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Get Well in Chinese / Japanese...

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  1. Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

  2. Drain the pond to get all the fish

  3. You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure

  4. Mind Over Matter

  5. Accept the Situation and Move On

  6. Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success

  7. Keep Calm, Be Not Impatient

  8. God Bless You

  9. Daughter

10. Happy Marriage

11. Jesus Christ

12. Example is Better than Precept

13. Okami / God

14. This Too Shall Pass

15. Taijutsu

16. Lightning

17. Helpfulness

18. Seiseki

19. Self-Discipline / Will-Power

20. Lei

21. 1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View

22. Avenger

23. Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity

24. Flexibility

25. Willow

26. Diligence

27. Tonga

28. Vitality

29. Without a big net, how can you catch fish?

30. Optimistic

31. Chu

32. How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?

33. Life in Harmony / Balanced Life

34. Juggernaut

35. Desire / Longing / Craving

36. Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water

37. Win / Victory

38. Moderation

39. Kodokan

40. Adventure

41. Walk in the Way

42. Extreme Faithfulness

43. Sanctified by God

44. Life in Harmony / Balanced Life

45. God Bless You / God Be With You

46. Honorable Death - No Surrender

47. Forgiveness

48. A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

49. Shiatsu-Do

50. Warriors Adapt and Overcome

51. Devotion / Diligence / Vigorous / Energetic

52. Greatest Love

53. Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea

54. Kodokan

55. Brevity: Fewer Words are Best

56. Pain of Seperation from Your Loves

57. Five Codes of Tang Soo Do

58. Trust No One / Trust No Man

59. No Fear

60. Trust No One / Trust No Man

61. Ikigai

62. Perseverance is the Key

63. Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

64. Wine / Alcohol / Sake

65. Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books

66. Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs

67. No Guts, No Glory

68. Beauty Shop / Beauty Salon

69. Black Belt

70. Never Forget Your First Resolution

71. Smooth Sailing

72. Fidelity Honor Courage

73. Ken Zen Ichi Nyo

74. One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

75. Day

76. No Pain No Gain

77. Katana

78. Jujitsu / Jujutsu

79. Empress

80. Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu

81. Nothingness

82. Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu

83. Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

84. Sword

85. Christ

86. One

87. Diligent Study Proverb

88. Martial Arts Master

89. Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

90. Glory and Honor

91. Body and Earth in Unity

92. Reiki

93. Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde

94. Broken Mirror Rejoined

95. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

96. Better Late Than Never


Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

Always rising after a fall or repeated failures
shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight Scroll

This Japanese proverb relays the vicissitudes of life, with the meaning "seven times down eight times up".

Some would more naturally translate it into English as "Always rising after a fall or repeated failures" or compare it to the English, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again".

The first Kanji is literally "7". The second means "fall down" (sometimes this Kanji means "turn around", "revolve" or "turn over" but in this case, it holds the meaning of "fall"). The third is "8". And the last is "get up", "rouse", or "rise".

Basically, if you fail 7 times, you should recover from those events and be prepared to rise an 8th time. This also applies if it is the world or circumstances that knock you down seven times...
...just remember that you have the ability to bounce back from any kind of adversity.

Note: This can be pronounced two ways. One is "shichi ten hakki" or "shichitenhakki". The other is "nana korobi ya oki" also written, "nanakorobi-yaoki".

Special Note: The second character is a Kanji that is not used in China. Therefore, please select a Japanese calligrapher for this title.

Drain the pond to get all the fish

Kill the goose that lays the golden eggs
jié zé ér yú
Drain the pond to get all the fish Scroll

In 632 BC, Duke Wen of the Kingdom of Jin was about to lead an army against the forces of the Kingdom of Chu.
The Duke asked one of his advisers, Jiu Fan, how they could possibly win the impending battle, as they were drastically outnumbered.
Jiu Fan said, "All is fair in war", and went on to suggest a plan of dishonorable tactics (cheating).
The Duke was not sure of this advice, so he asked another adviser, Yong Ji, who replied, "If you catch fish by draining the pond, you can certainly get all the fish. But there will be no fish the following year. You can cheat this one time in battle but such tactics can only be used once, as the enemy will be wise in future encounters".

The Duke heard the words of his wiser adviser but cheated to gain victory in the battle. However, he rewarded Yong Ji more than Jiu Fan at the victory celebration, stating that while Jiu Fan's advice gained one victory, the wise words of Yong Ji would last forever.

This Chinese idiom/proverb is still used, over 2600 years later to remind people not to burn bridges, cheat, or dishonor oneself in exchange for a short term gain, while sacrificing the future.

竭澤而漁 is very similar to the meaning of the English phrase, "Kill the goose that lays the golden eggs".

You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure

bǎi shèng nán lǜ dí sān zhé nǎi liáng yī
You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: [Even a general who has won a] hundred victories [may be] hard put to see through the enemy's [strategy], [but one who has] broken [his] arm three [times] [will] be a good doctor.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot always depend on past successes to guarantee future success but one can always learn from lessons drawn from failure.


See Also:  Failure - Mother of Success | Experience - Mother of Success | Fall Down 7 Times Get Up 8 | Hard Knocks

Mind Over Matter

busshitsu-sei o chouetsu suru seishin-ryoku
Mind Over Matter Scroll

This means, "mind over matter", in Japanese.

If you get really technical, you get a translation like, "mental strength transcends materiality".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Accept the Situation and Move On

xiǎng kāi
Accept the Situation and Move On Scroll

想開 is a Chinese title that can be translated as "move on".

It can mean to get over a shock or bereavement. More often, it means to avoid dwelling on unpleasant things, or to accept the situation and move on. Basically, it's a suggestion to get over it and get on with life.

The literal meaning of the characters is something like "thoughts opening". But it's understood more as getting over the same old thoughts, and opening yourself up to new thoughts or ways of thinking.

Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success

Do not fear strong winds waves; just be sure to row in unison
bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Do not fear strong winds [and] high waves; what [one should] worry about whether or not you're rowing in unison.

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the task, the key to success lies in making collective efforts.

I like to translate this as, "Don't sweat the details, just get together and get it done".

Keep Calm, Be Not Impatient

shǎo ān wú zào
Keep Calm, Be Not Impatient Scroll

少安毋躁 is a short Chinese phrase that means keep calm, don't get excited, and don't be impatient or hot-tempered.

God Bless You

odaijini
God Bless You Scroll

お大事に means, "God bless you" in Japanese.

It can also mean, "take care of yourself", or "get well soon". It's not always associated with a religious meaning.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

gu jo
Daughter Scroll

愚女 is a humble title for "daughter" in Japanese.

If you literally define each character, you get "silly girl" or "foolish woman".

Happy Marriage

fuufuenman
Happy Marriage Scroll

夫婦円満 is a Japanese title that means matrimonial happiness or happy marriage.

If you translate this literally, you get, "Husband wife circle complete".

yē sū jī dū
Jesus Christ Scroll

耶穌基督 is the full version, with the name "Jesus" being the first two characters and the meaning of "Christ" as the last two.

You can't get more specific than this when referring to the Messiah.

Example is Better than Precept

shēn jiào shèng yú yán jiào
Example is Better than Precept Scroll

Tell somebody how to do something and they might get it.
Show them how to do it and they will master it in no time.

This can also be translated as "Behavior teaches more than words".


See Also:  Wisdom

okami / daijin
Okami / God Scroll

大神 is Okami, an honorific title for God (used in Shinto and other religions).

If you directly translate this, you get something like, "Big Spirit" or "Great Spirit".


There are other titles that romanize as "Okami" in Japanese, so make sure this is the right meaning for you. Another common okami means wolf but is a completely different Kanji and meaning.

This Too Shall Pass

yī qiè dōu jiāng guò qù
This Too Shall Pass Scroll

This phrase means, "this too shall pass" in Chinese.

This should be a reminder on your wall that no matter how bad things get, difficulties in life are transient and will go away in time.

This is not the only way to express this idea, as there is also 这一切都会过去 and 一切都会过去.
The version we are using here is more traditional-sounding.

tai jutsu
Taijutsu Scroll

體術 is the Japanese title, "Taijutsu", which more or less means, "classical form of martial arts".

體術 is often written in a modern form, 体術 in Japan, let me know if you want that modern form, otherwise, you'll get the ancient/classic version shown in the wall scroll sample.

shǎn diàn
Lightning Scroll

閃電 is the title for lightning in Chinese.

The first character means, flash, or to dodge / get out of the way. In this case, it's the "flash" meaning. Sometimes this character can be used to mean lightning by itself.

The second character means electricity.


See Also:  Thunder | Rain | Storm

lè yú zhù rén
Helpfulness Scroll

Helpfulness is being of service to others, doing thoughtful things that make a difference in their lives.

Offer your help without waiting to be asked. Ask for help when you need it. When we help each other, we get more done. We make our lives easier.


See Also:  Caring | Charity | Benevolence

seiseki
Seiseki Scroll

星石 is a Japanese word that means meteorite (literally "star stone").

星石 is also the common given name "Seiseki".
Please note this is not the only Japanese given name that romanizes as Seiseki. Be sure to get the right one before order (contact me first if needed).

