Seeing One���S Nature and Becoming a Buddha in Chinese / Japanese...

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  1. One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

  2. Ace / One

  3. Beauty of Nature

  4. Best / Number One

  5. Wisdom and Insight of the Buddha

  6. The Aura of Buddha

  7. The Eye of the Buddha

  8. Happy Buddha

  9. Buddha Seeking

10. Buddha Dharma Sangha

11. Buddha Heart / Mind of Buddha

12. Seeing one’s Nature and becoming a Buddha

13. The Buddha Realm / Buddhahood

14. Buddhism / Buddha

15. Buddha / Buddhism

16. Buddha Way

17. The Buddha is in Each Sentient Being

18. Working Together as One / Cooperation

19. Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it

20. Amitabha Buddha

21. The farts of others stink, but one’s own smells sweet

22. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

23. One Good Deed Each Day

24. Words Have Enormous Weight: One Word Worth Nine Caldrons

25. Human Nature

26. Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot

27. One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils

28. The Nature of Enlightenment in One's Mind

29. Kensho Jobutsu - Enlightenment - Path to Buddha

30. Meet the Buddha, Kill the Buddha

31. Kindness and Forgiving Nature

32. To Know Hardship, One Must Experience It

33. We are not born with knowledge, how does one achieve maturity?

34. Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

35. Loving Heart / One’s Love

36. Mother Nature

37. Namo Amitabha Buddha

38. Namo Shakyamuni Buddha

39. Nature

40. Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature

41. The Nature of Martial Arts

42. Mantra to Buddha / Nembutsu

43. No one knows a son better than the father

44. One Direction

45. One Family Under Heaven

46. One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul

47. One Key Opens One Lock

48. One Love

49. One Mind / Unity

50. One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet

51. One

52. Proud Of One’s Name

53. One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door

54. One who is drenched in rain, does not fear drops of dew

55. Seeing is Believing

56. Self Awareness Becomes a Buddha

57. Shakyamuni / The Buddha

58. The Strong One

59. Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

60. The Chosen One

61. A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

62. When Three People Gather, One Becomes a Teacher

63. Time Waits For No One

64. True Religion / Buddha Truth

65. Trust No One / Trust No Man

66. Work Together with One Mind

67. Work Together with One Heart

68. Solidarity / Working Together as One


One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

yí rì qiān qiū
ichi jitsu sen shuu
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years Scroll

一日千秋 is a Japanese and Chinese proverb about missing someone.

一日千秋 is often used to express how hard it is to wait for someone's return, or to be away from someone.

Some will translate this as, "one day feels like a very long time", or "waiting for someone (something) is hard".

You might see this romanized as a single word, Ichijitsusenshuu, or as "Ichijitsu Senshuu" from Japanese.
If you break down the characters one-by-one, we get:
一 = one / a
日 = day / sun (can also represent time, or a date)
千 = 1000 / a thousand
秋 = autumn / fall

Together, 千秋 can mean, "autumn comes thousand times" (or 1000 years). It can also be read as 1000 periods of time.
However you literally read this, it relays the idea of heartache as you wait for someone that you miss.

yāo
yao
Ace / One Scroll

幺 means one, as used on a dice or in a card game.

Thus, in that context, it means Ace.

幺 can also be the surname "Yao" in both Chinese and Japanese.
Note: Rarely if ever used in Korean.

幺 can sometimes be written these ways: 么麼

Beauty of Nature

Ka-Chou-Fuu-Getsu

ka chou fuu getsu
Beauty of Nature Scroll

花鳥風月 is the Japanese Kanji proverb for "Beauties of Nature".

The dictionary definition is, "the traditional themes of natural beauty in Japanese aesthetics".

The Kanji each represents an element of nature that constitute beauty in traditional Japanese art and culture.

The Kanji breakdown:
花 = ka = flower (also pronounced "hana")
鳥 = chou = bird (also pronounced "tori").
風 = fuu = wind (also pronounced "kaze").
月 = getsu = moon (also pronounced "tsuki")

Best / Number One

ichi ban
Best / Number One Scroll

一番 is often used to mean "best" or "the best" in Japanese.

It actually means "number one" in Japanese.

Wisdom and Insight of the Buddha

fó zhī jiàn
bucchiken
Wisdom and Insight of the Buddha Scroll

This title represents the wisdom and insight of the Buddha, or the penetrative power of Buddha's wisdom, or vision.

佛知見 is a term derived from the Lotus Sutra perhaps up to 1900 years ago.

The Aura of Buddha

fó guāng
bukkou
The Aura of Buddha Scroll

佛光 means Buddha's teachings, or Buddha's Light.

This often refers to the aura around the head of Buddha.

Alternate meanings include: Spiritual Enlightenment (from Buddha), Buddha's Halo, Light of the Buddha, or Buddha's Glory.

The Eye of the Buddha

wǔ yǎn
butsugen
The Eye of the Buddha Scroll

The eye of Buddha, the enlightened one who sees all and is omniscient.


仏In modern Japan, they also write the first Kanji as shown to the right. Both versions are correct but if you want the modern Japanese version, click on the Kanji to the right instead of the button above.

Happy Buddha

Buddha of Joyful Light

huān xǐ guāng fó
kan gi kou butsu
Happy Buddha Scroll

This title is Buddha of Joyful Light.

歡喜光佛 is Amitābha from Sanskrit but pronounced very different in Chinese and Japanese.

Buddha Seeking

qín qiú
gongu
Buddha Seeking Scroll

勤求 is a complex word that means inquiring in the Buddha way.

To put it another way, it is seeking something in the right way, at the right time, and diligently seeking only truth or the good.

Buddha Dharma Sangha

fó fǎ sēng
buppō sō
Buddha  Dharma  Sangha Scroll

佛法僧 is the Buddha, Dharma and Saṅgha.

These three characters are the "Triple Gem" of Buddhism or the Buddhist Trinity.

Buddha Heart / Mind of Buddha

fó xīn
busshin
Buddha Heart / Mind of Buddha Scroll

佛心 means the Buddha's mind, Buddha-heart, or the spiritually enlightened heart/mind.

The Buddha-heart is one that is detached from good and evil and other such constructs. The Buddha-heart has mercy, compassion, and loving-kindness for all sentient life, the good, the wicked, and all in between.

The heart and mind (心) are the same concept in the ancient Orient, so you can use heart and mind interchangeably in this context.

