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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Imagination"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Imagination
  2. Imagine / Imagination
  3. Meditation
  4. Creativity
  5. Illusion
  6. Create / Creation
  7. Creative / Creativity
  8. Unbridled Creativity
  9. Dream / Dreams
10. Idea / Thought
11. Thought / Thinking / Idea
12. Omoi / Desire
13. With all the strength of your heart
14. Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart
15. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial
16. Hide / Shelter / Shield
17. Prosperity
18. Clarity
19. Sword
20. Dream / Vision
21. Banzai / Wansui
22. Banzai
23. Determination
24. Consideration / Thought / Ikko
25. Dragon Warrior
26. Push or Knock
27. Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo


Imagination

China xiǎng xiàng lì
Japan souzouryoku
Imagination Wall Scroll

想像力 is probably the best way to express "imagination" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. It literally means "your strength to imagine." As the last character means strength or ability, while the first two mean imagine or conceptualize. My Japanese dictionary defines this as, "The power of imagination." While my Korean dictionary says, "imaginative power."

Imagine / Imagination

China xiǎng xiàng
Japan souzou
Imagine / Imagination Wall Scroll

想像 is the shortest word for imagine, visualize, or imagination. It can also mean "to guess" (which is why I favor the 3-character version of imagination (just a third character is added to the end, which clarifies it).

Meditation

China míng xiǎng
Japan mei sou
Meditation Wall Scroll

This encompasses the idea of meditation. It's also a term used to describe a deep form of day-dreaming, exploring one's imagination, the act of contemplating, or the idea of contemplation. 冥想 is often associated with Buddhism, however, the word "Zen" in Japanese (or "Chan" in Chinese) is probably more commonly used (or better known in the west).


See Also:  Zen

Creativity

China chuàng zào lì
Japan souzouryoku
Creativity Wall Scroll

Creativity is the power of imagination. It is discovering your own special talents. Daring to see things in new ways and find different ways to solve problems. With your creativity, you can bring something new into the world.

The first character means "to create" the second means "to make or build." Together they mean "creative." The third character means "strength." So altogether, these three characters are a word that means "strength of creativity" or sort of "creativity (is your) strength." This can also be translated as "ingenuity."

Illusion

China huàn xiàng
Japan gen zou
Illusion Wall Scroll

幻像 is a universal word for Illusion in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The first character means phantasm, vision, dream, illusion, apparition, or fantasy.

The second character means statue, picture, image, figure, portrait, shape, form, appearance, to be like, to resemble, to take after, to seem, or in rare/ancient context: an elephant.


象Note that the first character can be written without the left-side radical in Chinese. This form is shown to the right. Both forms are acceptable in Chinese but the character shown to the right is more likely to be read as "elephant."


See Also:  Reality

Create / Creation

China chuàng zào
Japan sou zou
Create / Creation Wall Scroll

The first character here means to create, genesis, or origin.
The second means to make or build.
Together they mean to create, to bring about, to produce or simply creative or creation.

Creative / Creativity

China chuàng yì
Japan sou i
Creative /  Creativity Wall Scroll

創意 is creative or creativity in Chinese characters, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji. It can also refer to and original idea or originality.

Unbridled Creativity

China bù jū yī gé
Unbridled Creativity Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb speaks of exploring different styles and not being stuck in conventional thinking. It can also be translated as "not sticking to one pattern" or "not limited to one type (or style)." The most simple translation is "being creative," or "unbridled creativity." Some may also say this means, "not being stuck in a rut," in the context of a designer or artist.

If you literally translate this, the first two characters mean, "not stick to," or "not confine oneself to."
The second two characters mean, "one mode," "one pattern," "one form," "one style," or "one rule."

Dream / Dreams

China mèng
Japan yume
Dream / Dreams Wall Scroll

夢 is the very simple word for dreams in Chinese and Japanese. It can also mean having a vision or simply an illusion.

Idea / Thought

China yì jiàn
Japan i ken
Idea / Thought Wall Scroll

意見 means idea, thought, opinion, or view in Japanese.

This word also has a similar meaning in Chinese, just often used in China.

Idea / Thought

China yì niàn
Idea / Thought Wall Scroll

意念 / 意唸 means idea or thought in Chinese.

Thought / Thinking / Idea

China sī xiǎng
Japan shisou
Thought / Thinking / Idea Wall Scroll

思想 means thought, thinking, or idea in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Sometimes it can mean ideology, depending on context.

This can refer to someone's personality - like saying, "he is a thinker."

