonese pronunciation of these characters. In Mandarin, they are "jing wu."
Also used in Korean but only by those involved with martial arts who can also read Korean Hanja (a small percentage of the population).

Knight

China qí shì
Japan ki shi
Knight Wall Scroll

The first character has the element of "horse" in it, and alone can mean "one who rides." Together, these characters can be translated as "riding soldier" or "horseman soldier," which of course can also be translated as "knight."


Can also be translated as "cavalier."


See Also:  Warrior | Horse

Lingering Mind

Zanshin
China cán xīn
Japan zan shin
Lingering Mind Wall Scroll

First off, this should only be used in context of Japanese martial arts. In Chinese, it's a rather sad title (like a broken heart). In Chinese, the first character alone means destroyed, spoiled, ruined, injured, cruel, oppressive, savage, incomplete, disabled. However, in Japanese, it's remainder, leftover, balance, or lingering.
The second character means heart, mind, soul, or essence in both languages.

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: The spirit of zanshin is the state of the remaining or lingering spirit. It is often described as a sustained and heightened state of awareness and mental follow-through. However, true zanshin is a state of focus or concentration before, during, and after the execution of a technique, where a link or connection between uke and nage is preserved. Zanshin is the state of mind that allows us to stay spiritually connected, not only to a single attacker but to multiple attackers and even an entire context; a space, a time, an event.


残In modern Japan (and Simplified Chinese), they use a different version of the first character, as seen to the right. Click on this character to the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version of lingering mind / zanshin.

Marine

Amphibious Warrior
China hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì yuán
Marine Wall Scroll

This is the Chinese way to express "Marine." (as in a member of the Marine Corps). It is not country-specific, so it could be the Royal Marines, U.S. Marines, Chinese Marines, etc.
In Australian English, they would translate this as "Naval Infantryman."

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea military/arms shore/land fighting/war/battle corps/team/group person/member." Note that the first two characters presented together but outside of this phrase mean "navy" (sea military).


See Also:  Warrior | Military | Navy | Art of War

Marine Corps

China hǎi jūn lù zhàn duì
Marine Corps Wall Scroll

海軍陸戰隊 is the Chinese way to express "Marine Corps." This could be the Marine Corps of virtually any country that has an amphibious military force.

Let me know you want a more specific title such as British Royal Marines or U.S. Marine Corps.

The Chinese title for Marines is very verbose...
Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea military/arms shore/land fighting/war/battle corps/team/group."


See Also:  Military

Marine Corps

Japan kaiheitai
Marine Corps Wall Scroll

海兵隊 is the Japanese and Korean way to express "Marine Corps" or simply "Marines." It is not specific, so this can be the Marine Corps of any country, such as the British Royal Marines to the U.S. Marines.

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea soldiers/army corps/regiment/group."


See Also:  Military

Marine / Soldier of the Sea

Japan kai hei
Marine / Soldier of the Sea Wall Scroll

This way to express "Marine" as in an individual "Soldier of the Sea" in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja characters (not to be confused with Korean Hangul).

Breaking down each character, this means:
"ocean/sea soldier/army/warrior."

Please note that this Japanese/Korean version kind of means "sailor" or "navy" in Chinese.


See Also:  Military

Martial Morality
Martial Arts Ethics / Virtue

China wǔ dé
Japan butoku
Martial Morality / Martial Arts Ethics / Virtue Wall Scroll

This refers to the virtue, morality, and ethics that any practitioner of martial arts should posses. This can be used in both Chinese and Japanese in lieu of English terms such as "soldierly virtue," "good conduct" (military), "warrior ethics," and being honorable in regards to any fight or competition.


See Also:  Morality of Mind | Morality of Deed

Martial Arts Master

China wǔ yún zhě
Japan bugeisha
Martial Arts Master Wall Scroll

武芸者 is the Japanese Kanji title for "Martial Arts Master." It suggests that you have reached at least the level of black belt, and are probably to the level where you are ready to become an instructor.

Please consider carefully where you stand before ordering this phrase on a wall scroll. If you are not a master, this will make you look a bit foolish.

If you want to get this as a gift for your master at the dojo. Try to discreetly make sure this term is used in your school. Different schools and styles of Japanese martial arts use different terms. You may notice in the Romaji and the characters, this has the same characters as "geisha" which means "person skilled in arts" (what a geisha girl really is). The title here has the character for "martial," "warrior," and/or "military" in front of it. Therefore the literal translation is "martial art person."

These Kanji are valid Chinese characters and Korean Hanja but this title does not really make sense in Chinese and not often used in Korean, though a Chinese or Korean would be able to guess the meaning by looking at the first and last characters.