Self-Discipline / Will-Power

zì lǜ
jiritsu
Self-Discipline / Will-Power Scroll

自律 means self-discipline and self-control.

It is doing what you really want to do, rather than being tossed around by your feelings like a leaf in the wind. You act instead of react. You get things done in an orderly and efficient way. With self-discipline, you take charge of yourself.


Not sure if this one works for a Japanese audience.


See Also:  Discipline | Self-Control

léi
Lei Scroll

嫘 is one Chinese surname that romanizes as Lei.

There are other characters that romanize as Lei, and are surnames. Make sure you get the right one.

I believe this is also a surname in Korean, where it's written as 루 and pronounced like "Ru" or "Lu" in modern Korean.

1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View

Samyag Dristhi / Samyag Drsti / Samma Ditthi
zhèng jiàn
sei ken
1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View Scroll

正見 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right View, along with Right Thought constitutes the path to Wisdom.

To get to the right view of the world, you must first understand and follow Four Noble Truths.


Note: This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

fù chóu zhě
Avenger Scroll

復仇者 is a Chinese title that means avenger or taker of revenge.

The first two characters literally mean avenge, vengeance, reprisal, or revenge.

The last character is a way to say person. This last character is like adding -er or -ist to subjects like write and art to get writer and artist.

Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity

bù qì bù chóu huó dào bái tóu
Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "Without anger or worry, you will have a long life, until after all your hair is white".

It more literally reads, "Don't get angry or worried [and you will] live [long] till [all your] hair [becomes] white".

líng huó xìng
Flexibility Scroll

靈活性 is a Chinese and Korean word that means flexibility or being open to change.

You consider others' ideas and feelings and don't insist on your own way. Flexibility gives you creative new ways to get things done. Flexibility helps you to keep changing for the better. 靈活性 could also be defined as "flexible nature".


See Also:  Cooperation

liǔ
ryuu / yanagi
Willow Scroll

柳 is the Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji for willow (as in willow tree).

In ancient Chinese astronomy/astrology, this can refer to the "Willow" constellation (one of the 28 mansions).

If you want to get scientific, this can refer to any tree of genus Salix including the weeping willow (Salix babylonica).


Notes:
In Chinese, this can be the surname Liu.
In Japanese, it can be the surname Yanagi. It can also be pronounced other ways for different rare surnames. Some Japanese use this as a female given name.
In Korean, this can be the surname Yu, though most of the time it’s pronounced ryu in Korean.

qín miǎn
kinben
Diligence Scroll

勤勉 can be translated as diligence, industrious, assiduity, assiduous, diligent, or sedulity.

Diligence is working hard and doing your absolute best. You take special care by doing things step by step. Diligence helps you to get things done with excellence and enthusiasm. Diligence leads to success.


See Also:  Hard Work | Tenacity | Commitment | Passion for a Cause

tāng jiā
yuka
Tonga Scroll

湯加 is the Chinese name for the country of Tonga.

While this is the name of that south Pacific archipelago kingdom in Chinese, it does not mean the same in Japanese...
In Japanese, this is a female given name Yuka. There are several female names that romanize as Yuka, so be sure you get the right one.


See Also:  Oceania

shēng mìng lì
seimeiryoku
Vitality Scroll

生命力 can mean "vitality" or "libido".

The first two characters mean "life" or "life force". The last character is a common word that means "strength". So together you get the meaning "life strength" which is the essence of vitality.

Some will also translate this word as "good health".


See Also:  Life Force | Health

Without a big net, how can you catch fish?

bù sā dà wǎng bù dé dà yú
Without a big net, how can you catch fish? Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: [if one does] not cast a big net, [one can] not get big fish.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot make great accomplishments without making great efforts or taking great pains.

不撒大網不得大魚 is sort of the fishing version of, "No pain, no gain".

huò dá
katsudatsu
Optimistic Scroll

Beyond optimistic, this word can also be defined as sanguine; magnanimous; open-minded; openhearted; broad-minded.

豁達 is appropriate if you are, or want to be, the kind of person who is not bothered by the little things or minor troubles of life. This signifies a person who always feels things will get better. 豁達 is great for the person who figuratively sees a window of opportunity opening even as a door closes.


While a valid word in Japanese, this is kind of antiquated, and not in common use in modern Japan.

chù
Chu Scroll

鄐 is a Chinese surname that romanizes as Chu.

Please note, there are several surnames that romanize as Chu. In fact, in the mainland, names that romanize as Zhu would be Chu in Taiwan. It's easy to get confused to please email me if you are not sure about which surname you need (send me an image of the character if you can).

How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?

Nothing ventured, nothing gained
bú rù hǔ xué yān dé hǔ zǐ
How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger? Scroll

While perhaps no longer politically correct, this Chinese proverb is a reminder that you must take risks if you want reward.

This is similar to the English proverb, "Nothing ventured, nothing gained".

The literal word order of the Chinese is, "If (you) don't enter the tiger's lair/cave, how can (you) get/obtain tiger cubs?".

Life in Harmony / Balanced Life

cho wa sei katsu
Life in Harmony / Balanced Life Scroll

This Japanese title suggests that you have, or want to get your life in balance.

The first two Kanji mean harmonious or in harmony.

The second two Kanji mean "life". More specifically this refers to your livelihood, career, and the daily activities that comprise your life or living.

jiàn shèng
Juggernaut Scroll

劍聖 is about the closest you can get to juggernaut in Chinese.

This more literally means, "Sage of the Sword", "Master Swordsman", or "Sword Saint". In Chinese terms, such a person with divine mastery of the sword is unstoppable. Thus, the meaning of juggernaut can be derived from this term.

There is a very similar Japanese word (slight variation on first character) that means "Sword Saint", or "Kensei".

Desire / Longing / Craving

yoku
Desire / Longing / Craving Scroll

慾 means desire, longing, appetite, wish, covetousness, greed, passion, desire, avarice, and craving.

慾 is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja.

The context in which this character is used, determines whether the meaning is good or bad. As a single character on a wall scroll, you get to decide what the definition is to you (hopefully more toward desire than greed).


Japanese DesirePlease note that Japanese use a simplified version of this character - it also happens to be the same simplification used in mainland China. Click on the character to the right if you want the Japanese/Simplified version of desire.

Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water

An utterly inadequate measure
bēi shuǐ chē xīn
Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water Scroll

杯水車薪 is a warning against a futile effort.

This proverb literally refers to one who is "trying to put out a burning cart of wood with a cup of water", or "throw a cup of water on a cartload of wood". The lesson to be learned is about using the right measure or tool for the job, and not to waste your effort if you are inadequately equipped for the task at hand - in other words the postscript should be "go get a bucket or a fire hose".

Win / Victory

shèng
shou
Win / Victory Scroll

This single character means to win or be victorious.

This can also be translated: To overcome; success; to beat; to defeat; to surpass; superior to; to get the better of; better than; surpassing; superb.

In other context, this can mean: Beautiful (scenery); scenic spot; scenic beauty.

In Taiwanese Mandarin, this can be pronounced with the first tone (sheng1) and mean: Able to bear; equal to (a task).

In Japan, this can also be the name Masaru.

In Korea, this has the same meaning but can also be the surname Sŭng.

jié zhì
sessei
Moderation Scroll

Moderation is creating a healthy balance in your life between work and play, rest and exercise. You don't overdo or get swept away by the things you like. You use your self-discipline to take charge of your life and your time.

節制 can also be translated as sobriety, self-restraint, or temperance.

節制 is often used as part of the Seven Heavenly Virtues to represent sobriety and/or temperance.


See Also:  Prudence | Ethics | Humble | Humility

kou dou kan
Kodokan Scroll

光道館 is Kodokan. 光道館 is the title of an Aikido dojo, studio, or hall.

Be careful in selecting the correct Kodokan, as there are a few different titles that romanize as Kodokan.

Here's how the characters break down in meaning for this one:
1. Light / Bright
2. Way / Path (the Tao/Dao as in Taoism/Daoism)
3. Schoolroom / Building / Establishment / Mansion / Hall (of learning)

Altogether, you get something like, "The Path of Light Establishment".

bou ken
Adventure Scroll

冒険 is a common Japanese way to say "Adventure".

The first character can mean "to risk", "to defy" or "to dare". The second character means "inaccessible place" or "impregnable position". Together, you get the idea of why these two characters mean adventure when put them together in Japanese.

Note: The second character is a morphed Japanese Kanji. The original Chinese version is also available and holds the same root meaning.

Walk in the Way

The Way of Buddha Truth
xíng dào
yukimichi
Walk in the Way Scroll

In Taoist and Buddhist context, this means to "Walk in the Way". In Buddhism, that further means to follow the Buddha truth. In some Buddhist sects, this can mean to make a procession around a statue of the Buddha (always with the right shoulder towards the Buddha).

Outside of that context, this can mean route (when going somewhere), the way to get somewhere, etc.

In Japanese, this can be the surname or given name Yukimichi.

Extreme Faithfulness

tei retsu
Extreme Faithfulness Scroll

貞烈 is the Japanese Kanji for, "Extreme Faithfulness".

