Buy a Custom Wealth Chinese or Japanese Calligraphy Wall Scroll

We have many options to create artwork with the Chinese characters / Asian symbols / Japanese Kanji for Wealth on a wall scroll or portrait.
If you want to create a cool Wealth Asian character tattoo, you can purchase that on our Chinese and Japanese Tattoo Image Service page and we'll help you select from many forms of ancient Asian symbols that express the idea of Wealth.

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Money / Wealth
  2. Wealth / Fortune / Riches / Abundance
  3. Wealth / Riches / Fortune
  4. Five Red Bats
  5. Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance
  6. Abundance / Prosperous
  7. Abundance and Prosperity
  8. Baby
  9. Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony
10. Better to be Happy than Rich
11. Blessings on this Home
12. Cherish
13. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33
14. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching
15. Dark Sister
16. The farts of others stink, but one’s own smells sweet
17. A Bright Future
18. Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs
19. Good Luck / Good Fortune
20. Guanxi
21. Gung Ho
22. Happiness / Contentment
23. Glory and Honor
24. Hua Mulan
25. I am Enough
26. Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine
27. Mutual Welfare and Benefit
28. Safety and Well-Being of the Family
29. Kindness and Forgiving Nature
30. Kowtow - The deepest bow
31. Live Together and Help Each Other
32. Large River
33. Learn from Wisdom
34. A Life of Happiness and Prosperity
35. Lioness
36. Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red,...
37. Live for What You Love
38. Live in Prosperity
39. Longevity / Long Life Wishes
40. Love and Protect
41. Energy Sword Body in Concert
42. Mind Your Own Business
43. Precious
44. Precious / Treasure
45. Prosperity
46. Realize Your Ambitions...
47. Prosperity and Happiness
48. Prosperity
49. Prosperous Business
50. Red Envelope
51. Siddhartha
52. Star
53. Success
54. Sushi
55. Time is more valuable than Jade
56. Treasure
57. Wado-Ryu
58. Warrior
59. Worldwide Wish for Peace and Prosperity
60. Boar / Pig
61. Live Free or Die

Money / Wealth

China jīn qián
Japan kin sen
Money / Wealth Wall Scroll

金錢 / 金銭 means money, cash, currency or wealth in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Literally, it means "gold coins" but has come to be used to mean money in general, as well as the idea of wealth.

銭The second character of this word is written in a variant form in Japan. The more common version in Japan is shown to the right. Click on the Kanji to the right instead of the button above if you want this Japanese variant in your calligraphy.

Wealth / Fortune / Riches / Abundance

Japan tomi
Wealth / Fortune / Riches / Abundance Wall Scroll

The title says it all; this word is clearly understood in Chinese and Japanese as well as Korean Hanja.

Wealth / Riches / Fortune

China cái fù
Wealth / Riches / Fortune Wall Scroll

財富 means wealth or riches in Chinese.

Hanging this on your wall will label you as a "lover of money" or a "greedy person." Order this, only if you don't mind being seen in this light.

Five Red Bats

China hóng wǔ fú
Five Red Bats Wall Scroll

紅五蝠 is a play on words in Chinese because of some homophones.

The first thing you need to know is that the word for bat, 蝠, sounds exactly like the word for good fortune, 福. Thus, bats are often associated with good luck and good fortune in Chinese culture.

Five bats (五福 / 五蝠) means "five fortunes" referring to luck, prosperity, wealth, happiness, and longevity.

The word red, 红, has the same sound as 宏 meaning vast, great, or magnificent. Therefore, a red bat means "vast fortune."

Altogether, five red bats represent vast reaches of the five fortunes.

Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance

China nián nián yǒu yú
Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance Wall Scroll

年年有餘 is a common proverb or wish of prosperity you'll hear around the time of Chinese New Years.

Directly translated character by character it means, "Year Year Have Surplus." A more natural English translation including the deeper meaning would be "Every Year may you Have Abundance in your life."

On a side note, this phrase often goes with a gift of something related to fish. 年年有餘 is because the last character "yu" which means surplus or abundance has exactly the same pronunciation in Mandarin as the word for "fish."

年年有餘 is also one of the most common titles for traditional paintings that feature koi fish.

In China, this phrase might make an odd wall scroll - a customer asked especially for this common phrase which is why it appears here. See my other abundance-related words if you want a wall scroll that will seem more comfortable in Chinese culture.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean, but it's not a commonly used term.

See Also:  Prosperity | Good Fortune

Abundance / Prosperous

China fù yù
Japan fu yuu
Abundance / Prosperous Wall Scroll

This word means prosperous, having abundance, well-to-do, or well-off.

It's a simple word that suggests that "you have made it" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja.

See Also:  Good Fortune

Abundance and Prosperity

China fán róng fù yù
Japan hanei yuuhuku
Abundance and Prosperity Wall Scroll

繁榮富裕 is a proverb about "Prosperity and Abundance."

These characters present and reinforce the ideas of being prosperous, a booming economy, well-to-do, well-off, wealth, riches, and opulence.

繁榮富裕 is the ancient/traditional Chinese way to write this but most Japanese can fully read and understand it. It's also the correct form of old Korean Hanja (though few Koreans of the current generation will be able to read this).

