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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Easy-Going"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Easy-Going
  2. Relax / Take it Easy
  3. Forgiveness
  4. Carry On, Undaunted
  5. Rage / Frenzy / Berserk
  6. Wu Wei / Without Action
  7. Pleasant Journey
  8. Swim / Swimming
  9. Monkey
10. Sunshine
11. Will-Power / Self-Control
12. God Give Me Strength
13. Warrior Saint / Saint of War
14. Crystal
15. Motivation
16. Retro / Old School
17. Perseverance
18. Eternal Energy / Eternal Matter
19. Walk in the Way
20. God Is With You Always
21. A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One
22. Mutual Welfare and Benefit
23. Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo
24. Shidai / Sida / Mahabhuta
25. Guan Gong / Warrior Saint
26. Loyalty
27. Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision
28. Homosexual Male / Gay Male
29. Life Energy / Spiritual Energy
30. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100


Easy-Going

China xiāo
Japan shou
Easy-Going Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means leisurely or easy-going.

In some context it can mean to roam or saunter.


This can be pronounced as "shou" in Japanese but rarely seen as a single Kanji in Japan. This is better if your target audience is Chinese.

Relax / Take it Easy

Japan ki o raku ni su ru
Relax / Take it Easy Wall Scroll

気を楽にする is a Japanese word that means "relax" or "take it easy."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Forgiveness (from the top down)

China róng shè
Japan you sha
Forgiveness (from the top down) Wall Scroll

容赦 is the kind of forgiveness that a king might give to his subjects for crimes or wrong-doings.

容赦 is a rather high-level forgiveness. Meaning that it goes from a higher level to lower (not the reverse).

Alone, the first character can mean "to bear," "to allow" and/or "to tolerate," and the second can mean "to forgive," "to pardon" and/or "to excuse."

When you put both characters together, you get forgiveness, pardon, mercy, leniency, or going easy (on someone).


See Also:  Benevolence

Carry On, Undaunted

China qián fù hòu jì
Carry On, Undaunted Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb figuratively means, "to advance dauntlessly in wave upon wave."

It suggests that you should or can carry on, and have the strength to keep going.

While this proverb is a little bit militaristic, it suggests that in spite of a fallen comrade (or perhaps a loved one), you should keep going and work towards the goal they intended.

Rage / Frenzy / Berserk

China kuáng bào
Japan kyou bou
Rage / Frenzy / Berserk Wall Scroll

狂暴 is rage or the idea of going berserk in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Wu Wei / Without Action

Daoist / Taoist Tenet
China wú wéi
Japan mui
Wu Wei / Without Action Wall Scroll

Wu Wei is a Daoist (Taoist) tenet, that speaks to the idea of letting nature take its course.

Some will say it's about knowing when to take action and when not to. In reality, it's more about not going against the flow. What is going to happen is controlled by the Dao (Tao), for which one who follows the Dao will not resist or struggle against.

There is a lot more to this concept but chances are, if you are looking for this entry, you already know the expanded concept.

Warning: Outside of Daoist context, this means idleness or inactivity (especially in Japanese where very few know this as a Daoist concept).

Pleasant Journey

China yī lù shùn fēng
Japan ichirojunpuu
Pleasant Journey Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese proverb means, "to have a pleasant journey," "sailing with the wind at your back," or as an expression to say, "everything is going well."

Swim / Swimming

China yóu yǒng
Japan yuuei / yue
Swim / Swimming Wall Scroll

游泳 is the Chinese and Japanese Kanji for swimming, or swim. This can be the act of, or the sport of swimming.

In certain context, this could mean bathing. Further, like the old phrase, "it's going swimmingly." this word can refer to the "conduct of life."

Monkey

Year of the Monkey / Zodiac Sign
China hóu
Monkey Wall Scroll

猴 is the character for monkey in Chinese.
猴 means ape in Japanese due to a error made long ago as Japan absorbed Chinese characters.

If you were born in the year of the monkey, you . . .


Are smart, brave, active and competitive.
Like new things.
Have a good memory.
Are quick to respond
Have an easy time winning people's trust.
Are however, not very patient.


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Note: This character does have the meaning of monkey in Korean Hanja but is not used very often.

Sunshine

China yáng guāng
Japan you kou
Sunshine Wall Scroll

陽光 is the Chinese word for sunshine.

陽光 is a more emotional word compared to another Asian word that means "sunlight." If you were going to sing a song, or write a poem, this is the word you would use.


Note: This is a rarely-used word in Korean or Japanese.

Will-Power / Self-Control

China yì zhì lì
Japan ishi ryoku
Will-Power / Self-Control Wall Scroll

意志力 is the form of will power or self-control is about having the determination or tenacity to keep going.