Omoi / Desire

Japan omoi
Omoi / Desire Wall Scroll

想い is a Japanese word that is often translated as desire.

Other definitions include: thought; imagination; mind; heart; wish; hope; expectation; love; affection; feelings; emotion; sentiment; experience. The context in which this word is used determines how it is understood.

With all the strength of your heart

Japan omoi kiri
With all the strength of your heart Wall Scroll

This can be translated as, "with all one's strength," "with all one's heart," "to the limits of your heart," or "to the end of your heart/emotions."

The character breakdown:
思い (omoi) thought; mind; heart; feelings; emotion; sentiment; love; affection; desire; wish; hope; expectation; imagination; experience
切り (kiri) bounds; limits.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

China suí xīn ér xíng
Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart Wall Scroll

隨心而行 is the closest way to express this idea in Chinese. Literally translated, this phrase means, "Allow your heart to dictate your behavior" or "Let your heart guide your conduct" in Chinese. You could also translate this as "follow your heart." Or, with a bit of imagination, it could mean: "let your spirit be your guide."

Note that in some cases, "heart" can mean "mind," "soul" or even "spirit" in Chinese. In ancient China, it was thought that the big pumping organ in your chest was where your thoughts came from, or where your soul resides.
Ancient western thought followed a similar belief. Thus phrases like "I love you with all my heart" and "I give you my whole heart."

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair."

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self."

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish." The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice."

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair." So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common Good | Altruism

Hide / Shelter / Shield

China
Japan toku
Hide / Shelter / Shield Wall Scroll

This character means to hide, shelter, or shield.

If you imagine a safe place shielded from danger and trouble, this could be the character for you.

Prosperity

(also means salary)
China
Japan fuchi
Prosperity Wall Scroll

This character is occasionally used in China to mean prosperity or good fortune.
This character once meant the "official's salary" in old feudal China and Korea (obviously, the officials lived well, so you can imagine how this was associated with the idea of being prosperous).

祿 is only used in Korean historical documents for "salary." In old Japanese, this means fief, allowance, stipend, reward, pension, grant and sometimes happiness depending on context. It's very obscure in modern Japanese.

We have other entries that are better-suited for a prosperity wall scroll. This entry just addresses "the coffee cup issue" where this character has been used on coffee cups and tee-shirts. However, without context, the meaning is ambiguous to some.

Clarity

China qīng
Japan sei
Clarity Wall Scroll

This word means clarity or clear in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Looking at the parts of this character, you have three splashes of water on the left, "life" on the top right, and the moon on the lower right.

Because of something Confucius said about 2500 years ago, you can imagine that this character means "live life with clarity like bright moonlight piercing pure water." The Confucian idea is something like "Keep clear what is pure in yourself, and let your pure nature show through." Kind of like saying, "Don't pollute your mind or body, so that they remain clear."

This might be stretching the definition of this single Chinese character but the elements are there, and "clarity" is a powerful idea.


Korean note: Korean pronunciation is given above but this character is written with a slight difference in the "moon radical" in Korean. However, anyone who can read Korean Hanja, will understand this character with no problem (this is considered an alternate form in Korean). If you want the more standard Korean Hanja form (which is an alternate form in Chinese), just let me know.

Japanese note: When reading in Japanese, this Kanji has additional meanings of pure, purify, or cleanse (sometimes to remove demons or "exorcise"). Used more in compound words in Japanese than as a stand-alone Kanji.

Sword

China jiàn
Japan ken / tsurugi
Sword Wall Scroll

This Character is pronounced "jian" in Chinese. When you say it, imagine that you are making the sound of a sword as it clashes with a metal shield. This might get you closer to the correct pronunciation in Chinese.

I actually wonder if this word came from the metallic ringing sounds of a sword in battle - but such knowledge is lost in history.

The sword is a symbol of a warrior. The one thing that a soldier in ancient China lived and died by. A warrior with his skills and sword proves himself of great value. A warrior who losses his sword instantly becomes worthless.

劍 is an excellent scroll for someone in the military (especially officers of all services - as well as enlisted NCO Marines since they still carry swords even if mainly for ceremonial purposes). Or perhaps someone who practices variations of kung fu or tai chi that involve weapons.

Please note that while this character is understood with the sword meaning in Japanese, you might be looking for the word "katana" which also means sword in Japanese but means "knife" in Chinese.


There are other ways to write sword, and here are a few...
Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese Typical traditional form of sword in Chinese Common Japanese and rare Chinese traditional form of sword Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese Old/Alternative way to write sword in Chinese This one kind of means golden sword in Chinese
If you are particular about the version you receive, please let me know when you place your order (Note: Special styles are only available from one of our master calligraphers).