See Also:  Good Fortune


China bǎo bao
Baby Wall Scroll

寶寶 is how Chinese people express "baby."

The word is composed of the same character twice, and therefore literally means "double precious" or "double treasure."

This would be a nice wall scroll to put either inside or by the door of your baby's room (not on the door, as wall scrolls swing around wildly when hung on doors that open and close a lot).

Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony

China hé měi
Japan wa mi
Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony Wall Scroll

These two characters create a word that means, "harmonious" or, "in perfect harmony." The deeper meaning or more natural translation would be something like, "beautiful life."

The first character means peace and harmony.

The second character means beautiful. But in this case, when combined with the first character, beautiful refers to being satisfied with what you have in your life. This can be having good relations, good feelings, comfort, and having enough (with no feeling of wanting).

Note: In Japanese, this is often used as the name "Wami." This title is probably more appropriate if your audience is Chinese.

Better to be Happy than Rich

China ān pín lè dào
Better to be Happy than Rich Wall Scroll

Even if you are poor, you should still feel satisfied in your life...

...Satisfaction, happiness, and the meaning of your life come from within yourself and not from money or riches of the world.

In Chinese, there are a lot of four-character proverbs which express some very old philosophies.
Though there are only four characters on this scroll, in Chinese the meanings often surpass the dictionary definition of each character.

In this case, you should not set your expectations too high for the amount to money or riches you wish to have. One who sets their expectations too high is almost always disappointed. Instead, you should cherish what you have, and seek to improve yourself from within, and not measure your personal worth by the size of your bank account.

See Also:  A Sly Rabbit Will Have Three Openings to Its Den

Blessings on this Home

China wǔ fú lín mén
Blessings on this Home Wall Scroll

This literally means, "five good-fortunes arrive [at the] door." It is understood to mean, "may the five blessings descend upon this home."

These blessing are known in ancient China to be: longevity, wealth, health, virtue, and a natural death (living to old age). 五福臨門 is one of several auspicious sayings you might hear during Chinese New Years.


China zhēn ài
Cherish Wall Scroll

珍愛 means to cherish, to treasure, or to love dearly in Chinese.


Japan hi zou
Cherish Wall Scroll

秘蔵 means to cherish, to treasure, or to prize in Japanese.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

China zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33 Wall Scroll

知人者知也自知者明也勝人者有力也自勝者強也知足者富也強行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者壽也 is referred to as passage or chapter 33 of the Dao De Jing (often Romanized as "Tao Te Ching"). These are the words of the philosopher Laozi (Lao Tzu).

The following is one translation of this passage:
To know others is wisdom;
To know oneself is acuity/intelligence.
To conquer others is power,
To conquer oneself is strength.
To know contentment is to have wealth.
To act resolutely is to have purpose.
To stay one's ground is to be enduring.
To die and yet not be forgotten is to be long-lived.

Another translation:
To understand others is to be knowledgeable;
To understand yourself is to be wise.
To conquer others is to have strength;
To conquer yourself is to be strong.
To know when you have enough is to be rich.
To go forward with strength is to have ambition.
To not lose your place is to be long lasting.
To die but not be forgotten -- that's true long life.

A third translation of the second half:
He who is content is rich;
He who acts with persistence has will;
He who does not lose his roots will endure;
He who dies physically but preserves the Dao will enjoy a long after-life.


During our research, the Chinese characters shown here are probably the most accurate to the original text of Laozi. These were taken for the most part from the Mawangdui 1973 and Guodan 1993 manuscripts which pre-date other Daodejing texts by about 1000 years.

Grammar was a little different in Laozi's time. So you should consider this to be the ancient Chinese version. Some have modernized this passage by adding, removing, or swapping articles and changing the grammar (we felt the oldest and most original version would be more desirable). You may find other versions printed in books or online - sometimes these modern texts are simply used to explain to Chinese people what the original text really means.

This language issue can be compared in English by thinking how the King James (known as the Authorized version in Great Britain) Bible from 1611 was written, and comparing it to modern English. Now imagine that the Daodejing was probably written around 403 BCE (2000 years before the King James Version of the Bible). To a Chinese person, the original Daodejing reads like text that is 3 times more detached compared to Shakespeare's English is to our modern-day speech.

Extended notes:

While on this Biblical text comparison, it should be noted, that just like the Bible, all the original texts of the Daodejing were lost or destroyed long ago. Just as with the scripture used to create the Bible, various manuscripts exist, many with variations or copyist errors. Just as the earliest New Testament scripture (incomplete) is from 170 years after Christ, the earliest Daodejing manuscript (incomplete) is from 100-200 years after the death of Laozi.

The reason that the originals were lost probably has a lot to do with the first Qin Emperor. Upon taking power and unifying China, he ordered the burning and destruction of all books (scrolls/rolls) except those pertaining to Chinese medicine and a few other subjects. The surviving Daodejing manuscripts were either hidden on purpose or simply forgotten about. Some were not unearthed until as late as 1993.