The first Kanji means "firm adherence to one's principles", chastity (of a woman), chaste, etc.

The second Kanji means ardent, intense, fierce, stern, upright, to give one's life for a noble cause, exploits, achievements, virtuous, and in some contexts, heroic.

Now you get the idea why this refers to someone who is extremely faithful (to a cause, themselves, their religious beliefs, or their philosophy.

Sanctified by God

shèng dì shǐ nǐ shén shèng
Sanctified by God Scroll

This means, "Sanctified by God", in Chinese.

This was added at the request of a customer. This may be more appropriate for a priest or reverend than a layman. But that depends on how your religion sees the order of things.

If you directly translate, you get something like, "God made you Holy".

Here's the character breakdown:
上帝 = God
 使 = Makes; Made; Let
 你 = You
神聖 = Sacred; Holy; Sanctification; Divine; Hallow; Holiness

Life in Harmony / Balanced Life

Harmonious Life
hé xié shēng huó
Life in Harmony / Balanced Life Scroll

This title suggests that you have, or want to get your life in balance.

The first two characters regard the idea of balance, harmony, and peace.

The second two characters mean "life". More specifically this refers to your livelihood, career, and the daily activities that comprise your life or living. Some would translate those two characters as "one's daily existence".


Note: We have a couple of titles for this idea. This version is more of a noun, thus "The Balanced Life" verses a verb form like "Balancing [Your] Life."

God Bless You / God Be With You

kami sa ma ga mamo ru you ni
God Bless You / God Be With You Scroll

This is about as close as you can get to, "God Bless You" in Japanese.

This literally means, "[May] God Protect [You]". It can also mean, "God is Always With You", as the word in this phrase that means "protect" can also mean to follow or be with. In fact, the Japanese dictionary entry for that word reads like this: to protect; to guard; to defend; to keep (i.e. a promise); to abide; to observe; to follow.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Honorable Death - No Surrender

gyokusai shugi
Honorable Death - No Surrender Scroll

This ancient Japanese proverb can be translated as "The principle of honorable death and no surrender", or simply "No surrender".

If you directly translate this, you get something that means "Doctrine of suicide", or "Ideology of honorable death".

玉砕主義 is a specifically-Japanese proverb that embraces the long history of honorable suicide or self-sacrifice for honor in Japanese culture.

Forgiveness (from the top down)

róng shè
you sha
Forgiveness (from the top down) Scroll

容赦 is the kind of forgiveness that a king might give to his subjects for crimes or wrong-doings.

容赦 is a rather high-level forgiveness. Meaning that it goes from a higher level to lower (not the reverse).

Alone, the first character can mean "to bear", "to allow" and/or "to tolerate", and the second can mean "to forgive", "to pardon" and/or "to excuse".

When you put both characters together, you get forgiveness, pardon, mercy, leniency, or going easy (on someone).


See Also:  Benevolence

A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

sen ri mo ichi ri
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One Scroll

This Japanese proverb states that, "A journey of a thousand miles feels like only one mile". It is understood that in the proverb, this applies when going to see the one you love.

Note that the "mile" or 里 used in this proverb is an old Chinese "li" (pronounced "ri" in Japanese). It's not actually a mile, as the measurement is really closer to 500 meters (it would take 3 of these to get close to a western mile). Still, 1000里 (333 miles) is a long way.

shiatsudou
Shiatsu-Do Scroll

指圧道 is the title for Shiastu-Do, the Japanese way of finger pressure.

Shitsu-Do is about applying special figure pressure to points on the body thought to be connected to pathways called "meridians". Shiatsu is a healthful way to get your 気 or 氣 (ki energy) flowing properly.

Note: This title can also be written in the older 指壓道 form (just the middle character has an ancient/traditional form used before WWII).
You might even see 指压道 which uses the Simplified Chinese form of the second character.

Warriors Adapt and Overcome

Soldiers need a fluid plan
bīng wú cháng shì shuǐ wú cháng xíng
Warriors Adapt and Overcome Scroll

This literally translates as: Troops/soldiers/warriors have no fixed [battlefield] strategy [just as] water has no constant shape [but adapts itself to whatever container it is in].

Figuratively, this means: One should seek to find whatever strategy or method is best suited to resolving each individual problem.

This proverb is about as close as you can get to the military idea of "adapt improvise overcome". This is best way to express that idea in both an ancient way, and a very natural way in Chinese.

Devotion / Diligence / Vigorous / Energetic

vīrya
jīng jìn
shoujin
Devotion / Diligence / Vigorous / Energetic Scroll

精進 is a wide-ranging word that is used in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

It can mean devotion, diligence, concentration, aggressive, enterprising, vigorous, energetic, purification, pushing, asceticism, assiduity, or virility. 精進 is deep, and these two characters can express ideas that take a full English phrase to describe such as, "concentration of mind", "to forge ahead vigorously", or "to dedicate oneself to progress".

Used in the context of Buddhism, it means, "making earnest efforts to cultivate virtue and get rid of evil", or "zeal in one's quest for enlightenment".

Greatest Love

zuì wěi dà de ài
Greatest Love Scroll

最偉大的愛 means "the greatest love", in Chinese.

Keeping in mind that Chinese is different than English, the first character is like "-est" or adding "the most" as a modifier to the next word.
The 2nd and 3rd characters are a word meaning great, mighty, and/or large.
The 4th is a possessive article.
The last is the character for love.

When you put it all together, you get a phrase that means, the greatest love, the biggest love, or the mightiest love.

Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea

qiān lǜ yī dé
senryonoittoku
Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea Scroll

千慮一得 means, "1000 tries, one success", or "[a] thousand tries [leads to] one success".

This proverb is a humble way to speak of your success, ideas, or accomplishments. As if you are a fool who just got lucky in inventing or creating something.

Translations for this proverb include:
Even without any notable ability on my part, I may still get it right sometimes by good luck.
Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea.

kou dou kan
Kodokan Scroll

This title refers to a certain kind or school of Judo martial arts.

Here's how the characters break down in meaning for this one:
1. Mutual Assistance or Association. Can also refer to a lecture, speech, or explaining something (as in teaching).
2. Way / Path (the Tao/Dao as in Taoism/Daoism)
3. Schoolroom / Building / Establishment / Mansion / Small Castle / Hall (of learning)

Altogether, you get something like, "The Path of Mutual Learning Hall".

More about Kodokan from the Institute of Kodokan.

Brevity: Fewer Words are Best

shǎo shuō wéi jiā
Brevity: Fewer Words are Best Scroll

Get to the point quickly with the fewest words possible is the suggestion of this Chinese proverb.

But taking it deeper, there is a warning that using too many words may act to "tip your hat" or "show your hand" (to use two American idioms).

It can also be said that using many words does not make the message have more value.

少說為佳 is really about the art of brevity.

Now my only hope is that I did not use too many words to explain this proverb.

Pain of Seperation from Your Loves

ài bié lí kǔ
ai betsu ri ku
Pain of Seperation from Your Loves Scroll

愛別離苦 is a Buddhist term that refers to "the pain of separation from loved ones", or "the suffering of being separated from those whom one loves".

If you translate each character separately, you get, "love(s) separated [and] departed [yields] pain".

The pain character can also be defined as: anguish; suffering; distress; anxiety; worry; trouble; difficulty; hardship; bitterness; to suffer; anguish; distress; anxiety; worry; trouble; difficulty; bitterness; unhappiness; misery.

Five Codes of Tang Soo Do

guó jiā zhōng chéng fù mǔ xiào dào péng yǒu yǒu xìn shā shēng yǒu zé lín zhàn wú tuì
Five Codes of Tang Soo Do Scroll

These are the five codes of Tang Soo Do.

I suggest you have this arranged in five columns when you get to the options page for your custom calligraphy wall scroll.

Here are my translations of each of the five codes:
國家忠誠 Be loyal to your country.
父母孝道 In regards to parents, behave in a filial way.
朋友有信 Be faithful in friendship.
殺生有擇 When fighting for life and death, make noble choices.
臨戰無退 No retreat in battle.

Note: "Tang Soo Do" is a romanization of 唐手道. It's 당수도 in Korean Hangul. It can also be romanized as "Tangsudo" or "Dangsudo".

Trust No One / Trust No Man

dare mo shin ji ru na
Trust No One / Trust No Man Scroll

The first two characters mean everyone or anyone but change to "no one" with the addition of a negative verb.

The third through fifth characters express the idea of to believe, to believe in, to place trust in, to confide in, or to have faith in.

The last character makes the sentence negative (without the last character, this would mean "trust everyone", with that last character it's "trust no one").

This is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man" in Japanese, though no gender is specified.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

oso re zu
No Fear Scroll

恐れず is probably the best way to express "No Fear" in Japanese.

The first Kanji and following Hiragana character create a word that means: to fear, to be afraid of, frightened, or terrified.

The last Hiragana character serves to modify and negate the first word (put it in negative form). Basically, they carry a meaning like "without" or "keeping away". 恐れず is almost like the English modifier "-less".

Altogether, you get something like, "Without Fear" or "Fearless".

