Fear Not for I Am With You in Chinese / Japanese...

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  1. Do not be afraid, God is always with you

  2. Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition

  3. No Fear

  4. Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success

  5. No Fear

  6. Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries

  7. Bravery / Courage

  8. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

  9. Never Give Up

10. Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles

11. 1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad

12. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

13. Qi Gong / Chi Kung


Do not be afraid, God is always with you

Joshua 1:9

anata ga doko e iku ni mo anata no kami omo ga tomoni ora reru yue osorete wa naranai ononoite wa naranai
Do not be afraid, God is always with you Scroll

This is a Japanese translation of a large portion of Joshua 1:9.

The Japanese passage includes, "The Lord God is with you wherever you are; Therefore do not fear or be discouraged".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition

bú pà lù yuǎn zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as, "Fear not a long roads; fear only short ambition", or "Don't fear that the road is long, only fear that your will/ambition/aspiration is short".

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the goal is, one can achieve it as long as one is determined to do so.

Others may translate the meaning as, "Don't let a lack of willpower stop you from pressing onwards in your journey".

oso re zu
No Fear Scroll

恐れず is probably the best way to express "No Fear" in Japanese.

The first Kanji and following Hiragana character create a word that means: to fear, to be afraid of, frightened, or terrified.

The last Hiragana character serves to modify and negate the first word (put it in negative form). Basically, they carry a meaning like "without" or "keeping away". 恐れず is almost like the English modifier "-less".

Altogether, you get something like, "Without Fear" or "Fearless".

Here's an example of using this in a sentence: 彼女かのじょは思い切ったことを恐れずにやる。
Translation: She is not scared of taking big risks.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Bravery | Courage

Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success

Do not fear strong winds waves; just be sure to row in unison

bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Do not fear strong winds [and] high waves; what [one should] worry about whether or not you're rowing in unison.

Figuratively, this means: However difficult the task, the key to success lies in making collective efforts.

I like to translate this as, "Don't sweat the details, just get together and get it done".

No Fear

(four-character version)

yǒng zhě wú wèi
No Fear Scroll

勇者無畏 is a complete sentence that means literally "Brave People Have No Fear" or "A Brave Person Has No Fear" (plural or singular is not implied).

We translated "No Fear" into the two variations that you will find on our website. Then we checked Chinese Google and found that others had translated "No Fear" in the exact same ways. Pick the one you like best. A great gift for your fearless friend.


See Also:  Fear No Man

Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries

yǒu bèi wú huàn
Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries Scroll

This really means, "When you are well-prepared, you have nothing to fear".

Noting that the third character means "no" or "without" and modifies the last... The last character can mean misfortune, troubles, worries, or fears. It could even be stretched to mean sickness. Therefore you can translate this proverb a few ways. I've also seen it translated as "Preparedness forestalls calamities".

有備無患 is comparable to the English idiom, "Better safe than sorry" but does not directly/literally mean this.

Bravery / Courage

Courage in the face of Fear

yǒng gǎn
yuu kan
Bravery / Courage Scroll

勇敢 is about courage or bravery in the face of fear.

You do the right thing even when it is hard or scary. When you are courageous, you don't give up. You try new things. You admit mistakes. This kind of courage is the willingness to take action in the face of danger and peril.

勇敢 can also be translated as braveness, valor, heroic, fearless, boldness, prowess, gallantry, audacity, daring, dauntless and/or courage in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. This version of bravery/courage can be an adjective or a noun. The first character means bravery and courage by itself. The second character means "daring" by itself. The second character just emphasizes the meaning of the first but adds an idea that you are not afraid of taking a dare, and you are not afraid of danger.

勇敢 is more about brave behavior and not so much the mental state of being brave. You'd more likely use this to say, "He fought courageously in the battle", rather than "He is very courageous".

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges

bǎi zhé bù náo
hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks".

More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching". 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose the corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and the common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career, a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks", "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable".

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks", the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times". The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up".
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Never Give Up

yǒng bù fàng qì
Never Give Up Scroll

The first character means "eternal" or "forever", the second means "not" (together they mean "never"). The last two characters mean "give up" or "abandon". Altogether, you can translate this proverb as "never give up" or "never abandon".

Depending on how you want to read this, it is also a statement that you will never abandon your hopes, dreams, family or friends.


See Also:  Undaunted | No Fear | Hope

Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles

teki o shi ri o no o shi re ba hya ku sen aya u ka ra zu
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles Scroll

This is the longer/full Japanese version of this proverb. This means, "Know your enemy, know yourself, and you will not fear a hundred battles".

Others will translate this as, "Know thy enemy, know thyself, yields victory in one hundred battles".


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad

bú pà qiān zhāo huì zhǐ pà yī zhāo shú
1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Do not worry about making a thousand clever moves; what [one has to] fear is one bad move.

Figuratively, this means: Even if you have made many clever moves before, one wrong move will ruin the whole game.

I compare this to the English saying, "It takes only one Aw-shit to wipe out a thousand Attaboys".

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black

wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100 Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, the one who retreats 50 paces mocke the one who retreats 100 paces.

