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Expect in Chinese / Japanese...

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Personalize your custom “Expect” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Expect” title below...


  1. Sasuga / Nagare

  2. Peaceful Warrior

  3. Yellow Dragon

  4. Black Dragon

  5. Desire / Craving

  6. White Dragon

  7. Looking Forward / Hoping

  8. Thug Life

  9. Desire

10. Red Dragon / Vermillion Dragon

11. Soccer / Football / Futbol

12. Kindheartedness / Benevolence / Humanity

13. Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false

14. Humility / Being Humble

15. Shit Happens

16. Military Discipline

17. Trust No One / Trust No Man

18. Tolerance

19. Broken Hearted

20. Ninja

21. Patience / Perseverance

22. Banzai

23. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

24. Guanxi


Sasuga / Nagare

ryuuzeki / nagareishi / nagare / sasuga
Sasuga / Nagare Scroll

流石 can be the Japanese surnames Ryuuzeki, Ryuuseki, Nagareishi, Nagare or Sasuga.

The meaning of this as a word is "as one would expect", "still", or "all the same".

Peaceful Warrior

hei wa no bu shi
Peaceful Warrior Scroll

This can be read as "Peaceful Warrior" or "Warrior for Peace" in Japanese. This sounds like an oxymoron in Japanese, so it's a weird title. Expect Japanese people to be perplexed when they see it.

Character breakdown:
平和 (heiwa) peace; harmony.
の (no) possessive particle.
武士 (bushi) warrior; samurai; soldier.

Yellow Dragon

huáng lóng
Yellow Dragon Scroll

黃龍 is a sophisticated or scholarly way to say, "Yellow Dragon". 黃龍 is the title you'd expect in ancient Chinese literature.

The first character means yellow.

The second character means dragon.

The Yellow Dragon represents a king that favorably hears all petitions of his subjects.


Note: This title can be the name of Huanglong county in Yan’an, located in Shaanxi province of China.

Black Dragon

xuān lóng
Black Dragon Scroll

玄龍 is a sophisticated or scholarly way to say, "Black Dragon".

玄龍 is the title you'd expect in ancient Chinese literature.

The first character means black or mysterious.

The second character means dragon.

This black dragon represents a king dwelling in the depths of the mystic waters.

Desire / Craving

yù wàng
yokubou
Desire / Craving Scroll

欲望 is a word that means strong desire, while some might translate it as "lust".

The first character of this word means desire, longing, hunger, covetousness, greed, passion, desire, craving, or wish. The second character means to hope for, ambition, to desire, to aspire, to expect, to gaze (into the distance) or to look for something.

White Dragon

bái lóng
White Dragon Scroll

白龍 is a sophisticated or scholarly way to say, "White Dragon". 白龍 is the title you'd expect in ancient Chinese literature.

The first character means white, pure, or bright.

The second character means dragon.

The White Dragon represents a king who is virtuous and pure.

Looking Forward / Hoping

qǐ wàng
kibou
Looking Forward / Hoping  Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese word can be translated as:
to hope; to look forward; looking forward to; hoping for.

The first character means to plan. The second can mean to hope; to expect; to gaze (into the distance); to look towards. Sometimes it can mean full moon.
Together, these characters create this word about hoping, wishing, looking forward, and dreaming about the future.

Thug Life

bào tú shēng huó
bou to sei katsu
Thug Life Scroll

暴徒生活 is probably the best way to say "Thug Life" in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean.

It's a strange title to be sure, so expect native Asian people to be confused when they see your Thug Life calligraphy.

The first two characters mean bandit, thug, ruffian, insurgent, rioter, or mob.

The last two characters mean life, live, or living.

Desire

kě wàng
Desire Scroll

This Chinese word can mean desirous, wishful, or simply desire.

The first character means to thirst for [something], or to be thirsty. The second character means to hope for, to expect, to gaze (into the distance) or to look for something. The combined meaning of these two characters changes a bit but I think it's nice to know the individual meanings to give you a better understanding of where a word comes from.

Korean definitions of this word include craving, longing, and thirst for knowledge.

Red Dragon / Vermillion Dragon

zhū lóng
Red Dragon / Vermillion Dragon Scroll

朱龍 is a sophisticated or scholarly way to say, "Red Dragon". 朱龍 is the title you'd expect in ancient Chinese literature.

The first character means red, cinnabar, or vermillion.

The second character means dragon.

It is said that the Vermillion Dragon represents kings that bestow blessings on lakes or bodies of water. This makes more sense in an ancient Chinese context.