Here's an example of using this in a sentence: 彼女かのじょは思い切ったことを恐れずにやる。
Translation: She is not scared of taking big risks.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Bravery | Courage

Trust No One / Trust No Man

wú fǎ xìn rèn
Trust No One / Trust No Man Scroll

無法信任 is the kind of thing you expect to hear in a spy movie.

"Trust no one, 007!"

The first two characters express the idea of "no way" or "cannot".

The last two characters mean "trust".

The characters must go in this order due to Chinese grammar issues and in order to sound natural.

Note: 無法信任 is not an ancient Chinese phrase by any means. It's just that we received a lot of requests for this phrase.

無法信任 is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man", though technically no gender is specified.

ikigai
Ikigai Scroll

生き甲斐 is a Japanese word that means something one lives for, a reason for being, purpose in life, or in French, raison d'etre.

Everyone has an ikigai. Finding it requires a deep and often lengthy search of self. Finding your Ikigai is the way to also finding satisfaction and meaning to life.

Your Ikigai could be almost anything. For some it is running for president, for others, the satisfaction found in raising children.

Ikigai is the reason you get up in the morning, the thing that brings meaning to your life, and pursuing your Ikigai makes life worthwhile.

Perseverance is the Key

Skills cannot be perfected without perseverance in practice
bú pà liàn bù chéng jiù pà xīn bù héng
Perseverance is the Key Scroll

This literally translates as: Do not worry about not being able to master [a skill]; What [one should] be concerned about is lack of perseverance.

Figuratively, this means: One's skills cannot be perfected without perseverance in practice.

For me, I've learned that you can only get so much from school or studying. You've really got to do "on-the-job training" to perfect your ability and skill.

For martial arts students: You can read about a kick in a book, or someone can tell you about a certain kick but until you practice the kick, there's no way you'll master it.

Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

zhēn rú
shinnyo
Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things Scroll

真如 comes from the Sanskrit and Pali word often romanized as "tathata" or "tathatā". Originally written, "तथता".

It's a Buddhist term that is often translated as "thusness" or "suchness" but this does not explain it.
A better explanation may be, "the ultimate nature of all things". However, this gives it too strong of a feeling. This concept is sometimes described as being in awe of the simple nature of something - like a blade of grass blowing in the wind, or ripples on water. It is what it is supposed to be, these things are following their nature. Amazing in their mundane simplicity.

Every sect of Buddhism will have a slightly different flavor, or explanation, so don't get fixated on one definition.


Notes: Sometimes Buddhists use the word dharmatā, a synonym to tathatā.

In Japan, this can also be the female given name Mayuki, or the surname Majo.

Wine / Alcohol / Sake

jiǔ
sake / shu
Wine / Alcohol / Sake Scroll

酒 is the Chinese character, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji that means alcohol.

This can refer to wine (esp. rice wine), liquor, spirits, sake, or to alcoholic beverages in general.

In the west, we tend to say "sake" to mean Japanese rice wine, however, this character is a little ambiguous in Japanese. It literally just means alcohol, and is often pronounced "shu" in Japanese. Specifically, in Japanese, you might want to ask for "seishu" or 清酒 to get the sake that you are used to in the west. Seishu literally means "clear alcohol".

Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books

xíng wàn lǐ lù shèng dú wàn juǎn shū
Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books Scroll

This translates a few ways:
To travel ten-thousand miles beats reading ten-thousand books.
Better to travel ten thousand li than to read ten thousand books. (a "li" is an ancient Chinese mile)
Travelling thousands of miles is better than reading thousands of books.

No matter how you slice it, this Chinese proverb is claiming that experience is more profound and meaningful than what you can get from a book. Go do it! Don't just read about it.

Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs

Eiko-Seisui
ei ko sei sui
Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs Scroll

This Japanese proverb can be translated as, "flourish and wither, prosper and perish", "life is full of fortune and misfortune", or simply "vicissitudes of life".

This is about the rise and fall of human affairs or the ups and downs of life. Prosperity comes and goes, everything is fleeting and temporary but like waves, another swell of prosperity may come.

Here's how the Kanji break down in this proverb:

栄 = prosper; thrive; flourish; boom.
枯 = wither; die.
盛 = prosperous; flourishing; thriving; successful; energetic; vigorous; enthusiastic.
衰 = become weaker; decline; get weak; die down; subside; abate; fail.


榮 Notes: The original version of the first character looks like the image to the right. In modern Japan, they simplified that Kanji a bit into the version shown above. If you have a preference for which style is used for your calligraphy, please let me know when you place your order.

Apparently, with that original version of the first character, this is also used in Korean Hanja. However, I have not confirmed that it’s used in the same way or is widely-known in Korean.

No Guts, No Glory

wú yǒng bù róng
No Guts, No Glory Scroll

While difficult to translate, "No guts no glory", into Mandarin Chinese, 無勇不榮 is kind of close.

The first two characters mean, "without bravery", or "without courage". In this case, bravery/courage is a stand-in for "guts".

The last two characters mean, "no glory".

The idea that guts (internal organs) is somehow equal to courage, does not crossover to Chinese. However, translating the phrase back from Chinese to English, you get, "No Courage, No Glory", which is pretty close to the intended idea.

Beauty Shop / Beauty Salon

měi róng diàn
Beauty Shop / Beauty Salon Scroll

美容店 is how to write "Beauty Shop" or "Beauty Salon".

If you own such a business, this would make a nice wall scroll to hang up - and many of your Asian customers will be able to read and appreciate it.

When traveling in China, you will see signs like this in the window of any place that offers full services of hair styling, manicures, pedicures, and often shampoo with head and back massage.

However, as a handmade wall scroll, this becomes a very fancy piece of artwork that shows the high class of your business (a great sign for your window, if you don't get direct sunlight).

hēi dài
Black Belt Scroll

黑帶 is "black belt" in Chinese.

Many will argue whether rank systems that include a "black belt" are used in pure Chinese martial arts systems. The argument goes that it's more a Japanese idea that's merged into the western versions of Chinese martial arts. However, in Wushu (often referred to as Kung Fu), it's said that all students started with white belts. Over the years of training, the white belt would get dirty, until finally appearing black with filth. Thus, more advanced students had darker belts.

If you want this title in Chinese, this would be the form.


带 Often, the second character is written like the image to the right. If you like this version, click on this character instead of the button above.

Never Forget Your First Resolution

Never Lose Your Beginner's Spirit
sho shin wasu ru be ka ra zu
Never Forget Your First Resolution Scroll

This is an old Japanese proverb that suggests you try to never forget the enthusiasm you had as a child when you try new things (or even face the day-to-day). Basically avoid having a mundane attitude that many people get with age.

You'll find this Japanese proverb translated a few different ways. Here are some of them:
Don't forget your first resolution.
Never forget your child-like enthusiasm.
Forget not the beginner's mind.
Try never to lose your initial enthusiasm (freshness of attitude).


Note: This is sometimes written as 初心忘る可からず. The one shown above is used about 10x more often. There’s only one character difference between the two versions.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Smooth Sailing

yī fán fēng shùn
Smooth Sailing Scroll

一帆風順 is just what you think it means. It suggests that you are on a trouble-free voyage through life, or literally on a sailing ship or sail boat. It is often used in China as a wish for good luck on a voyage or as you set out on a new quest or career in your life. Some may use this in lieu of "bon voyage".

The literal meaning is roughly, "Once you raise your sail, you will get the wind you need, and it will take you where you want to go". Another way to translate it is "Your sail and the wind follow your will".

一帆風順 is a great gift for a mariner, sailor, adventurer, or someone starting a new career.

Note: Can be understood in Korean Hanja but rarely used.


See Also:  Bon Voyage | Adventure | Travel

Fidelity Honor Courage

xìn yì zūn yán yǒng qì
Fidelity Honor Courage Scroll

This means fidelity, honor, courage in Chinese.

信義尊嚴勇氣 is a word list that was requested by a customer. Word lists are not that common in Chinese but we've put this one on the best order/context to make it as natural as possible.

We used the "honor" that leans toward the definition of "dignity" since that seemed like the best match for the other two words.

Please note: These are three two-character words. You should choose the single-column format when you get to the options when you order this selection. The two-column option would split one word or it would be arranged with four characters on one side and two on the other.

Ken Zen Ichi Nyo

ken zen ichi nyo
Ken Zen Ichi Nyo Scroll

This Japanese phrase is often translated as "train both body and spirit".

Here's the breakdown of the words in this phrase:
拳 means fist.
禅 is zen, which means meditation.
一如 is a word that means "to be just like", "oneness", "true nature", or "true character".

So to get to the translation of "train both body and spirit", you must understand that "fist" is representing "body" and the idea of mediation is representing "mind".

I have to say, this is not how I would translate this. To me, it's really about training with your mind and remembering that mediation is a huge part of training, not just your fist. As the Shaolin Buddhist monks show us, meditation is just as important as physical training in martial arts.

One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

yí rì qiān qiū
ichi jitsu sen shuu
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years Scroll

一日千秋 is a Japanese and Chinese proverb about missing someone.

一日千秋 is often used to express how hard it is to wait for someone's return, or to be away from someone.

Some will translate this as, "one day feels like a very long time", or "waiting for someone (something) is hard".