In Japanese, this is the power of will, strength of will, volition, intention, intent, or determination.

God Give Me Strength

China yuàn shàng dì gěi wǒ lì liàng
God Give Me Strength Wall Scroll

願上帝給我力量 is a wish or a prayer that you might call out at a desperate time.

Translated by us for a military serviceman in Iraq - obviously, he may have a need to use this phrase often, though I am not sure where he's going to find a place to hang a wall scroll.

Warrior Saint / Saint of War

China wǔ shèng
Warrior Saint / Saint of War Wall Scroll

This Chinese title, Wusheng means, Saint of War.

武聖 is usually a reference to Guan Yu (關羽), also known as Guan Gong (關公).

Some Chinese soldiers still pray to Wusheng for protection. They would especially do this before going into battle.

Crystal

…or Krystal
China kè lǐ sī tuō
Crystal Wall Scroll

克裡斯托 is a common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the names Crystal or Krystal.

Consider also going with the meaning of crystal. The characters shown to the left sound like crystal in Mandarin but do not mean crystal (of course, the word for crystal in Chinese does not sound at all like the English word crystal).

Motivation

China dòng lì
Japan douryoku
Motivation Wall Scroll

This word can be used for motivation - it can also mean power / motion / propulsion / force. It can be anything internal or external that keeps you going.

動力 is the safest way to express motivation in Chinese. If your audience is Japanese, please see the other entry for motivation. 動力 is a word in Japanese and Korean but it means "motive power" or "kinetic energy" (without the motivation meaning that you are probably looking for).


See Also:  Enthusiasm | Passion

Retro / Old School

China fù gǔ
Japan fukko
Retro / Old School Wall Scroll

The meaning of this title can vary depending on context. It used to just mean a return to the old ways.

It can also mean, "to turn back the clock," "retro" (fashion style based on nostalgia, esp. for 1960s), "revival," or "restoration."

The return to "the old ways" was also an aspiration of Confucius about 2500 years ago. This proves that "going retro" or "old school" has been cool since at least 500 B.C.

Perseverance

China jiān rèn bù bá
Perseverance Wall Scroll

Perseverance is being steadfast and persistent. You commit to your goals and overcome obstacles, no matter how long it takes. When you persevere, you don't give up...you keep going. Like a strong ship in a storm, you don't become battered or blown off course. You just ride the waves.

The translation of this proverb literally means, "something so persistent or steadfast, that it is not uprootable / movable / surpassable."


See Also:  Tenacious | Devotion | Persistence | Indomitable

Eternal Energy / Eternal Matter

China bù lái bù qù
Japan furai fuko
Eternal Energy /  Eternal Matter Wall Scroll

不來不去 is a Buddhist term, originally anāgamana-nirgama from Sanskrit.

This implies that things are neither coming into nor going out of existence.

This can also mean, "all things are eternal," or others will call this the Buddhist concept of the eternal conservation of energy.

This theory predates Albert Einstein and Isaac Newton.

Note: 不來不去 is not a well-known word for both Buddhists and non-Buddhists, so not all will recognize it.

Walk in the Way

The Way of Buddha Truth
China xíng dào
Japan yukimichi
Walk in the Way Wall Scroll

In Taoist and Buddhist context, this means to "Walk in the Way." In Buddhism, that further means to follow the Buddha truth. In some Buddhist sects, this can mean to make a procession around a statue of the Buddha (always with the right shoulder towards the Buddha).

Outside of that context, this can mean route (when going somewhere), the way to get somewhere, etc.

In Japanese, this can be the surname or given name Yukimichi.

God Is With You Always

China shàn dì zǒng shì yǔ nǐ tóng zài
God Is With You Always Wall Scroll

I was going to write this phrase as "God is with me always" but as a wall scroll, hanging in your room, it is talking to you (you're not talking), so it works better with you.

上帝總是與你同在 is a nice phrase that any Chinese Christian would be happy to have on his/her wall.

If I annotate this, it sounds a little strange in English but it's perfectly natural in Chinese:
上帝 God | 总是 always | 与 and | 你 you | 同 together | 在 existing

A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

Japan sen ri mo ichi ri
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb states that, "A journey of a thousand miles feels like only one mile." It is understood that in the proverb, this applies when going to see the one you love.

Note that the "mile" or 里 used in this proverb is an old Chinese "li" (pronounced "ri" in Japanese). It's not actually a mile, as the measurement is really closer to 500 meters (it would take 3 of these to get close to a western mile). Still, 1000里 (333 miles) is a long way.

Mutual Welfare and Benefit

Jita-Kyoei
Japan ji ta kyou ei
Mutual Welfare and Benefit Wall Scroll

自他共榮 can be translated a few different ways. Here are some possibilities:
Benefit mutually and prosper together.
Mutual welfare and benefit.
A learning concept of mutual benefit and welfare (that applies to all fields of society).
Mutual prosperity.