We compared a lot of research by various archeologists and historians before deciding on this as the most accurate and correct version. But one must allow that it may not be perfect, or the actual and original as from the hand of Laozi himself.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

Except from Chapter 67
China yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Wall Scroll

一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先 is an except from the 67th Chapter of Lao Tzu's (Lao Zi's) Te-Tao Ching (Dao De Jing). 一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先 is the part where the three treasures are discussed. In English, we'd say these three treasures are compassion, frugality, and humility. Some may translate these as love, moderation, and lack of arrogance. I have also seen them translated as benevolence, modesty, and "Not presuming to be at the forefront in the world." You can mix them up the way you want, as translation is not really a science but rather an art.

I should also explain that the first two treasures are single-character ideas, yet the third treasure was written out in six characters (there are also some auxiliary characters to number the treasures).

If Lao Tzu's words are important to you, then a wall scroll with this passage might make a great addition to your home.

Dark Sister

China hēi àn nǚ
Japan koku an nyo
Dark Sister Wall Scroll

This Buddhist title means "dark sister," "dark one," or "dark woman."

There are two sisters:
One is the deva, 功德女 ("merit" or "achieving"), who causes people to acquire wealth.
The other is the "dark one," 黑闇女, who causes people to spend and waste.

These sisters always accompany each other.

The farts of others stink, but one’s own smells sweet

China bié rén pì chòu zì jiā xiāng
The farts of others stink, but one’s own smells sweet Wall Scroll

This literally translates as:
Other people's flatulence stinks, [but] one's own is fragrant.

Figuratively, this means:
Some people criticize as defects in others what they (seem to) treasure in themselves.

A Bright Future

Incredible 10,000-Mile Flight of the Peng
China péng chéng wàn lǐ
A Bright Future Wall Scroll

鵬程萬里 / 鵬程萬裡 is an ancient Chinese proverb used in modern times to wish someone a long and successful career.

It's really about the 10,000 Flight of the Peng (Peng, also known as Roc is a mythical fish that can turn into a bird and take flight).


庄子 - Zhuangzi

Breaking down each character:
1. Peng or Roc (a kind of bird).
2. Journey (in this case, a flight).
3. 10,000 (Ten Thousand).
4. Li is a unit of distance often referred to as a "Chinese Mile," though the real distance is about half a kilometer.

Direct Translation: "Peng's Journey [of] 10,000 Li."
Literal meaning: "The 10,000-Li Flying Range Of The Roc."
Perceived meaning: "To have a bright future" or "To go far."

This proverb/idiom comes from the book of Zhuangzi. It tells the tale of a huge fish which could turn into a gigantic bird. This bird was called "peng" and was many miles long. This legendary size allowed the Peng to fly from the Northern Sea to the Southern Sea in a single bound.

Wishing someone "a Peng's Journey of 10,000 Li," will imply that they will be able to travel far without stopping, and will have great success, a long career, and a prosperous future.

Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs

Japan ei ko sei sui
Rise and Fall / Ups and Downs Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb can be translated as, "flourish and wither, prosper and perish," "life is full of fortune and misfortune," or simply "vicissitudes of life."

栄枯盛衰 / 榮枯盛衰 is about the rise and fall of human affairs, or the ups and downs of life. Prosperity comes and goes, everything is fleeting and temporary but like waves, another swell of prosperity may come.

Here's how the Kanji break down in this proverb:
栄 = prosper. thrive. flourish. boom.
枯 = wither. die.
盛 = prosperous. flourishing. thriving. successful. active. energetic. vigorous. lively. enthusiastic. popular.
衰 = become weaker. decline. get weak. die down. subside. abate. fail.

榮The original version of the first character looks like the image to the right. In modern Japan, they simplified that Kanji a bit into the version shown above. If you have a preference for which style is used for your calligraphy, please let me know when you place your order.

Apparently, with that original version of the first character, this is also used in Korean Hanja. However, I have not confirmed that it's used in the same way or is widely-known in Korean. Korean pronunciation is shown above for reference only.

Good Luck / Good Fortune

Japan fuku
Good Luck / Good Fortune Wall Scroll

This Character is pronounced "fu" in Chinese.

The character "fu" is posted by virtually all Chinese people on the doors of their homes during the Spring Festival (closely associated with the Chinese New Years).

One tradition from the Zhou Dynasty (beginning in 256 B.C.) holds that putting a fu symbol on your front door will keep the goddess of poverty away.

This character literally means good fortune, prosperity, blessed, happiness, and fulfillment.

See Also:  Lucky


The Chinese Concept of Relationship and Exchange of Favors
China guān xì
Japan kankei
Guanxi Wall Scroll

The dictionary definition is:
relations / relationship / to concern / to affect / to have to do with / connection.

But there's more to it...

In China, your relationship that you have with certain people can open doors for you. Having guanxi with someone also means they would never defraud you but instead are honor-bound to treat you fairly (of course, this goes both ways). Sometimes it is suggested that guanxi is the exchange of favors. I would say this is more having a relationship that allows you to ask for, and expect favors without shame.

There is no concept in western culture that exactly matches guanxi but perhaps having a social or professional network is similar.

Note that there are some variations common within Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja for this word...

関Japanese tend to use a Chinese alternate form as shown to the right for
the first character.