Martial Arts Skills

China wǔ jì
Japan bugi
Martial Arts Skills Wall Scroll

This can be translated as "martial arts skills," "warrior skills," or "military skills" depending on usage. In both Japanese and Chinese, rather than meaning martial arts, this speaks more to the skills that you posses in regards to martial arts. This phrase also has a light suggestion of "having an itch to show off these skills."

Martial Arts / Budo

Way of the Warrior
China wǔ dào
Japan bu dou
Martial Arts / Budo Wall Scroll

武道 is the very common Japanese way to say "Martial Arts."

武道 is used mostly in Japanese dojos but is also understood in Chinese and Korean.

Some will use this title to mean chivalry (the conduct of a knight) or military art. The way this word is understood would depend on the context in which it is used.

The first character means "force" or "warlike" or "essence of a warrior."

The second character means "method," "path," and "the way." It is the same character used to describe/mean the philosophy of Taoism / Daoism.

Some will also translate this as, "The Way of the Warrior," especially in the context of Korean martial arts.

Morality of Deed

China xíng dé
Morality of Deed Wall Scroll

The idea of "morality of deed" goes along with "wu de" (martial morality or virtues of the warrior).

Here, the first character is a representation of the actions or deeds that you engage in.
The second character refers to morality or virtue.

This translates better in English in the opposite order, as the Chinese order is literally "deed morality."


See Also:  Morality of Mind | Martial Morality

Morality of Mind

China xīn dé
Morality of Mind Wall Scroll

The idea of "morality of mind" goes along with "wu de" (martial morality or virtues of the warrior).

Here, the first character is a representation of your heart or mind.
The second character refers to morality or virtue.

This can also be translated as "morality of heart," "virtue of heart," or "virtue of the mind."

Note that since ancient times in Asia, the idea of your mind (the place where your soul resides, and your thought originate from) has been associated with the heart. Just as in western culture where we say "it comes from the heart," or "heartfelt emotions," there is a belief that your heart and mind are one and the same (medical science now begs to differ).


See Also:  Morality of Deed | Martial Morality

Ninja

China rěn zhě
Japan ninja
Ninja Wall Scroll

In feudal Japan, ninja or shinobi (literally, "one who is concealed" or "one that endures") were sometimes assassins and agents of espionage. The ninja, like samurai, followed their own special code of conduct.

The role of the ninja has been romanticized in many American movies (and to a lesser extent in Japanese movies). Because the ninja-craze has taken off in the west, Japan has followed the trend and you'll see plenty of ninja-related imagery in Japan.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect that form. Our Chinese calligraphers can also write it in the Japanese form but only if you request it (in the special instructions about your order during checkout).


See Also:  Samurai | Warrior | Ninjitsu

No Mind / Mushin

China wú xīn
Japan mu shin
No Mind / Mushin Wall Scroll

In Japanese, this word means innocent, or one with no knowledge of good and evil. It literally means "without mind."

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: "No mind, a mind without ego. A mind like a mirror which reflects and dos not judge." The original term was "mushin no shin," meaning, "mind of no mind." It is a state of mind without fear, anger, or anxiety. Mushin is often described by the phrase, "mizu no kokoro," which means, "mind like water." The phrase is a metaphor describing the pond that clearly reflects it’s surroundings when calm but whose images are obscured once a pebble is dropped into its waters.

This has a good meaning in conjunction with Chan / Zen Buddhism in Japan. However, out of that context, it means mindlessness or absent-minded. To non-Buddhists in China, this is associated with doing something without thinking.
In Korean, this usually means indifference.

Use caution and know your audience before ordering this selection.


More info: Wikipedia: Mushin

Paladin

Japan gi kyō no shi
Paladin Wall Scroll

義俠の士 is how Paladin is written in Japanese.

The literal translation of this Japanese title is something like, "Chivalrous Warrior."

Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude

A Japanese martial arts title/concept
China xǐ xīn
Japan sen shin
Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude Wall Scroll

The first Kanji alone means to wash, to bathe, primness, cleanse or purify.

The second Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these two Kanji create a word that is defined as "purified spirit" or "enlightened attitude" within the context of Japanese martial arts.

This is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context it's often defined this way: A spirit that protects and harmonizes the universe. Senshin is a spirit of compassion that embraces and serves all humanity and whose function is to reconcile discord in the world. It holds all life to be sacred. It is the Buddha mind.

This title will only be familiar to Japanese who practice certain martial arts. Others may not recognize this word at all.

This word does not show up as a word in too many Chinese dictionaries but it can be read and has the same meaning in Chinese.


