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Help Me in Chinese / Japanese...

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Personalize your custom “Help Me” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Help Me” title below...

  1. Guide / Help / Cooperate

  2. Live Together and Help Each Other

  3. Helpfulness

  4. Mind Your Own Business

  5. Caring

  6. Self Sacrifice

  7. Purpose / Aim / Goal

  8. Rabbit / Hare

  9. Kindness / Caring

10. Benevolent and Skilled Doctor

11. Divine Grace

12. Compassion

13. The Guts Theory

14. Bodhisattva

15. Grace

16. Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls

17. Past experience is the teacher for the future.

18. Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding

19. The Middle Way

20. A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

21. Wing Chun Fist Maxims

22. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

23. Tiger Rumor

24. Better Late Than Never

Guide / Help / Cooperate

tí xié
tei kei
Guide / Help / Cooperate Vertical Wall Scroll

提携 varies a bit depending on which language you are reading it in.

提携 means to guide and help (younger people) in Chinese.
Cooperation or "working in concert" in Korean.
And, cooperation, tie-up, joint business, link-up in Japanese.

Live Together and Help Each Other

kyou son kyou ei
Live Together and Help Each Other Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "live together and help each other," "existing together, thriving together," or "co-existence and co-prosperity."

Helpfulness

lè yú zhù rén
Helpfulness Vertical Wall Scroll

Helpfulness is being of service to others, doing thoughtful things that make a difference in their lives.

Offer your help without waiting to be asked. Ask for help when you need it. When we help each other, we get more done. We make our lives easier.


See Also:  Caring | Charity | Benevolence

Mind Your Own Business

yokei na osewa
Mind Your Own Business Vertical Wall Scroll

This suggests that you not give unwanted help or advice to someone.

The Japanese characters break down this way:
余計 (yokei) too much, unnecessary, extraneous, abundance, surplus, excess, superfluity.
な (na) connecting article. お世話 (osewa) help, aid, assistance.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Caring

guān xīn
Caring Vertical Wall Scroll

關心 means caring in Chinese.

Caring is giving love and attention to people and things that matter to you and anyone who is in need of help. When you care about people, you help them. You do a careful job, giving your very best effort. You treat people and things gently and respectfully. Caring makes the world a safer place.

Note: 關心 is also a word in Korean Hanja but in Korean, it means taking interest or concern. In Korean it's still a good word but it doesn't quite have the "caring for a person" meaning that it does in Chinese.


See Also:  Benevolence | Altruism

Self Sacrifice

shě jǐ
sutemi / suteki
Self Sacrifice Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese word means selfless, self-sacrifice (to help others), self-renunciation, or altruism.

Purpose / Aim / Goal

mù dì
mokuteki
Purpose / Aim / Goal Vertical Wall Scroll

目的 means purpose, aim, goal, target, objective, or intention.

If you need a reminder about seeking purpose in life, your job, or following your goal, hanging this on your wall might help.

Rabbit / Hare

Year of the Rabbit / Zodiac Sign
usagi
Rabbit / Hare Vertical Wall Scroll

兔 is the character for rabbit or hare in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the rabbit, you . . .


Are gentle and full of sympathy.
Love to help others.
Enjoy a quiet life.
Are a good worker.
Are however, a bit of a pushover.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Kindness / Caring

qīn qiè
shin setsu
Kindness / Caring Vertical Wall Scroll

Kindness is showing you care, doing some good to make life better for others. Be thoughtful about people's needs. Show love and compassion to someone who is sad or needs your help. When you are tempted to be cruel, to criticize or tease, decide to be kind instead.

This Chinese / Japanese / Korean word can also mean affectionate, cordial, warmly, or close (emotionally).


See Also:  Love | Caring | Benevolence

Benevolent and Skilled Doctor

miào shǒu rén xīn xuán hú jì shì
Benevolent and Skilled Doctor Vertical Wall Scroll

This phrase celebrates the benevolence, skill, and service to his/her patients.

