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Infinite in Chinese / Japanese...

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Infinity / Infinite / Endless / Boundless

(Chinese / Korean)
China wú qióng
Japan mu kyuu
Infinity / Infinite / Endless / Boundless Vertical Wall Scroll

無窮 is the Chinese and Korean word meaning infinity, eternity, infinitude, infinite or endless.

無窮 literally translates as "without [ever becoming] exhausted/poor," and in that context, can mean "inexhaustible" or "boundless" but this is usually read as "without end." Some extended definitions include eternity, infinitude, or immortality.

In certain context, it can mean "immortality."

The first character means "never" or "not." The second means "exhausted," "finished," or "ending."

Note: 無窮 is a Japanese word but rarely used in modern Japan.

Infinity / Infinite / Unlimited / Unbounded

Japanese = Infinity / Chinese = No limits
China wú xiàn
Japan mu gen
Infinity / Infinite / Unlimited / Unbounded Vertical Wall Scroll

無限 is the Chinese and Japanese word meaning infinity, unlimited or unbounded.

無限 literally translates as "without limits" or "without [being] bound."

The first character means "never" or "not" or like a prefix "un-."

The second means "limited," "restricted," or "bound."

Please note that the Japanese definition leans more toward "infinity" and the Chinese is more about being "boundless" or "without limits."

In Korean, this means infinity, infinitude, or boundlessness. But in Korean, this term has many interpretations or contexts, so your intended meaning might come out a little vague or ambiguous.

Infinite Love

China wú xiàn ài
Japan mu gen ai
Infinite Love Vertical Wall Scroll

無限愛 is the Chinese and Japanese title meaning infinite love, unlimited love, or unbounded love.

The first character means never, not, or like a prefix "un-."

The second means limited, restricted, or bound.

The third means love or affection.

To Infinity and Beyond

China chāo yuè wú xiàn
To Infinity and Beyond Vertical Wall Scroll

超越無限 means, "to infinity and beyond," in Chinese.

超越無限 is how the slogan/phrase from Toy Story's Buzz Lightyear was translated from the movie into Chinese.

To Infinity and Beyond

Japan mugen no kanata e
To Infinity and Beyond Vertical Wall Scroll

This means, "to infinity and beyond," in Japanese.

This is how the slogan/phrase from Toy Story's Buzz Lightyear was translated from the movie into Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Not the results for infinite that you were looking for?

Below are some entries from our dictionary that may match your infinite search...

Characters

If shown, 2nd row is Simp. Chinese

Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

see styles
Mandarin/ fo2
Taiwan fo
Japanese hotoke / ほとけ    butsusaki / ぶつさき
To Infinity and Beyond Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese Buddha; Buddhism
Japanese (surname) Hotoke; (surname) Butsusaki
Buddha, from budh to "be aware of", "conceive", "observe", "wake"; also 佛陀; 浮圖; 浮陀; 浮頭; 浮塔; 勃陀; 勃馱; 沒馱; 母馱; 母陀; 部陀; 休屠. Buddha means "completely conscious, enlightened", and came to mean the enlightener. he Chinese translation is 覺 to perceive, aware, awake; and 智 gnosis, knowledge. There is an Eternal Buddha, see e.g. the Lotus Sutra, cap. 16, and multitudes of Buddhas, but the personality of a Supreme Buddha, an Ādi-Buddha, is not defined. Buddha is in and through all things, and some schools are definitely Pan-Buddhist in the pantheistic sense. In the triratna 三寳 commonly known as 三寳佛, while Śākyamuni Buddha is the first "person" of the Trinity, his Law the second, and the Order the third, all three by some are accounted as manifestations of the All-Buddha. As Śākyamuni, the title indicates him as the last of the line of Buddhas who have appeared in this world, Maitreya is to be the next. As such he is the one who has achieved enlightenment, having discovered the essential evil of existence (some say mundane existence, others all existence), and the way of deliverance from the constant round of reincarnations; this way is through the moral life into nirvana, by means of self-abnegation, the monastic life, and meditation. By this method a Buddha, or enlightened one, himself obtains Supreme Enlightenment, or Omniscience, and according to Māhāyanism leads all beings into the same enlightenment. He sees things not as they seem in their phenomenal but in their noumenal aspects, as they really are. The term is also applied to those who understand the chain of causality (twelve nidānas) and have attained enlightenment surpassing that of the arhat. Four types of the Buddha are referred to: (1) 三藏佛the Buddha of the Tripiṭaka who attained enlightenment on the bare ground under the bodhi-tree; (2) 通佛the Buddha on the deva robe under the bodhi-tree of the seven precious things; (3) 別佛the Buddha on the great precious Lotus throne under the Lotus realm bodhi-tree; and (4) 圓佛the Buddha on the throne of Space in the realm of eternal rest and glory where he is Vairocana. The Hīnayāna only admits the existence of one Buddha at a time; Mahāyāna claims the existence of many Buddhas at one and the same time, as many Buddhas as there are Buddha-universes, which are infinite in number.

