Custom Health Chinese & Japanese Calligraphy Wall Scroll

We have many options to create artwork with Health characters on a wall scroll or portrait.
See also: Strength and Fortitude

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Good Health
  2. Good Health / Healthy / Vigor
  3. Healthy Living
  4. Inner Strength / Inner Well-Being and Health
  5. Peace and Good Health
  6. Restoration to Good Health
  7. Strong / Healthy
  8. Vitality
  9. Vitality / Virility
10. Wellness
11. Birth / Life
12. Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm
13. Exercise
14. Inner Strength
15. Life Energy / Spiritual Energy
16. Life Force
17. Robust / Sturdy
18. Spirit
19. Physical Strength
20. Power / Strength
21. Strong / Powerful
22. Training / Drill

Good Health

China jiàn kāng
Japan kenkou
Good Health Wall Scroll

健康 is the best way to express good health in Chinese, Korean and Japanese.

These characters also suggest the ideas of being solid, strong, sound, wholesome and at peace.

Can also be used to express "healthy," "vitality," or "well-being."

See Also:  Vitality | Wellness

Good Health / Healthy / Vigor

Also suggests being at peace
China kāng
Japan kou
Good Health / Healthy / Vigor Wall Scroll

康 is a single character that means good health or vigor in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This character can also mean peaceful, at ease, or abundant in some contexts.

Please note that this is rarely seen alone in Japanese Kanji. In Japanese, it is used both for health-related compound words and to denote the kouhou through koushou eras of Japan.

In Korean, this can also be the family name "Kang" (caution: not the only family name romanized as Kang in Korean).

See Also:  Vitality | Wellness

Healthy Living

China jiàn kāng shēng huó
Japan kenkou seikatsu
Healthy Living Wall Scroll

If you are into healthy living, this might be an excellent selection for a wall scroll to hang in your home.

The first two characters speak of health, vitality, vigor, and being of sound body. The second two characters mean living or life (daily existence).

See Also:  Strength | Vitality

Inner Strength / Inner Well-Being and Health

China nèi jiàn
Inner Strength / Inner Well-Being and Health Wall Scroll

內健 is an old Chinese word meaning inner strength, or inner health. It's the idea of health and well-being starting or residing from inside yourself. Also defined as fortitude within the context of good health.

Peace and Good Health

China ān kāng
Peace and Good Health Wall Scroll

安康 means just what it says. It's a word that expresses both the idea of being at peace and healthy at the same time.

Note: 安康 is a bona-fide word in Chinese and Korean, and the characters will at least make sense in Japanese.

Restoration to Good Health

China píng fù
Japan byou fuku
Restoration to Good Health Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese title means "to be cured," "to be healed," "restoration to health," or "recovery from illness."

In some context, it can mean "to pacify" or "to calm down."

Strong / Healthy

China jiàn
Japan ken
Strong / Healthy Wall Scroll

This "strong" character is the more "healthy" version of strong. 健 is the "strong" that is appropriate for an athlete.

Beyond "healthy," it can also mean strength, persistence, vigorous or invigorated.

Strong / Healthy

Japan sukoyaka
Strong / Healthy Wall Scroll

健やか is a verbose way to say strong and healthy in Japanese. 健やか is the "strong" that is appropriate for an athlete.

Beyond "healthy," it can also mean strength, persistence, vigorous or invigorated.

Japanese also use the first Kanji to mean the same thing. This version just adds two hiragana which serve to emphasize or amplify the word and clarify the meaning.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


China shēng mìng lì
Japan seimeiryoku
Vitality Wall Scroll

This word can mean "vitality" or "libido." The first two characters mean "life" or "life force." The last character is a common word that means "strength." So together you get the meaning "life strength" which is the essence of vitality. Some will also translate this word as "good health."

See Also:  Life Force

Vitality / Virility

China jīng qì
Japan seiki
Vitality / Virility Wall Scroll

This two-character Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word means vitality or virility.

Depending on context, this can also mean, "mind and spirit," "life energy," or "essence."

This term is often used in Buddhism with the same meaning.

気Note: In modern Japanese, they have simplified the last Kanji to look like the version shown to the right. If you want this modern version, please click on this Kanji. Otherwise, if you click the button above, you'll get the ancient or traditional version (which is also universal between Chinese, old Korean, and old Japanese).