You might see this romanized as a single word, Ichijitsusenshuu, or as "Ichijitsu Senshuu" from Japanese.
If you break down the characters one-by-one, we get:
一 = one / a
日 = day / sun (can also represent time, or a date)
千 = 1000 / a thousand
秋 = autumn / fall

Together, 千秋 can mean, "autumn comes thousand times" (or 1000 years). It can also be read as 1000 periods of time.
However you literally read this, it relays the idea of heartache as you wait for someone that you miss.

hi / nichi
Day Scroll

日 is how to write "day" in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Hanja.

This can also mean "Sun", the star in the middle of the Solar system in which we live. In Japanese, it can also mean "sunshine" or even "Sunday".

When writing the date in modern Chinese and Japanese, putting a number in front of this character indicates the day of the month. Of course, you need to indicate the month too... The month is expressed with a number followed by the character for the moon. So "three moons ten suns" would be "March 10th" or "3/10".

Note: 日 is also the first character for the proper name of Japan. Remember that Japan is "The land of the rising sun"? Well, the first character for Japan means "sun" the second means "origin" so you get the real meaning now. Sometimes, in China, this sun character can be a short name for Japan or a suffix for something of or from Japan.

No Pain No Gain

itami naku shite erumono wa nashi
No Pain No Gain Scroll

This Japanese phrase means "no pain, no gain".

Literally, this suggests that with pain, a gain must follow.

The pain Kanji here can also be translated as sorrow or suffering. The gain can also mean profit, advantage, or benefit. In Japanese Buddhist context, that gain Kanji can mean rebirth in paradise, entering nirvana.

The character break down:
痛みなく (itami naku) pain; ache; sore; grief; distress. The naku part adds a meaning of "a lot of" or "extended"
して (shite) and then. (indicates a causative expression; acts as a connective particle)
得る (eru) to get; to acquire; to obtain; to procure; to earn; to win; to gain; to secure; to attain.
もの (mono) conjunctive particle indicating a cause or reason.
なし (nashi) none of; -less; without; no.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Katana

Japanese Samurai Sword
dāo
katana
Katana Scroll

刀 is the Japanese Kanji for "sword". This refers to the style of sword carried by warriors, samurai, and shogun of ancient Japan.

With the pacification of Japan, such swords are now only used for ceremony and decoration. The true art of sword-smithing is all but lost in Japan with new sword production dedicated to making inexpensive replicas for the tourist and foreign market.

For those of you that want to ask whether I can get you a real antique sword. Let me tell you that most real Asian swords were melted down after WWII in Japan, and during the Great Leap Forward in China. Any remaining swords are family heirlooms that nobody will part with.

Please carefully note that the Japanese kanji character shown above is only for a Japanese audience. In China, this character means "knife". See our other entry for "sword" in Chinese.
Note: 刀 can mean knife, sword, or blade in Korean, depending on context.


See Also:  Sword

Jujitsu / Jujutsu

róu shù
juu jutsu
Jujitsu / Jujutsu Scroll

柔術 has been somewhat incorrectly spelled and pronounced "Jujitsu" for some time in the English-speaking world. The correct Japanese Romaji is Jujutsu or Juujutsu.

A little background on the word: By combining the Kanji pronounced "Ju" (which means flexible, pliable, gentle, yielding) with the Kanji pronounced "Jutsu" (which means art, or technique), we get a meaning that can be translated as "flexible technique", "gentle art" or "yielding technique".
柔術 does make sense in Chinese as well, although pronounced, "rou shu" in China.

The Jujutsu system has a history in Japan that started well-before the 1600's. Some see this style as a variation of the "Empty Hand Method" (Karate-do). Even the samurai of old used some Jujutsu methods in defending themselves with their unarmed hands against weapons that could pierce their heavy armor.

There are convoluted relationships between various schools and systems of martial arts but it's generally accepted that Jujutsu led to the development of Judo and a few other variations.

huáng hòu
kou gou
Empress Scroll

皇后 is the title of empress or emperess, the female form of emperor.

皇后 is used in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

While the emperor's reign was for life, if he died, his wife would hold his power. In this case, a woman was the ultimate ruler of the greater part of East Asia (what is now China) until her death and the succession of the emperor's firstborn son to lead the empire. Numerous times in various Chinese dynasties, an empress took power in this way.

The first character means emperor by itself.

The second character alone can mean "wife of an emperor or king" (the first character clarifies that we are talking about an empress and not a queen). It can also mean sovereign or last offspring, depending on context.

Note: In some books, this word is translated as queen. While only incorrect if you get technical (because an empress is theoretically a higher level than a queen), the meaning is very similar.

皇后 is sometimes used for the title of queen but more technically, this is the wife of the emperor (a higher level than a queen).


See Also:  Emperor | King | Queen | Phoenix

Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu

rěn shù
ninjutsu
Ninjutsu / Ninjitsu Scroll

忍術 is the "art of the ninja" in Japanese. Most Japanese people associate ninjas with some degree of romance and reverence to Japan's ancient past. But most will accept that the ninja is an idea or way of life whose time has passed. However, this has not stopped floods of movies about ninjas and dojos offering Ninjutsu training from keeping the idea of the ninja alive in modern times.

My modern Japanese dictionary defines this term as "assassination, stealth and combat techniques", or "fighting art of the ninja".

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. Because this is specifically a Japanese title, we only suggest our Japanese master calligrapher for this selection - and you will get the form shown to the right if you do that (please ignore the fact that some of the images you see during the following pages in the options process will be the Chinese/alternate form).

kōng wú
kuu mu
Nothingness Scroll

空無 is "nothingness" in a Buddhist context.

The first character means empty but can also mean air or sky (air and sky have no form).

The second character means have not, no, none, not or to lack.

Together these characters reinforce each other into a word that means "absolute nothingness".

I know this is a term used in Buddhism but I have not yet figured out the context in which it is used. I suppose it can be the fact that Buddhists believe that the world in a non-real illusion, or perhaps it's about visualizing yourself as "nothing" and therefore leaving behind your desire and worldliness.
Buddhist concepts and titles often have this element of ambiguity or rather "mystery". Therefore, such ideas can have different meanings to different people, and that's okay. If you don't get it right in this lifetime, as there will be plenty more lifetimes to master it (whatever "it" is, and if "it" really exists at all).

Soothill defines this as "Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature".

Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu

Martial Arts Teacher
shī fù
si fu
shi fu
Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu Scroll

師父 means master in Chinese (occasionally used in Korean Hanja and Japanese as well). In the context of Martial Arts, this is the master and teacher who instructs students.

The second character by itself means father. Thus, you get the "Fatherly Master" translation. There's an old Chinese saying that goes something like, "One who is your teacher for one day, is your father for life".

Language notes: I've often seen this romanized as "sifu", this is actually the Cantonese romanization. In Mandarin Chinese, it's "shifu". The pronunciation in Mandarin is actually like "sure foo" (using typical English pronunciation). There's an "R-sound" in there, which is not obvious from the romanization. Many martial arts studios incorrectly pronounce this like "she foo" (which is actually the Japanese pronunciation). In Cantonese, it sounds like "Sea foo" (almost like "sea food", minus the "d" on the end).

師父 is kind of a weird selection for a calligraphy wall scroll, this entry is more for educational purposes. But you are welcome to buy it if you feel it's appropriate for your circumstances.

Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country

The most famous tattoo in Chinese history
jìn zhōng bào guó
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country Scroll

This proverb is the tattoo worn on the back of Yue Fei, a famous Chinese warrior who lived until 1142 A.D.

The tattoo can be translated as "Serve the country with the utmost loyalty". More literally, it means, "[The] Ultimate Loyalty [is too] Duty [of] Country".

Legend has it that this tattoo once saved his life when he was accused of treason.

The first two characters have come to create a word that means "serve the country faithfully" or "die for the country". Note: It's more a willingness to die for one's country than the actual act of dying.

The last two characters have come to mean, "Dedicate oneself to the service of one's country".

Both of these words are probably only in the Chinese lexicon because of this famous tattoo.

If you break it down, character-by-character, here is what you get:
1. To the utmost, to the limit of something, the ultimate.
2. Loyalty or duty (a sense of duty to one's master, lord, country, job).
3. Report, recompense, give back to (in this case, you are giving yourself to your country as payback).
4. Country, state, nation, kingdom.


More about the famous warrior and army general, Yue Fei

jiàn
ken / tsurugi
Sword Scroll

This Character is pronounced "jian" in Chinese. When you say it, imagine that you are making the sound of a sword as it clashes with a metal shield. This might get you closer to the correct pronunciation in Chinese.

I actually wonder if this word came from the metallic ringing sounds of a sword in battle - but such knowledge is lost in history.

The sword is a symbol of a warrior. The one thing that a soldier in ancient China lived and died by. A warrior with his skills and sword proves himself of great value. A warrior who losses his sword instantly becomes worthless.

劍 is an excellent scroll for someone in the military (especially officers of all services - as well as enlisted NCO Marines since they still carry swords even if mainly for ceremonial purposes). Or perhaps someone who practices variations of kung fu or tai chi that involve weapons.