Seeing one’s Nature and becoming a Buddha

jiàn xìng chéng fó
ken shou jou butsu
Seeing one’s Nature and becoming a Buddha Scroll

見性成佛 is a universal phrase that suggests that one may see one's own nature and accomplish Buddhahood.

見性 suggests penetrating deep inside oneself to finally see one's "Original Mind".

成佛 refers to a sentient being who dispenses with illusions and delusions through ascetic practice, is enlightened to truth, and becomes a Buddha.

見性成佛 is used by Mahayana, Chan, and Zen Buddhists in China, Korea, and Japan.


You will also see this with the last character written as 仏 in Japanese. In the religious context, 佛 is commonly used to mean Buddha. If you want the other version, see Kenshō Jōbutsu 見性成仏

The Buddha Realm / Buddhahood

fó jìng
bukkyou
The Buddha Realm / Buddhahood Scroll

佛境 means the spiritual region of Buddhas, the state of the Buddha, or the Buddha realm.

佛境 is Bukkyō in Japanese and Fójìng in Mandarin Chinese.

If you are contemplating the Metaverse, in contrast, 佛境 is the Buddha-sphere or Buddhaverse.

Buddhism / Buddha

hotoke
Buddhism / Buddha Scroll

佛 is the essence of the Buddha or Buddhism.

Depending on context, this word and character can be used to refer to the religion and lifestyle of Buddhism, or in some cases, the Buddha himself.

It is interesting to note that this word is separate from all others in the Chinese language. The sound of "fo" has only this meaning. 佛 is in contrast to many sounds in the Chinese language which can have one of four tones, and more than 20 possible characters and meanings. This language anomaly shows just how significant Buddhism has affected China since the ancient times.

More about Buddhism

佛 is also used with the same meaning in Korean Hanja.

It's used in the very religious context of Buddhism in Japan. It should be noted that there are two forms of this Kanji in use in Japan - this is the more formal/ancient version but it's rarely seen outside of religious artwork, and may not be recognized by all Japanese people.

It also acts as a suffix or first syllable for many Buddhist-related words in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.


See our Buddhism & Zen page


See Also:  Bodhisattva | Enlightenment

Buddha / Buddhism

Hotoke

hotoke / butsu
Buddha / Buddhism Scroll

仏 is the single Japanese Kanji can mean Buddha or Buddhism.

This Kanji was actually a shorthand way to write 佛 (Buddha) in Chinese (popular around the 13th century). Somehow, this became the version of this Chinese character that was absorbed into Japanese, and thus became part of standard Kanji. Centuries later, this character is not recognized in Chinese at all (except by those from China with a background in Chinese literature or language).

仏 is also a rare or derivative Korean Hanja form - but I doubt you will find any Korean that knows that.

fó dào
butsudō
Buddha Way Scroll

佛道 is "The way of Buddha, leading to Buddhahood" or the way to becoming a bodhi and enlightened.

Known in Japanese as Butsudō, Mandarin Chinese as Fódào, and Korean as Buldo or 불도.

The Buddha is in Each Sentient Being

butsu wa shujou no naka ni ari
The Buddha is in Each Sentient Being Scroll

This is "Butsu wa shujo no naka ni ari" and means that the Buddha (potential for Buddhahood) exists in all beings in the universe.

So yes, your dog has the potential to be a Buddha (but only in a future reincarnation as a human). But all things, from the tiny cricket to the humpback whale have Buddha-nature within them. If one takes the time to look and contemplate, one will see the Buddha in all things.

In Japan, sometimes the Buddha character is written 仏 instead of 佛, so you might see the whole phrase written as 仏は衆生の中に在り.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Working Together as One / Cooperation

tóng xīn xié lì
Working Together as One / Cooperation Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "to work with a common purpose", "to make concerted efforts", "to pull together", or "to work as one".

Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it

chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it Scroll

This proverb suggests that one should always be grateful to those who helped you succeed.

And remember your ancestors and those that came before you whose sacrifices made your present life better.

Some Chinese will separate the intended meaning from this proverb and translate this as "Don't forget the people who once helped you". In Modern China, this idiom is virtually never used to refer to an actual well.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used phrase.

Amitabha Buddha

ē mí tuó fó
amida butsu
Amitabha Buddha Scroll

This title can mean the Buddha of the Western paradise.

But it's more a chant that means, "May the lord Buddha preserve us!" or "Merciful Buddha!".

阿彌陀佛 is also a translation to Chinese, Japanese, and Korean for, "Amitâbha Buddha".

Asian Buddhists will often greet and say goodbye to each other with this phrase/chant/title.

The farts of others stink, but one’s own smells sweet

bié rén pì chòu zì jiā xiāng
The farts of others stink, but one’s own smells sweet Scroll

This literally translates as:
Other people's flatulence stinks, [but] one's own is fragrant.

Figuratively, this means:
Some people criticize as defects in others what they (seem to) treasure in themselves.

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black

wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100 Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, the one who retreats 50 paces mocke the one who retreats 100 paces.

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, "I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty, and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?"

Mencius answered, "Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, "Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces".

Mencius then said, "You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people but you are so fond of war, that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there really any difference?"

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, "The pot calls the kettle black", or the Biblical phrase, "Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye".

One Good Deed Each Day

yī rì yī shàn
ichi nichi ichi zen
One Good Deed Each Day Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja phrase suggests doing a good deed each day, or doing one good turn a day.

It literally reads, "One Day, One Good (Deed)".

Words Have Enormous Weight: One Word Worth Nine Caldrons

yī yán jiǔ dǐng
Words Have Enormous Weight: One Word Worth Nine Caldrons Scroll

Highly-Valued Bronze Tripod Caldron 一言九鼎 is an ancient Chinese proverb used in modern times talk of profound or powerful words.

The literal meaning is, "one word [worth] nine [sacred] tripods". The tripod is a highly-prized three-legged (sometimes four-legged) metal pot or kettle of ancient China. They are often made of bronze, and the Emperor would have very large ones gilded in gold. See the image to the right for an example.

Human Nature

rén xìng
Human Nature Scroll

This title is the essence of what it means to act and be human.

These two characters refer to the way we are as people.

人性 is also sometimes translated as human personality, human instinct, humanity, or humanism.

The first character literally means human or people.

The second character means nature. It can also mean property, quality, attribute, or essence. It can even be a modifier like "-ity" or "-ness", which is why this word is also translated as "humanity".

Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot

bǎi chǐ gān tóu gèng jìng yī bù
Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot Scroll

This proverb literally translates as: [Even a] one-hundred foot [tall] bamboo [can] progress even one [more] step.