化身

see styles
Mandarin huà shēn / hua4 shen1
Taiwan hua shen
Japanese keshin / けしん
To Infinity and Beyond Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese incarnation; reincarnation; embodiment (of abstract idea); personification
Japanese (n,vs,adj-no) {Buddh} incarnation; impersonation; personification; avatar
nirmāṇakāya, 應身, 應化身; 變化身 The third characteristic or power of the trikāya 三身, a Buddha's metamorphosic body, which has power to assume any shape to propagate the Truth. Some interpret the term as connoting pan-Buddha, that all nature in its infinite variety is the phenomenal 佛身 Buddha-body. A narrower interpretation is his appearance in human form expressed by 應身, while 化身 is used for his manifold other forms of appearances.

無盡


无尽

see styles
Mandarin wú jìn / wu2 jin4
Taiwan wu chin
Japanese mujin / むじん
To Infinity and Beyond Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese endless; inexhaustible
Inexhaustible, without limit. It is a term applied by the 權教 to the noumenal or absolute; by the 實教 to the phenomenal, both being considered as infinite. The Huayan sūtra 十地品 has ten limitless things, the infinitude of living beings, of worlds, of space, of the dharmadhātu, of nirvāṇa, etc.

無量


无量

see styles
Mandarin wú liàng / wu2 liang4
Taiwan wu liang
Japanese muryou / muryo / むりょう
To Infinity and Beyond Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese measureless; immeasurable
Japanese (noun - becomes adjective with の) immeasurable
apramāṇa; amita; ananta; immeasurable, unlimited, e.g. the 'four infinite' characteristics of a bodhisattva are 慈悲喜捨 kindness, pity, joy, and self-sacrifice; uncountable

無限


无限

see styles
Mandarin wú xiàn / wu2 xian4
Taiwan wu hsien
Japanese mugen / むげん
Chinese unlimited; unbounded
Japanese (1) infinity; infinitude; eternity; (adj-no,adj-na) (2) infinite; limitless
infinite

see styles
Mandarin hòng / hong4
Taiwan hung
Chinese vast; infinite

三堅


三坚

see styles
Mandarin sān jiān / san1 jian1
Taiwan san chien
Japanese sanken
The three sure or certain things are 身, 命 and 財, i.e. the reward of the true disciple is an infinite body or personality, an endless life, and boundless (spiritual) possessions, 無極之身, 無窮之命, 無盡之財, v. 能摩經:菩薩品; three certainties

九地

see styles
Mandarin jiǔ de / jiu3 de
Taiwan chiu te
Japanese kuji / くじ
Japanese very low land
The nine lands, i.e. the 欲界 realm of desire or sensuous realm the four 色界 realms of form or material forms; and the four 無色界 formless realms, or realms beyond form; v. 九有, 九有情居, 禪 and 定. The nine realms are:—(1) 欲界五趣地; the desire realm with its five gati, i.e. hells, hungry ghosts, animals, men, and devas. In the four form-realms are:— (2) 離生喜樂地 Paradise after earthly life, this is also the first dhyāna, or subject of meditation, 初禪. (3) 定生喜樂地 Paradise of cessation of rebirth, 二禪. (4) 離喜妙樂地 Land of wondrous joy after the previous joys, 三禪. (5) 捨念淸淨地 The Pure Land of abandonment of thought, or recollection (of past delights), 四禪. The four formless, or infinite realms, catur arūpa dhātu, are:—(6) 空無邊處地 ākāśānantyā-yatanam, the land of infinite space; also the first samādhi, 第一定. (7) 識無邊處地 vijñānānamtyāyatanam, the land of omniscience, or infinite perception, 二定. (8) 無所有處地 ākiñcanyāyatana, the land of nothingness, 三定. (9) 非想非非想處地 naivasaṁjñānā-saṁjñāyatana, the land (of knowledge) without thinking or not thinking, or where there is neither consciousness nor unconsciousness, i.e. above either; this is the 四定. Eitel says that in the last four, "Life lasts 20,000 great kalpas in the 1st, 40,000 in the 2nd, 60,000 in the 3rd, and 80,000 great kalpas in the 4th of these heavens."; nine levels of existence