Please note that while this character is understood with the sword meaning in Japanese, you might be looking for the word "katana" which also means sword in Japanese but means "knife" in Chinese.


There are other ways to write sword, and here are a few...
Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese
If you are particular about the version you receive, please let me know when you place your order (Note: Special styles are only available from one of our master calligraphers).

We have a forum entry that addresses the many ways to write sword. You can find that here: 100 Ways to Write Sword - Deciphering Ancient Seal Script

jī dū
kirisuto
Christ Scroll

This how to write "Christ" in Chinese characters, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji. 基督 is the word used in the Chinese Union Bible (the only readily-available translation of the Bible into Chinese that I know of - published about 100 years ago). For Chinese Christians, this is the most common way to refer to Jesus Christ.

基督 is also the way that "Christ" is written in Japanese. But since the Japanese language is very flexible about the sounds that can be assigned to various Kanji, these characters have been assigned a pronunciation that sounds a lot like "Christ" or actually closer to the original "Christos". In Japanese (if you don't know how the Romaji shown above in the gray box works) it sounds like "key ree sue toe" using English words/sounds. Say those four words really fast and you'll get it.
It should be noted that only Japanese Christians will be familiar with this word.

基督 is best defined, read and understood with the characters together but if you take this word for Christ apart, the first character means "fundamentals" or "foundation". The second character can mean "leader" or "boss".

One

The number one
ichi
One Scroll

一 is "one" or "1" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

People keep searching for "one" but I'm not sure what you want. This would be a strange selection for a wall scroll, so please don't order it. Post a request on our forum if you want a phrase with "one" in it that you can't find on our site.

The "one" character is really simple, it's just one stroke. Two is two strokes and three is three strokes, from four and above, the characters get more complicated.

In some ways, the "one" character is too simple, it could be a stray mark, or added to a banking document. Therefore, the following banking anti-fraud character for "one" have developed over the last 1500 years in China and Japan:
壱 壹 弌

Diligent Study Proverb

Drill a hole in the wall to get light to read by.
záo bì tōu guāng
Diligent Study Proverb Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "Bore a hole on the wall to make use of the neighbor's light to study".

鑿壁偷光 is a nice gift for a very studious person.

Kuang Heng was born during the Western Han period. He was very fond of reading ever since he was young. However, he could not go to school since his family was poor, and he had to borrow books from people to learn.

In order to borrow these books he normally did chores for people who had them. When he became older, he had to work in the field from sunrise to sunset since his family's financial situation did not get any better. Thus, he tried to study at night but he had no lamp.

One day, he noticed that there was light from the neighbor's house coming through a crack in the wall. This made him very happy, so he dug a larger hole from the crack and read in the light that shone through. This diligent study eventually made him an accomplished person.

Martial Arts Master

wǔ yún zhě
bugeisha
Martial Arts Master Scroll

武芸者 is the Japanese Kanji title for "Martial Arts Master". It suggests that you have reached at least the level of black belt, and are probably to the level where you are ready to become an instructor.

Please consider carefully where you stand before ordering this phrase on a wall scroll. If you are not a master, this will make you look a bit foolish.

If you want to get this as a gift for your master at the dojo. Try to discreetly make sure this term is used in your school. Different schools and styles of Japanese martial arts use different terms. You may notice in the Romaji and the characters, this has the same characters as "geisha" which means "person skilled in arts" (what a geisha girl really is). The title here has the character for "martial", "warrior", and/or "military" in front of it. Therefore the literal translation is "martial art person".

These Kanji are valid Chinese characters and Korean Hanja but this title does not really make sense in Chinese and not often used in Korean, though a Chinese or Korean would be able to guess the meaning by looking at the first and last characters.

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents Scroll

This is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parent's or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is "You Zi Yin" which means "The Traveler's Recite".

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sun light which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt which you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

Glory and Honor

róng
ei
Glory and Honor Scroll

榮 relates to giving someone a tribute or praise.

It's a little odd as a gift, so this may not be the best selection for a wall scroll.

I've made this entry just because this character is often misused as "honorable" or "keeping your honor". It's not quite the same meaning, as this usually refers to a tribute or giving an honor to someone.

榮 is often found in tattoo books incorrectly listed as the western idea of personal honor or being honorable. Check with us before you get a tattoo that does not match the meaning you are really looking for. As a tattoo, this suggests that you either have a lot of pride in yourself or that you have a wish for prosperity for you and/or your family.

栄In modern Japanese Kanji, glory and honor looks like the image to the right.

There is a lot of confusion about this character, so here are some alternate translations for this character: prosperous, flourishing, blooming (like a flower), glorious beauty, proud, praise, rich, or it can be the family name "Rong". The context in which the character is used can change the meaning between these various ideas.

In the old days, this could be an honor paid to someone by the Emperor (basically a designation by the Emperor that a person has high standing).

To sum it up: 榮 has a positive meaning, however, it's a different flavor than the idea of being honorable and having integrity.

Body and Earth in Unity

shindofuni / shindofuji
Body and Earth in Unity Scroll

身土不二 (Shindofuni) is originally a Buddhist concept or proverb referring to the inseparability of body-mind and geographical circumstances.

身土不二 literally reads, "Body [and] earth [are] not two".

Other translations or matching ideas include:
Body and land are one.
Body and earth can not be separated.
Body earth sensory curation.
You are what you eat.
Indivisibility of the body and the land (because the body is made from food and food is made from the land).

Going further, this speaks of our human bodies and the land from which we get our food being closely connected. This phrase is used often when talking about natural and organic vegetables coming directly from the farm to provide the healthiest foods in Japan.

Character notes: 身(shin) in this context does not just mean your physical body rather a concept including both body and mind.
土 (do) refers to soil, earth, clay, land, or in some cases, locality. It's not the proper name of Earth, the planet. However, in can refer to the land or realm we live in.

Japanese note: This has been used in Japan, on and off since 1907 as a slogan for a governmental healthy eating campaign (usually pronounced as shindofuji instead of the original shindofuni in this context). It may have been hijacked from Buddhism for this propaganda purpose, but at least this is "healthy propaganda".

Korean note: The phrase 身土不二 was in use by 1610 A.D. in Korea where it can be found in an early medical journal.
In modern South Korea, it's written in Hangul as 신토불이. Korea used Chinese characters (same source for Japanese Kanji) as their only written standard form of the language until about a hundred years ago. Therefore, many Koreans will recognize 身土不二 as a native phrase and concept.


See Also:  Strength and Love in Unity

líng qì
reiki
Reiki Scroll

靈氣 is the title of a healing practice that is now found throughout the world but with origins in Japan.

Special note: Outside of the context of the healing practice of Reiki, this means "aura" or "spiritual essence that surrounds all living things". A Japanese person not familiar with the practice will take the "aura" meaning.

Reiki is a technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also heals. It can be compared to massage but is based on the idea that an unseen "life force energy" flows through us and is what causes us to be alive. If your life force energy is low, you'll be more likely to get sick or feel stress. If your life force energy is abundant and flowing well, you become more capable of being happy and healthy.

There is a lot of information available if you want to Google this term - my job is to offer the calligraphy, while you can decide if it is right for you.

Note: We are showing the ancient (traditional) form of the Reiki Kanji. I have seen Reiki written with both the slightly simplified version and this more classic form. If you want the form of Reiki with the two strokes in the shape of an X on the second character and the modern first character, simply click on the Kanji characters to the right.

Note: 靈氣 is also a Chinese word but in Chinese, these characters create a word that refers to a smart person or someone with high aspirations. It is not read as a healing method in Chinese.
In Korean Hanja, this can be read as "mysterious atmosphere" by a Korean who is not familiar with the practice of Reiki (still has a cool meaning in Korean).

Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde

dōng fāng zì zūn
dung fong chi juen
tou hou zi son
Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / AZN Pryde Scroll

東方自尊 is the most universal way to write "Asian Pride".

We worked on this one for a long time. The effort involved both Chinese and Japanese translators and lengthy discussions. If you have been searching for this term, there is a reason that it's hard to find the way to write "Asian Pride" in Chinese and Japanese - it's because of the inherent difficulties in figuring out a universal combination of characters that can be read in all languages that use forms of Chinese characters.

This final solution that you see to the left creates a reasonable title in Chinese, and an exotic (perhaps unusual) title in Japanese (This could be read as "Eastern Self-Respect" in Japanese").
Although not as natural, it does have the same meaning in Korean Hanja and the older-generation of Vietnamese people will be able to read it too.

The first two characters literally mean "Oriental" and the second two mean "pride", "self-esteem", or "self-respect" (we chose the most non-arrogant way to say "pride"). If you have "Asian Pride" (sometimes spelled Asian Pryde) these are the characters for you.

Note: For those of you that wonder, there is nothing technically wrong with the word "Oriental". It is a correct word, and any bad meanings were created by so-called "Asian Americans" and Caucasians in the United States. To say "Asian" would not completely correct to the intended meaning, since that would include people from Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, India, and portions of Russia.

For further proof, if you were of East Asian ancestry and born in England, you would be known as a "British Oriental" (The "Oriental stigma" is basically an American creation and, therefore, applies mostly to the American English language - where they get a bit overzealous with political correctness).