關There's also another alternate form of that first character (currently used as the official Simplified form in mainland China) which looks like the character shown to the right. It's basically the central radical of the alternate version shown above but without the "door radical" around it. In more free-flowing calligraphy styles, this version would be the likely choice for a calligrapher.

係In Modern Japanese, they use the character shown to the right.
They also tend to use this same form in Korean Hanja (I've only checked this word in my Korean dictionary but it has not been confirmed by a translator's review).

系If that was not confusing enough, there is another alternate form of that second character. See right.

An Asian calligrapher of any nationality may use any of these forms at their discretion. However, They would tend to stick to the most common form used in their respective languages.

If you have any preference on any of these issues, please give us a special note with your order, and we'll make sure it's done the way you want.

Gung Ho

Working Together
China gōng hé
Japan guai
Gung Ho Wall Scroll

工合 is one of those Asian words that is used more in English than it is in the original Chinese.

Gung Ho was originally used to speak of Carlson's Raiders, a group of "Gung Ho" U.S. Marines who went on an island-hopping campaign of death during WWII.

A movie called Gung Ho came out in the mid-1940s and was later re-released in the 1950s depicting the 2nd Marine Raider Battalion, and brought this word to the mainstream.

It is still sometimes used today within the U.S. Marine Corps brotherhood to refer to a unit or group that works well together, or is otherwise efficient and motivated (has good moral).

In 1986, there was a movie called Gung Ho, about a Japanese company taking over an American automotive factory. They completely ignored the fact that this was a Chinese title.

It should be noted that this title actually means a condition, state, manner, or health of something in Japanese.

Language and pronunciation notes:
Like many Asian words absorbed into common use in English, this one is drastically mispronounced. The official Romanization is "gong he" but that doesn't tell you enough. The vowel sound on the first character is like the English word "own," now just add the g-sounds to the beginning and end. The second character is misleading, as you might think it is like the English word "he." In reality, the vowel sound is more like the "u" in "up."

It should also be noted, that the current generation in China no longer uses, or recognizes this as a common word or slogan.

Note: This can be pronounced and is a word in Japanese, though seldom used. Japanese will use a variation of "具合" instead. But still, not common.

Happiness / Contentment

China mǎn zú
Japan man zoku
Happiness / Contentment Wall Scroll

滿足 / 満足 is the kind of happiness that involves being satisfied and content.

This can also suggest the actions of "to satisfy," "to meet the needs of."

Other single-word definitions include: satisfaction; contentment; sufficient; enough; adequate; full; complete.

満In Japanese, the Kanji for this word is an alternate Chinese form. You can see and select this version at the right (recommended only if your audience is specifically Japanese).

See Also:  Satisfaction | Contentment | Pleasure | Well-Being

Glory and Honor

China róng
Japan ei
Glory and Honor Wall Scroll

This character relates to giving someone a tribute or praise. It's a little odd as a gift, so this may not be the best selection for a wall scroll.

I've made this entry just because this character is often misused as "honorable" or "keeping your honor." It's not quite the same meaning, as this usually refers to a tribute or giving an honor to someone.

榮 is often found in tattoo books incorrectly listed as the western idea of personal honor or being honorable. Check with us before you get a tattoo that does not match the meaning you are really looking for. As a tattoo, this suggests that you either have a lot of pride in yourself or that you have a wish for prosperity for you and/or your family.

栄In modern Japanese Kanji, glory and honor looks like the image to the right.

There is a lot of confusion about this character, so here are some alternate translations for this character: prosperous, flourishing, blooming (like a flower), glorious beauty, proud, praise, rich, or it can be the family name "Rong." The context in which the character is used can change the meaning between these various ideas.

In the old days, this could be an honor paid to someone by the Emperor (basically a designation by the Emperor that a person has high standing).

To sum it up: This character has a positive meaning, however, it's a different flavor than the idea of being honorable and having integrity.

Hua Mulan

China huā mù lán
Hua Mulan Wall Scroll

花木蘭 is the name of the famous Chinese woman warrior Hua Mulan.

She was made famous in the west by Disney's animated movie, "Mulan."

Most of the historical information about her comes from an ancient poem. It starts with a concerned Mulan, as she is told a man from each family is to serve conscription in the army. Her father is too old, and her brother is too young. Mulan decides to take the place of her father. After twelve years of war, the army returns and the best warriors are awarded great posts in the government and riches. Mulan turns down all offers, and asks only for a good horse for the long trip home. When Mulan greets visiting comrades wearing her old clothes, they are shocked to find the warrior they rode into battle with for years was actually a woman.

I am Enough

China jǐ zú yǐ
I am Enough Wall Scroll

己足以 is a profound and philosophical way to say "I am enough" in Chinese.

The first character means self or oneself.

The last two characters are a word that means sufficient or enough.

Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine

China jīng qì shén
Three Treasures of Chinese Medicine Wall Scroll

These are the characters jing, qi, and shen.

As a set, these three characters are known in English as the treasures of traditional Chinese medicine, the treasures of Qi Gong, or the three treasures of Taoism / Daoism.

Sometimes this set is titled as 三寶 (sānbǎo) or "three treasures" but here, we're writing each treasure out.