Figuratively, this means: After having achieved a fair degree of success, one should try to do still better.

One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils

yī zhèng yā bǎi xié
One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils Scroll

This ancient "One Justice Can Overpower a Hundred Evils" idiom and proverb is famous in China. But it has been around so long that its origins have long been forgotten.

It could be something that Confucius or one of his disciples said but no one can say for sure.

The Nature of Enlightenment in One's Mind

jué xìng
kakushou
The Nature of Enlightenment in One's Mind Scroll

覺性 represents "The enlightened mind free from all illusion", "The nature of enlightenment in one's mind", or "The Buddha-nature".

To reach this "enlightened nature", one must form their mind into and utilize their mind as the agent of knowledge, or enlightenment.

Kensho Jobutsu - Enlightenment - Path to Buddha

ken shou jou butsu
Kensho Jobutsu - Enlightenment - Path to Buddha Scroll

見性成仏 or Kenshō Jōbutsu is the initial enlightenment that leads to self-awareness, becoming Buddha, and the path to enter Nirvana.

Kenshō Jōbutsu is a complex concept in Japanese Buddhism. 見性成仏 is probably better translated as "Seeing one’s nature and becoming a Buddha".


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Initial Enlightenment

Meet the Buddha, Kill the Buddha

butsu ni atte wa butsu o korosu
Meet the Buddha, Kill the Buddha Scroll

This controversial Buddhist koan means, "On encountering Buddha, you should kill him".

This is the short concise Japanese version of an original statement by ninth-century Chinese Buddhist monk Linji Yixuan, "If You Meet The Buddha On The Road, Kill Him".

This takes some explaining... The concept here is that if you think you have seen, experienced, or achieved true enlightenment, the chances that you really have are so slim that you should kill or dismiss that idea.

Another suggestion is that one's path to becoming a Buddha is one's own, and one should not get caught up in religious fervor, and avoid "showing off" that they are a Buddhist.


Helpful references for this concept:
Lion's Roar addresses "If You Meet The Buddha On The Road, Kill Him"
Kill the Buddha


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Kindness and Forgiving Nature

rén shù
jinjo
Kindness and Forgiving Nature Scroll

These two characters create a word in Chinese and Japanese that means something like benevolence with magnanimity or kindness with a forgiving nature.

If this describes you, then you are the type of person that I would like to call my friend.

This may not be the most common word in daily use but it's old enough that it transcended cultures from China to Japan in the 5th century when Japan lacked a written language, and absorbed Chinese characters and words into their language.
Note: 仁恕 is not commonly used in Korean.

To Know Hardship, One Must Experience It

bù dāng hé shàng bù zhī tóu lěng
To Know Hardship, One Must Experience It Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: [One who has] not been a monk [does] not know [the feeling of a] cold head.
I need to explain that a Chinese Buddhist monk always has a shaved head, and thus a cold head in winter.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot know the true meaning of hardship until one has experienced it oneself.


This is an idiom in Chinese, so the figurative meaning is what people perceive when they hear or read this phrase. Just as in English, when someone says, "The grass is always greener," one will think about the idea of jealousy, rather than the quality of one’s lawn.

We are not born with knowledge, how does one achieve maturity?

rén fēi shēng ér zhī zhī zhě shú néng wú huò
We are not born with knowledge, how does one achieve maturity? Scroll

This figuratively means, "Without a teacher, how can we learn/mature?"

This is a philosophic pondering by Han Yu, a Tang Dynasty essayist and philosopher (618-907 A.D.). This Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Knowledge is not innate to man, how can we overcome doubt?" or, "We are not born with knowledge, how does one achieve maturity?".

This infers that we need the guidance of a teacher if we wish to learn, mature, and become better.

Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark Scroll

兼聽則明偏聽則暗 is an ancient Chinese proverb about getting all the information from all sides so that you truly understand a situation.

Wei Zheng

Wei Zheng

A man named Wei Zheng lived between 580-643 AD. He was a noble and wise historian and minister in the court of the early Tang Dynasty.The emperor once asked him, "What should an emperor do to understand the real-world situation and what makes an emperor out-of-touch with reality?"

Wei Zheng replied, "Listen to both sides and you will be enlightened; listen to only one side and you will be left in the dark".

Then Wei Zheng went on to cite examples of leaders in history that were victorious after heeding both sides of the story, and other leaders that met their doom because they believed one-sided stories which often came from flattering lips.

Please note that there is an unwritten rule when the same character appears twice in the same phrase, the calligrapher will alter the appearance so that no two characters are exactly alike in the same piece. This calligraphy has two repeating characters that will be written differently than they appear here.

Loving Heart / One’s Love

koi gokoro
Loving Heart / One’s Love Scroll

This literally means "loving heart". It can also be translated as "one's love" or "awakening of love".

戀心 is used exclusively for love between boyfriends and girlfriends or husband and wife.

Breaking down the meaning by each Kanji, the first means love, affection, or tender passion. The second Kanji means heart, mind, or soul (most will read it as heart).


See Also:  Compassion | Love

Mother Nature

dà zì rán
dai shi zen
Mother Nature Scroll

大自然 is the simple way to express "mother nature" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This can also be translated as "the great nature" or "all of nature".

Namo Amitabha Buddha

nā mó ē mí tuó fó
na mu a mi da butsu
Namo Amitabha Buddha Scroll

南無阿彌陀佛 is how to express "The Compassionate Amitabha Buddha" (especially for the Pure Land Buddhist Sect).

Some will translate as, "Homage to Amitâbha Buddha" or "I seek refuge in the Amitâbha Buddha".

This is valid in Chinese characters Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Sometimes modern Japanese use a different version of the 4th and last Kanji but the version shown here is the most universal.

This is used to pay homage to Amitabha Buddha.


See Also:  Bodhisattva | Buddhism | Nirvana

Namo Shakyamuni Buddha

nán wú shì jiā móu ní fó
namu shakamuni butsu
Namo Shakyamuni Buddha Scroll

南無釋迦牟尼佛 is a Buddhist chant or prayer of respect to the Shakyamuni Buddha.

Some will translate this as the Buddhist vow.

The first two characters, 南無, are sometimes translated as "amen"; others will translate it as, "believe in", or "homage to".
To expand on this, 南無 can also mean, "taking of refuge in", while also representing devotion or conviction. 南無 as with most religious concepts or words, different people or denominations will have varying definitions.