Further, since the Chinese and Japanese word for Oriental is not English, it can not be construed having ill-meaning. One trip to China or Japan, and you will find many things titled with these two characters such as malls, buildings, and business names. These places also use "Oriental" as their English title (much as we do, since our Chinese business name starts with these same two characters).

In short, the first two character have the meaning that Americans attach to "Asian" but is more technically correct.

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:


You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.


The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb, 破鏡重圓, is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty.

It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.


Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds, people's homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.


Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present-day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins".

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation". The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence".

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight七転八起shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
shichi ten haki / nana korobi ya oki
shichitenhaki / nanakorobiyaoki
Drain the pond to get all the fish竭澤而漁
竭泽而渔
jié zé ér yú
jie2 ze2 er2 yu2
jie ze er yu
jiezeeryu
chieh tse erh yü
chiehtseerhyü
You May Learn from Victory, You Will Learn from Failure百勝難慮敵三折乃良醫
百胜难虑敌三折乃良医
bǎi shèng nán lǜ dí sān zhé nǎi liáng yī
bai3 sheng4 nan2 lv4 di2 san1 zhe2 nai3 liang2 yi1
bai sheng nan lv di san zhe nai liang yi
pai sheng nan lü ti san che nai liang i
Mind Over Matter物質性を超越する精神力busshitsu-sei o chouetsu suru seishin-ryoku
bushitsu-sei o choetsu suru seishin-ryoku
bushitsu-seiochoetsusuruseishin-ryoku
Accept the Situation and Move On想開
想开
xiǎng kāi
xiang3 kai1
xiang kai
xiangkai
hsiang k`ai
hsiangkai
hsiang kai
Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success不怕風浪大就怕槳不齊
不怕风浪大就怕桨不齐
bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
bu4 pa4 feng1 lang4 da4 jiu4 pa4 jiang3 bu4 qi2
bu pa feng lang da jiu pa jiang bu qi
pu p`a feng lang ta chiu p`a chiang pu ch`i
pu pa feng lang ta chiu pa chiang pu chi
Keep Calm, Be Not Impatient少安毋躁shǎo ān wú zào
shao3 an1 wu2 zao4
shao an wu zao
shaoanwuzao
shao an wu tsao
shaoanwutsao
God Bless Youお大事にodaijini
Daughter愚女gu jo / gujo
Happy Marriage夫婦円満fuufuenman / fufuenman
Jesus Christ耶穌基督
耶稣基督
yē sū jī dū
ye1 su1 ji1 du1
ye su ji du
yesujidu
yeh su chi tu
yehsuchitu
Example is Better than Precept身教勝於言教
身教胜于言教
shēn jiào shèng yú yán jiào
shen1 jiao4 sheng4 yu2 yan2 jiao1
shen jiao sheng yu yan jiao
shenjiaoshengyuyanjiao
shen chiao sheng yü yen chiao
Okami
God
大神okami / daijin
This Too Shall Pass一切都將過去
一切都将过去
yī qiè dōu jiāng guò qù
yi1 qie4 dou1 jiang1 guo4 qu4
yi qie dou jiang guo qu
yiqiedoujiangguoqu
i ch`ieh tou chiang kuo ch`ü
ichiehtouchiangkuochü
i chieh tou chiang kuo chü
Taijutsu體術
体術
tai jutsu / taijutsu
Lightning閃電
闪电
shǎn diàn
shan3 dian4
shan dian
shandian
shan tien
shantien
Helpfulness樂於助人
乐于助人
lè yú zhù rén
le4 yu2 zhu4 ren2
le yu zhu ren
leyuzhuren
le yü chu jen
leyüchujen
Seiseki星石seiseki
Self-Discipline
Will-Power
自律jiritsuzì lǜ / zi4 lv4 / zi lv / zilvtzu lü / tzulü
Leiléi / lei2 / lei
1. Right Understanding
Right Perspective
Right View
Perfect View
正見
正见
sei ken / seikenzhèng jiàn
zheng4 jian4
zheng jian
zhengjian
cheng chien
chengchien
Avenger復仇者
复仇者
fù chóu zhě
fu4 chou2 zhe3
fu chou zhe
fuchouzhe
fu ch`ou che
fuchouche
fu chou che
Freedom from Anger and Worry Yields Longevity不氣不愁活到白頭
不气不愁活到白头
bù qì bù chóu huó dào bái tóu
bu4 qi4 bu4 chou2 huo2 dao4 bai2 tou2
bu qi bu chou huo dao bai tou
buqibuchouhuodaobaitou
pu ch`i pu ch`ou huo tao pai t`ou
puchipuchouhuotaopaitou
pu chi pu chou huo tao pai tou
Flexibility靈活性
灵活性
líng huó xìng
ling2 huo2 xing4
ling huo xing
linghuoxing
ling huo hsing
linghuohsing
Willow ryuu / yanagi
ryuu / yanagi
ryu / yanagi
ryu / yanagi
liǔ / liu3 / liu
Diligence勤勉kinbenqín miǎn / qin2 mian3 / qin mian / qinmianch`in mien / chinmien / chin mien
Tonga湯加
汤加
yukatāng jiā / tang1 jia1 / tang jia / tangjiat`ang chia / tangchia / tang chia
Vitality生命力seimeiryokushēng mìng lì
sheng1 ming4 li4
sheng ming li
shengmingli
Without a big net, how can you catch fish?不撒大網不得大魚
不撒大网不得大鱼
bù sā dà wǎng bù dé dà yú
bu4 sa1 da4 wang3 bu4 de2 da4 yu2
bu sa da wang bu de da yu
busadawangbudedayu
pu sa ta wang pu te ta yü
pusatawangputetayü
Optimistic豁達
豁达
katsudatsuhuò dá / huo4 da2 / huo da / huodahuo ta / huota
Chuchù / chu4 / chuch`u / chu
How can you catch tiger cubs without entering the lair of the tiger?不入虎穴焉得虎子bú rù hǔ xué yān dé hǔ zǐ
bu2 ru4 hu3 xue2 yan1 de2 hu3 zi3
bu ru hu xue yan de hu zi
buruhuxueyandehuzi
pu ju hu hsüeh yen te hu tzu
pujuhuhsüehyentehutzu
Life in Harmony
Balanced Life
調和生活cho wa sei katsu
chowaseikatsu
Juggernaut劍聖
剑圣
jiàn shèng
jian4 sheng4
jian sheng
jiansheng
chien sheng
chiensheng
Desire
Longing
Craving

yokuyù / yu4 / yu
Put out a burning wood cart with a cup of water杯水車薪
杯水车薪
bēi shuǐ chē xīn
bei1 shui3 che1 xin1
bei shui che xin
beishuichexin
pei shui ch`e hsin
peishuichehsin
pei shui che hsin
Win
Victory