The first two characters are easy to explain. They are "self" and "others." Together, these two characters create a word which means "mutual" (literally "me and them").

The third character can have different meanings depending on context. Here, it means "in common" or "to share."

The fourth character suggests the idea of "prosperity," "flourishing" or becoming "glorious."

It should be noted that these Kanji are used almost exclusively in the context of Judo martial arts. 自他共榮 is not a common or recognized Japanese proverb outside of Judo.


In modern Japanese Kanji, the last character looks like 栄 instead of 榮. If you want this slightly-simplified version, please let us know when you place your order.

Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo

Japan shi kin ha ra mitsu dai ko myo
Shikin Haramitsu Daikomyo Wall Scroll

These are the Japanese Kanji characters that romanize as "Shikin Haramitsu Daikōmyō."

詞韻波羅蜜大光明 is a complicated proverb. I'm actually going to forgo writing any translation information here. You can figure it out via Google search and at sites like Paramita and the Perfection of Wisdom or Fecastel.Wordpress.com::Shikin Haramitsu Daikōmyō

Shidai / Sida / Mahabhuta

China sì dà
Japan shi dai
Shidai / Sida / Mahabhuta Wall Scroll

In Buddhism, this is mahābhūta, the four elements of which all things are made: earth, water, fire, and wind.

This can also represent the four freedoms: speaking out freely, airing views fully, holding great debates, and writing big-character posters.

In some context, this can be a university or college offering four-year programs.

To others, this can represent the Tao, Heaven, Earth and King.

Going back to the Buddhist context, these four elements "earth, water, fire, and wind" represent 堅, 濕, 煖, 動, which is: solid, liquid, heat, and motion.

Guan Gong / Warrior Saint

China guān gōng
Guan Gong / Warrior Saint Wall Scroll

Guan Gong Warrior Saint

This Chinese title, Guan Gong means, Lord Guan (The warrior saint of ancient China).

While his real name was Guan Yu / 關羽, he is commonly known by this title of Guan Gong / 關公.

Some Chinese soldiers still pray to Guan Gong for protection. They would especially do this before going into battle. Statues of Guan Gong are seen throughout China.

Loyalty

China zhōng chéng
Japan chuu sei
Loyalty Wall Scroll

Loyalty is staying true to someone. It is standing up for something you believe in without wavering. It is being faithful to your family, country, school, friends or ideals, when the going gets tough as well as when things are good. With loyalty, you build relationships that last forever.

Notes:
1. This written form of loyalty is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

2. There is also a Japanese version that is part of the Bushido Code which may be more desirable depending on whether your intended audience is Japanese or Chinese.

3. This version of loyalty is sometimes translated as devotion, sincerity, fidelity, or allegiance.


See Also:  Honor | Trust | Integrity | Sincerity

Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision

Also means: honor loyalty morality righteousness
China
Japan gi
Justice / Rectitude / Right Decision Wall Scroll

義 is about doing the right thing or making the right decision, not because it's easy but because it's ethically and morally correct.

No matter the outcome or result, one does not lose face if tempering proper justice.

This character can also be defined as righteousness, justice, morality, honor, or "right conduct." In more a more expanded definition, it can mean loyalty to friends, loyalty to the public good, or patriotism. This idea of loyalty and friendship comes from the fact that you will treat those you are loyal to with morality and justice.

義 is also one of the five tenets of Confucius doctrine.

儀 There's also an alternate version of this character sometimes seen in Bushido or Korean Taekwondo tenets. It's just the addition of a radical on the left side of the character. If you want this version, click on the image to the right instead of the button above.


This is also a virtue of the Samurai Warrior
See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Judgment | Impartial | Confucius Tenets

Homosexual Male / Gay Male

China nán tóng xìng liàn
Homosexual Male / Gay Male Wall Scroll

You just need the male character in front of the word for homosexual in Chinese to create this word.

It's a much nicer way to say "Gay Male" than English words like Fag, Fairy, Sissy, Puff, Poof, Poofster, Swish or Pansy. Although I suppose it could be used as a substitute for Nancy Boy or Queen (for which last time I checked, my gay friends said were OK in the right context).

For those of you who think China is a restrictive society - there are at least two gay discos in Beijing, the capital of China. It's at least somewhat socially acceptable to be a gay male in China. However, lesbians seem to be shunned a bit.

I think the Chinese government has realized that the 60% male population means not everybody is going to find a wife (every gay male couple that exists means two more women in the population are available for the straight guys), and the fact that it is biologically impossible for men to give birth, may be seen as helping to decrease the over-population in China.