Here's how these characters are perceived in this context...
Jing: nutritive essence; refined; perfected; pure
Qi: vitality; energy; force; breath; vigor
Shen: spirit; soul; mind; being

To keep it simple, you can use, "essence, vitality and spirit," to define these.

Mutual Welfare and Benefit

Japan ji ta kyou ei
Mutual Welfare and Benefit Wall Scroll

自他共榮 can be translated a few different ways. Here are some possibilities:
Benefit mutually and prosper together.
Mutual welfare and benefit.
A learning concept of mutual benefit and welfare (that applies to all fields of society).
Mutual prosperity.

The first two characters are easy to explain. They are "self" and "others." Together, these two characters create a word which means "mutual" (literally "me and them").

The third character can have different meanings depending on context. Here, it means "in common" or "to share."

The fourth character suggests the idea of "prosperity," "flourishing" or becoming "glorious."

It should be noted that these Kanji are used almost exclusively in the context of Judo martial arts. 自他共榮 is not a common or recognized Japanese proverb outside of Judo.

In modern Japanese Kanji, the last character looks like 栄 instead of 榮. If you want this slightly-simplified version, please let us know when you place your order.

Safety and Well-Being of the Family

Kanai Anzen
Japan ka nai an zen
Safety and Well-Being of the Family Wall Scroll

家內安全 is kind of the Japanese way of saying, "Family First." It's really a Japanese proverb about the safety and well-being of your family, and/or, peace and prosperity in the household.

Some Japanese will hang an amulet in their home with these Kanji on it. The purpose being to keep your family safe from harm.

According to Shinto followers, hanging this in your home is seen as an invocation to God to always keep members of the family free from harm.

We were actually looking for a way to say "family first" in Japanese when this proverb came up in the conversation and research. While it doesn't literally say "family first," it shows that the safety and well-being of your family is your first or most important priority. So, this proverb is the most natural way to express the idea that you put your family first.

See Also:  Peace and Prosperity

Kindness and Forgiving Nature

China rén shù
Japan jinjo
Kindness and Forgiving Nature Wall Scroll

These two characters create a word in Chinese and Japanese that means something like benevolence with magnanimity or kindness with a forgiving nature.

If this describes you, then you are the type of person that I would like to call my friend.

This may not be the most common word in daily use but it's old enough that it transcended cultures from China to Japan in the 5th century when Japan lacked a written language, and absorbed Chinese characters and words into their language.
Note: 仁恕 is not commonly used in Korean.

Kowtow - The deepest bow

China kòu tóu
Japan koutou
Kowtow - The deepest bow Wall Scroll

叩頭 is the term that seems to be known worldwide as kowtow. In Japanese and Chinese, it simply means a deep bow, especially one so low that one's head touches the ground in submission. However, in western culture, it has sometimes come to mean "giving in" or "surrendering to someone else's will." Sometimes even said of a person who stoops to flattery at the expense of their own dignity.

I don't know if you would really want this on a wall scroll but enough people have searched for this term on our website, that I guess it was time to add it. It just feels strange to see such a word on a wall scroll, so please order with caution. This word is antiquated in both Japanese and Chinese. The act is seldom done anymore, and seen as an ancient ritual of sorts.

Live Together and Help Each Other

Japan kyou son kyou ei
Live Together and Help Each Other Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "live together and help each other," "existing together, thriving together," or "co-existence and co-prosperity."

Large River

China jiāng
Japan kou
Large River Wall Scroll

江 means large river in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. This generally refers to a river big enough that it's navigable by cargo boats, passenger boats, or small ships.

In Japanese, this can be a surname when pronounced as Minkou or just Kou.

Learn from Wisdom

(When you see a wise person, try to be like them)
China jiàn xián sī qí
Learn from Wisdom Wall Scroll

When you meet a wise person, you should learn from them and be inspired to become as wise as they are.

見賢思齊 is a pretty long proverb in English but in Chinese it's only four characters.
However, in Chinese the deeper meaning often surpass the dictionary definition of each character.

In this case, you should seek wise people to learn from throughout your life...
Always try to learn enough to become equal to them. It also suggests that the process of learning and seeking wisdom is a non-ending cycle.

See Also:  Knowledge

A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

China xìng fú chéng gōng de yì shēng
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity Wall Scroll

幸福成功的一生 means, "A life of happiness and prosperity" or "A life of happiness and success." It's a great and very positive and inspirational wall scroll selection.

See Also:  Prosperity

A Life of Happiness and Prosperity

Japan kou fuku to ha nei no jin sei
A Life of Happiness and Prosperity Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "A life of happiness and prosperity" or "A life of happiness and success."

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Prosperity


China cí shī
Lioness Wall Scroll

雌獅 is how to write "lioness" in Chinese.

Note: 雌獅 is not a very common title for a wall scroll in China. Perhaps because lions are not indigenous to China. Though oddly enough, rarity of lions made them very prized - and lion dances are a popular festival attraction.
If you do see name of this species of animal written on a wall scroll, it's more likely to be the masculine form of "lion."

Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red,
Gold Turns a Heart Black

China bái jiǔ hóng rén miàn huáng jīn hēi shì xīn
Just as Liquor Turns a Face Red, / Gold Turns a Heart Black Wall Scroll

Literally this says: [Just as] white liquor makes people's faces turn red, [So] yellow gold makes people's hearts turn black.

白酒紅人面黃金黑世心 is a warning about the nature of greed. The suggestion is that one who lusts for gold and riches, will eventually have a black heart (or become a heartless greedy bastard). As a wall scroll, this is a reminder and warning to keep yourself from following the greedy path.

Live for What You Love

Japan jin sei ou ka
Live for What You Love Wall Scroll

人生謳歌 means, "live for what you love" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean "human life" or simply "living." The last two characters mean, "merit," "prosperity," or "what you enjoy." This phrase can suggest working or staying busy for your own goals (in your career).

See Also:  Prosperity

Live in Prosperity

China shēng huó yú fán róng zhōng
Live in Prosperity Wall Scroll

生活于繁榮中 means, "live in prosperity." It's kind of a suggestion to be prosperity the center of your world.

生活于繁榮中 is the way some people want to live (and you should always live for what you love). However, this phrase does not suggest a peaceful life - rather one that is always busy. It's not for everyone but it might be for you.

See Also:  Prosperity

Longevity / Long Life Wishes

Japan nan zan no jyu
Longevity / Long Life Wishes Wall Scroll

南山之壽 is a wish for long life for someone. The first part of this Japanese phrase is, "Nan Zan," which literally means "south mountain." This mountain is one of good wishes, good fortune, and prosperity. The title is often used as a salutation of good wishes.

The third Kanji is just a connector, and the last Kanji means long life or longevity.

I guess you could translate this phrase as "May your life be as long as Nan Zan is tall."

Love and Protect

China ài hù
Japan ai go
Love and Protect Wall Scroll

愛護 is the Chinese and Japanese Kanji for: to cherish, to treasure, to take care of, to love and protect, provide loving protection, or tender care.

Energy Sword Body in Concert

Spirit, Sword & Body as One
Japan ki ken tai icchi
Energy Sword Body in Concert Wall Scroll

This often gets translated as "Mind Sword Body," or "Spirit, Sword and Body as One." But I think these translations don't tell you enough about what this is really saying.

In this context, 気, which is the modern Japanese version of 氣, means spiritual and unseen energy or "life energy." In some cases, 気 can be translated as spirit, feeling, or nature. If defined as mind, it's more about invisible or intangible part of one's mind (or soul).

剣 is the Japanese version of 劍 meaning sword.

体 is the modern Japanese version of 體 meaning body.

The Kanji 一 means one, and in this case suggests "all in one." The Kanji 到 means to send, deliver, or convey. But together, 一到 suggests all these things in agreement, union cooperation, or in concert.

Mind Your Own Business

Japan yokei na osewa
Mind Your Own Business Wall Scroll

This suggests that you not give unwanted help or advice to someone.

The Japanese characters break down this way:
余計 (yokei) too much, unnecessary, extraneous, abundance, surplus, excess, superfluity.
な (na) connecting article. お世話 (osewa) help, aid, assistance.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


Japan tattoi
Precious Wall Scroll

This Japanese word means precious, valuable, priceless, noble, exalted, or sacred.

Precious / Treasure

Japan ki chou hin
Precious / Treasure Wall Scroll

貴重品 means precious or treasured as an adjective or as a noun, valuables or treasures in Japanese.

This word exists in the Korean dictionary but is rarely if ever used in Korea.


China fán róng
Japan han ei
Prosperity Wall Scroll

繁榮 means "prosperous," "flourishing," or "thriving" when used in regards to a person.

However, when used in reference to a whole country, it can mean "booming economy."

繁榮 is the traditional Chinese, ancient Japanese Kanji, and ancient Korean Hanja version of prosperity.

栄 Note: If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, the second character may look more like the Kanji shown to the right. If you want a different form, please note that in the special instructions for your order.

Realize Your Ambitions
Ride on the Crest of Success

China dà jiǎn hóng tú
Realize Your Ambitions / Ride on the Crest of Success Wall Scroll

This four-character proverb is used in Chinese to mean "realize your ambitions" or "exhibit your ambition and success." It's used to talk about someone with great career ambitions. Almost literally, it expresses the idea of someone unfolding a great career like a map or a set of blueprint plans.

Very literally translated, these four characters mean, "Great unfolding of a huge map" or "Great exhibition of an colossal plan."

Prosperity and Happiness

China fù lè
Japan furaku
Prosperity and Happiness Wall Scroll

富樂 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for a title meaning prosperity and happiness.

If you have a desire to live in prosperity and happiness, this is for you.

Note: This title is often used in a Buddhist context.


China fán róng
Japan hanei
Prosperity Wall Scroll

繁栄 is the same "prosperity" as our traditional Chinese version, except for a slight change in the way the second character is written (it's the Japanese Kanji deviation from the original/ancient Chinese form). Chinese people will still be able to read this, though you should consider this to be the Japanese form (better if your audience is Japanese).


Sometimes the Kanji form shown to the right is used in Japanese. It will depend on the mood of the calligrapher, as to which form you may receive. If you have a preference, please let us know at the time of your order.