Here's a breakdown of the characters:
妙手 miào shǒu admirable skill in curing disease (when used in reference to doctors).
仁心 rén xīn kindheartedness, charity, benevolent heart.
悬壶济世 xuán hú jì shì practice medicine or pharmacy to help the people or public.

Divine Grace

tiān yòu
ten yuu
Divine Grace Vertical Wall Scroll

天佑 is a Chinese and Japanese word that means divine aid, divine grace, Heaven blessed, or providential help.

Some Chinese people will use this to infer that this means a home or family blessed by heaven or God. 天佑 is the shortest way to express that idea anyway.

Compassion

tóng qíng
dou jou
Compassion Vertical Wall Scroll

These two characters mean compassion and sympathy in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, which makes this word universal.

Compassion is caring and understanding someone is hurt or troubled (even if you don't know them). It is wanting to help, even if all you can do is listen and say kind words. You forgive mistakes. You are a friend when someone needs a friend.


See Also:  Caring | Kindness

The Guts Theory

The belief that where there's a will there's a way.
kon jou ron
The Guts Theory Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese title refers to the belief that where there's a will, there's a way.

Another way to translate this is, "The Guts Theory" or "The Doctrine of Will-Power." Maybe breaking down the meaning of the characters will help clarify this:
根性 = will-power; guts; temper; nature; spirit; nature and character; the nature of the powers of any sense.
論 = theory; doctrine; treatises on dogma, philosophy, discipline, etc.

Bodhisattva

pú sà
bosatsu
Bodhisattva Vertical Wall Scroll

菩薩 is the title of a deity in Buddhism that exists to help you reach enlightenment.

In Buddhist beliefs, a bodhisattva (bodhisatta) is a being who is dedicated to helping us achieve enlightenment. Bodhisattva literally means enlightenment truth which is bodhi sattva in Sanskrit.

This term is sometimes used to refer to a kindhearted person, one who will sacrifice himself/herself for others, and lacks ego or desire but is instead devoted to the good and well-being of others.


See Also:  Buddha | Namo Amitabha

ēn
on
Grace Vertical Wall Scroll

恩 is often translated as "kind act from above," as in "The Grace of God." This doesn't necessarily have to come from God. It could be a favor paid to you, or help that you received (or gave). Of course, you can decide for yourself whether the grace or favor given to you by a friend is actually a gift from God.

Other possible translations of this character:
Favor / favour, acts of kindness, merits, beneficial Influence, kindness, indebtedness, obligation, and benevolent influence.

Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls

lún huí
rin ne
Reincarnation / Transmigration of Souls Vertical Wall Scroll

輪回 / 輪廻 is a universal word in Japanese and Chinese that expresses the Buddhist idea of "reincarnation," "transmigration of souls" or "the eternal cycle of birth and death."

In some context, this can also mean "karma," and others will say it represents "samsara."

The first character means wheel, ring, turn, circle, loop or rotate.
The second character can be thought of as a suffix meaning "-times." This second character can also refer to something that revolves, returns, goes back, or a counter for the number of occurrences of some event.
Together the sum supersedes the parts and it means reincarnation. But knowing the seeing the essence of each character may help you understand some of the meaning behind the word.


廻Shown to the right is the more common way to write the second character in Japanese. It's an alternate form of this character in Chinese (so neither way is technically wrong in either language). If you select a Japanese calligrapher, expect that is will look like the Kanji to the right.


See Also:  Buddhism | Rebirth

Past experience is the teacher for the future.

Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events.
qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
Past experience is the teacher for the future. Vertical Wall Scroll

The most literal translation to English of this ancient Chinese proverb is:
"Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events."

However, it's been translated several ways:
Don't forget past events, they can guide you in future.
Benefit from past experience.
Past experience, if not forgotten, is a guide for the future.
Past calamity is my teacher.
A good memory for the past is a teacher for the future.
The remembrance of the past is the teacher of the future.
If one remembers the lessons of the past; They will serve as a guide to avoid mistakes in the future.