五因

see styles
Mandarin wǔ yīn / wu3 yin1
Taiwan wu yin
Japanese goin
The five causes, v. 倶舍論 7. i. e. (1) 生因 producing cause; (2) 依因supporting cause; (3) 立因 upholding or establishing cause; (4) 持因 maintaining cause; (5) 養因 nourishing or strengthening cause. These all refer to the four elements, earth, water, fire, wind, for they are the causers or producers and maintainers of the infinite forms of nature. Another list from the Nirvana-Sutra 21 is (1) 生因 cause of rebirth, i. e. previous delusion; (2) 和合因 intermingling cause, i. e. good with good, bad with bad, neutral with neutral; (3) 住因 cause of abiding in the present condition, i. e. the self in its attachments; (4) 增長因 causes of development, e. g. food, clothing, etc.; (5) 遠因 remoter cause, the parental seed.

五觀


五观

see styles
Mandarin wǔ guān / wu3 guan1
Taiwan wu kuan
Japanese gokan
The five meditations referred to in the Lotus Sutra 25: (1) 眞 on the true, idem 空觀, to meditate on the reality of the void or infinite, in order to be rid of illusion in views and thoughts; (2) 淸淨觀 on purity, to be rid of any remains of impurity connected with the temporal, idem 假觀; (3) 廣大智慧觀 on the wider and greater wisdom, idem 中觀, by study of the 'middle' way; (4) 悲觀 on pitifulness, or the pitiable condition of the living, and by the above three to meditate on their salvation; (5) 慈觀 on mercy and the extension of the first three meditations to the carrying of joy to all the living; five contemplations

六瑞

see styles
Mandarin liù ruì / liu4 rui4
Taiwan liu jui
Japanese roku sui
The six auspicious indications attributed to the Buddha as a preliminary to his delivery of the Lotus Sutra, see 法華經, 序品: (1) his opening address on the infinite; (2) his samādhi; (3) the rain of flowers; (4) the earthquake; (5) the delight of the beholders; (6) the Buddha-ray; six portents

十智

see styles
Mandarin shí zhì / shi2 zhi4
Taiwan shih chih
Japanese jū chi
The ten forms of understanding. I. Hīnayāna: (1) 世俗智 common understanding; (2) 法智 enlightened understanding, i.e. on the Four Truths in this life; (3) 類智 ditto, applied to the two upper realms 上二界; (4), (5), (6), (7) understanding re each of the Four Truths separately, both in the upper and lower realms, e.g. 苦智; (8) 他心智 understanding of the minds of others; (9) 盡智 the understanding that puts an end to all previous faith in or for self, i.e. 自信智; (10) 無生智 nirvāṇa wisdom; v. 倶舍論 26. II. Mahāyāna. A Tathāgatas ten powers of understanding or wisdom: (1) 三世智 perfect understanding of past, present, and future; (2) ditto of Buddha Law; (3) 法界無礙智 unimpeded understanding of the whole Buddha-realm; (4) 法界無邊智 unlimited, or infinite understanding of the whole Buddha-realm; (5) 充滿一切智 understanding of ubiquity; (6) 普照一切世間智 understanding of universal enlightenment; (7) 住持一切世界智 understanding of omnipotence, or universal control; (8) 知一切衆生智 understanding of omniscience re all living beings; (9) 知一切法智 understanding of omniscience re the laws of universal salvation; (10) 知無邊諸佛智 understanding of omniscience re all Buddha wisdom. v. 華嚴経 16. There are also his ten forms of understanding of the "Five Seas" 五海 of worlds, living beings, karma, passions, and Buddhas; ten kinds of cognition

四住

see styles
Mandarin sì zhù / si4 zhu4
Taiwan ssu chu
Japanese shizumi / しずみ
The four abodes or states in the 智度論 3, i. e. (1) 天住 the devalokas, equivalents of charity, morality, and goodness of heart; (2) 梵住 the brahmalokas, equivalents of benevolence, pity, joy, and indifference; (3) 聖住 the abode of śrāvakas, pratyekabuddhas, and bodhisattvas, equivalent of the samādhi of the immaterial realm, formless and still; (4) 佛住 the Buddha-abode, the equivalent of the samādhis of the infinite. v. 四住地.

