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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Faith"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Faith
  2. Religious Devotion / Faith in God / Religious Faith
  3. Trust / To Have Faith
  4. Believe / Faith / Trust
  5. Trust in God / Faith in God
  6. Firm Belief...
  7. Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark
  8. Faithful / Honorable...
  9. Believe
10. Sincerity and Devotion
11. Eishin-Ryu
12. Confidence / Faithful Heart
13. Fragrant / Good Smell
14. Believe in Yourself
15. Self-Confidence
16. Fidelity / Personal Integrity / Honor
17. Dōgen
18. Trust No One / Trust No Man
19. Seven Heavenly Virtues
20. Lei
21. Forgive
22. Turtle
23. Loyalty
24. Commitment
25. Guan Yu
26. Honesty
27. Nothingness
28. Goldfish
29. Aries
30. Capricorn
31. Shaolin Temple
32. Fate / Opportunity / Chance
33. Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do
34. Journey of Life
35. Believe in Yourself
36. Tiger Rumor
37. Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis
38. Namu Amida Butsu
39. Namo Shakyamuni Buddha


Faith

China xìn niàn
Japan shinnen
Faith Wall Scroll

These characters express the idea of "having a belief," or "trusting in the unseen."

This word could also be translated as beliefs or convictions.


Note: Also considered to be one of the Seven Heavenly Virtues.


See Also:  Devotion | Dedication | Trust

Religious Devotion / Faith in God / Religious Faith

China xìn yǎng
Japan shin kou
Religious Devotion / Faith in God / Religious Faith Wall Scroll

信仰 means firm belief, faith, persuasion, conviction, and sometimes religion or creed in Chinese, Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja.

This word clearly fits religious connotation of the English word "devotion."

信仰 is often used to refer to a person of faith or a religious person.

This can be directly translated as "firm belief," "creed," "conviction" or simply as "religious" depending on context.

Some will also use this to mean "trust in God" in Japanese (though the term for God is not actually in this title).

It should be noted that this word is a little strange alone on a wall scroll.


While this can be pronounced in Japanese, it's not a great selection for a wall scroll if your audience is Japanese.


See Also:  Trust | Devotion | Trust | Trust in God

Trust / To Have Faith

China xìn lài
Japan shinrai
Trust / To Have Faith Wall Scroll

Trust is having faith in someone or something. It is a positive attitude about life. You are confident that the right thing will happen without trying to control it or make it happen. Even when difficult things happen, trust helps us to find the gift or lesson in it.

This word can also be translated as confidence, reliance, or dependence; thus it can also mean "to rely on" or "to depend on."


頼There is a slight deviation in the Japanese Kanji form of the second character. If you want the modern Japanese version, please click on the special Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above. Note that the traditional Chinese form is still readable and understood by Japanese people.


See Also:  Confidence | Truth | Honor

Believe / Faith / Trust

śraddhā
China xìn
Japan shin
Believe / Faith / Trust Wall Scroll

This character can mean to believe, truth, faith, fidelity, sincerity, trust and confidence in Chinese, old Korean Hanja and Japanese Kanji.

This single character is often part of other words with similar meanings.

It is one of the five basic tenets of Confucius.

In Chinese, it sometimes has the secondary meaning of a letter (as in the mail) depending on context but it will not be read that way when seen on a wall scroll.

In Buddhist context, this is śraddhā (faith through hearing or being taught).


See Also:  Trust | Confucius

Trust in God / Faith in God

Japan kami wo shin ze yo
Trust in God / Faith in God Wall Scroll

神を信ぜよ is a way to express, "Trust in God" in Japanese.

The first character is "God."

The second character is a particle that links the ideas here.

The last three characters are a word that means, "to believe," "to believe in," "to place trust in," "to confide in," "to have faith in."

Basically, this is the Japanese phrase for, "Have faith in God," "Believe in God," or "Trust in God."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Firm Belief
Strong Faith

China jiān xìn
Japan ken shin
Firm Belief / Strong Faith Wall Scroll

This word means: to believe firmly; firm faith; without any doubt.

Japanese Christians sometimes use this term to mean the rite of confirmation.

This can also be the Japanese given name, Kenshin.

Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark

China xìn niǎn shì zài lí míng qián de hēi àn zhōng néng gǎn dào guāng míng de niǎo
Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark Wall Scroll

信唸是在黎明前的黑闇中能感到光明的鳥 is a philosophical poem/quote from Indian Poet and Philosopher, Rabindranath Tagore.

Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore, 1915


This quote is not sourced, and therefore several variations exist in English. Some suggest the original was in the Bengali language.

This, of course, is the Chinese translation which has the meaning of, "Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark."

Faithful / Honorable
Trustworthy / Fidelity / Loyalty

China xìn yì
Japan shingi
Faithful / Honorable / Trustworthy / Fidelity / Loyalty Wall Scroll

信義 is a word that is often used to describe a person with an honest and loyal reputation. To put it simply, this applies to somebody you can trust (with your life).

In Chinese, this is often defined as good faith, honor, trust, and justice.
In Korean, this word means fidelity, truthfulness, or faithfulness.
In Japanese: faith, fidelity and loyalty. It's also a Japanese male given name when pronounced "Nobuyoshi."

Believe

China xiāng xìn
Believe Wall Scroll

相信 is the Chinese way to say believe.

This specifically means to be convinced that something is true or to accept something as true or real.

This can also be translated as "convinced of," "have trust in," "have faith in"

Sincerity and Devotion

China zhì chéng
Japan shisei
Sincerity and Devotion Wall Scroll

至誠 is the idea that you enter into something with the utmost sincerity and fidelity. Ideas such as devotion, honesty, and "one's true heart" are also contained in this word.

至誠 is a universal word as the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja are all identical.

Eishin-Ryu

Japan ei shin ryuu
Eishin-Ryu Wall Scroll

英信流 is the Japanese martial arts term, Eishin-ryu. This can also be pronounced Hidenobu-ryu. The direct meaning is something like, hero faith school (or school of heroic faith).

Confidence / Faithful Heart

China xìn xīn
Japan shin jin
Confidence / Faithful Heart Wall Scroll

信心 is a Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word that means confidence, faith, or belief in somebody or something.

The first character means faith, and the second can mean heart or soul. Therefore, you could say this means "faithful heart" or "faithful soul."

In Korean especially, this word has a religious connotation.

In old Japanese Buddhist context, this was a word for citta-prasāda (clear or pure heart-mind).
In modern Japan (when read by non-Buddhists), this word is usually understood as, "faith," "belief" or "devotion."


See Also:  Self-Confidence

Fragrant / Good Smell

China xiāng
Japan ka / kou
Fragrant / Good Smell Wall Scroll

香 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja that means: fragrant; sweet smelling; aromatic; savory; appetizing; perfume; incense; aroma; fragrance; scent; good smell.

Fragrance or incense is known to be one of the Buddha's messengers to stimulate faith and devotion.

Believe in Yourself

Japan jibun o shinjiru
Believe in Yourself Wall Scroll

自分を信じる means, "believe in yourself," "have faith in yourself," or "believe in myself" (can be myself or yourself depending in if you're saying it to yourself or someone else).


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Self-Confidence

China zì xìn
Japan jishin
Self-Confidence Wall Scroll

This word is created by simply putting the character for "faith/believe/confidence" with the character for "oneself" in front of it.

The literal translation holds the same meaning in English, Chinese and Japanese.

It's like a self-affirmation to say, "you can do it."

Some may also use this to mean self-esteem or a sense of self-worth. 自信 is also how to say, "believe in oneself."


See Also:  Confidence

Fidelity / Personal Integrity / Honor

China cāo shǒu
Japan soushu
Fidelity / Personal Integrity / Honor Wall Scroll

操守 is the Chinese and Japanese Kanji for personal integrity, constancy, fidelity, and honor/honour.

The original meaning of the first character is chastity, fidelity, honor/honour, and/or faith.

The second character means to defend, guard, keep watch, be observant.

So, this is about being observant of, and guarding your integrity and honor.

Dōgen

China dào yuán
Japan dou gen
Dōgen Wall Scroll

Usually, when people are looking for "Dogen," they are referring to the Japanese Zen monk by this name.