Nature

The natural world

zì rán
shi zen
Nature Scroll

自然 is the simple way to express nature in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This can also be translated as "the natural world".

In Japanese and Korean, this term is sometimes used to refer to spontaneity or a spontaneous act.

Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature

zì rán píng héng
Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature Scroll

自然平衡 means "nature balanced".

The first two characters mean nature (as in mother nature, or all biological life).
The second two characters mean balance or balanced.

Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature

shēng tài píng héng
Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature Scroll

This title is about the way and balance of nature.

The first two characters mean nature or the way of life.
The second two characters mean balance or balanced.

Note: We have two versions of this title on our website. 生態平衡 is the one we recommend, as it is a little more natural (no pun intended).

Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature

shizenkai no kinkou
Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature Scroll

自然界の均衡 is a verbose way to say "nature in balance" in Japanese.

The first three Kanji have the meaning of "the natural world" or "the natural kingdom" (kind of like animal kingdom but including plants, and all things biological).
The third character is a Hiragana that acts to connect the two ideas here.
The last two Kanji mean equilibrium or balance.

Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature

shizen no cho wa
Nature in Balance / Balanced Nature Scroll

自然の調和 means "nature in harmony" in Japanese.

The first two Kanji mean nature (as in mother nature, or the natural world).
The middle Hiragana is a possessive article that connects the two ideas.
The last two Kanji mean "in harmony" or "in balance".

The Nature of Martial Arts

zì rán wǔ dào
shi zen bu do
The Nature of Martial Arts Scroll

The first two characters create a word that means nature, natural, or spontaneous.

The last two characters are often translated as martial arts.

Mantra to Buddha / Nembutsu

niàn fó
nenbutsu
Mantra to Buddha / Nembutsu Scroll

念佛 is used primarily in Japanese where it is romanized as nenbutsu.

The meaning is to pray to Buddha, to chant the name of Buddha, or repeat the name of Buddha. This can be an audible or inaudibe chant.

No one knows a son better than the father

zhī zǐ mò ruò fù
No one knows a son better than the father Scroll

This can be translated as "No one knows a son better than his father".

This idiom is based on the idea that after spending many years together, family members know everything about each other. Better than anyone else, a father knows the qualities and shortcomings of his son.

If you are looking for something about "father and son", this is probably the best selection.

知子莫若父 is the original proverb (very old) but others have been composed about various combinations of mothers, sons, daughters, and fathers.

One Direction

yí shì dài
One Direction Scroll

一世代 is a way to write "One Direction" in Chinese, referring to the British-Irish boy band.

More commonly, they are referred to as "1D" in Japan and China (no Chinese characters for that).

This title does not exactly mean "one direction", it's more close to "one generation", "one era", or "one world".

One Direction

wan dairekushon
One Direction Scroll

This is a way to write "One Direction" in Japanese Katakana, referring to the British-Irish boy band.

More commonly, they are referred to as "1D" in Japan and China (no Japanese Kanji for that).

This title sounds like "One Direction" using Japanese sounds. Unlike Japanese Kanji words, this does not have any meaning, just pronunciation.


Note: Because this title is entirely Japanese Katakana, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

One Family Under Heaven

tiān xià yī jiā
tenka ikka
One Family Under Heaven Scroll

This proverb can also be translated as "The whole world is one family".

It is used to mean that all humans are related under heaven.

The first two characters can be translated as "the world", "whole country", "descended from heaven", "earth under heaven", "the public" or "the ruling power".

The second two characters can mean "one family", "a household", "one's folks", "a house" or "a home". Usually this is read as "a family".

Note: This proverb can be understood in Japanese, though not commonly used.

One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul

yī shì dài
isshin
One Heart / One Mind / Heart and Soul Scroll

This literally reads as "one heart" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Colloquially or figuratively, it means: wholeheartedly; heart and soul; of one mind; wholeheartedness; one's whole heart; with the whole mind or heart; one mind of heart.
I'm not kidding, all of those came right from the dictionary for this one title. In Buddhism, this can refer to the bhūtatathatā, or the whole of things; the universe as one mind, or a spiritual unity.

In Japanese this can be the female given name, Hitomi.

One Key Opens One Lock

yī bǎ yào shi kāi yī bǎ suǒ
One Key Opens One Lock Scroll

This Chinese proverb translates directly as, "One key opens one lock".

Figuratively, this means, "There is a different solution for each problem".

yí fèn ài
One Love Scroll

一份愛 means "one love".

一份愛 is not referring to a person but the emotion of love.

It's like saying "A piece of love" or "One unit of love". There's not a perfect way to express a singular love, which is probably what you were searching for.

hito tsu no ai
One Love Scroll

一つの愛 is how to write "One Love" in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

One Mind / Unity

hé hé
wagou / wago
One Mind / Unity Scroll

和合 means to blend, unite, or be of one mind.

和合 is usually used as a Buddhist term. It can also be defined as: harmony; concord; agreement; unity; union; harmonize.

One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet

cháng zài hé biān zǒu nǎ néng bù shī xié
One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet Scroll

This is an old Chinese proverb that is sometimes compared to the English saying "Shit Happens".

It's a reflection that there are risks in life, and you should not be surprised when things don't go your way.

A secondary translation might be, "When walking by a river, often one cannot avoid wet shoes".

One

The number one

ichi
One Scroll

一 is "one" or "1" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

People keep searching for "one" but I'm not sure what you want. This would be a strange selection for a wall scroll, so please don't order it. Post a request on our forum if you want a phrase with "one" in it that you can't find on our site.

The "one" character is really simple, it's just one stroke. Two is two strokes and three is three strokes, from four and above, the characters get more complicated.

In some ways, the "one" character is too simple, it could be a stray mark, or added to a banking document. Therefore, the following banking anti-fraud character for "one" have developed over the last 1500 years in China and Japan:
壱 壹 弌

Proud Of One’s Name

xíng bù gēng míng zuò bù gǎi xìng
Proud Of One’s Name Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "I am who I am (and I'm not ashamed)".

Figuratively, it means to be proud of one's name and stand by one's actions.

One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door

bái tiān bú zuò kuī xīn shì yè bàn qiāo mén bù chī jīng
One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door Scroll

This literally translates as: [If one does] not do bad things in the daytime, one need not be alarmed at knocks on the door in the middle of the night.

The meaning is something like, "A quiet conscience sleeps in thunder". Basically, the message is, "don't commit crimes and you won't be jumpy every time the doorbell rings (so don't do anything wrong and your life will have fewer worries and you can sleep at night)".