The origin:
This proverb comes from the 5th century B.C. just before the Warring States Period in the territory now known as China.
The head of the State of Jin, Zhi Bo, seized power in a coup. He did this with help from the armies of the State of Han and Wei. Instead of being grateful for the help from Han and Wei, he treacherously took the land of Han and Wei. Never satisfied, Zhi Bo employed the armies of Han and Wei to attack and seize the State of Zhao.

The king of Zhao took advice from his minister Zhang Mengtan and secretly contacted the Han and Wei armies to reverse their plans and attack the army of Zhi Bo instead. The plan was successful, and the State of Zhao was not only saved but was set to become a powerful kingdom in the region.

Zhang Mengtan immediately submitted his resignation to a confused king of Zhao. When asked why, Zhang Mengtan said, "I've done my duty to save my kingdom but looking back at past experience, I know sovereign kings are never satisfied with the power or land at hand. They will join others and fight for more power and more land. I must learn from past experiences, as those experiences are the teachers of future events."
The king could not dispute the logic in that statement and accepted Zhang Mengtan's resignation.

For generations, the State of Zhao continued to fight for power and land until finally being defeated and decimated by the State of Qin (which lead to the birth of the Qin Dynasty in 221 B.C.).

Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding

níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding Vertical Wall Scroll

寧靜而致遠 is five characters from a longer ten-character proverb composed by Zhuge Liang about 1800 years ago.

Zhuge Liang

诸葛亮 Zhuge Liang

The proverb means, "Your inner peace / tranquility / serenity will help you see or reach far (into the world)."

The last word means "far" but the deeper meaning is that you will surpass what you can currently see or understand. Perhaps even the idea of opening up vast knowledge and understanding of complex ideas.

The Middle Way

zhōng dào
chuu dou
The Middle Way Vertical Wall Scroll

In the most basic translation, this means road through the middle, or middle road.

The expanded meaning can be moderation, golden mean.

But if you are looking for this title, you are probably seeking the Buddhist definition, which is more complex.

中道 is the middle way or middle path of Buddhism. 中道 has various interpretations. In general, it denotes the mean between two extremes and has special reference to the mean between realism and nihilism, or eternal substantial existence and annihilation.

The Buddha teaches that one should not take things to extremes. Don't be extremely evil, and engage in debauchery and murder. But do not spend every waking out trying to be a perfect saint. Instead, take the middle path, try to help others, show loving kindness wherever you can, try not to do harm. If you do inadvertently harm another being, make amends if you can, and move on. Realize you are not perfect, but in time, a path of moderation lead toward proper living and enlightenment.

A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a kind of complex ten-character proverb composed by Zhuge Liang about 1800 years ago.

This Chinese proverb means "Leading a simple life will yield a clear mind, and having inner peace will help you see far (into the world)."

What I have translated as "simple life" means NOT being materialistic and NOT competing in the rat race.

The last word means "far" but the deeper meaning is that you will surpass what you can currently see or understand. Perhaps even the idea of opening up vast knowledge and understanding of complex ideas.

The whole phrase has a theme that suggests if you are NOT an aggressive cut-throat person who fights his way to the top no matter how many people he crushes on the way, and instead seek inner peace, you will have a happier existence and be more likely to understand the meaning of life.


See Also:  Serenity

Wing Chun Fist Maxims

Wing Chun Kuen Kuit
Wing Chun Fist Maxims Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the chant or poem of Wing Chun. I call it a "chant" because it was meant to be a somewhat rhythmic poem to help practitioners memorize many aspects of Wing Chun.

You will see this referred to as, "Wing Chun Kuem Kuit." This Cantonese romanization is popular in the west (and there is no official way to romanize Cantonese, so many variations exist). In Mandarin it would be, "Yong Chun Quan Jue." The last character (kuit or kyut from Cantonese, jue or chüeh from Mandarin) kind of means "secrets of the art." It's a short way to write 口訣, meaning "mnemonic chant" or "rhyme for remembering."

In the west (especially in the military), we often use acronyms to remember things. There's no initials to make acronyms in Chinese, so in ancient times, chants like this are used to remember vast amounts of information.