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, "I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty, and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?"

Mencius answered, "Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, "Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces".

Mencius then said, "You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people but you are so fond of war, that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there really any difference?"

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, "The pot calls the kettle black", or the Biblical phrase, "Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye".

Qi Gong / Chi Kung

qì gōng
kikou
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll

Qigong is the title of a technique that is somewhere between a medical practice, meditation, and in some cases a religion. The definition is blurred depending on which school of Qigong you are following. In some cases, it is even incorporated with martial arts.

Some people (even Chinese people) mix this title with Tai Chi (Tai Qi) exercises.

Lately in China, people will claim to practice Tai Chi rather than Qigong because the Qigong title was recently used as a cover for an illegal pseudo-religious movement in China with the initials F.G. or F.D. (I can not write those names here for fear of our website being banned in China).

You can learn those names and more here: Further info about Qigong

If you are wondering about why I wrote "Qi Gong" and "Chi Kung" as the title of this calligraphy entry, I should teach you a little about the various ways in which Chinese can be Romanized. One form writes this as "Chi Kung" or "Chikung" (Taiwan). In the mainland and elsewhere, it is Romanized as "Qi Gong" or "Qigong". The actual pronunciation is the same in Taiwan, mainland, and Singapore Mandarin. Neither Romanization is exactly like English. If you want to know how to say this with English rules, it would be something like "Chee Gong" (but the "gong" has a vowel sound like the "O" in "go").

Romanization is a really confusing topic and has caused many Chinese words to be mispronounced in the west. One example is "Kung Pao Chicken" which should actually be more like "Gong Bao" with the "O" sounding like "oh" for both characters. Neither system of Romanization in Taiwan or the Mainland is perfect in my opinion and lead to many misunderstandings.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Do not be afraid, God is always with youあなたがどこへ行くにもあなたの神主が共におられるゆえ恐れてはならないおののいてはならないanata ga doko e iku ni mo anata no kami omo ga tomoni ora reru yue osorete wa naranai ononoite wa naranai
Fear not long roads; Fear only short ambition不怕路遠隻怕志短
不怕路远只怕志短
bú pà lù yuǎn zhǐ pà zhì duǎn
bu2 pa4 lu4 yuan3 zhi3 pa4 zhi4 duan3
bu pa lu yuan zhi pa zhi duan
bupaluyuanzhipazhiduan
pu p`a lu yüan chih p`a chih tuan
pu pa lu yüan chih pa chih tuan
No Fear恐れずoso re zu / osorezu
Do not fear the task: Cooperation will lead to success不怕風浪大就怕槳不齊
不怕风浪大就怕桨不齐
bù pà fēng làng dà jiù pà jiǎng bù qí
bu4 pa4 feng1 lang4 da4 jiu4 pa4 jiang3 bu4 qi2
bu pa feng lang da jiu pa jiang bu qi
pu p`a feng lang ta chiu p`a chiang pu ch`i
pu pa feng lang ta chiu pa chiang pu chi
No Fear勇者無畏
勇者无畏
yǒng zhě wú wèi
yong3 zhe3 wu2 wei4
yong zhe wu wei
yongzhewuwei
yung che wu wei
yungchewuwei
Preparation Yields No Fear or Worries有備無患
有备无患
yǒu bèi wú huàn
you3 bei4 wu2 huan4
you bei wu huan
youbeiwuhuan
yu pei wu huan
yupeiwuhuan
Bravery
Courage
勇敢yuu kan / yuukan / yu kan / yukanyǒng gǎn / yong3 gan3 / yong gan / yongganyung kan / yungkan
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
hyakusetsusuto
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
Never Give Up永不放棄
永不放弃
yǒng bù fàng qì
yong3 bu4 fang4 qi4
yong bu fang qi
yongbufangqi
yung pu fang ch`i
yungpufangchi
yung pu fang chi
Know Your Enemy, Know Yourself, and Win 100 Battles敵を知り己を知れば百戦危うからずteki o shi ri o no o shi re ba hya ku sen aya u ka ra zu
1000 good moves ruined by 1 bad不怕千招會隻怕一招熟
不怕千招会只怕一招熟
bú pà qiān zhāo huì zhǐ pà yī zhāo shú
bu2 pa4 qian1 zhao1 hui4 zhi3 pa4 yi1 zhao1 shu2
bu pa qian zhao hui zhi pa yi zhao shu
pu p`a ch`ien chao hui chih p`a i chao shu
pu pa chien chao hui chih pa i chao shu
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100五十步笑百步wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
wu4 shi2 bu4 xiao4 bai3 bu4
wu shi bu xiao bai bu
wushibuxiaobaibu
wu shih pu hsiao pai pu
wushihpuhsiaopaipu
Qi Gong
Chi Kung
氣功
气功
kikou / kikoqì gōng / qi4 gong1 / qi gong / qigongch`i kung / chikung / chi kung
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Scroll


And formats...

Qi Gong / Chi Kung Vertical Portrait
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Horizontal Wall Scroll
Qi Gong / Chi Kung Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Fear Not for I Am With You in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

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