shou / shoshèng / sheng4 / sheng
Moderation節制
节制
sessei / seseijié zhì / jie2 zhi4 / jie zhi / jiezhichieh chih / chiehchih
Kodokan光道館
讲道馆
kou dou kan
koudoukan
ko do kan
kodokan
Adventure冒険bou ken / bo ken
Walk in the Way行道yukimichixíng dào / xing2 dao4 / xing dao / xingdaohsing tao / hsingtao
Extreme Faithfulness貞烈tei retsu / teiretsu
Sanctified by God上帝使你神聖
上帝使你神圣
shèng dì shǐ nǐ shén shèng
sheng4 di4 shi3 ni3 shen2 sheng4
sheng di shi ni shen sheng
shengdishinishensheng
sheng ti shih ni shen sheng
shengtishihnishensheng
Life in Harmony
Balanced Life
和諧生活
和谐生活
hé xié shēng huó
he2 xie2 sheng1 huo2
he xie sheng huo
hexieshenghuo
ho hsieh sheng huo
hohsiehshenghuo
God Bless You
God Be With You
神さまが守るようにkami sa ma ga mamo ru you ni
kamisamagamamoruyouni
kami sa ma ga mamo ru yo ni
kamisamagamamoruyoni
Honorable Death - No Surrender玉砕主義gyokusai shugi
gyokusaishugi
Forgiveness (from the top down)容赦you sha / yousha / yo sha / yosharóng shè / rong2 she4 / rong she / rongshejung she / jungshe
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One千里も一里sen ri mo ichi ri
senrimoichiri
Shiatsu-Do指圧道shiatsudou / shiatsudo
Warriors Adapt and Overcome兵無常勢水無常形
兵无常势水无常形
bīng wú cháng shì shuǐ wú cháng xíng
bing1 wu2 chang2 shi4 shui3 wu2 chang2 xing2
bing wu chang shi shui wu chang xing
ping wu ch`ang shih shui wu ch`ang hsing
ping wu chang shih shui wu chang hsing
Devotion
Diligence
Vigorous
Energetic
精進
精进
shoujin / shojinjīng jìn / jing1 jin4 / jing jin / jingjinching chin / chingchin
Greatest Love最偉大的愛
最伟大的爱
zuì wěi dà de ài
zui4 wei3 da4 de ai4
zui wei da de ai
zuiweidadeai
tsui wei ta te ai
tsuiweitateai
Even a fool may sometimes come up with a good idea千慮一得
千虑一得
senryonoittokuqiān lǜ yī dé
qian1 lv4 yi1 de2
qian lv yi de
qianlvyide
ch`ien lü i te
chienlüite
chien lü i te
Kodokan講道館
讲道馆
kou dou kan
koudoukan
ko do kan
kodokan
Brevity: Fewer Words are Best少說為佳
少说为佳
shǎo shuō wéi jiā
shao3 shuo1 wei2 jia1
shao shuo wei jia
shaoshuoweijia
shao shuo wei chia
shaoshuoweichia
Pain of Seperation from Your Loves愛別離苦
爱别离苦
ai betsu ri ku
aibetsuriku
ài bié lí kǔ
ai4 bie2 li2 ku3
ai bie li ku
aibieliku
ai pieh li k`u
aipiehliku
ai pieh li ku
Five Codes of Tang Soo Do國家忠誠父母孝道朋友有信殺生有擇臨戰無退
国家忠诚父母孝道朋友有信杀生有择临战无退
guó jiā zhōng chéng fù mǔ xiào dào péng yǒu yǒu xìn shā shēng yǒu zé lín zhàn wú tuì
guo2 jia1 zhong1 cheng2 fu4 mu3 xiao4 dao4 peng2 you3 you3 xin4 sha1 sheng1 you3 ze2 lin2 zhan4 wu2 tui4
guo jia zhong cheng fu mu xiao dao peng you you xin sha sheng you ze lin zhan wu tui
kuo chia chung ch`eng fu mu hsiao tao p`eng yu yu hsin sha sheng yu tse lin chan wu t`ui
kuo chia chung cheng fu mu hsiao tao peng yu yu hsin sha sheng yu tse lin chan wu tui
Trust No One
Trust No Man
誰も信じるなdare mo shin ji ru na
daremoshinjiruna
No Fear恐れずoso re zu / osorezu
Trust No One
Trust No Man
無法信任
无法信任
wú fǎ xìn rèn
wu2 fa3 xin4 ren4
wu fa xin ren
wufaxinren
wu fa hsin jen
wufahsinjen
Ikigai生き甲斐ikigai
Perseverance is the Key不怕練不成就怕心不恆
不怕练不成就怕心不恒
bú pà liàn bù chéng jiù pà xīn bù héng
bu2 pa4 lian4 bu4 cheng2 jiu4 pa4 xin1 bu4 heng2
bu pa lian bu cheng jiu pa xin bu heng
pu p`a lien pu ch`eng chiu p`a hsin pu heng
pu pa lien pu cheng chiu pa hsin pu heng
Tathata
Ultimate Nature of All Things
真如shinnyozhēn rú / zhen1 ru2 / zhen ru / zhenruchen ju / chenju
Wine
Alcohol
Sake
sake / shujiǔ / jiu3 / jiuchiu
Better to Travel 10,000 Miles than Read 10,000 Books行萬里路勝讀萬捲書
行万里路胜读万卷书
xíng wàn lǐ lù shèng dú wàn juǎn shū
xing2 wan4 li3 lu4 sheng4 du2 wan4 juan3 shu1
xing wan li lu sheng du wan juan shu
hsing wan li lu sheng tu wan chüan shu
Rise and Fall
Ups and Downs
栄枯盛衰 / 榮枯盛衰
荣枯盛衰
ei ko sei sui
eikoseisui
No Guts, No Glory無勇不榮
无勇不荣
wú yǒng bù róng
wu2 yong3 bu4 rong2
wu yong bu rong
wuyongburong
wu yung pu jung
wuyungpujung
Beauty Shop
Beauty Salon
美容店měi róng diàn
mei3 rong2 dian4
mei rong dian
meirongdian
mei jung tien
meijungtien
Black Belt黑帶
黑带
hēi dài / hei1 dai4 / hei dai / heidaihei tai / heitai
Never Forget Your First Resolution初心忘るべからず / 初心忘る可からず
初心忘るべからず
sho shin wasu ru be ka ra zu
shoshinwasurubekarazu
Smooth Sailing一帆風順
一帆风顺
yī fán fēng shùn
yi1 fan2 feng1 shun4
yi fan feng shun
yifanfengshun
i fan feng shun
ifanfengshun
Fidelity Honor Courage信義尊嚴勇氣
信义尊严勇气
xìn yì zūn yán yǒng qì
xin4 yi4 zun1 yan2 yong3 qi4
xin yi zun yan yong qi
xinyizunyanyongqi
hsin i tsun yen yung ch`i
hsinitsunyenyungchi
hsin i tsun yen yung chi
Ken Zen Ichi Nyo拳禪一如
拳禅一如
ken zen ichi nyo
kenzenichinyo
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years一日千秋ichi jitsu sen shuu
ichijitsusenshuu
ichi jitsu sen shu
ichijitsusenshu
yí rì qiān qiū
yi2 ri4 qian1 qiu1
yi ri qian qiu
yiriqianqiu
i jih ch`ien ch`iu
ijihchienchiu
i jih chien chiu
Dayhi / nichirì / ri4 / rijih
No Pain No Gain痛みなくして得るものなしitami naku shite erumono wa nashi
Katanakatanadāo / dao1 / daotao
Jujitsu
Jujutsu
柔術
柔术
juu jutsu / juujutsu / ju jutsu / jujutsuróu shù / rou2 shu4 / rou shu / roushujou shu / joushu
Empress皇后kou gou / kougou / ko go / kogohuáng hòu
huang2 hou4
huang hou
huanghou
Ninjutsu
Ninjitsu
忍術
忍术
ninjutsurěn shù / ren3 shu4 / ren shu / renshujen shu / jenshu
Nothingness空無
空无
kuu mu / kuumu / ku mu / kumukōng wú / kong1 wu2 / kong wu / kongwuk`ung wu / kungwu / kung wu
Fatherly Master
Sifu
Shi Fu
Shifu
師父
师父
shi fu / shifushī fù / shi1 fu4 / shi fu / shifushih fu / shihfu
Ultimate Loyalty to Your Country盡忠報國
尽忠报国
jìn zhōng bào guó
jin4 zhong1 bao4 guo2
jin zhong bao guo
jinzhongbaoguo
chin chung pao kuo
chinchungpaokuo
Sword
ken / tsurugijiàn / jian4 / jianchien
Christ基督kirisutojī dū / ji1 du1 / ji du / jiduchi tu / chitu
Oneichiyī / yi1 / yii
Diligent Study Proverb鑿壁偷光
凿壁偷光
záo bì tōu guāng
zao2 bi4 tou1 guang1
zao bi tou guang
zaobitouguang
tsao pi t`ou kuang
tsaopitoukuang
tsao pi tou kuang
Martial Arts Master武芸者bugeishawǔ yún zhě
wu3 yun2 zhe3
wu yun zhe
wuyunzhe
wu yün che
wuyünche
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents誰言寸草心報得三春暉
谁言寸草心报得三春晖
shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
shui2 yan2 cun4 cao3 xin1 bao4 de2 san1 chun1 hui1
shui yan cun cao xin bao de san chun hui
shui yen ts`un ts`ao hsin pao te san ch`un hui
shui yen tsun tsao hsin pao te san chun hui
Glory and Honor
荣 / 栄
eiróng / rong2 / rongjung
Body and Earth in Unity身土不二shindofuni / shindofuji
Reiki靈氣
灵气 霊気
reikilíng qì / ling2 qi4 / ling qi / lingqiling ch`i / lingchi / ling chi
Asian Pride
Oriental Pride
AZN Pryde
東方自尊
东方自尊
tou hou zi son
touhouzison
to ho zi son
tohozison
dōng fāng zì zūn
dong1 fang1 zi4 zun1
dong fang zi zun
dongfangzizun
tung fang tzu tsun
tungfangtzutsun
Broken Mirror Rejoined破鏡重圓
破镜重圆
pò jìng chóng yuán
po4 jing4 chong2 yuan2
po jing chong yuan
pojingchongyuan
p`o ching ch`ung yüan
pochingchungyüan
po ching chung yüan
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu遠上寒山石徑斜白雲生處有人家停車坐愛楓林晚霜葉紅於二月花
远上寒山石径斜白云生处有人家停车坐爱枫林晚霜叶红于二月花
yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
yuan3 shang4 han2 shan1 shi2 jing4 xia2 bai2 yun2 sheng1 chu4 you3 ren2 jia1 ting2 che1 zuo4 ai4 feng1 lin2 wan3 shuang4 ye4 hong2 yu2 er4 yue4 hua1
yuan shang han shan shi jing xia bai yun sheng chu you ren jia ting che zuo ai feng lin wan shuang ye hong yu er yue hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng ch`u yu jen chia t`ing ch`e tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
yüan shang han shan shih ching hsia pai yün sheng chu yu jen chia ting che tso ai feng lin wan shuang yeh hung yü erh yüeh hua
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll
Better Late Than Never Scroll


And formats...

Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Better Late Than Never Horizontal Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Get Well in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

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5 people have searched for Get Well in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
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