Soccer / Football / Futbol

zú qiú
Soccer / Football / Futbol Scroll

This the word for football or soccer in Chinese.

As with most of the world, football is very popular in China. During the World Cup, the whole country seems to shut down to watch (regardless of whether Team China is playing or not).

Soccer is probably the 3rd most popular participation sport in China (after ping pong and badminton).

As you might expect, the first character means "foot" and the second character means "ball".


FYI: This game would never be confused with American Football in Chinese. As with the rest of the world, there is a vague awareness of what American Football is (often described as "that game kind of like rugby").

For those familiar with American Football, there is some disgust regarding the fact that winners of the Superbowl call themselves "world champions" of a game that is only played in the USA. This is one of the reasons that jokes abound about how Americans are unaware that there is a world outside of their borders.

Kindheartedness / Benevolence / Humanity

rén dé
jintoku
Kindheartedness / Benevolence / Humanity Scroll

These two characters create a word that can be translated as love, kindheartedness, benevolence and humanity.

The first character means benevolence by itself.
The second character means virtue or morality.

Japanese note: The second Kanji of this word has been slightly simplified (one tiny horizontal stroke removed). It is still readable for Japanese but if you select our Japanese calligrapher, expect that stroke to be missing on your wall scroll.

Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false

dǎ pà de rén shì jiǎ de jìng pà de rén shì zhēn de
Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false Scroll

This is a proverb that seems to be aimed at world leaders or others in power. Perhaps a suggestion to avoid the practice of "fear mongering" opting instead for a policy of benevolence and justice.

An example: When the Bush administration told Pakistan they could either join America in the "war on terror", or expect some bombs to be coming their way, Bush gained this kind of "less-than-genuine respect" from Pakistanis.
Leaders in places like North Korea and even Saudi Arabia reap the same bogus respect from their own citizens.


Note that calligraphers do not like to repeat the same characters in exactly the same way in the same piece of artwork. So expect the characters that are repeated to be written in different forms in the real artwork (unlike the way they are displayed to the left).

Humility / Being Humble

qiān xùn
ken son
Humility / Being Humble Scroll

謙遜 can also be translated as being modest, humble, or unpretentious.

Being humble is considering others to be as important as yourself. You are thoughtful of their needs and willing to be of service. You don't expect others or yourself to be perfect. You learn from your mistakes. When you do great things, humility reminds you to be thankful instead of boastful.

This Humility title is also used as one of the 8 key concepts of Tang Soo Do. Often romanized as "Kyum Son".

Also sometimes used in Japanese to express humility with an essence of modesty.


See Also:  Modesty | Humility

Shit Happens

shì shì nán liào
Shit Happens Scroll

世事難料 is a polite Chinese version of, "shit happens". This phrase just suggests that things happen (for no reason, and for which we have no control).

The first two characters mean: the affairs of life; things of the world; worldly affairs; ways of the world.

The third character means: disaster; distress; problem; difficulty; difficult; hardships; troubles; defect.

The last character in this context means: to expect; to anticipate; to guess.

If you put this back together, you have something like, "In life, troubles (should be) expected".

Military Discipline

jūn jì
gun ki
Military Discipline Scroll

軍紀 means military discipline or military principles.

If maintaining your military discipline is important to you personally, or important to your military unit, this is the wall scroll to have up behind your desk. In fact, it's the kind of thing I expect to see behind the desk of a First Sergeant or maybe a hardcore NCO.

Note: In some rare context, it could be extended to mean "morale" but "discipline" is much closer to the commonly-held definition.

Note: This term is not well-known outside of the military services in Asia (not used by the common person).


See Also:  Self-Discipline

Trust No One / Trust No Man

wú fǎ xìn rèn
Trust No One / Trust No Man Scroll

無法信任 is the kind of thing you expect to hear in a spy movie.

"Trust no one, 007!"

The first two characters express the idea of "no way" or "cannot".

The last two characters mean "trust".

The characters must go in this order due to Chinese grammar issues and in order to sound natural.

Note: 無法信任 is not an ancient Chinese phrase by any means. It's just that we received a lot of requests for this phrase.

無法信任 is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man", though technically no gender is specified.

Tolerance

kuān róng
kanyou
Tolerance Scroll

Being tolerant is accepting differences. You don't expect others to think, look, speak or act just like you. You are free of prejudice, knowing that all people have feelings, needs, hopes and dreams. Tolerance is also accepting things you wish were different with patience and flexibility.

寬容 can also be translated as magnanimity, generosity, or leniency.