This is the Chinese text:
1 有手黐手,無手問手
2 來留區送, 甩手直沖
3 怕打終歸打, 貪打終被打
4 粘連迫攻, 絕不放鬆
5 來力瀉力, 借力出擊
6 步步追形, 點點朝午
7 以形補手, 敗形不敗馬
8 腰馬一致, 心意合一
9 拳由心發, 動法無形
10 活人練活死功夫

I will presume you already know the meaning of the 10 maxims, so I will skip that to keep this calligraphy entry from getting too large.

Some think 练拳者必记 is the title but that just says, "Training fist people should remember:." Therefore, I've not included that in the calligraphy. However, you can put a note in the special instructions if you want it added.

Note: On a traditional calligraphy wall scroll, the characters will be written in vertical columns, starting from the right, and proceeding left.


Note: This is an except and variation from a huge 口訣. These 10 maxims are used extensively in Wing Chun training, and you'll find them all over the internet. Just know there is a much longer version out there, along with several variations and excepts like this one. If you know of, or want a different version, just contact me, and I will add it for you.

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dou ten chi shou hou
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis Vertical Wall Scroll

The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation.

It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb, and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu's writings would understand.

Tiger Rumor

sān rén chéng hǔ
Tiger Rumor Vertical Wall Scroll

These four characters together relay the meaning that can be expressed in English as, "When three people say there's a tiger running in the street, you believe it."

Of course, there is an ancient story behind this idiom...

三人成虎 is actually a proverb that resulted from a conversation that occurred around 300 B.C.

The conversation was between the king of the Wei kingdom and one of the king's ministers named Pang Cong.

It was near the end of one of many wars, this time with the Zhao kingdom. Pang Cong was to be sent by the king to the Zhao kingdom with the king's son who was to be held hostage. It was common at the time for a king to make his son a hostage to secure stable peace between warring kingdoms.

Before minister Pang Cong departed, he asked his king, "If one person told you there was a tiger running in the street, would you believe it?."

"No," the king said.

The minister continued, "What if two people told you?"

The king replied, "Well, I would have my doubts but I might believe it."

The minister continued, "So, what if three people told you that there is a tiger running in the streets?"

The king replied, "Yes, I would believe it, it must be true if three people say it."

The minister then reminded the king, "Your son and I are now traveling far away to live in the distant Zhao kingdom - much farther from your palace than the street. Rumors may fly about me in my absence, so I hope your majesty will weight such rumors appropriately."

The king replied, "I have every trust in you, do not worry"

While the minister was gone, the king's enemies gossiped about minister Pang Cong on many occasions. At first, the king thought nothing of these comments and rumors. But slowly as the rumors mounted, the king began to suspect ill of his minister.

Some time later when peace was well-established, the minister and prince were freed and returned to the kingdom of Wei. The king received his son, BUT DID NOT EVEN SUMMON MINISTER PANG CONG TO THE PALACE!

Hopefully this story will help you see how dangerous words can be when used to promote rumors, or create ill will. And perhaps will inspire you to not believe everything you hear.

There is also a secondary suggestion in this idiom that gossip is as ferocious as a tiger. Some Chinese people who don't know the ancient story above may believe that this scroll means that rumors are as vicious as three tigers.