四禪


四禅

see styles
Mandarin sì chán / si4 chan2
Taiwan ssu ch`an / ssu chan
Japanese shizen
(四禪天) The four dhyāna heavens, 四靜慮 (四靜慮天), i. e. the division of the eighteen brahmalokas into four dhyānas: the disciple attains to one of these heavens according to the dhyāna he observes: (1) 初禪天 The first region, 'as large as one whole universe' comprises the three heavens, Brahma-pāriṣadya, Brahma-purohita, and Mahābrahma, 梵輔, 梵衆, and 大梵天; the inhabitants are without gustatory or olfactory organs, not needing food, but possess the other four of the six organs. (2) 二禪天 The second region, equal to 'a small chiliocosmos' 小千界, comprises the three heavens, according to Eitel, 'Parīttābha, Apramāṇābha, and Ābhāsvara, ' i. e. 少光 minor light, 無量光 infinite light, and 極光淨 utmost light purity; the inhabitants have ceased to require the five physical organs, possessing only the organ of mind. (3) 三禪天 The third region, equal to 'a middling chiliocosmos '中千界, comprises three heavens; Eitel gives them as Parīttaśubha, Apramāṇaśubha, and Śubhakṛtsna, i. e. 少淨 minor purity, 無量淨 infinite purity, and 徧淨 universal purity; the inhabitants still have the organ of mind and are receptive of great joy. (4) 四禪天 The fourth region, equal to a great chiliocosmos, 大千界, comprises the remaining nine brahmalokas, namely, Puṇyaprasava, Anabhraka, Bṛhatphala, Asañjñisattva, Avṛha, Atapa, Sudṛśa, Sudarśana, and Akaniṣṭha (Eitel). The Chinese titles are 福生 felicitous birth, 無雲 cloudless, 廣果 large fruitage, 無煩 no vexations, atapa is 無熱 no heat, sudṛśa is 善見 beautiful to see, sudarśana is 善現 beautiful appearing, two others are 色究竟 the end of form, and 無想天 the heaven above thought, but it is difficult to trace avṛha and akaniṣṭha; the inhabitants of this fourth region still have mind. The number of the dhyāna heavens differs; the Sarvāstivādins say 16, the 經 or Sutra school 17, and the Sthavirāḥ school 18. Eitel points out that the first dhyāna has one world with one moon, one mem, four continents, and six devalokas; the second dhyāna has 1, 000 times the worlds of the first; the third has 1, 000 times the worlds of the second; the fourth dhyāna has 1, 000 times those of the third. Within a kalpa of destruction 壞劫 the first is destroyed fifty-six times by fire, the second seven by water, the third once by wind, the fourth 'corresponding to a state of absolute indifference' remains 'untouched' by all the other evolutions; when 'fate (天命) comes to an end then the fourth dhyāna may come to an end too, but not sooner'.

四等

see styles
Mandarin sì děng / si4 deng3
Taiwan ssu teng
Japanese shitō
The four virtues which a Buddha out of his infinite heart manifests equally to all; also called 四無量 q. w. They are: 慈悲喜捨 maitrī, karuṇā, muditā, upekṣā, i. e. kindness, pity, joy and indifference, or 護 protection. Another group is 字語法身, i. e. 字 that all Buddhas have the same title or titles; 語 speak the same language; 法 proclaim the same truth; and 身 have each the threefold body, or trikāya. A third group is 諸法 all things are equally included in the bhūtatathatā; 發心 the mind-nature being universal, its field of action is universal; 道等 the way or method is also universal; therefore 慈悲 the mercy (of the Buddhas) is universal for all.