He lived from 1200-1253. This Dogen name or title literally means "The Way Origin" or "Beginning of the Path." It is understood to mean "beginning of right doctrine or faith" in the context of his name and work to establish the Sōtō school of Zen in Japan.

To accomplish that task, this humble monk traveled from Japan and across China to find the more original or pure forms of Buddhism.

Trust No One / Trust No Man

Japan dare mo shin ji ru na
Trust No One / Trust No Man Wall Scroll

The first two characters mean everyone or anyone but change to "no one" with the addition of a negative verb.

The third through fifth characters express the idea of to believe, to believe in, to place trust in, to confide in, or to have faith in.

The last character makes the sentence negative (without the last character, this would mean "trust everyone," with that last character it's "trust no one").

誰も信じるな is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man" in Japanese, though no gender is specified.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Seven Heavenly Virtues

China xìn yǎng xī wàng cí shàn jiān rěn zhèng yì shèn zhòng jié zhì
Japan shinkou kibou jizen kennin seigi shinchou sessei
Seven Heavenly Virtues Wall Scroll

信仰希望慈善堅忍正義慎重節制 is a list in Chinese and Japanese Kanji of an interpretation of the Seven Heavenly Virtues.

1. Faith is belief in God, and the right virtues.
2. Hope is taking a positive future view that good will prevail.
3. Charity is concern for, and active helping of, others.
4. Fortitude is never giving up.
5. Justice is being fair and equitable with others.
6. Prudence is care of and moderation with money.
7. Temperance is moderation of needed things and abstinence from things which are not needed.

The full list is here. 信仰希望慈善堅忍正義慎重節制 is a word list, not a common phrase. While all Chinese and Japanese people will recognize the words in the list, they may not understand what the list is about (unless they are familiar with the Seven Heavenly Virtues).


Don't get this as a tattoo or anything like that without first consulting a native translator in the target language. These are fine for a wall scroll but a long discussion is needed before you commit to this for a lifetime inking commitment.

Lei

Surname
China léi
Lei Wall Scroll

嫘 is one Chinese surname that romanizes as Lei.

There are other characters that romanize as Lei, and are surnames. Make sure you get the right one.

I believe this is also a surname in Korean, where it's written as 루 and pronounced like "Ru" or "Lu" in modern Korean.

Forgive

China liàng
Forgive Wall Scroll

This single character means "forgive" in Chinese. In Korean, this kind of means forgive but also has slightly different definitions of consider, excuse, faithful, believe.

Turtle

...also means tortoise
China guī
Japan kame
Turtle Wall Scroll

龜 is the generic term for turtle in Chinese, and old Korean Hanja. It's like saying "turtle" (or "tortoise") without being specific about species of turtle.

Please note that there are many special characters in Chinese and a few in Japanese that denote specific species of turtle, and do not include this character. We can't possibly cover all of these species but if you want a certain one, such as "loggerhead" or a "leatherback," just post your request for a special Chinese / Japanese Kanji / Korean Hanja calligraphy word and we'll do our best to research your special species.

If you noticed, I said species names that do not include this character. 龜 is because, in much the same way we can do it in English by just saying, "loggerhead," instead of "loggerhead turtle," the same can be done in Chinese and Japanese.

亀This may be hard to believe but the image shown to the right is an alternate version of this character, which is currently used in Japan. This was originally an alternate form in ancient China for turtle - but it's so obscure now, that most Chinese people would just think this is the Japanese version of turtle (I did a lot of research on this). The version shown in the upper left is traditional Chinese (also used in Korea, prior to 100 years ago). It will generally not be recognized by the new generation of Japanese people. If your audience is Japanese, please click on the Kanji image shown to the right to have the calligrapher write that version (instead of clicking the button above).


Note: In Japanese, this Kanji is also a representation of long life. This is related to the fact that a tortoise can live for hundreds of years.

Loyalty

China zhōng chéng
Japan chuu sei
Loyalty Wall Scroll

Loyalty is staying true to someone. It is standing up for something you believe in without wavering. It is being faithful to your family, country, school, friends or ideals, when the going gets tough as well as when things are good. With loyalty, you build relationships that last forever.