One who is drenched in rain, does not fear drops of dew

bèi yǔ lín guò de rén bù pà lù shuǐ
One who is drenched in rain, does not fear drops of dew Scroll

被雨淋過的人不怕露水 is a Chinese proverb that literally translates as, "One who has been drenched by the rain is not afraid of dew drops".

Figuratively, this means:
One who has gone through hardships is not afraid of (minor)setbacks.

Seeing is Believing

bǎi wén bù rú yí jiàn
Seeing is Believing Scroll

This proverb literally means "Better to see something once rather than hear about it one hundred times" or "Telling me about something 100 times is not as good as seeing it once".

In English, we have the similar proverb of "Seeing is believing" but this has a bit of the "A picture paints a thousand words" meaning too.

Sometimes it's simply more prudent to verify with your own eyes.

Seeing is Believing

hyakubun wa ikken ni shikazu
Seeing is Believing Scroll

This Japanese proverb is the rough equivalent of "seeing is believing", "one eye-witness is better than many hearsays", or "a picture is worth a thousand words".

Sometimes it's simply more prudent to verify with your own eyes.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Self Awareness Becomes a Buddha

Jishou satore ba sunawachi kore butsu nari
Self Awareness Becomes a Buddha Scroll

This is a Zen quote that means, "If one realizes one's own nature, one becomes a Buddha".

The inference here is that if you understand who you really are, become truly aware of yourself and your original nature, you are well on your way to becoming a liberated person (a Buddha).


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Shakyamuni / The Buddha

shì jiā móu ní
sha ka mu ni
Shakyamuni / The Buddha Scroll

釋迦牟尼 is a transliteration of "Shakyamuni" or "Sakyamuni" in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

The perceived meaning of the name is roughly translated as, "Sage of the Sakyas".
This same Buddha is also known as "Siddhartha Gautama", "Gotama Buddha", "Tathagata", or simply, "The Supreme Buddha".

釋迦牟尼 is the legendary man and prince who eventually established the Buddhist religion.

Note: Occasionally Romanized as "Siddhattha Gotama".

This combination of characters is sometimes seen and used in South Korea and Japan as well (with the same meaning).


Note: 釋迦牟尼 came from the Sanskrit शाक्यमुनि and can also be romanized with diuretics as Śākyamuni.

Shakyamuni / The Buddha

shì jiā
sha ka
Shakyamuni / The Buddha Scroll

釈迦 is the way to write Shakyamuni in Japanese.

It's just two Kanji, the first is a simplified version of the one used in Chinese for Shakyamuni, and the second one is identical to the Chinese.
This refers to the Buddha (Siddhartha Gautama, 563 BCE-483 BCE) also known as Sakyamuni and Gautama Buddha.

This has very good meaning in Japanese but is an odd selection for a wall scroll. It appears here more for reference.

The Strong One

tsuyoi mono
The Strong One Scroll

強いもの means, "strong one", in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

zhēn rú
shinnyo
Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things Scroll

真如 comes from the Sanskrit and Pali word often romanized as "tathata" or "tathatā". Originally written, "तथता".

It's a Buddhist term that is often translated as "thusness" or "suchness" but this does not explain it.
A better explanation may be, "the ultimate nature of all things". However, this gives it too strong of a feeling. This concept is sometimes described as being in awe of the simple nature of something - like a blade of grass blowing in the wind, or ripples on water. It is what it is supposed to be, these things are following their nature. Amazing in their mundane simplicity.

Every sect of Buddhism will have a slightly different flavor, or explanation, so don't get fixated on one definition.


Notes: Sometimes Buddhists use the word dharmatā, a synonym to tathatā.

In Japan, this can also be the female given name Mayuki, or the surname Majo.

The Chosen One

erabareshimono
The Chosen One Scroll

This Japanese title means, "The chosen one" but can also refer to "The select few" or "the chosen ones".
The last character clarifies that the "one" refers to a person or persons (male or female).

This can also be written 撰ばれし者 or 択ばれし者 with same pronunciation and meaning. The one shown above is the most common way to write it.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

sen ri mo ichi ri
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One Scroll

This Japanese proverb states that, "A journey of a thousand miles feels like only one mile". It is understood that in the proverb, this applies when going to see the one you love.

Note that the "mile" or 里 used in this proverb is an old Chinese "li" (pronounced "ri" in Japanese). It's not actually a mile, as the measurement is really closer to 500 meters (it would take 3 of these to get close to a western mile). Still, 1000里 (333 miles) is a long way.

When Three People Gather, One Becomes a Teacher

sān rén xíng bì yǒu wǒ shī
When Three People Gather, One Becomes a Teacher Scroll

This literally means, "when three people meet, one becomes the teacher".

This famous Chinese philosophy suggests that when people come together, they can always learn from each other.

One person must be the teacher and others learn. And in turn, the others become the teachers of the knowledge they posses.

It is important to remember that we all have something to teach, and we all have something to learn as well.

Time Waits For No One

sai getsu hito o ma ta zu
Time Waits For No One Scroll

This Japanese idiom "Saigetsu hito o matazu" which means, "Time waits for no-one".

Another way to put it, "Time and tide stay for no man".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

True Religion / Buddha Truth

The way of the truth

shí dào
jitsu dou
True Religion / Buddha Truth Scroll

This Buddhist title means, "The true way", "The true religion", "The way of the truth", or "The absolute Buddha-truth".

Trust No One / Trust No Man

wú fǎ xìn rèn
Trust No One / Trust No Man Scroll

無法信任 is the kind of thing you expect to hear in a spy movie.

"Trust no one, 007!"

The first two characters express the idea of "no way" or "cannot".

The last two characters mean "trust".

The characters must go in this order due to Chinese grammar issues and in order to sound natural.

Note: 無法信任 is not an ancient Chinese phrase by any means. It's just that we received a lot of requests for this phrase.

無法信任 is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man", though technically no gender is specified.

Trust No One / Trust No Man

dare mo shin ji ru na
Trust No One / Trust No Man Scroll

The first two characters mean everyone or anyone but change to "no one" with the addition of a negative verb.

The third through fifth characters express the idea of to believe, to believe in, to place trust in, to confide in, or to have faith in.

The last character makes the sentence negative (without the last character, this would mean "trust everyone", with that last character it's "trust no one").