We have a forum entry that addresses the many ways to write sword. You can find that here: 100 Ways to Write Sword - Deciphering Ancient Seal Script

Dream / Vision

China mèng xiǎng
Japan mu sou
Dream / Vision Wall Scroll

夢想 is the two-character version of "dream," which can mean "to dream of [something]," vision, imagine, or reverie.

Be careful, as in some context, it can mean to dream of something in vain.

Banzai / Wansui

Old Japanese / Traditional Chinese & Korean
China wàn suì
Japan banzai / manzai
Banzai / Wansui Wall Scroll

We've made two almost identical entries for this word. 萬歲 is the traditional Chinese, Korean Hanja, and ancient Japanese way to write banzai. In modern times, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. So you might want to select the other entry for more universal readability.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 萬歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

Other translations include: Cheers! (not the drinking kind), hurrah!, long live [name]!, congratulations!

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Banzai

Modern Japanese Version
China wàn suì
Japan banzai
Banzai Wall Scroll

We've made two almost identical entries for this word. 萬歲 is the modern Japanese way to write banzai. In the last century, the first character was simplified in Japan and China. The new generation will expect it to be written this way but the old generation can still read the more traditional form. You must make your own determination as to what version is best for you. If your audience is mostly Japanese, I suggest this form.

While it has become a popular if not an odd thing to scream as you jump out of an airplane (preferably with a parachute attached), banzai is actually a very old Asian way to say "hooray." The Japanese word "banzai" comes from the Chinese word "wan sui" which means "The age of 10,000 years." It is actually a wish that the Emperor or the Empire live that long.

Imagine long ago as the Emperor made a rare public appearance. 萬歲 is what all of the people would yell to their leader in respect.

So if you like is as a hooray, or you want to wish someone that they live for 10,000 years, this is the calligraphy for you.

To other things with banzai in their names; I am still waiting for the promised sequel to Buckaroo Banzai.

Other translations: hurrah, long life, congratulations, cheers, live long.

Notes: Sometimes people confuse banzai with bonsai. A bonsai is a miniature tree. They have nothing to do with each other. Further, bonzai is not a word at all - although it would make a great name for a calcium supplement for older people.

Determination

China jué xīn
Japan kesshin
Determination Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word holds the dictionary definition of "determination" but literally means, "determined heart."

The first character means "to determine" or "determined."

The second character means "heart," "mind" or "soul," so you can imagine that this form of "determination" partially means to put your heart into something. It can also be translated as resolve, resolution, or decision (as in a decision made and followed).


See Also:  Devotion | Tenacious | Passion | Dedication | Will-Power

Consideration / Thought / Ikko

Japan ikkou / ikko
Consideration / Thought / Ikko Wall Scroll

This Japanese word means consideration or thought. This can also be pronounced Kazutaka when used as a personal name.

People search this site for "Ikko," and I imagine this is what they want. But, keep in mind that many other Japanese words and names Romanize as Ikko.

Dragon Warrior

China lóng wǔ shì
Japan ryuu bu shi
Dragon Warrior Wall Scroll

龍武士 is a generic title for "Dragon Warrior." Just as in English, it's a bit ambiguous. It can mean one who fights against dragons, or the title of a warrior himself (imagine a warrior with a dragon symbol on his chest).

Push or Knock

To weigh one's words
China fǎn fù tuī qiāo
Push or Knock Wall Scroll

During the Tang Dynasty, a man named Jia Dao (born in the year 779), a well studied scholar and poet, went to the capital to take the imperial examination.

One day as he rides a donkey through the city streets, a poem begins to form in his mind. A portion of the poem comes into his head like this:

"The bird sits on the tree branch near a pond,
A monk approaches and knocks at the gate..."


At the same time, he wondered if the word "push" would be better than "knock" in his poem.

As he rides down the street, he imagines the monk pushing or knocking. Soon he finds himself making motions of pushing, and shaking a fist in a knocking motion as he debates which word to use. He is quite a sight as he makes his way down the street on his donkey with hands and fists flying about as the internal debate continues.

As he amuses people along the street, he becomes completely lost in his thoughts and does not see the mayor's procession coming in the opposite direction. Jia Bao is blocking the way for the procession to continue down the road, and the mayor's guards immediately decide to remove Jia Bao by force. Jia Bao, not realizing that he was in the way, apologizes, explains his poetic dilemma, and awaits his punishment for blocking the mayor's way.