塵劫


尘劫

see styles
Mandarin chén jié / chen2 jie2
Taiwan ch`en chieh / chen chieh
Japanese jingō
(塵點劫) A period of time as impossible of calculation as the atoms of a ground-up world, an attempt to define the infinite, v. Lotus Sūtra 7 and 16; eons as great in number of all the atoms in the universe

方廣


方广

see styles
Mandarin fāng guǎng / fang1 guang3
Taiwan fang kuang
Japanese hōkō
vaipulya, 毘佛略 expansion, enlargement, broad, spacious. 方 is intp. by 方正 correct in doctrine and 廣 by 廣博 broad or wide; some interpret it by elaboration, or fuller explanation of the doctrine; in general it may be taken as the broad school, or wider teaching, in contrast with the narrow school, or Hīnayāna. The term covers the whole of the specifically Mahāyāna sutras. The sutras are also known as 無量義經 scriptures of measureless meaning, i. e. universalistic, or the infinite. Cf. 方等; correct and extensive

有量

see styles
Mandarin yǒu liàng / you3 liang4
Taiwan yu liang
Japanese uryō
Limited, finite; opposite of 無量 measureless, boundless, infinite. 有相有量That which has form and measurement is called 麤 coarse, i. e. palpable, that which is without form and measurement 無相無量 is called 細 fine, i. e. impalpable.

法相

see styles
Mandarin fǎ xiāng / fa3 xiang1
Taiwan fa hsiang
Japanese hossou / hosso / ほっそう    houshou / hosho / ほうしょう
Japanese (1) {Buddh} (See 法性) dharmalaksana (dharma characteristics, the specific characteristics of all manifest phenomena); (2) (abbreviation) (See 法相宗) Hosso sect of Buddhism; (abbreviation) (See 法務大臣) Minister of Justice
The aspects of characteristics of things-all things are of monad nature but differ in form. A name of the 法相宗 Faxiang or Dharmalakṣaṇa sect (Jap. Hossō), called also 慈恩宗 Cien sect from the Tang temple, in which lived 窺基 Kuiji, known also as 慈恩. It "aims at discovering the ultimate entity of cosmic existence n contemplation, through investigation into the specific characteristics (the marks or criteria) of all existence, and through the realization of the fundamental nature of the soul in mystic illumination". "An inexhaustible number" of "seeds" are "stored up in the Ālaya-soul; they manifest themselves in innumerable varieties of existence, both physical and mental". "Though there are infinite varieties. . . they all participate in the prime nature of the ālaya." Anesaki. The Faxiang School is one of the "eight schools", and was established in China on the return of Xuanzang, consequent on his translation of the Yogācārya works. Its aim is to understand the principle underlying the 萬法性相 or nature and characteristics of all things. Its foundation works are the 解深密經, the 唯識論, and the 瑜伽論. It is one of the Mahāyāna realistic schools, opposed by the idealistic schools, e.g. the 三論 school; yet it was a "combination of realism and idealism, and its religion a profoundly mystic one". Anesaki.

無極


无极

see styles
Mandarin wú jí / wu2 ji2
Taiwan wu chi
Japanese mugoku / むごく
Chinese everlasting; unbounded; Wuji county in Shijiazhuang 石家莊地區|石家庄地区[Shi2 jia1 zhuang1 di4 qu1], Hebei; The Promise (name of film by Chen Kaige)
Japanese (n,adj-na,adj-no) (1) limitless; (2) apolar; (3) (See 太極) limitlessness of taiji
Limitless, infinite.

無現

see styles
Japanese mugen / むげん Japanese (1) (abbreviation) infinite; (2) incumbent member (or candidate) unaffiliated with a party

無辺

see styles
Japanese muhen / むへん Japanese (noun or adjectival noun) infinite; boundless

無邊


无边

see styles
Mandarin wú biān / wu2 bian1
Taiwan wu pien
Japanese muhen
Chinese without boundary; not bordered
ananta; endless, boundless, limitless, infinite, e.g. like space.

界內


界内

see styles
Mandarin jiè nèi / jie4 nei4
Taiwan chieh nei
Japanese kainai
Within the region, limited, within the confines of the 三界, i. e. the three regions of desire, form, and formlessness, and not reaching out to the infinite; within the world

空心

see styles
Mandarin kòng xīn // kōng xīn / kong4 xin1 // kong1 xin1
Taiwan k`ung hsin // k`ung / kung hsin // kung
Japanese kūshin
Chinese on an empty stomach; hollow; empty headed; mindless
An empty mind, or heart; a mind meditating on the void, or infinite; a mind not entangled in cause and effect, i.e. detached from the phenomenal.