Note: There is a tiny deviation in the first character when written in Japanese. If you choose our Japanese master calligrapher, the little dot on the lower right of the first character will be omitted. With or without the dot, this can be read in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.


See Also:  Patience

Broken Hearted

shī liàn
shitsuren
Broken Hearted Scroll

In Chinese, this can mean to lose one's love; to break up (in a romantic relationship); to feel jilted.

In Japanese Kanji, this means disappointed love, broken heart, unrequited love, or being lovelorn.

失戀 is also valid in old Korean Hanja, where is means unrequited love, unreturned love, a disappointment in love, or a broken heart.

Note: In modern Japan, they will tend to write the more simple 失恋 form instead of 失戀. If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect the more simple modern version to be written (unless you give us instructions to use the older or more traditional version).

rěn
nin
Ninja Scroll

忍 is just the first character of "Ninja".

It means to beat, to endure, or to tolerate.

Some use this as the short form of "Ninja" but it would be more correct to use the two-character version in most cases (and for clarity). Other definitions of this Kanji include: to bear, put up with, conceal, spy or sneak. It is also a character in Korean Hanja and Chinese but not well-known with this meaning but rather a definition like "patience".

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write it in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).

rěn zhě
ninja
Ninja Scroll

In feudal Japan, ninja or shinobi (literally, "one who is concealed" or "one that endures") were sometimes assassins and agents of espionage. The ninja, like samurai, followed their own special code of conduct.

The role of the ninja has been romanticized in many American movies (and to a lesser extent in Japanese movies). Because the ninja-craze has taken off in the west, Japan has followed the trend and you'll see plenty of ninja-related imagery in Japan.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect that form. Our Chinese calligraphers can also write it in the Japanese form but only if you request it (in the special instructions about your order during checkout).


See Also:  Samurai | Warrior | Ninjitsu

Patience / Perseverance

rěn
nin
Patience / Perseverance Scroll

忍 contains the ideas of patience, equanimity, perseverance, forbearance, and endurance. Alone, this single character can be a bit ambiguous or flexible. It can also mean to endure, to bear, to put up with or to conceal. If you want to simply decide what this character means to you within the general meaning but keep it a mystery to others, this is a good choice.

If you want to be more direct, you may want to choose one of our other selections that mean perseverance or patience (you will see this character within those larger words/phrases).

There is a secondary meaning in Japanese, since this is the first character of the word ninja.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write it in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).


See Also:  Perseverance | Patience | Tenacious

Banzai

Modern Japanese Version
wàn suì
banzai
Banzai Scroll

万歲 is the modern Japanese way to write banzai.

We've made two almost identical entries for this word, with just a variation on the first character. In the last century, 萬 was simplified to 万 in Japan and China. The new generation will expect it to be written as 万 but the old generation can still read the more traditional 萬 form. You must make your own determination as to what version is best for you. If your audience is mostly Japanese, I suggest 万歲.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray". The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years". It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 万歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Other translations: hurrah, long life, congratulations, cheers, live long.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dou ten chi shou hou
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis Scroll

The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation.

It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb, and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu’s writings would understand.

Guanxi

The Chinese Concept of Relationship and Exchange of Favors
guān xì
kankei
Guanxi Scroll

The dictionary definition is:
relations / relationship / to concern / to affect / to have to do with / connection.

But there's more to it...

In China, your relationship that you have with certain people can open doors for you. Having guanxi with someone also means they would never defraud you but instead are honor-bound to treat you fairly (of course, this goes both ways). Sometimes it is suggested that guanxi is the exchange of favors. I would say this is more having a relationship that allows you to ask for, and expect favors without shame.

There is no concept in western culture that exactly matches guanxi but perhaps having a social or professional network is similar.

Note that there are some variations common within Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja for this word...

関Japanese tend to use a Chinese alternate form as shown to the right for
the first character.

關There's also another alternate form of that first character (currently used as the official Simplified form in mainland China) which looks like the character shown to the right. It's basically the central radical of the alternate version shown above but without the "door radical" around it. In more free-flowing calligraphy styles, this version would be the likely choice for a calligrapher.

係In Modern Japanese, they use the character shown to the right.
They also tend to use this same form in Korean Hanja (I've only checked this word in my Korean dictionary but it has not been confirmed by a translator's review).

系If that was not confusing enough, there is another alternate form of that second character. See right.

An Asian calligrapher of any nationality may use any of these forms at their discretion. However, They would tend to stick to the most common form used in their respective languages.