(also means salary)
Japan fuchi
Prosperity Wall Scroll

This character is occasionally used in China to mean prosperity or good fortune.
This character once meant the "official's salary" in old feudal China and Korea (obviously, the officials lived well, so you can imagine how this was associated with the idea of being prosperous).

祿 is only used in Korean historical documents for "salary." In old Japanese, this means fief, allowance, stipend, reward, pension, grant and sometimes happiness depending on context. It's very obscure in modern Japanese.

We have other entries that are better-suited for a prosperity wall scroll. This entry just addresses "the coffee cup issue" where this character has been used on coffee cups and tee-shirts. However, without context, the meaning is ambiguous to some.

Prosperous Business

China xīng lóng
Japan kou ryuu
Prosperous Business Wall Scroll

This kind of prosperity applies to a business. Something great to hang behind your desk if you are a small or large business owner. Doing so says that you either are a successful business, or you wish success and prosperity for your business.

Can also be translated as thriving, flourishing, brisk business, and other words related to prosperity in business.

A good meaning in China but a little antiquated in Japanese.

See Also:  Prosperity

Red Envelope

China hóng bāo
Red Envelope Wall Scroll

This literally means, "red treasure."

Depending on context, it can also mean, "money wrapped in red as a gift," "a bonus payment," "a kickback," or "a bribe."

However, most of the time, this is an innocent gift of money in a red envelope that is given from an elder relative to a youngster. This usually happens during Chinese New Years. It can also happen in preparation for, or during a wedding in China.

紅包 is called a "Hong Bao" in Chinese. Filipino Chinese call it an "Ang Pao." There are a few other variations.


China xī dá duō
Japan shiddatta / shiddaruta
Siddhartha Wall Scroll

悉達多 is the name Siddhartha (as in Siddhartha Gautama), the personal name for Śākyamuni.

This same Buddha is also known as "Shakyamuni Gautama," "Gotama Buddha," or "Tathagata."

Siddhartha Gautama was a spiritual teacher in the northern region of the Indian subcontinent who founded Buddhism. He is generally seen by Buddhists as the Supreme Buddha (Sammāsambuddha) of known human history.

The actual meaning of this name in Chinese is the realization of all aims, or simply being prosperous.

This name is sometimes romanized from the original Sanskrit or Pali as Siddhattha (from Siddhattha Gotama), Siddharth, Siddhārtha, or Sarvāthasiddha.

Siddhārtha or Sarvāthasiddha can also be written as 悉達, 悉多, 悉多頞他, or 悉陀.


China xīng
Japan hoshi
Star Wall Scroll

星 is how "star" is written in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

Thousands of years ago, when this character was first developed, there was belief that you could see remnants of stars in everything. In fact, some early Chinese men of science suggested that all living things came from "stardust" or cosmic debris. This could explain why the upper portion of this character mans "sun" (a star itself) and the lower portion means "birth" or "life."

Oddly enough, modern-day scientists suggest that we are all made up of cosmic dust. Seems they were getting it right in China at a time when the western world thought the Earth was flat and the Church was claiming that the sun and all cosmic bodies revolved around the Earth.


China chéng gōng
Japan seikou
Success Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese word for "success" is often used to refer to "career success" but is also used for other successes in life.

It matches the western dictionary definition of "The achievement of something desired, planned, or attempted." And it's also used it this old Chinese proverb: Failure is the Mother of Success which means Failure is the Mother of Success.

Sometimes this word is translated as prosperity but success, succeed, or successfully are more correct definitions.

See Also:  Prosperity


China shòu sī
Japan su shi
Sushi Wall Scroll

Got a sushi restaurant and need an appropriate wall scroll? Or maybe you love sushi enough to have it on your wall. This sushi calligraphy scroll is for you.

Note that the written characters for sushi are exactly the same in both Chinese and Japanese. However, the first character is actually a modern Japanese / Simplified Chinese so in some cases it will be written differently in Taiwan, Hong Kong and some older Japanese sushi restaurants.

Time is more valuable than Jade

China bù guì chǐ zhī bì ér zhòng cùn zhī yīn
Time is more valuable than Jade Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Treasure not a foot long [piece of] jade, [rather] treasure an inch of time.

Figuratively, this suggests that time is the most important/valuable thing in life.


China zhēn bǎo
Japan chin hou
Treasure Wall Scroll

In Chinese this word meaning treasure, something you value highly, or something very precious to you.

In Japanese, this has a meaning like "rare treasure."

The first character can mean precious thing or treasure. The second character can mean a jewel or gem, a treasure or simply precious. Together these two characters reinforce each other into a word that clearly means treasure.


China bǎo
Japan takara
Treasure Wall Scroll

This character means precious thing or treasure. This can also mean precious, a gem, a pearl, or anything valuable.

宝The version of this character shown to the left is the traditional Chinese and ancient/traditional Japanese version. In modern Japan and China, this character has been simplified. This simplified version is shown to the right. If you want this modern Japanese/simplified version, just click the Kanji on the right, instead of the button above. If your audience is Chinese or Korean, I recommend the ancient/traditional form. Only consider the simplified form if your audience is younger Japanese people.