先心 There is an issue with the first character. The original, and probably most correct version is shown above. However, many dojo documents and other sources have used a more simple first character. Arguments ensue about which version is correct. If you want to be correct in the Japanese language, use the "Select and Customize" button above. If you want to match the Kanji used by your dojo, click the Kanji shown to the right. There is a slightly different meaning with this first character which means before, ahead, previous, future, precedence.

Ronin / Masterless Samurai

China làng rén
Japan rou nin
Ronin / Masterless Samurai Wall Scroll

The Ronin have no master - The most famous are the 47 ronin created after their Lord committed suicide. This term was not exactly a positive title for the Samurai of ancient Japan. However, in recent years, movies and video games have glorified the term Ronin.

In Chinese, this term has the original meaning of a hobo, vagabond or ruffian.
In Korean Hanja, these characters would be read as adventurer, wanderer, someone without a steady job, or someone who is wasting away time.

In modern Japan, this term is used as a nickname for a high school student who has failed a college entry exam (and is trying again).

In Chinese and Korean, the Japanese definition of "Masterless Samurai" is known because of the historical context, even in Japanese, the literal translation is closer to the Chinese and Korean definitions shown above.

This will make a fine wall scroll if you are a fan of the Ronin, or see yourself as a Ronin of sorts. However, please think twice before getting a Ronin tattoo!

Samurai

China shì
Japan samurai
Samurai Wall Scroll

In Japanese, this character represents the warriors that attempted to hold peace when there was no Emperor in Japan. Be cautious though, as it is an old way to express "servant" or "waiter" in Chinese and Korean. Of course, if you are a samurai, you are a servant to your Shogun-ate, Lord, or the people (which is the root meaning).


See Also:  Warrior

Shogun / Japanese General

China jiāng jūn
Japan shougun
Shogun / Japanese General Wall Scroll

In the west, when someone mentions "Shogun" we may be filled with thoughts of gallant warriors. Some might even think of the TV mini-series with Richard Chamberlain. Often westerners use the words Samurai and Shogun interchangeably. So I will clear it up really quickly...

Shogun in the simplest definition is a General. You could also use words such as commander, lord, overlord, highest ranking, or commanding officer, since "Shogun" has held some slightly ambiguous meanings at times in Japanese history.

Sometimes a Shogun was a general, other times he was the leader of a military government in Japan.

Variants of the same characters are used in China for the rank and title of a General of the People's Liberation Army (and the same term and characters have been used for the last 2200 years since the Qin Dynasty).

Chinese or Korean Army General

China jiāng jūn
Japan shougun
Chinese or Korean Army General Wall Scroll

There is a slight variation in the way the first character is written. This is the more Chinese and Korean Hanja version. So if you want to specifically refer to a Chinese or Korean General, this is the way. Japanese people would still easily identify this as "shogun."

Note: This term is also used for Admiral in Korean in certain context (if you need a better title for Admiral, just let me know).

Soldier of the Gods

China shén bīng
Japan shin pei
Soldier of the Gods Wall Scroll

神兵 is a Japanese, Chinese, and Korean title that means "soldier dispatched by a god," or "soldier under the protection of the gods."

神兵 is used more in Japanese (especially in animation) than the other languages.

Soldiers

China bīng
Japan hei
Soldiers Wall Scroll

兵 can be used to express soldiers, troops, a force, an army, weapons, arms, military, warfare, tactics, strategy, or warlike. The final meaning depends on context. It's also part of the Chinese title for the Terracotta soldiers. In fact, this character is usually used in compound words (words of more than one character). Sometimes this single character is the title used for the pawns in a chess game (in a related issue, this is also a nickname for soldiers with the rank of Private).


See Also:  Military | Warrior

Superman

China chāo rén
Japan chou jin
Superman Wall Scroll

超人 is the Chinese title for the comic book hero, Superman.

In Japanese, this can also refer to a superman or superwoman but may refer to Nietzsche's ideal man of the future or the "Ubermensch" or "overman."

超人 is also a word in old Korean Hanja but more a generic term for a super or excellent person or hero.

Sword

China jiàn
Japan ken / tsurugi
Sword Wall Scroll

This Character is pronounced "jian" in Chinese. When you say it, imagine that you are making the sound of a sword as it clashes with a metal shield. This might get you closer to the correct pronunciation in Chinese.

I actually wonder if this word came from the metallic ringing sounds of a sword in battle - but such knowledge is lost in history.

The sword is a symbol of a warrior. The one thing that a soldier in ancient China lived and died by. A warrior with his skills and sword proves himself of great value. A warrior who losses his sword instantly becomes worthless.