Notes:
1. This written form of loyalty is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

2. There is also a Japanese version that is part of the Bushido Code which may be more desirable depending on whether your intended audience is Japanese or Chinese.

3. This version of loyalty is sometimes translated as devotion, sincerity, fidelity, or allegiance.


See Also:  Honor | Trust | Integrity | Sincerity

Commitment

China chéng nuò
Japan shoudaku
Commitment Wall Scroll

Commitment is caring deeply about something or someone. It is deciding carefully what you want to do, and then giving it 100%, holding nothing back. You give your all to a friendship, a task, or something you believe in. You finish what you start. You keep your promises.

In Chinese, this word directly means to undertake something or to make a promise to do something.

Within the idea of commitment, this word also means to make a big effort, or undertaking a great task. Outside of the commitment idea, this particular word can also mean approval, acceptance, consent, assent, acquiescence, or agreement depending on context (especially in Japanese and Korean). Therefore, this word is probably best if your audience is Chinese.


See Also:  Partnership | Hard Work | Dedication

Guan Yu

China guān yǔ
Guan Yu Wall Scroll

關羽 is the name Guan Yu, Army General for the Kingdom of Shu.

He is also known as Guan Gong (like saying Duke Guan or Sir Guan)

He was immortalized in the novel, "Romance of the Three Kingdoms."

He was a fearsome fighter, also famous for his virtue and loyalty. He is worshiped by some modern-day soldiers and has the title "Warrior Saint" in China. Some believe he offers safety and protection for military servicemen.

Guan Yu lived until 219 A.D.

Honesty

China zhèng zhí
Japan shoujiki
Honesty Wall Scroll

Honesty is being truthful and sincere. It is important because it builds trust. When people are honest, they can be relied on not to lie, cheat or steal. Being honest means that you accept yourself as you are. When you are open and trustworthy, others can believe in you.

正直 is one of the 8 key concepts of Tang Soo Do.


Note: This entry is cross-listed as "integrity" because it also fits that definition.

Japanese jikiPlease note that the second Kanji sometimes has an alternate form in Japanese. Let us know if you want the alternate form shown to the right.


See Also:  Truth | Trust | Integrity

Nothingness

China kōng wú
Japan kuu mu
Nothingness Wall Scroll

空無 is "nothingness" in a Buddhist context.

The first character means empty but can also mean air or sky (air and sky have no form).

The second character means have not, no, none, not or to lack.

Together these characters reinforce each other into a word that means "absolute nothingness."

I know this is a term used in Buddhism but I have not yet figured out the context in which it is used. I suppose it can be the fact that Buddhists believe that the world in a non-real illusion, or perhaps it's about visualizing yourself as "nothing" and therefore leaving behind your desire and worldliness.
Buddhist concepts and titles often have this element of ambiguity or rather "mystery." Therefore, such ideas can have different meanings to different people, and that's okay. If you don't get it right in this lifetime, as there will be plenty more lifetimes to master it (whatever "it" is, and if "it" really exists at all).

Soothill defines this as "Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature."

Goldfish

China jīn yú
Japan kin gyo
Goldfish Wall Scroll

金魚 is the title for goldfish in Chinese and Japanese.

There was a time in ancient China when only the Emperor could possess the true yellow-gold colored fish. 金魚 is why alternate coloration such as orange, black, red, and white were bred. Many believe this is why colors other than yellow-gold are more common for "goldfish" found in pet shops today.

Aries Zodiac Symbol / Sign

(Alternate / Chinese)
China bái yáng zuò
Aries Zodiac Symbol / Sign Wall Scroll

白羊座 is an alternate Chinese way to write Aries (ram) of western astrology. I don't believe it is used at all in Japanese, so the other version is probably better or at least more universal.


See Also:  Chinese Zodiac

Capricorn Zodiac Symbol / Sign

(Alternate / Chinese)
China mó jié zuò
Capricorn Zodiac Symbol / Sign Wall Scroll

摩羯座 is an alternate Chinese way to write Capricorn (horned goat) of western astrology. I don't believe it is used at all in Japanese, so the other version is probably better or at least more universal.


See Also:  Chinese Zodiac

Shaolin Temple

China shào lín sì
Japan shou rin ji
Shaolin Temple Wall Scroll

少林寺 is the full title of the Shaolin Temple.