Life Energy / Spiritual Energy

Chi Energy: Essence of Life / Energy Flow
China
Japan ki
Life Energy / Spiritual Energy Wall Scroll

This energy flow is a fundamental concept of traditional Asian culture.

This character is romanized as "Qi" or "Chi" in Chinese, "Gi" in Korean, and "Ki" in Japanese.
Chi is believed to be part of everything that exists, as in “life force” or “spiritual energy”. It is most often translated as “energy flow,” or literally as “air” or “breath”. Some people will simply translate this as “spirit” but you have to take into consideration the kind of spirit we're talking about. I think this is weighted more toward energy than spirit.

米The character itself is a representation of steam (or breath) rising from rice. To clarify, the character for rice is shown to the right.

Steam was apparently seen as visual evidence of the release of "life energy" when this concept was first developed. The Qi / Chi / Ki character is still used in compound words to mean steam or vapor.

氣氣The etymology of this character is a bit complicated. It's suggested that the first form of this character from bronze script (about 2500 years ago) looked like one the symbols shown to the right.

氣However, it was easy to confuse this with the character for the number three. So the rice radical was added by 221 B.C. (the exact time of this change is debated). This first version with the rice radical is shown to the right.

The idea of Qi / Chi / Ki is really a philosophical concept. It's often used to refer to the “flow” of metaphysical energy that sustains living beings. Yet there is much debate that has continued for thousands of years as to whether Qi / Chi / Ki is pure energy, or consists partially, or fully of matter.

You can also see the character for Qi / Chi / Ki in common compound words such as Tai Chi / Tai Qi, Aikido, Reiki and Qi Gong / Chi Kung.

In the modern Japanese Kanji, the rice radical has been changed into two strokes that form an X.


気The original and traditional Chinese form is still understood in Japanese but we can also offer that modern Kanji form in our custom calligraphy. If you want this Japanese Kanji, please click on the character to the right, instead of the “Select and Customize” button above.

More language notes: This is pronounced like “chee” in Mandarin Chinese, and like “key” in Japanese.
This is also the same way to write this in Korean Hanja where it is Romanized as “gi” and pronounced like “gee” but with a real G-sound, not a J-sound.
Though Vietnamese no longer use Chinese characters in their daily language, this character is still widely known in Vietnam.


See Also:  Energy | Life Force | Vitality | Life | Birth | Soul

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black
China wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100 Wall Scroll

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, "I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty, and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?"

Mencius answered, "Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, "Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces."

Mencius then said, "You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people but you are so fond of war, that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there really any difference?"

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, "The pot calls the kettle black," or the Biblical phrase, "Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye."




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Easy-Going shou / shoxiāo / xiao1 / xiao hsiao
Relax
Take it Easy
気を楽にするki o raku ni su ru
kiorakunisuru
Forgiveness (from the top down) 容赦you sha / yousha / yo sha / yosharóng shè / rong2 she4 / rong she / rongshe jung she / jungshe
Carry On, Undaunted 前赴後繼
前赴后继
qián fù hòu jì
qian2 fu4 hou4 ji4
qian fu hou ji
qianfuhouji
ch`ien fu hou chi
chienfuhouchi
chien fu hou chi
Rage
Frenzy
Berserk
狂暴kyou bou / kyoubou / kyo bo / kyobokuáng bào
kuang2 bao4
kuang bao
kuangbao
k`uang pao
kuangpao
kuang pao
Wu Wei
Without Action
無為
无为
muiwú wéi / wu2 wei2 / wu wei / wuwei
Pleasant Journey 一路順風
一路顺风
ichirojunpuu
ichirojunpu
yī lù shùn fēng
yi1 lu4 shun4 feng1
yi lu shun feng
yilushunfeng
i lu shun feng
ilushunfeng
Swim
Swimming
游泳yuuei / yue
yuei / yue
yuei/yue
yóu yǒng / you2 yong3 / you yong / youyong yu yung / yuyung
Monkey hóu / hou2 / hou
Sunshine 陽光
阳光
you kou / youkou / yo ko / yokoyáng guāng
yang2 guang1
yang guang
yangguang
yang kuang
yangkuang
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Easy-Going Kanji, Easy-Going Characters, Easy-Going in Mandarin Chinese, Easy-Going Characters, Easy-Going in Chinese Writing, Easy-Going in Japanese Writing, Easy-Going in Asian Writing, Easy-Going Ideograms, Chinese Easy-Going symbols, Easy-Going Hieroglyphics, Easy-Going Glyphs, Easy-Going in Chinese Letters, Easy-Going Hanzi, Easy-Going in Japanese Kanji, Easy-Going Pictograms, Easy-Going in the Chinese Written-Language, or Easy-Going in the Japanese Written-Language.