This is an excellent scroll for someone in the military (especially officers of all services - as well as enlisted NCO Marines since they still carry swords even if mainly for ceremonial purposes). Or perhaps someone who practices variations of kung fu or tai chi that involve weapons.

Please note that while this character is understood with the sword meaning in Japanese, you might be looking for the word "katana" which also means sword in Japanese but means "knife" in Chinese.


There are other ways to write sword, and here are a few...
Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese
If you are particular about the version you receive, please let me know when you place your order (Note: Special styles are only available from one of our master calligraphers).

We have a forum entry that addresses the many ways to write sword. You can find that here: 100 Ways to Write Sword - Deciphering Ancient Seal Script

United States Marine Corps

Japan bei kai hei tai
United States Marine Corps Wall Scroll

米海兵隊 is the Japanese way to write "United States Marine Corps" or simply "U.S. Marines."

Breaking down each Kanji, this means:
"rice (American) ocean/sea soldiers/army/military corps/regiment/group."

This title will only make sense in Japanese, it is not the same in Chinese! Make sure you know your audience before ordering a custom wall scroll.

If you are wondering about the rice, America is known as "rice country" or "rice kingdom" when literally translated. The Kanji for rice is often used as an abbreviation in front of words (like a sub-adjective) to make something "American." Americans say "rice-burner" for a Japanese car, and "rice-rocket" for a Japanese motorcycle. If you did the same in Japanese, it would be exactly the opposite meaning.


Note: I have not verified this but I've found this title used for U.S. Marines in Korean articles, so it's most likely a normal Korean term as well (but only in Korean Hanja).


See Also:  Marine Corps | Navy | Army | Art of War | Warrior | Military

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
China jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Wall Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty." More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country."

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country." Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country."

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

Zhuge Liang

China zhū gě liàng
Zhuge Liang Wall Scroll

諸葛亮 is the name Zhuge Liang, written in Chinese.

Zhuge Liang lived from 181 to 234 A.D.
He was a military leader and prime minister of Shu Han (蜀漢) during the Three Kingdoms period.
He was the main hero of the fictional Romance of Three Kingdoms.
He is considered a famous sage, philosopher, and military genius.

Sasuke

Japan sasuke
Sasuke Wall Scroll

サスケ is the Japanese title of the TV show, Sasuke Rising.

サスケ is the original Japanese TV show that inspired the American Ninja Warrior, Ninja Warrior UK, and other variations.

It should be noted that in Japan, the shows title is usually displayed in capital Roman letters as "SASUKE", rather than the Japanese text, サスケ. Although, both titles are known in Japan (you'd probably need to search for サスケ if looking to buy a Sasuke DVD in Japan).


Notes: Sasuke can also be a given name (written the same way). There are also other names that romanize as Sasuke in Japanese.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana , it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Avenger

Japan fuku shuu sha
Avenger Wall Scroll

復讐者 is a Japanese Kanji title that means avenger or revenger.

The first two characters literally mean revenge or avenge.

The last character is a way to say person (or soldier/warrior).

Altogether, you have something like, "avenging person," hence avenger.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Hero 英雄ei yuu / eiyuu / ei yu / eiyuyīng xióng
ying1 xiong2
ying xiong
yingxiong
ying hsiung
yinghsiung
Man of Remarkable Character
Hero
傑物
杰物
ketsubutsu
Woman of Strong Character
Woman Hero
女傑
女杰
joketsunǚ jiá / nv3 jia2 / nv jia / nvjia nü chia / nüchia
Heroic Spirit 英氣
英气
yīng qì / ying1 qi4 / ying qi / yingqi ying ch`i / yingchi / ying chi
Heroic Spirit
Great Ambition
雄心yuushin / yushinxióng xīn
xiong2 xin1
xiong xin
xiongxin
hsiung hsin
hsiunghsin
Heroic Spirit
Heroism
豪氣
豪气
háo qì / hao2 qi4 / hao qi / haoqi hao ch`i / haochi / hao chi
Warrior Soul
Heroic Spirit
勇士精神yǒng shì jīng shén
yong3 shi4 jing1 shen2
yong shi jing shen
yongshijingshen
yung shih ching shen
yungshihchingshen
Woman Hero
Heroine
巾幗英雄
巾帼英雄
jīn guó yīng xióng
jin1 guo2 ying1 xiong2
jin guo ying xiong
jinguoyingxiong
chin kuo ying hsiung
chinkuoyinghsiung
Brave Warrior 勇士yuu shi / yuushi / yu shi / yushiyǒng shì / yong3 shi4 / yong shi / yongshi yung shih / yungshih
Daredevil Warrior
Soul of a Warrior
鬼武者oni mu sha / onimusha
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.