The mayor, Han Yu, a scholar and author of prose himself, finds himself intrigued by Jia Dao's poem and problem. Han Yu gets off his horse, and addresses Jia Bao, stating, "I think knock is better." The relieved Jia Bao raises his head, and is invited by the mayor to join the procession, and are seen riding off together down the street exchanging their ideas and love of poetry.

In modern Chinese, this idiom is used when someone is trying to decide which word to use in their writing or when struggling to decide between two things when neither seems to have a downside.

Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo

China shào lín sì quán fǎ
Japan shourinji kenpou
Shorinji Kempo / Kenpo Wall Scroll

少林寺拳法 is a specific type of martial arts in Japan that claims origins in the Kung Fu practiced in the original Shaolin Monastery of China.

The first three characters mean "Shaolin Monastery" and you might notice the Japanese is pronounced in a very similar way. 少林寺拳法 is because many words were "borrowed" from the original Chinese when Japan did not have a written language and simply absorbed Chinese characters into their language around the 5th century. When a Japanese word did not exist, the Chinese pronunciation was often absorbed as well as the written form.

The last two characters mean "fist law" or "method of the fist." It has long been argued as to whether the Japanese for these characters should be Romanized as "kempo" or "kenpo." The official method should be "kenpou" but it's common to drop the "u" that comes after the "o."

I imagine if you are looking for this title, you already know what it means, so the above is simply extra information that a student of Shorinji Kempo might want to know.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Imagination 想像力souzouryoku
sozoryoku
xiǎng xiàng lì
xiang3 xiang4 li4
xiang xiang li
xiangxiangli
hsiang hsiang li
hsianghsiangli
Imagine
Imagination
想像souzou / sozoxiǎng xiàng
xiang3 xiang4
xiang xiang
xiangxiang
hsiang hsiang
hsianghsiang
Meditation 冥想mei sou / meisou / mei so / meisomíng xiǎng
ming2 xiang3
ming xiang
mingxiang
ming hsiang
minghsiang
Creativity 創造力
创造力
souzouryoku
sozoryoku
chuàng zào lì
chuang4 zao4 li4
chuang zao li
chuangzaoli
ch`uang tsao li
chuangtsaoli
chuang tsao li
Illusion 幻像
幻像 / 幻象
gen zou / genzou / gen zo / genzohuàn xiàng
huan4 xiang4
huan xiang
huanxiang
huan hsiang
huanhsiang
Create
Creation
創造
创造
sou zou / souzou / so zo / sozochuàng zào
chuang4 zao4
chuang zao
chuangzao
ch`uang tsao
chuangtsao
chuang tsao
Creative
Creativity
創意
创意
sou i / soui / so i / soichuàng yì
chuang4 yi4
chuang yi
chuangyi
ch`uang i
chuangi
chuang i
Unbridled Creativity 不拘一格bù jū yī gé
bu4 ju1 yi1 ge2
bu ju yi ge
bujuyige
pu chü i ko
puchüiko
Dream
Dreams

yumemèng / meng4 / meng
Idea
Thought
意見i ken / ikenyì jiàn / yi4 jian4 / yi jian / yijian i chien / ichien
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Adventure
Alison
Apollo
Balance
Billy
Caleb
Calm Mind
Cassie
Cheyenne
Chloe
Clint
Colin
Courage
Dillon
Dragon
Dylan
Empty
Ethan
Family
Fire
Fire Dragon
Fist
Flower
Freedom
Friendship
Golden Dragon
Goldfish
Honor
Hope
Horse
Humble
I Miss You
Illusion
Independence
Indomitable Spirit
Inner Power
Inner Strength
Jack
Jade
Jeanine
Jesus
Jose
Juliet
Kirin
Kristin
Kyokushinkai
Life Force
Live in the Moment
Lotus Flower
Love
Mackenzie
Maddie
Monkey
Nothingness
Paladin
Peace
Power of Understanding
Priyanka
Rafael
Renee
Respect
River
Saint
Sara
Sarah
Success
Susan
Tai Chi Chuan
Three
Vermillion Dragon
Water
Wisdom

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Imagination Kanji, Imagination Characters, Imagination in Mandarin Chinese, Imagination Characters, Imagination in Chinese Writing, Imagination in Japanese Writing, Imagination in Asian Writing, Imagination Ideograms, Chinese Imagination symbols, Imagination Hieroglyphics, Imagination Glyphs, Imagination in Chinese Letters, Imagination Hanzi, Imagination in Japanese Kanji, Imagination Pictograms, Imagination in the Chinese Written-Language, or Imagination in the Japanese Written-Language.