China cái bǎo
Japan zaihou
Treasure Wall Scroll

財寶 is the Japanese word meaning "treasure" or "money and valuables."

The first character means "property," "money," "wealth" or "assets." The second character means "treasure," "wealth" or "valuables" in Japanese. Together these two characters reinforce each other into a word that clearly means treasure in Japanese.

財寶 is also a word meaning "money and valuables" in Chinese but more of a daily use word - not as appropriate for a wall scroll if your audience is Chinese.

宝The second character shown to the left is the ancient/traditional Japanese version. In modern Japan, this character has been simplified. This simplified version is shown to the right. If you want this modern Japanese/simplified version, just click the Kanji on the right, instead of the button above.


Style of Karate or Jujitsu
Japan wa dou ryuu
Wado-Ryu Wall Scroll

Wado-Ryu is a style of Karate or Jujutsu (Jujitsu).
Note: Many will argue as to whether this is a style of Karate or Jujutsu.

While some find Wado-Ryu similar to Shotokan Karate, enough differences exist in perspective and technique that it stands by itself.

Breaking down the characters into the proper Japanese Romaji, you have "wa dou ryuu" or "wa dō ryū." The meaning is roughly-translated as "Harmony Way Style" or "Peace Method Style." The first Kanji should probably be read as harmony, rather than peace in this case.

See Also:  Wado-Kai


China wǔ shì
Japan bu shi
Warrior Wall Scroll

The first character is the spirit or essence of a warrior. The second character means soldier, officer, or official. This character is also used appropriately enough to describe a piece of a chess game. This can also be translated as soldier, cavalier, palace guard, or samurai and sometimes as knight. I've occasionally seen this translated as strong man or tough man (gender not necessarily implied).

By far, this is the most common way to write warrior in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Note: In Japanese, this is Bushi, as in Bushido.

See Also:  Knight | Army | Marines | Samurai

Worldwide Wish for Peace and Prosperity

China qǐ shèng shì kāi tài píng
Worldwide Wish for Peace and Prosperity Wall Scroll

啟盛世開太平 means "To bring flourishing peace and security to the world (our current era)."

It's really a wish that a new door leading to peace and prosperity could be opened to mankind.

Character and word breakdown:
啟 to open; to start; to initiate; to enlighten or awaken.
盛世 a flourishing period; period of prosperity; a golden age.
開 to open; to start; to turn on.
太平 peace and security; peace and tranquility; peace; tranquility.
I don't really like to do breakdowns like this, as the words altogether create their own unique meaning (encompassed in the main title above). Please take that into consideration.

Boar / Pig

Year of the Pig / Zodiac Sign
China zhū
Japan inoshishi
Boar / Pig Wall Scroll

豬 is the character for boar, pig, or swine in Chinese and old Korean.

If you were born in the year of the boar / year of the pig, you...

Are optimistic.
Have good luck with wealth and money.
Are honest, generous, and warm-hearted.

猪The character shown to the right is the Japanese Kanji for "wild boar."
It's an alternate/simplified form of pig/boar in Chinese (can be read by both Chinese and Japanese people). Click on that character instead of the button above if you want this version.

See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Live Free or Die

Give me liberty or give me death
China bú zì yóu wú nìng sǐ
Live Free or Die Wall Scroll

不自由毋寧死 means, "Give me liberty or give me death," in Chinese.

不自由毋寧死 is also the best way to say, "Live free or die."

The characters break down this way:
不 = Not; none; without.
自由 = Freedom; liberty; freewill; self-determination.
毋寧 = Rather; would rather; rather be.
死 = Dead; death.

This will go nicely next to your, "Don't tread on me," flag. This phrase is known well enough in China that it's listed in a few dictionaries. Though I doubt you will find too many Chinese citizens willing to yell this on the steps of the capital in Beijing.

See Also:  Death Before Dishonor

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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
金錢 / 金銭
kin sen / kinsenjīn qián / jin1 qian2 / jin qian / jinqian chin ch`ien / chinchien / chin chien
tomifù / fu4 / fu
cái fù / cai2 fu4 / cai fu / caifu ts`ai fu / tsaifu / tsai fu
Five Red Bats 紅五蝠
hóng wǔ fú
hong2 wu3 fu2
hong wu fu
hung wu fu
Year-In Year-Out Have Abundance 年年有餘
nián nián yǒu yú
nian2 nian2 you3 yu2
nian nian you yu
nien nien yu yü
富裕fu yuu / fuyuu / fu yu / fuyufù yù / fu4 yu4 / fu yu / fuyu fu yü / fuyü
Abundance and Prosperity 繁榮富裕
hanei yuuhuku
hanei yuhuku
fán róng fù yù
fan2 rong2 fu4 yu4
fan rong fu yu
fan jung fu yü
Baby 寶寶
bǎo bao / bao3 bao / bao bao / baobao pao pao / paopao
Beautiful Life
Life in Perfect Harmony
和美wa mi / wamihé měi / he2 mei3 / he mei / hemei ho mei / homei
Better to be Happy than Rich 安貧樂道
ān pín lè dào
an1 pin2 le4 dao4
an pin le dao
an p`in le tao
an pin le tao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.