Not what you want?

Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Happy Marriage in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a Happy Marriage calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Happy Marriage" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Happy Marriage" title below...

  1. 100 Years of Happy Marriage
  2. Double Happiness
  3. Happiness / Joyful / Joy
  4. Love
  5. Golden Anniversary / 50th Wedding Anniversary
  6. Perfect Harmony
  7. Soul Mates
  8. Better Late Than Never

100 Years of Happy Marriage

China bǎi nián hǎo hé
100 Years of Happy Marriage

百年好合 is a wish or greeting, often heard at Chinese weddings, for a couple to have 100 good years together.

Some will translate this more naturally into English as: "May you live a long and happy life together."

The character breakdown:
百 = 100
年 = Years
好 = Good (Happy)
合 = Together

Double Happiness

(Happy wedding and marriage)
China
Double Happiness

囍 is a common gift for Chinese couples getting married or newly married couples.

As we say in the west, "Two heads are better than one" Well, in the east, two "happinesses" are certainly better than one.

Some will suggest this is a symbol of two happinesses coming together. Others see it as a multiplication of happiness because of the union or marriage.

囍 is not really a character that is pronounced very often - it's almost exclusively used in written form. However, if pressed, most Chinese people will pronounce this "shuang xi" (double happy) although literally there are two "xi" characters combined in this calligraphy (but nobody will say "xi xi").

Double Happiness Portrait Red If you select this character, I strongly suggest the festive bright red paper for your calligraphy. Part of my suggestion comes from the fact that red is a good luck color in China, and this will add to the sentiment that you wish to convey with this scroll to the happy couple.


See Also:  Happiness

Happiness / Joyful / Joy

China
Japan ki / yorokobi
Happiness / Joyful / Joy

喜 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja for the kind of happiness known in the west as "joy."

喜 can also be translated as rejoice, enjoyment, delighted, pleased, or "take pleasure in." Sometimes it can mean, "to be fond of" (in a certain context).

If you write two of these happiness/joy characters side by side, you create another character known in English as "double happiness," which is a symbol associated with weddings and a happy marriage.


There is another version of this character that you will find on our website with an additional radical on the left side (exactly same meaning, just an alternate form). The version of happiness shown here is the commonly written form in China, Japan and South Korea (banned in North Korea).


See Also:  Contentment | Happiness | Joy

Love

China ài
Japan ai
Love

愛 is a very universal character. It means love in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, old Korean Hanja, and old Vietnamese.

愛 is one of the most recognized Asian symbols in the west, and is often seen on tee-shirts, coffee mugs, tattoos, and more.

愛 can also be defined as affection, to be fond of, to like, or to be keen on. It often refers to romantic love, and is found in phrases like, "I love you." But in Chinese, one can say, "I love that movie" using this character as well.

This can also be a pet-name or part of a pet-name in the way we say "dear" or "honey" in English.


It's very common for couples to say "I love you" in Chinese. However, in Japanese, "love" is not a term used very often. In fact, a person is more likely to say "I like you" rather than "I love you" in Japanese. So this word is well-known but seldom spoken.


More about this character:

This may be hard to imagine as a westerner but the strokes at the top of this love character symbolize family & marriage.

心The symbol in the middle is a little easier to identify. It is the character for "heart" (it can also mean "mind" or "soul"). I guess you can say that no matter if you are from the East or the West, you must put your heart into your love.

友The strokes at the bottom create a modified character that means "friend" or "friendship."

I suppose you could say that the full meaning of this love character is to love your family, spouse, and friends with all of your heart, since all three elements exist in this character.


See Also:  I Love You | Caring | Benevolence | Friendliness

Golden Anniversary / 50th Wedding Anniversary

China xìng fú jīn hūn
Japan kou fuku kin kon
Golden Anniversary / 50th Wedding Anniversary

This means "Happy Golden Anniversary" and is a great gift for a couple who is celebrating 50 years together.

The first two characters mean happy, blessed, or happiness.

The last two characters mean, "couple's golden anniversary." It literally means "golden wedding" or "golden marriage" but this is only used for the 50-year-mark of a marriage (the same way we use gold to represent 50 years in the west).

This is a nice title to use with an inscription. You could request something like, "Happy 50th Anniversary Mr. and Mrs. Smith," to be written down the side of this title, in smaller Chinese characters.


Please note: This can be pronounced and understood in Japanese but not as commonly used in Japan. Japanese people who read this will understand it but might tend to feel it's of Chinese origin.

Perfect Harmony

China qín sè hé míng
Perfect Harmony

琴瑟和鳴 is a Chinese title that means, "in perfect harmony" or "in sync."

This can translate as, "two harps in harmony." While this more literally means, "qin [and] se harmonious sound."