空處


空处

see styles
Mandarin kōng chù / kong1 chu4
Taiwan k`ung ch`u / kung chu
Japanese sorajo / そらじょ
空無邊處 Ākāśānantyāyatana; the abode of infinite space, the formless, or immaterial world 無色界 the first of the arūpaloka heavens, one of the four brahmalokas; empty place

空行

see styles
Mandarin kōng xíng / kong1 xing2
Taiwan k`ung hsing / kung hsing
Japanese kuugyou / kugyo / くうぎょう
Japanese blank line
The discipline or practice of the immaterial, or infinite, thus overcoming the illusion that the ego and all phenomena are realities; practice of emptiness

八解脫


八解脱

see styles
Mandarin bā jiě tuō / ba1 jie3 tuo1
Taiwan pa chieh t`o / pa chieh to
Japanese hachi gedatsu
aṣṭa-vimokṣa, mokṣa, vimukti, mukti. Liberation, deliverance, freedom, emancipation, escape, release―in eight forms; also 八背捨 and cf. 解脫 and 八勝處. The eight are stages of mental concentration: (1) 内有色想觀外色解脱 Liberation, when subjective desire arises, by examination of the object, or of all things and realization of their filthiness. (2) 内無色想觀外色解脫 Liberation, when no subjective desire arises, by still meditating as above. These two are deliverance by meditation on impurity, the next on purity. (3) 淨身作證具足住解脫 Liberation by concentration on the pure to the realization of a permanent state of freedom from all desire. The above three "correspond to the four Dhyānas". (Eitel.) (4) 空無邊處解脫 Liberation in realization of the infinity of space, or the immaterial. (5) 識無邊處解脫 Liberation in realization of infinite knowledge. (6) 無所有處解脫Liberation in realization of nothingness, or nowhereness. (7) 非想非非想處解脫 Liberation in the state of mind where there is neither thought nor absence of thought. These four arise out of abstract meditation in regard to desire and form, and are associated with the 四空天. (8) 滅受 想定解脫 Liberation by means of a state of mind in which there is final extinction, nirvāṇa, of both sensation, vedanā, and consciousness, saṁjñā; eight kinds of liberation

半無限


半无限

see styles
Mandarin bàn wú xiàn / ban4 wu2 xian4
Taiwan pan wu hsien
Chinese semi-infinite

大方等

see styles
Mandarin dà fāng děng / da4 fang1 deng3
Taiwan ta fang teng
Japanese dai hōdō
Mahāvaipulya or vaipulya 大方廣; 毗佛畧. They are called 無量義經 sutras of infinite meaning, or of the infinite; first introduced into China by Dharmarakṣa (A.D.266―317). The name is common to Hīnayāna and Mahayana, but chiefly claimed by the latter for its special sutras as extending and universalizing the Buddha's earlier preliminary teaching. v. 大方廣 and 方等; greatly extended

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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Infinity
Infinite
Endless
Boundless
無窮
无穷
mu kyuu / mukyuu / mu kyu / mukyuwú qióng / wu2 qiong2 / wu qiong / wuqiongwu ch`iung / wuchiung / wu chiung
Infinity
Infinite
Unlimited
Unbounded
無限
无限
mu gen / mugenwú xiàn / wu2 xian4 / wu xian / wuxianwu hsien / wuhsien
Infinite Love無限愛
无限爱
mu gen ai / mugenaiwú xiàn ài
wu2 xian4 ai4
wu xian ai
wuxianai
wu hsien ai
wuhsienai
To Infinity and Beyond超越無限
超越无限
chāo yuè wú xiàn
chao1 yue4 wu2 xian4
chao yue wu xian
chaoyuewuxian
ch`ao yüeh wu hsien
chaoyüehwuhsien
chao yüeh wu hsien
To Infinity and Beyond無限の彼方へmugen no kanata e
mugennokanatae
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Alexandra
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Forever in My Heart
Gerard
Good Luck
Happiness
Have Faith in God
Hayley
Heart Sutra
Home Sweet Home
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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Infinite Kanji, Infinite Characters, Infinite in Mandarin Chinese, Infinite Characters, Infinite in Chinese Writing, Infinite in Japanese Writing, Infinite in Asian Writing, Infinite Ideograms, Chinese Infinite symbols, Infinite Hieroglyphics, Infinite Glyphs, Infinite in Chinese Letters, Infinite Hanzi, Infinite in Japanese Kanji, Infinite Pictograms, Infinite in the Chinese Written-Language, or Infinite in the Japanese Written-Language.

122 people have searched for Infinite in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Infinite was last searched for by someone else on May 3rd, 2019