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Simply the Best in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Simply the Best calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Simply the Best" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Simply the Best" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Simply the Best
  2. Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever
  3. In Flowers the Cherry Blossom,...
  4. Live Strong
  5. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial
  6. Mind, Body and Spirit
  7. Better Late Than Never
  8. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu


Simply the Best

Supreme / Highest
China zuì gāo
Japan sai kou
Simply the Best Wall Scroll

最高 means highest level, supreme, top, the most, or the best. Depending on context, it can mean the most expensive or highest quality.

Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever

China yǒng yuǎn de péng yǒu
Eternal Friendship / Friends Forever Wall Scroll

永遠的朋友 is exactly what the title suggests. 永遠的朋友 means friends that are eternal or a friendship that will last forever - you will remain the best of friends as long as you live.

The first two characters mean forever, eternal, eternity, perpetuity, immortality, and/or permanence.

The middle character links the words (it's a possessive article).

The last two characters represent friendship, or simply "friends."

In Flowers the Cherry Blossom,
In Men the Samurai

Japan hana wa sakuragi hito wa bushi
In Flowers the Cherry Blossom, / In Men the Samurai Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb simply reads, "[In] Flowers it's Cherry Blossoms, [In] Men it's Warriors."

This is meant to say that of all the flowers in the world, the cherry blossom is the best. And of all men in the world, the Samurai or Warrior is the best

This proverb has been around for a long time. It's believed to have been composed sometime before the Edo Period in Japan (which started in 1603).

Some will drop one syllable and pronounce this, "hana wa sakura hito wa bushi." That's "sakura" instead of "sakuragi," which is like saying "cherry blossom" instead of "cherry tree."


The third character was traditionally written as 櫻. But in modern Japan, that became 桜. You may still see 櫻 used from time to time on older pieces of calligraphy. We can do either one, so just make a special request if you want 櫻.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live Strong

China jiān qiáng shēng huó
Live Strong Wall Scroll

While hard to translate directly, this is the best way to write "Live Strong" in Chinese. If you are a cancer survivor, or simply support Lance Armstrong's ideas, this is a nice selection for a wall scroll.

The first two characters mean strong or staunch. The last two mean living or life (daily existence). While the Chinese version is the reverse order of "Live Strong" it is the only way to write it in a natural form that is also grammatically correct.

Note that we are in no way affiliated or connected to Lance, nor his foundation. This translation is offered because of multiple requests from customers whose philosophies or ideas match those of the Live Strong idea.

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair."

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self."

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish." The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice."

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair." So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common Good | Altruism

Mind, Body and Spirit

China shēn xīn líng
Japan mi shin rei
Mind, Body and Spirit Wall Scroll

This is probably the best way to express the idea of "Body, Mind and Spirit" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word for "heart" here because for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say "warm-hearted" or "I love you with all of my heart." In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is "body, heart & spirit" which could also be interpreted as "body mind & soul."

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply "feels" like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we have to be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).


霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Wall Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty. It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.

Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds peoples homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.

Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Simply the Best 最高sai kou / saikou / sai ko / saikozuì gāo / zui4 gao1 / zui gao / zuigao tsui kao / tsuikao
Eternal Friendship
Friends Forever
永遠的朋友
永远的朋友
yǒng yuǎn de péng yǒu
yong3 yuan3 de peng2 you3
yong yuan de peng you
yongyuandepengyou
yung yüan te p`eng yu
yungyüantepengyu
yung yüan te peng yu
In Flowers the Cherry Blossom, In Men the Samurai 花は櫻木人は武士
花は桜木人は武士
hana wa sakuragi hito wa bushi
Live Strong 堅強生活
坚强生活
jiān qiáng shēng huó
jian1 qiang2 sheng1 huo2
jian qiang sheng huo
jianqiangshenghuo
chien ch`iang sheng huo
chienchiangshenghuo
chien chiang sheng huo
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial 大公無私
大公无私
dà gōng wú sī
da4 gong1 wu2 si1
da gong wu si
dagongwusi
ta kung wu ssu
takungwussu
Mind, Body and Spirit 身心靈 / 身心霊
身心灵
mi shin rei
mishinrei
shēn xīn líng
shen1 xin1 ling2
shen xin ling
shenxinling
shen hsin ling
shenhsinling
Better Late Than Never 亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu 遠上寒山石徑斜白雲生處有人家停車坐愛楓林晚霜葉紅於二月花
远上寒山石径斜白云生处有人家停车坐爱枫林晚霜叶红于二月花
yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
yuan3 shang4 han2 shan1 shi2 jing4 xia2 bai2 yun2 sheng1 chu4 you3 ren2 jia1 ting2 che1 zuo4 ai4 feng1 lin2 wan3 shuang4 ye4 hong2 yu2 er4 yue4 hua1
yuan shang han shan shi jing xia bai yun sheng chu you ren jia ting che zuo ai feng lin wan shuang ye hong yu er yue hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng ch`u yu jen chia t`ing ch`e tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng chu yu jen chia ting che tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Abundance
Achieve
Adapt and Overcome
Aikido
Always Faithful
Ambitious
America
April
Aquarius
Archer
Art of War
Autumn
Awareness
Balanced Life
Beautiful Woman
Beloved
Best
Bible
Bird
Blessing
Bond
Book
Breath
Bright
Bruce Lee
Bull
Bushido
Butterfly
Caring
Chance
Charity
Cherish
Chicken
Christian
Clarity
Contentment
Courtesy
Create
Danger
Daruma
Death Before Surrender
Determination to Achieve
Determined
Dharma
Diamond
Dignity
Diligence
Divine
Doctor
Dragon
Dragon and Phoenix
Dragon Fly
Dragon Spirit
Dragonfly
Effort
Elegant
Elements
Emptiness
Equilibrium
Eternal Life
Family
Family Over Everything
Fear No Evil
Fierce
Five Tenets of Confucius
Follow Your Heart
Forgiven
Four Noble Truths
Frog
Furinkazan
Fury
Future
Geisha
Ghost
Glory
Goat
God Give Me Strength
God is Always With You
Grace
Grandfather
Green
Hapkido
Hawk
Healthy
Heart and Soul
Heart of a Warrior
Heart Sutra
Hero
Honor and Respect
Hope
Horse
Iaido
Illusion
Imagination
Independence
Independent
Iron
Isaac
Jeet Kune Do
Joyful
Judo
Jujitsu
Kendo
Kenjutsu
Knight
Large Painting
Laughter
Legendary Turtle
Liberty
Life Force
Life Goes On
Life in Balance
Life is Short
Listen
Live for the Day
Live for Today
Live for What You Love
Live Laugh Love
Live Strong
Live Without Regret
Lonely
Lost Soul
Lotus
Lotus Flower
Love
Love Always
Love and Affection
Love and Devotion
Love Binds Us Together
Love Eternal
Love Eternally
Love Faith Strength
Love Without Reason
Loving Father
Mind Like Water
Miracle
Mommy
Monk
Monkey
Mother Daughter
Musashi
Mushin
Musician
Namaste
Namo Amitabha Buddha
Never Give In
Ninjutsu
Nirvana
No Worries
Once in a Lifetime
Opportunity
Passionate
Path
Peace and Tranquility
Peaceful Heart
Perfect
Phoenix
Pisces
Pleasure
Princess
Pure
Pursuit of Happiness
Queen
Rabbit
Reason
Rebel
Resilience
Rooster
Sadness
Saifa
Samurai Virtues
Scorpio
Seize the Day
Self-Control
Sheep
Shinobi
Shotokan
Sincerity
Spirit of a Fighter
Spirit of Taekwondo
Spiritual Energy
Stone
Strong
Strong Heart
Strong Hearted
Strong Mind Strong Body
Strong Will
Survive
Tai Chi
Tamilsex
Tang Soo Do
Tao Te Ching
Teach
Tenacity
The Way
Tiger
Tolerance
Treasure
Trust in God
Trust No Man

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Simply the Best Kanji, Simply the Best Characters, Simply the Best in Mandarin Chinese, Simply the Best Characters, Simply the Best in Chinese Writing, Simply the Best in Japanese Writing, Simply the Best in Asian Writing, Simply the Best Ideograms, Chinese Simply the Best symbols, Simply the Best Hieroglyphics, Simply the Best Glyphs, Simply the Best in Chinese Letters, Simply the Best Hanzi, Simply the Best in Japanese Kanji, Simply the Best Pictograms, Simply the Best in the Chinese Written-Language, or Simply the Best in the Japanese Written-Language.