The qin and se are both types of string instruments (Chinese zithers) that are known to play in perfect harmony. Thus, the two together are often used as a metaphor for marital harmony or a happy marriage.

Soul Mates

China tiān shēng yí duì
Soul Mates

It was tough to find the best way to say "soul mates" in Chinese. We settled on this old way to say "A couple selected by heaven."

The first two characters together mean "natural" or "innate." Separated, they mean "heaven" and "born." The last two characters mean "couple." So this can be translated as "A couple that is together by nature," or "A couple brought together by heaven's decree," with a slight stretch, you could say "A couple born together from heaven."

It's a struggle to find the best way to describe this idea in English but trust me, it is pretty cool and it is a great way to say "soulmates."

If you're in a happy relationship or marriage and think you have found your soul mate, this would be a wonderful wall scroll to hang in your home.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Search for Happy Marriage in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $132.00

Your Price: $72.88

Gallery Price: $27.00

Your Price: $15.00

Gallery Price: $27.00

Your Price: $15.00

Gallery Price: $27.00

Your Price: $15.00

Gallery Price: $27.00

Your Price: $15.00

Gallery Price: $31.00

Your Price: $17.00

Gallery Price: $70.00

Your Price: $32.88

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $68.88

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $68.88

Gallery Price: $106.00

Your Price: $58.88

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $68.88

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $68.88

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $68.88

Happy Buddha Wall Scroll

Happy Buddha Wall Scroll

Discounted Blemished

Gallery Price: $62.00

Your Price: $34.00

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $68.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
100 Years of Happy Marriage百年好合bǎi nián hǎo hé
bai3 nian2 hao3 he2
bai nian hao he
bainianhaohe
pai nien hao ho
painienhaoho
Double Happiness
喜喜
xǐ / xi3 / xihsi
Happiness
Joyful
Joy
ki / yorokobixǐ / xi3 / xihsi
Love
aiài / ai4 / ai
Golden Anniversary
50th Wedding Anniversary
幸福金婚 / 倖福金婚
幸福金婚
kou fuku kin kon
koufukukinkon
ko fuku kin kon
kofukukinkon
xìng fú jīn hūn
xing4 fu2 jin1 hun1
xing fu jin hun
xingfujinhun
hsing fu chin hun
hsingfuchinhun
Perfect Harmony琴瑟和鳴
琴瑟和鸣
qín sè hé míng
qin2 se4 he2 ming2
qin se he ming
qinseheming
ch`in se ho ming
chinsehoming
chin se ho ming
Soul Mates天生一對
天生一对
tiān shēng yí duì
tian1 sheng1 yi2 dui4
tian sheng yi dui
tianshengyidui
t`ien sheng i tui
tienshengitui
tien sheng i tui
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Achieve Inner Peace
Aikido
Angel
Black
Blessing
Brave Heart
Brotherly and Sisterly Love
Chaos
Christian
Confidence
Destiny
Devil
Divine
Dream
Endurance
Enso
Family Over Everything
Feng Shui
Fire
Fire Dragon
Forever
Forever Family
Forgive and Forget
God Bless You
God is Always With You
Gold
Gratitude
Hapkido
Happy Birthday
Happy Life
Heart Sutra
Heaven
Hello
Hentai
Holy Spirit
Home is Where the Heart Is
House of Good Fortune
Indomitable
Inner Peace and Serenity
Integrity
Islam
Jeet Kune Do
Kingdom of Heaven
Libra
Lightning
Live Laugh Love
Lotus Sutra
Love
Love and Affection
Love and Peace
Metal
Muhammad
Mushin
Music
Never Give Up
New Beginning New Life
Noble
Once in a Lifetime
Pain
Peace and Good Health
Peace and Happiness
Phoenix
Phoenix Rise from the Ashes
Pure
Sacred Fire
Sacrifice
Samurai
Saudi
Self-Discipline
Shadow
Silence
Sing
Snake
Strength
Strength Ability
Strong Woman
Tai Chi
Tao Te Ching
The Dao of Filial Piety
Tiger Spirit
Together
Trust No Man
Victory
Wealth
Wine

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Happy Marriage Kanji, Happy Marriage Characters, Happy Marriage in Mandarin Chinese, Happy Marriage Characters, Happy Marriage in Chinese Writing, Happy Marriage in Japanese Writing, Happy Marriage in Asian Writing, Happy Marriage Ideograms, Chinese Happy Marriage symbols, Happy Marriage Hieroglyphics, Happy Marriage Glyphs, Happy Marriage in Chinese Letters, Happy Marriage Hanzi, Happy Marriage in Japanese Kanji, Happy Marriage Pictograms, Happy Marriage in the Chinese Written-Language, or Happy Marriage in the Japanese Written-Language.