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The Strong One in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a The Strong One calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "The Strong One" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "The Strong One" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. The Strong One
  2. Strong / Powerful / Force
  3. Strength: Strong and Solid
  4. Strong bones come from hard knocks
  5. Immovable Mind
  6. Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit
  7. Patience / Perseverance
  8. Free Will
  9. Do not fear the task,...
10. Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things
11. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33
12. With all the strength of your heart


The Strong One

Japan tsuyoi mono
The Strong One Wall Scroll

強いもの means, "strong one," in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong / Powerful / Force

China qiáng
Japan kyou
Strong / Powerful / Force Wall Scroll

This "strong" character means strength, force, powerful, better, stubborn, and stiff (yes, all of this in one character). This "strong" has less to do with physical strength and more to do with having a winning attitude, or just having the ability to win at something.

Note that most of the time, this character is pronounced "qiang" but when used with the meaning of stubborn, unyielding, or stiff, it is pronounced "jiang" in Chinese.

Also, sometimes "qiang" is used in modern Chinese to describe people that do crazy things (Example: Bicycling from Beijing to Tibet alone). I sometimes can be found outside my Beijing apartment wearing nothing but shorts and a tee-shirt while eating an ice cream during a snow storm, just to hear my neighbors call me "qiang." Maybe they mean "strong" but perhaps they are using the new meaning of "crazy strong."

Also a Korean Hanja with same meaning but mostly used in compound words.

This is used in Japanese (though normally in compound words). In Japanese, it has the same meaning but in some context can mean "a little more than..." or "a little over [some amount]." Most Japanese would read this as tough, strength, stiff, hard, inflexible, obstinate, or stubborn.

Strength: Strong and Solid

China qiáng gù
Japan kyouko
Strength: Strong and Solid Wall Scroll

Means firmness, stability, security, and strength in Japanese. It's not used commonly in China but it means "powerful," "firm," "solid," "strong" or "better than others" in Chinese. There is a slight variation in the top of the first character between Chinese and Japanese. Because this is more a Japanese word, we are showing the Japanese form here.

This is also a Korean word but Korean Hanja uses the Chinese form of the first character (one tiny stroke is a little different), so just let me now if your audience is Korean when you place your order, and we'll have it written in the Chinese/Korean version.

Strong bones come from hard knocks

China bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
Strong bones come from hard knocks Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Without being knocked around a bit, [one's] bones won't become hard.

Figuratively, this means: One can't become strong without first being tempered by "hard knocks."

While true for everyone, this sounds like the "Iron Body" form of Kung Fu, where practitioners bodies are beaten (and often bone fractured) in order to become stronger.
For the rest of us, this is just about how we can be tempered and build character through the hardships in our lives.

This is not a common title for a wall scroll in China.

Immovable Mind

fudoshin
Japan fu dou shin
Immovable Mind Wall Scroll

不動心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet.

Under that context, places such as the Budo Dojo define it this way: An unshakable mind and an immovable spirit is the state of fudoshin. It is courage and stability displayed both mentally and physically. Rather than indicating rigidity and inflexibility, fudoshin describes a condition that is not easily upset by internal thoughts or external forces. It is capable of receiving a strong attack while retaining composure and balance. It receives and yields lightly, grounds to the earth, and reflects aggression back to the source.

Other translations of this title include imperturbability, steadfastness, keeping a cool head in an emergency, or keeping one's calm (during a fight).

The first two Kanji alone mean immobility, firmness, fixed, steadfastness, motionless, idle.

The last Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these three Kanji create a title that is defined as "immovable mind" within the context of Japanese martial arts. However, in Chinese it would mean "motionless heart" and in Korean Hanja, "wafting heart" or "floating heart."

Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit

China jīng shén lì liàng
Japan seishin rikiryou
Spiritual Strength / Strength of Spirit Wall Scroll

This title speaks of one's soul or spirit, and the capacity or strength that soul possesses.

The first two characters mean mind, heart, spirit, and/or soul.

The last two characters mean strength, capacity, or ability.

Note: Separately, these are two words in Japanese, and can be pronounced but this does not make a natural title in Japanese (best if your audience is Chinese).

Patience / Perseverance

China rěn
Japan nin
Patience / Perseverance Wall Scroll

忍 contains the ideas of patience, equanimity, perseverance, forbearance, and endurance. Alone, this single character can be a bit ambiguous or flexible. It can also mean to endure, to bear, to put up with or to conceal. If you want to simply decide what this character means to you within the general meaning but keep it a mystery to others, this is a good choice.