China shēn tǐ jiàn kāng
Japan shin tai ken kou
Wellness Wall Scroll

身體健康 is how to express "wellness" in Chinese. The meaning is not much different than the idea of "good health." In fact, the first two characters alone are often translated as "health." Some will also translate this title as "physical health."

If you want to fill your room with a feeling of wellness, this is the wall scroll for you.

身體健康 is also the ancient way to express wellness in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja. The modern Japanese form is only different on the second Kanji but Koreans have completely changed their common writing system in the last 100 years.

See Also:  Vitality

Birth / Life

China shēng
Japan shou / iku
Birth / Life Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means "to be born" and "to give birth."

Also, it's often used to refer to life itself, and sometimes "to grow."

This character is used in a lot of compound words such as "yi sheng," which means "doctor" (literally "healer of life"), "sheng ri" which means "birthday" (literally "birth day") and "xue sheng" which means student (literally "studying life" or "learner [about] life"). Few Chinese people will think of the literal meaning when this use words like doctor and student - but it is interesting to note.

This character has the same root meaning in Korean Hanja and Japanese. However, in Japanese, there are many possible pronunciations, and this can be used to mean "raw" or "unprocessed" (as in draft beer). Therefore, not be the best if your audience is Japanese.

See Also:  Vitality

Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm

China huó lì
Japan katsuryoku
Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm Wall Scroll

This Chinese/Japanese/Korean word can be defined as: energy; vitality; vigor; vital force; enthusiasm; energetic; dynamism.

Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm

China huó lì sì shè
Dynamic Energy / Enthusiasm Wall Scroll

This Chinese word can be defined as: dynamic; enthusiastic; energetic; vitality.

活力四射 is the more robust 4-character version of this word. The short version consists of the first two characters: 活力. This 4-character version is commonly used only in Chinese.


(for body or mind)
China duàn liàn
Exercise Wall Scroll

鍛煉 / 鍛鍊 means exercise in much the same way we use the word exercise in English. This can be exercising your body at the gym, or exercising your mind in studies. Most of the time, this refers to physical exercise.

This can also be translated as to temper, to toughen, to train, to drill, to forge, or simply discipline.

Inner Strength

China nèi zài lì liàng
Inner Strength Wall Scroll

內在力量 is the slightly-verbose way to say inner-strength. The first two characters mean "intrinsic" or "inner." The second two characters mean "power," "force" or "strength" (especially physical strength). 內在力量 is more a short phrase rather than just a word in Chinese and Korean. This can sort of be understood in Japanese but it's not normal/proper Japanese.

Life Energy / Spiritual Energy

Chi Energy: Essence of Life / Energy Flow
Japan ki
Life Energy / Spiritual Energy Wall Scroll

This energy flow is a fundamental concept of traditional Asian culture.

This character is romanized as "Qi" or "Chi" in Chinese, "Gi" in Korean, and "Ki" in Japanese.
Chi is believed to be part of everything that exists, as in “life force” or “spiritual energy”. It is most often translated as “energy flow,” or literally as “air” or “breath”. Some people will simply translate this as “spirit” but you have to take into consideration the kind of spirit we're talking about. I think this is weighted more toward energy than spirit.

米The character itself is a representation of steam (or breath) rising from rice. To clarify, the character for rice is shown to the right.

Steam was apparently seen as visual evidence of the release of "life energy" when this concept was first developed. The Qi / Chi / Ki character is still used in compound words to mean steam or vapor.

氣氣The etymology of this character is a bit complicated. It's suggested that the first form of this character from bronze script (about 2500 years ago) looked like one the symbols shown to the right.

氣However, it was easy to confuse this with the character for the number three. So the rice radical was added by 221 B.C. (the exact time of this change is debated). This first version with the rice radical is shown to the right.

The idea of Qi / Chi / Ki is really a philosophical concept. It's often used to refer to the “flow” of metaphysical energy that sustains living beings. Yet there is much debate that has continued for thousands of years as to whether Qi / Chi / Ki is pure energy, or consists partially, or fully of matter.

You can also see the character for Qi / Chi / Ki in common compound words such as Tai Chi / Tai Qi, Aikido, Reiki and Qi Gong / Chi Kung.

In the modern Japanese Kanji, the rice radical has been changed into two strokes that form an X.