Note: This proverb appears in my Korean dictionary but is not well-known in Korea.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Guide
Help
Cooperate
提携tei kei / teikeití xié / ti2 xie2 / ti xie / tixiet`i hsieh / tihsieh / ti hsieh
Live Together and Help Each Other共存共栄kyou son kyou ei
kyousonkyouei
kyo son kyo ei
kyosonkyoei
Helpfulness樂於助人
乐于助人
lè yú zhù rén
le4 yu2 zhu4 ren2
le yu zhu ren
leyuzhuren
le yü chu jen
leyüchujen
Mind Your Own Business余計なお世話yokei na osewa
yokeinaosewa
Caring關心
关心
guān xīn / guan1 xin1 / guan xin / guanxinkuan hsin / kuanhsin
Self Sacrifice捨己
舍己
sutemi / sutekishě jǐ / she3 ji3 / she ji / shejishe chi / shechi
Purpose
Aim
Goal
目的mokutekimù dì / mu4 di4 / mu di / mudimu ti / muti
Rabbit
Hare
usagitù / tu4 / tut`u / tu
Kindness
Caring
親切
亲切
shin setsu / shinsetsuqīn qiè / qin1 qie4 / qin qie / qinqiech`in ch`ieh / chinchieh / chin chieh
Benevolent and Skilled Doctor妙手仁心懸壺濟世
妙手仁心悬壶济世
miào shǒu rén xīn xuán hú jì shì
miao4 shou3 ren2 xin1 xuan2 hu2 ji4 shi4
miao shou ren xin xuan hu ji shi
miao shou jen hsin hsüan hu chi shih
Divine Grace天佑ten yuu / tenyuu / ten yu / tenyutiān yòu / tian1 you4 / tian you / tianyout`ien yu / tienyu / tien yu
Compassion同情dou jou / doujou / do jo / dojotóng qíng
tong2 qing2
tong qing
tongqing
t`ung ch`ing
tungching
tung ching
The Guts Theory根性論kon jou ron
konjouron
kon jo ron
konjoron
Bodhisattva菩薩
菩萨
bosatsupú sà / pu2 sa4 / pu sa / pusap`u sa / pusa / pu sa
Graceonēn / en1 / en
Reincarnation
Transmigration of Souls
輪回 / 輪廻
轮回
rin ne / rinnelún huí / lun2 hui2 / lun hui / lunhui
Past experience is the teacher for the future.前事不忘后事之師
前事不忘后事之师
qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
qian2 shi4 bu2 wang4 hou4 shi2 zhi1 shi1
qian shi bu wang hou shi zhi shi
ch`ien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
chien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding寧靜而致遠
宁静而致远
níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
ning2 jing4 er2 zhi4 yuan3
ning jing er zhi yuan
ningjingerzhiyuan
ning ching erh chih yüan
ningchingerhchihyüan
The Middle Way中道chuu dou / chuudou / chu do / chudozhōng dào
zhong1 dao4
zhong dao
zhongdao
chung tao
chungtao
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding淡泊以明志寧靜而致遠
淡泊以明志宁静而致远
dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
dan4 bo2 yi3 ming2 zhi4, ning2 jing4 er2 zhi4 yuan3
dan bo yi ming zhi, ning jing er zhi yuan
tan po i ming chih, ning ching erh chih yüan
Wing Chun Fist Maxims有手黐手無手問手來留區送甩手直沖怕打終歸打貪打終被打粘連迫攻絕不放鬆來力瀉力借力出擊步步追形點點朝午以形補手敗形不敗馬腰馬一致心意合一拳由心發動法無形活人練活死功夫
有手黐手无手问手来留区送甩手直冲怕打终归打贪打终被打粘连迫攻绝不放松来力泻力借力出击步步追形点点朝午以形补手败形不败马腰马一致心意合一拳由心发动法无形活人练活死功夫
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis道天地將法
道天地将法
dou ten chi shou hou
doutenchishouhou
do ten chi sho ho
dotenchishoho
dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dao4 tian1 di4 jiang4 fa3
dao tian di jiang fa
daotiandijiangfa
tao t`ien ti chiang fa
taotientichiangfa
tao tien ti chiang fa
Tiger Rumor三人成虎sān rén chéng hǔ
san1 ren2 cheng2 hu3
san ren cheng hu
sanrenchenghu
san jen ch`eng hu
sanjenchenghu
san jen cheng hu
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll


And formats...

Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Better Late Than Never Horizontal Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Help Me in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Help Me Kanji, Help Me Characters, Help Me in Mandarin Chinese, Help Me Characters, Help Me in Chinese Writing, Help Me in Japanese Writing, Help Me in Asian Writing, Help Me Ideograms, Chinese Help Me symbols, Help Me Hieroglyphics, Help Me Glyphs, Help Me in Chinese Letters, Help Me Hanzi, Help Me in Japanese Kanji, Help Me Pictograms, Help Me in the Chinese Written-Language, or Help Me in the Japanese Written-Language.

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