If you have any preference on any of these issues, please give us a special note with your order, and we'll make sure it's done the way you want.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Sasuga
Nagare
流石ryuuzeki / nagareishi / nagare / sasuga
ryuzeki / nagareishi / nagare / sasuga
ryuzeki / nagareishi / nagare / sasuga
Peaceful Warrior平和の武士hei wa no bu shi
heiwanobushi
Yellow Dragon黃龍
黄龙
huáng lóng
huang2 long2
huang long
huanglong
huang lung
huanglung
Black Dragon玄龍
玄龙
xuān lóng
xuan1 long2
xuan long
xuanlong
hsüan lung
hsüanlung
Desire
Craving
欲望yokubou / yokuboyù wàng / yu4 wang4 / yu wang / yuwangyü wang / yüwang
White Dragon白龍
白龙
bái lóng / bai2 long2 / bai long / bailongpai lung / pailung
Looking Forward
Hoping
企望kibou / kiboqǐ wàng / qi3 wang4 / qi wang / qiwangch`i wang / chiwang / chi wang
Thug Life暴徒生活bou to sei katsu
boutoseikatsu
bo to sei katsu
botoseikatsu
bào tú shēng huó
bao4 tu2 sheng1 huo2
bao tu sheng huo
baotushenghuo
pao t`u sheng huo
paotushenghuo
pao tu sheng huo
Desire渴望kě wàng / ke3 wang4 / ke wang / kewangk`o wang / kowang / ko wang
Red Dragon
Vermillion Dragon
朱龍
朱龙
zhū lóng / zhu1 long2 / zhu long / zhulongchu lung / chulung
Soccer
Football
Futbol
足球zú qiú / zu2 qiu2 / zu qiu / zuqiutsu ch`iu / tsuchiu / tsu chiu
Kindheartedness
Benevolence
Humanity
仁德jintokurén dé / ren2 de2 / ren de / rendejen te / jente
Respect out of fear is never genuine; Reverence out of respect is never false打怕的人是假的敬怕的人是真的dǎ pà de rén shì jiǎ de jìng pà de rén shì zhēn de
da3 pa4 de ren2 shi4 jia3 de jing4 pa4 de ren2 shi4 zhen1 de
da pa de ren shi jia de jing pa de ren shi zhen de
ta p`a te jen shih chia te ching p`a te jen shih chen te
ta pa te jen shih chia te ching pa te jen shih chen te
Humility
Being Humble
謙遜
谦逊
ken son / kensonqiān xùn / qian1 xun4 / qian xun / qianxunch`ien hsün / chienhsün / chien hsün
Shit Happens世事難料
世事难料
shì shì nán liào
shi4 shi4 nan2 liao4
shi shi nan liao
shishinanliao
shih shih nan liao
shihshihnanliao
Military Discipline軍紀
军纪
gun ki / gunkijūn jì / jun1 ji4 / jun ji / junjichün chi / chünchi
Trust No One
Trust No Man
無法信任
无法信任
wú fǎ xìn rèn
wu2 fa3 xin4 ren4
wu fa xin ren
wufaxinren
wu fa hsin jen
wufahsinjen
Tolerance寬容
宽容
kanyou / kanyokuān róng
kuan1 rong2
kuan rong
kuanrong
k`uan jung
kuanjung
kuan jung
Broken Hearted失戀
失恋
shitsurenshī liàn / shi1 lian4 / shi lian / shilianshih lien / shihlien
Ninjaninrěn / ren3 / renjen
Ninja忍者ninjarěn zhě / ren3 zhe3 / ren zhe / renzhejen che / jenche
Patience
Perseverance
ninrěn / ren3 / renjen
Banzai万歲 / 萬歲
万岁
banzaiwàn suì / wan4 sui4 / wan sui / wansui
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis道天地將法
道天地将法
dou ten chi shou hou
doutenchishouhou
do ten chi sho ho
dotenchishoho
dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
dao4 tian1 di4 jiang4 fa3
dao tian di jiang fa
daotiandijiangfa
tao t`ien ti chiang fa
taotientichiangfa
tao tien ti chiang fa
Guanxi關繫 / 関繫 / 關係
关系 / 関係
kankeiguān xì / guan1 xi4 / guan xi / guanxikuan hsi / kuanhsi
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Guanxi Scroll
Guanxi Scroll
Guanxi Scroll
Guanxi Scroll


And formats...

Guanxi Vertical Portrait
Guanxi Horizontal Wall Scroll
Guanxi Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

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