This is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man" in Japanese, though no gender is specified.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Work Together with One Mind

ichi mi dou shin
Work Together with One Mind Scroll

一味同心 is a Japanese phrase that refers to people working together with one mind.

Work Together with One Heart

qí xīn xié lì
Work Together with One Heart Scroll

This Chinese proverb mean, "to work with a common purpose", "to make concerted efforts", "to pull together", or "to work as one (or as if with one heart)".

Solidarity / Working Together as One

icchidanketsu
Solidarity / Working Together as One Scroll

This Japanese phrase means solidarity, or "banding together and working as one for a common cause".




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years一日千秋ichi jitsu sen shuu
ichijitsusenshuu
ichi jitsu sen shu
yí rì qiān qiū
yi2 ri4 qian1 qiu1
yi ri qian qiu
yiriqianqiu
i jih ch`ien ch`iu
ijihchienchiu
i jih chien chiu
Ace
One
yaoyāo / yao1 / yao
Beauty of Nature花鳥風月ka chou fuu getsu
kachoufuugetsu
ka cho fu getsu
Best
Number One
一番ichi ban / ichiban
Wisdom and Insight of the Buddha佛知見
佛知见
bucchiken / buchikenfó zhī jiàn
fo2 zhi1 jian4
fo zhi jian
fozhijian
fo chih chien
fochihchien
The Aura of Buddha佛光bukkou / bukofó guāng / fo2 guang1 / fo guang / foguangfo kuang / fokuang
The Eye of the Buddha佛眼
佛眼 / 仏眼
butsugen / butsugenwǔ yǎn / wu3 yan3 / wu yan / wuyanwu yen / wuyen
Happy Buddha歡喜光佛
欢喜光佛
kan gi kou butsu
kangikoubutsu
kan gi ko butsu
huān xǐ guāng fó
huan1 xi3 guang1 fo2
huan xi guang fo
huanxiguangfo
huan hsi kuang fo
huanhsikuangfo
Buddha Seeking勤求gonguqín qiú / qin2 qiu2 / qin qiu / qinqiuch`in ch`iu / chinchiu / chin chiu
Buddha Dharma Sangha佛法僧buppō sō / buppōsō / bupō sōfó fǎ sēng
fo2 fa3 seng1
fo fa seng
fofaseng
Buddha Heart
Mind of Buddha
佛心busshin / bushinfó xīn / fo2 xin1 / fo xin / foxinfo hsin / fohsin
Seeing one’s Nature and becoming a Buddha見性成佛
见性成佛
ken shou jou butsu
kenshoujoubutsu
ken sho jo butsu
jiàn xìng chéng fó
jian4 xing4 cheng2 fo2
jian xing cheng fo
jianxingchengfo
chien hsing ch`eng fo
chienhsingchengfo
chien hsing cheng fo
The Buddha Realm
Buddhahood
佛境bukkyou / bukyofó jìng / fo2 jing4 / fo jing / fojingfo ching / foching
Buddhism
Buddha
hotokefó / fo2 / fo
Buddha
Buddhism
仏 / 佛
hotoke / butsu
Buddha Way佛道butsudōfó dào / fo2 dao4 / fo dao / fodaofo tao / fotao
The Buddha is in Each Sentient Being佛は衆生の中に在りbutsu wa shujou no naka ni ari
butsuwashujounonakaniari
butsu wa shujo no naka ni ari
Working Together as One
Cooperation
同心協力
同心协力
tóng xīn xié lì
tong2 xin1 xie2 li4
tong xin xie li
tongxinxieli
t`ung hsin hsieh li
tunghsinhsiehli
tung hsin hsieh li
Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it吃水不忘掘井人chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
chi1 shui3 bu2 wang4 jue2 jing3 ren2
chi shui bu wang jue jing ren
chishuibuwangjuejingren
ch`ih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
chih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
Amitabha Buddha阿彌陀佛
阿弥陀佛
amida butsu
amidabutsu
ē mí tuó fó
e1 mi2 tuo2 fo2
e mi tuo fo
emituofo
o mi t`o fo
omitofo
o mi to fo
The farts of others stink, but one’s own smells sweet別人屁臭自家香
别人屁臭自家香
bié rén pì chòu zì jiā xiāng
bie2 ren2 pi4 chou4 zi4 jia1 xiang1
bie ren pi chou zi jia xiang
bierenpichouzijiaxiang
pieh jen p`i ch`ou tzu chia hsiang
pieh jen pi chou tzu chia hsiang
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100五十步笑百步wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
wu4 shi2 bu4 xiao4 bai3 bu4
wu shi bu xiao bai bu
wushibuxiaobaibu
wu shih pu hsiao pai pu
wushihpuhsiaopaipu
One Good Deed Each Day一日一善ichi nichi ichi zen
ichinichiichizen
yī rì yī shàn
yi1 ri4 yi1 shan4
yi ri yi shan
yiriyishan
i jih i shan
ijihishan
Words Have Enormous Weight: One Word Worth Nine Caldrons一言九鼎yī yán jiǔ dǐng
yi1 yan2 jiu3 ding3
yi yan jiu ding
yiyanjiuding
i yen chiu ting
iyenchiuting
Human Nature人性rén xìng / ren2 xing4 / ren xing / renxingjen hsing / jenhsing
Even The 100-Foot Bamboo Can Grow One More Foot百尺竿頭更進一步
百尺竿头更进一步
bǎi chǐ gān tóu gèng jìng yī bù
bai3 chi3 gan1 tou2 geng4 jing4 yi1 bu4
bai chi gan tou geng jing yi bu
baichigantougengjingyibu
pai ch`ih kan t`ou keng ching i pu
pai chih kan tou keng ching i pu
One Justice Can Overpower 100 Evils一正壓百邪
一正压百邪
yī zhèng yā bǎi xié
yi1 zheng4 ya1 bai3 xie2
yi zheng ya bai xie
yizhengyabaixie
i cheng ya pai hsieh
ichengyapaihsieh
The Nature of Enlightenment in One's Mind覺性
觉性
kakushou / kakushojué xìng / jue2 xing4 / jue xing / juexingchüeh hsing / chüehhsing
Kensho Jobutsu - Enlightenment - Path to Buddha見性成佛
見性成仏
ken shou jou butsu
kenshoujoubutsu
ken sho jo butsu
Meet the Buddha, Kill the Buddha佛に逢っては佛を殺すbutsu ni atte wa butsu o korosu
Kindness and Forgiving Nature仁恕jinjorén shù / ren2 shu4 / ren shu / renshujen shu / jenshu
To Know Hardship, One Must Experience It不當和尚不知頭冷
不当和尚不知头冷
bù dāng hé shàng bù zhī tóu lěng
bu4 dang1 he2 shang4 bu4 zhi1 tou2 leng3
bu dang he shang bu zhi tou leng
pu tang ho shang pu chih t`ou leng
pu tang ho shang pu chih tou leng
We are not born with knowledge, how does one achieve maturity?人非生而知之者熟能無惑rén fēi shēng ér zhī zhī zhě shú néng wú huò
ren2 fei1 sheng1 er2 zhi1 zhi1 zhe3 shu2 neng2 wu2 huo4
ren fei sheng er zhi zhi zhe shu neng wu huo
jen fei sheng erh chih chih che shu neng wu huo
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark兼聽則明偏聽則暗
兼听则明偏听则暗
jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
jian1 ting1 ze2 ming2, pian1 ting1 ze2 an4
jian ting ze ming, pian ting ze an
chien t`ing tse ming, p`ien t`ing tse an
chien ting tse ming, pien ting tse an