気The original and traditional Chinese form is still understood in Japanese but we can also offer that modern Kanji form in our custom calligraphy. If you want this Japanese Kanji, please click on the character to the right, instead of the “Select and Customize” button above.

More language notes: This is pronounced like “chee” in Mandarin Chinese, and like “key” in Japanese.
This is also the same way to write this in Korean Hanja where it is Romanized as “gi” and pronounced like “gee” but with a real G-sound, not a J-sound.
Though Vietnamese no longer use Chinese characters in their daily language, this character is still widely known in Vietnam.

See Also:  Energy | Life Force | Vitality | Life | Birth | Soul

Life Force

China shēng mìng
Japan seimei / inochi
Life Force Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Korean and Japanese word means "life force" or simply "life." The first character means "life" or "birth." The second means "life" or "fate." Together they create the meaning of "life force," though some will translate this as "existence" and sometimes "vitality."

See Also:  Vitality | Birth

Robust / Sturdy

China qiáng jiàn
Japan kyouken
Robust / Sturdy Wall Scroll

強健 means robustness or sturdiness in regards to being healthy and fit. This can also be used to say "persistently good health."


China jīng shén
Japan sei shin
Spirit Wall Scroll

精神 is the kind of spirit that you have if you perform well in sports or competition. It is the idea of having a good attitude, and putting your all into something - so much so that others can see or feel your spirit. It is the essence of your being that can only be subjectively described because there are no words that can fully explain what "spirit" really is.

For your information:
My Japanese dictionary further tries to explain this word by comparing it to mind, soul, heart or intention.
My Chinese dictionary compares these characters to meanings like vigor, vitality, drive and mentality.
My Korean dictionary defines this as mind, spirit and soul.

See Also:  Vitality | Heart | Soul

Physical Strength

China tǐ lì
Japan tai ryoku
Physical Strength Wall Scroll

體力 means "physical strength," "physical power," or "physical stamina" in Chinese, ancient Japanese, and old Korean Hanja.

See Also:  Fortitude

Power / Strength

Japan chikara / ryoku
Power / Strength Wall Scroll

The simplest form of "power" or "strength."

In Japanese it is pronounced "chikara" when used alone, and "ryoku" when used in a sentence (there are also a few other possible pronunciations of this Kanji in Japanese).

In some context, this can mean ability, force, physical strength, capability, and influence.

See Also:  Strength | Vitality

Strong / Powerful

China qiáng zhuàng
Japan kyousou
Strong / Powerful Wall Scroll

強壯 is an adjective that means powerful or strong. It can also be translated as able-bodied, robust, or sturdy. This version of strength suggests muscularity.

壮Note that the second character was simplified in Japan after WWII (also simplified in mainland China but not for calligraphy). If you want the modern Japanese/simplified version, please click on the Kanji shown to the right.

See Also:  Strength | Vitality

Training / Drill

China xùn liàn
Japan kunren
Training / Drill Wall Scroll

If training or drill is important to you (especially for military drill and training), this might be just the thing for a drill master to hang behind his/her desk.

This term is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It can also mean practice or exercise, depending on context.

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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Good Health 健康kenkou / kenkojiàn kāng
jian4 kang1
jian kang
chien k`ang
chien kang
Good Health
kou / kokāng / kang1 / kang k`ang / kang
Healthy Living 健康生活kenkou seikatsu
kenko seikatsu
jiàn kāng shēng huó
jian4 kang1 sheng1 huo2
jian kang sheng huo
chien k`ang sheng huo
chien kang sheng huo
Inner Strength
Inner Well-Being and Health
內健nèi jiàn / nei4 jian4 / nei jian / neijian nei chien / neichien
Peace and Good Health 安康ān kāng / an1 kang1 / an kang / ankang an k`ang / ankang / an kang
Restoration to Good Health 平復
byou fuku / byoufuku / byo fuku / byofukupíng fù / ping2 fu4 / ping fu / pingfu p`ing fu / pingfu / ping fu
kenjiàn / jian4 / jian chien
Vitality 生命力seimeiryokushēng mìng lì
sheng1 ming4 li4
sheng ming li
seikijīng qì / jing1 qi4 / jing qi / jingqi ching ch`i / chingchi / ching chi
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.