If you want to be more direct, you may want to choose one of our other selections that mean perseverance or patience (you will see this character within those larger words/phrases).

There is a secondary meaning in Japanese, since this is the first character of the word ninja.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write it in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).


See Also:  Perseverance | Patience | Tenacious

Free Will

China zì yóu yì zhì
Japan jiyuu ishi
Free Will Wall Scroll

This concept has existed for thousands of years that humans have the ability to understand right and wrong, then make a decision one way or the other (thus affecting their own fate).

Sources such as Confucius, Buddhist scriptures, the Qur'an and the Bible all address this idea.

As for the characters shown here, the first two mean free, freedom, or liberty. The last two simply mean "will."


See Also:  Freedom | Strong Willed | Fate

Do not fear the task,
cooperation will lead to success

Do not fear strong winds waves; just be sure to row in unison
China bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
Do not fear the task, / cooperation will lead to success Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Do not fear strong winds [and] high waves; what [one should] worry about whether or not you're rowing in unison.

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the task, the key to success lies in making collective efforts.

I like to translate this as, "Don't sweat the details, just get together and get it done."

Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

China zhēn rú
Japan shinnyo
Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things Wall Scroll

This comes from the Sanskrit and Pali word often romanized as "tathata" or "tathatā." Originally written, "तथता."

It's a Buddhist term that is often translated as "thusness" or "suchness" but this does not explain it.
A better explanation may be, "the ultimate nature of all things." However, this gives it too strong of a feeling. This concept is sometimes described as being in awe of the simple nature of something - like a blade of grass blowing in the wind, or ripples on water. It is what it is supposed to be, these things are following their nature. Amazing in their mundane simplicity.

Every sect of Buddhism will have a slightly different flavor, or explanation, so don't get fixated on one definition.


Notes: Sometimes Buddhists use the word dharmatā, a synonym to tathatā.

In Japan, this can also be the female given name Mayuki, or the surname Majo.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

China zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33 Wall Scroll

This is referred to as passage or chapter 33 of the Dao De Jing (often Romanized as "Tao Te Ching"). These are the words of the philosopher Laozi (Lao Tzu).

The following is one translation of this passage:
To know others is wisdom;
To know oneself is acuity/intelligence.
To conquer others is power,
To conquer oneself is strength.
To know contentment is to have wealth.
To act resolutely is to have purpose.
To stay one's ground is to be enduring.
To die and yet not be forgotten is to be long-lived.


Another translation:
To understand others is to be knowledgeable;
To understand yourself is to be wise.
To conquer others is to have strength;
To conquer yourself is to be strong.
To know when you have enough is to be rich.
To go forward with strength is to have ambition.
To not lose your place is to be long lasting.
To die but not be forgotten -- that's true long life.


A third translation of the second half:
He who is content is rich;
He who acts with persistence has will;
He who does not lose his roots will endure;
He who dies physically but preserves the Dao will enjoy a long after-life.


Notes:

During our research, the Chinese characters shown here are probably the most accurate to the original text of Laozi. These were taken for the most part from the Mawangdui 1973 and Guodan 1993 manuscripts which pre-date other Daodejing texts by about 1000 years.

Grammar was a little different in Laozi's time. So you should consider this to be the ancient Chinese version. Some have modernized this passage by adding, removing, or swapping articles and changing the grammar (we felt the oldest and most original version would be more desirable). You may find other versions printed in books or online - sometimes these modern texts are simply used to explain to Chinese people what the original text really means.

This language issue can be compared in English by thinking how the King James (known as the Authorized version in Great Britain) Bible from 1611 was written, and comparing it to modern English. Now imagine that the Daodejing was probably written around 403 BCE (2000 years before the King James Version of the Bible). To a Chinese person, the original Daodejing reads like text that is 3 times more detached compared to Shakespeare's English is to our modern-day speech.

Extended notes:

While on this Biblical text comparison, it should be noted, that just like the Bible, all the original texts of the Daodejing were lost or destroyed long ago. Just as with the scripture used to create the Bible, various manuscripts exist, many with variations or copyist errors. Just as the earliest New Testament scripture (incomplete) is from 170 years after Christ, the earliest Daodejing manuscript (incomplete) is from 100-200 years after the death of Laozi.