Loving Heart
One’s Love
戀心
恋心
koi gokoro / koigokoro
Mother Nature大自然dai shi zen
daishizen
dà zì rán
da4 zi4 ran2
da zi ran
daziran
ta tzu jan
tatzujan
Namo Amitabha Buddha南無阿彌陀佛
南无阿弥陀佛
na mu a mi da butsu
namuamidabutsu
nā mó ē mí tuó fó
na1 mo2 e1 mi2 tuo2 fo2
na mo e mi tuo fo
namoemituofo
na mo o mi t`o fo
namoomitofo
na mo o mi to fo
Namo Shakyamuni Buddha南無釋迦牟尼佛
南无释迦牟尼佛
namu shakamuni butsu
namushakamunibutsu
nán wú shì jiā móu ní fó
nan2 wu2 shi4 jia1 mou2 ni2 fo2
nan wu shi jia mou ni fo
nanwushijiamounifo
nan wu shih chia mou ni fo
nanwushihchiamounifo
Nature自然shi zen / shizenzì rán / zi4 ran2 / zi ran / zirantzu jan / tzujan
Nature in Balance
Balanced Nature
自然平衡zì rán píng héng
zi4 ran2 ping2 heng2
zi ran ping heng
ziranpingheng
tzu jan p`ing heng
tzujanpingheng
tzu jan ping heng
Nature in Balance
Balanced Nature
生態平衡
生态平衡
shēng tài píng héng
sheng1 tai4 ping2 heng2
sheng tai ping heng
shengtaipingheng
sheng t`ai p`ing heng
shengtaipingheng
sheng tai ping heng
Nature in Balance
Balanced Nature
自然界の均衡shizenkai no kinkou
shizenkainokinkou
shizenkai no kinko
Nature in Balance
Balanced Nature
自然の調和shizen no cho wa
shizennochowa
The Nature of Martial Arts自然武道shi zen bu do
shizenbudo
zì rán wǔ dào
zi4 ran2 wu3 dao4
zi ran wu dao
ziranwudao
tzu jan wu tao
tzujanwutao
Mantra to Buddha
Nembutsu
念佛nenbutsuniàn fó / nian4 fo2 / nian fo / nianfonien fo / nienfo
No one knows a son better than the father知子莫若父zhī zǐ mò ruò fù
zhi1 zi3 mo4 ruo4 fu4
zhi zi mo ruo fu
zhizimoruofu
chih tzu mo jo fu
chihtzumojofu
One Direction一世代yí shì dài
yi1 shi4 dai4
yi shi dai
yishidai
i shih tai
ishihtai
One Directionワンダイレクションwan dairekushon
wandairekushon
One Family Under Heaven天下一家tenka ikka / tenkaikka / tenka ikatiān xià yī jiā
tian1 xia4 yi1 jia1
tian xia yi jia
tianxiayijia
t`ien hsia i chia
tienhsiaichia
tien hsia i chia
One Heart
One Mind
Heart and Soul
一心isshin / ishinyī shì dài
yi1 shi4 dai4
yi shi dai
yishidai
i shih tai
ishihtai
One Key Opens One Lock一把鑰匙開一把鎖
一把钥匙开一把锁
yī bǎ yào shi kāi yī bǎ suǒ
yi1 ba3 yao4 shi5 kai1 yi1 ba3 suo3
yi ba yao shi kai yi ba suo
yibayaoshikaiyibasuo
i pa yao shih k`ai i pa so
ipayaoshihkaiipaso
i pa yao shih kai i pa so
One Love一份愛
一份爱
yí fèn ài
yi2 fen4 ai4
yi fen ai
yifenai
i fen ai
ifenai
One Love一つの愛hito tsu no ai
hitotsunoai
One Mind
Unity
和合wagou / wago
wago / wago
hé hé / he2 he2 / he he / heheho ho / hoho
One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet常在河邊走哪能不濕鞋
常在河边走哪能不湿鞋
cháng zài hé biān zǒu nǎ néng bù shī xié
chang2 zai4 he2 bian1 zou3 na3 neng2 bu4 shi1 xie2
chang zai he bian zou na neng bu shi xie
ch`ang tsai ho pien tsou na neng pu shih hsieh
chang tsai ho pien tsou na neng pu shih hsieh
Oneichiyī / yi1 / yii
Proud Of One’s Name行不更名坐不改姓xíng bù gēng míng zuò bù gǎi xìng
xing2 bu4 geng1 ming2 zuo4 bu4 gai3 xing4
xing bu geng ming zuo bu gai xing
hsing pu keng ming tso pu kai hsing
One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door白天不做虧心事夜半敲門不吃驚
白天不做亏心事夜半敲门不吃惊
bái tiān bú zuò kuī xīn shì yè bàn qiāo mén bù chī jīng
bai2 tian1 bu2 zuo4 kui1 xin1 shi4 ye4 ban4 qiao1 men2 bu4 chi1 jing1
bai tian bu zuo kui xin shi ye ban qiao men bu chi jing
pai t`ien pu tso k`uei hsin shih yeh pan ch`iao men pu ch`ih ching
pai tien pu tso kuei hsin shih yeh pan chiao men pu chih ching
One who is drenched in rain, does not fear drops of dew被雨淋過的人不怕露水
被雨淋过的人不怕露水
bèi yǔ lín guò de rén bù pà lù shuǐ
bei4 yu3 lin2 guo4 de ren2 bu4 pa4 lu4 shui3
bei yu lin guo de ren bu pa lu shui
pei yü lin kuo te jen pu p`a lu shui
pei yü lin kuo te jen pu pa lu shui
Seeing is Believing百聞不如一見
百闻不如一见
bǎi wén bù rú yí jiàn
bai3 wen2 bu4 ru2 yi2 jian4
bai wen bu ru yi jian
baiwenburuyijian
pai wen pu ju i chien
paiwenpujuichien
Seeing is Believing百聞は一見に如かずhyakubun wa ikken ni shikazu
hyakubunwaikkennishikazu
hyakubun wa iken ni shikazu
Self Awareness Becomes a Buddha自性覚れば即ち是れ佛なりJishou satore ba sunawachi kore butsu nari
Jisho satore ba sunawachi kore butsu nari
Shakyamuni
The Buddha
釋迦牟尼
释迦牟尼
sha ka mu ni
shakamuni
shì jiā móu ní
shi4 jia1 mou2 ni2
shi jia mou ni
shijiamouni
shih chia mou ni
shihchiamouni
Shakyamuni
The Buddha
釈迦sha ka / shakashì jiā / shi4 jia1 / shi jia / shijiashih chia / shihchia
The Strong One強いものtsuyoi mono
tsuyoimono
Tathata
Ultimate Nature of All Things
真如shinnyozhēn rú / zhen1 ru2 / zhen ru / zhenruchen ju / chenju
The Chosen One選ばれし者erabareshimono
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One千里も一里sen ri mo ichi ri
senrimoichiri
When Three People Gather, One Becomes a Teacher三人行必有我師
三人行必有我师
sān rén xíng bì yǒu wǒ shī
san1 ren2 xing2 bi4 you3 wo3 shi1
san ren xing bi you wo shi
sanrenxingbiyouwoshi
san jen hsing pi yu wo shih
sanjenhsingpiyuwoshih
Time Waits For No One歳月人を待たずsai getsu hito o ma ta zu
saigetsuhitoomatazu
True Religion
Buddha Truth
實道
实道
jitsu dou / jitsudou / jitsu doshí dào / shi2 dao4 / shi dao / shidaoshih tao / shihtao
Trust No One
Trust No Man
無法信任
无法信任
wú fǎ xìn rèn
wu2 fa3 xin4 ren4
wu fa xin ren
wufaxinren
wu fa hsin jen
wufahsinjen
Trust No One
Trust No Man
誰も信じるなdare mo shin ji ru na
daremoshinjiruna
Work Together with One Mind一味同心ichi mi dou shin
ichimidoushin
ichi mi do shin
Work Together with One Heart齊心協力
齐心协力
qí xīn xié lì
qi2 xin1 xie2 li4
qi xin xie li
qixinxieli
ch`i hsin hsieh li
chihsinhsiehli
chi hsin hsieh li
Solidarity
Working Together as One
一致団結icchidanketsu
ichidanketsu
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Solidarity / Working Together as One Scroll
Solidarity / Working Together as One Scroll
Solidarity / Working Together as One Scroll
Solidarity / Working Together as One Scroll


And formats...

Solidarity / Working Together as One Vertical Portrait
Solidarity / Working Together as One Horizontal Wall Scroll
Solidarity / Working Together as One Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Seeing One���S Nature and Becoming a Buddha in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

1 Corinthians 13:4-87 Virtues of BushidoA Journey of a Thousand MilesAikidoAkumaAlways and ForeverArchangelAriesArt of WarAspirationAsuraAwarenessBagua ZhangBalanceBanzaiBe Like WaterBe True to YourselfBe Water My FriendBe YourselfBelieve in YourselfBenevolenceBetter Late Than NeverBibleBig DipperBlack BeltBlack Tiger FistBlacksmithBlessingBlessingsBlood BrotherBody and MindBoldBrahmaviharaBrave the WavesBreathBreatheBrother and Sister BondBrotherhoodBrotherly LoveBruce LeeBuddhaBudoBushido CodeCalmCalm MindCarpe DiemChaosCherishCherry BlossomChi EnergyChickenChito-RyuChristianityClarityClear MindConsciousnessConsiderateCourage and StrengthCreativityCrisisDaikomyoDaito Ryu Aiki JujutsuDark AngelDark OneDarknessDeath Before DishonorDeath Before SurrenderDestiny FateDeterminationDim MakDiscipleDisciplineDivineDivine ProtectionDivine SpiritDojo KunDouble HappinessDragon HorseDragon WarriorEarth DragonEffortEmptinessEmptyEmpty HandEnduranceEnergyEnjoy LifeEnsoEternal HappinessEternal LoveEven Monkeys Fall from TreesEverlastingEverlasting LifeEverything Happens for a ReasonEvil Cause Evil ResultExperience is the Mother of WisdomFaithFaith in YourselfFall 7 Rise 8Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8Fallen AngelFamily FirstFamily is My StrengthFamily Over EverythingFathers LoveFear No EvilFearlessFidelityFierceFighterFireFire TigerFive ElementsFive Tenets of ConfuciusFlexibilityFlowers Bloom and Flowers FallFollow Your DreamsFollow Your Dreams Chase Your DreamsFollow Your HeartFor Indomitable SpiritForever in My HeartForgive and ForgetForgivenForgivenessFortune Favors the BraveFour SeasonsFree SpiritFreedomFrogFurinkazanGirl PowerGo With the FlowGod Bless YouGodzillaGokuGolden DragonGood Good Study Day Day UpGood HealthGrandmasterHapkidoHappinessHappiness Good FortuneHave Faith in GodHavocHawaiiHeart of a LionHeavenHentaiHeroHiroshiHoly TrinityHonestyHonorHonor and IntegrityHumilityHunterI Love You Forever and AlwaysIkigaiImmortalImmortalityImprovise Adapt OvercomeIn God We TrustIndomitable SpiritInfiniteInfinite LoveInner PeaceInner PowerInner StrengthInnovationIntegrityInvincibleIt is the Journey Not the DestinationJackie ChanJasmineJeet Kune DoJesus ChristJesus Christ is LordJohn 3:16JudoJuggernautJujitsuJupiterJust Do ItKaizenKajukenboKarate-DoKatanaKeep FightingKnow Thy Enemy Know ThyselfLand of the Rising SunLao TzuLegendLeopardLife Energy Spiritual EnergyLife Goes OnLife is a JourneyLife is BeautifulListenLittle Dragon

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.