The reason that the originals were lost probably has a lot to do with the first Qin Emperor. Upon taking power and unifying China, he ordered the burning and destruction of all books (scrolls/rolls) except those pertaining to Chinese medicine and a few other subjects. The surviving Daodejing manuscripts were either hidden on purpose or simply forgotten about. Some were not unearthed until as late as 1993.

We compared a lot of research by various archeologists and historians before deciding on this as the most accurate and correct version. But one must allow that it may not be perfect, or the actual and original as from the hand of Laozi himself.

With all the strength of your heart

Japan omoi kiri
With all the strength of your heart Wall Scroll

This can be translated as, "with all one's strength," "with all one's heart," "to the limits of your heart," or "to the end of your heart/emotions."

The character breakdown:
思い (omoi) thought; mind; heart; feelings; emotion; sentiment; love; affection; desire; wish; hope; expectation; imagination; experience
切り (kiri) bounds; limits.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
The Strong One 強いものtsuyoi mono
tsuyoimono
Strong
Powerful
Force

kyou / kyoqiáng / qiang2 / qiang ch`iang / chiang
Strength: Strong and Solid 強固
强固
kyouko / kyokoqiáng gù / qiang2 gu4 / qiang gu / qianggu ch`iang ku / chiangku / chiang ku
Strong bones come from hard knocks 不磕不碰骨頭不硬
不磕不碰骨头不硬
bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
bu4 ke1 bu4 peng4 gu3 tou2 bu4 ying4
bu ke bu peng gu tou bu ying
bukebupenggutoubuying
pu k`o pu p`eng ku t`ou pu ying
pukopupengkutoupuying
pu ko pu peng ku tou pu ying
Immovable Mind 不動心fu dou shin
fudoushin
fu do shin
fudoshin
Spiritual Strength
Strength of Spirit
精神力量seishin rikiryou
seishinrikiryou
seishin rikiryo
seishinrikiryo
jīng shén lì liàng
jing1 shen2 li4 liang4
jing shen li liang
jingshenliliang
ching shen li liang
chingshenliliang
Patience
Perseverance
ninrěn / ren3 / ren jen
Free Will 自由意志jiyuu ishi / jiyuuishi / jiyu ishi / jiyuishizì yóu yì zhì
zi4 you2 yi4 zhi4
zi you yi zhi
ziyouyizhi
tzu yu i chih
tzuyuichih
Do not fear the task, cooperation will lead to success 不怕風浪大就怕槳不齊
不怕风浪大就怕桨不齐
bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
bu4 pa4 feng1 lang4 da4 jiu4 pa4 jiang3 bu4 qi2
bu pa feng lang da jiu pa jiang bu qi
pu p`a feng lang ta chiu p`a chiang pu ch`i
pu pa feng lang ta chiu pa chiang pu chi
Tathata
Ultimate Nature of All Things
真如shinnyozhēn rú / zhen1 ru2 / zhen ru / zhenru chen ju / chenju
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Always
August
Bamboo
Blessed by God
Brown
Bushido
Compassion
Crane
Dragon Lady
Earth
Elder Brother
Enso
Fist
Flower
Fortitude
Grace
Guardian
Happiness
Heart Sutra
Iaido
Independent Spirit
Integrity
Jujitsu
Karma
Learning is Eternal
Longevity
Lotus
Love
Lover
Martial Arts
Master of Martial Arts
Mother and Son
Peace and Happiness
Peace and Harmony
Peace and Health
Peace and Prosperity
Peace and Security
Peace and Tranquility
Peace of Mind
Pine
Princess
Respect and Loyalty
Rooster
Self-Respect
Semper Fidelis
Shine
Spirit
Tiger
Truth
Warrior
Wind

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as The Strong One Kanji, The Strong One Characters, The Strong One in Mandarin Chinese, The Strong One Characters, The Strong One in Chinese Writing, The Strong One in Japanese Writing, The Strong One in Asian Writing, The Strong One Ideograms, Chinese The Strong One symbols, The Strong One Hieroglyphics, The Strong One Glyphs, The Strong One in Chinese Letters, The Strong One Hanzi, The Strong One in Japanese Kanji, The Strong One Pictograms, The Strong One in the Chinese Written-Language, or The Strong One in the Japanese Written-Language.