This refers to the Buddhist monastery famous for its kung fu monks.

少林寺 is also known in Japanese where they use the same characters but romanize it as Shourinji or Shōrinji.

Some believe this monastery and temple represent the place where Bodhidharma sat with his face to a wall for nine years leading to his discovery of enlightenment and establishment of Buddhism.

Fate / Opportunity / Chance

Buddhist idea of Fate
China yīn yuán
Japan in nen
Fate / Opportunity / Chance Wall Scroll

因緣 is the Buddhist concept of a chance meeting or an opportunity that presents itself by fate.

Sometimes this is used to describe a cosmic chain of events or cause and effect.

It also is used to describe predestined relationships between people - and sometimes married couples (although if you want one about marriage, try this: Fate / Destiny of Lovers.

This word can also be translated as origin, karma, destiny, affinity, connection, and relation. This all depends on context - seen alone on a wall scroll, this will be read with a "fate / chance" meaning by a Chinese person, or a Korean person who can read Hanja.

The more complex definition of this word would be, "Direct causes and indirect conditions, which underlie the actions of all things."

This concept is known as nidana in the original Sanskrit. Also sometimes presented as hetupratyaya (or "hetu and prataya") which I believe is Pali.


Note: Japanese will tend to use this version of the second Kanji: 縁
If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect that you'll get this version. However, this word often carries a negative connotation in Japanese (bad things happen), as it is used that way in a certain Japanese idiom. Therefore, this may not be the best choice if Japanese is your target language.


See Also:  Buddhism | Opportunity

Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do

China táng shǒu dào
Japan kara te do
Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do Wall Scroll

唐手道 is the alternate title for Karate-do. This title uses a character which represents the Tang Dynasty of China. Thus, this is often translated as the "Tang Hand Way" or incorrectly, "Tang Fist Way." I have also seen some call it "China Hand Way."

There is not a lot of information on this title but some believe that a simplified form of Kung Fu that started in China, and ended up very popular in Japan used this title initially. It was later changed in Japan to a different Karate title which means "Empty Hand" (as in, without weapons).

In Korean, this title represents a certain style of martial arts. From Korean, this is often romanized as "Tang Soo Do," "Tangsudo," "Dang Su Do," or "Dangsudo." The last two romanizations on that list are the official Korean government romanization, though martial arts schools tend to use other non-standard versions.

Journey of Life

Japan jinseikouro
Journey of Life Wall Scroll

If you believe that life is a journey, this is a nice Japanese title for you wall.

人生行路 means "journey of life" in Japanese Kanji. The actual word order is more like "life (人生) journey (行路)" as Japanese grammar is a bit different than English.

Note: The "journey" part can also be translated as "road," so this is also how to say, "the road of life."

Believe in Yourself

China xiāng xìn zì jǐ
Believe in Yourself Wall Scroll

相信自己 means, "believe in yourself" in Chinese.

Tiger Rumor

China sān rén chéng hǔ
Tiger Rumor Wall Scroll

These four characters together relay the meaning that can be expressed in English as, "When three people say there's a tiger running in the street, you believe it."

Of course, there is an ancient story behind this idiom...

三人成虎 is actually a proverb that resulted from a conversation that occurred around 300 B.C.

The conversation was between the king of the Wei kingdom and one of the king's ministers named Pang Cong.

It was near the end of one of many wars, this time with the Zhao kingdom. Pang Cong was to be sent by the king to the Zhao kingdom with the king's son who was to be held hostage. It was common at the time for a king to make his son a hostage to secure stable peace between warring kingdoms.

Before minister Pang Cong departed, he asked his king, "If one person told you there was a tiger running in the street, would you believe it?."

"No," the king said.

The minister continued, "What if two people told you?"

The king replied, "Well, I would have my doubts but I might believe it."

The minister continued, "So, what if three people told you that there is a tiger running in the streets?"

The king replied, "Yes, I would believe it, it must be true if three people say it."

The minister then reminded the king, "Your son and I are now traveling far away to live in the distant Zhao kingdom - much farther from your palace than the street. Rumors may fly about me in my absence, so I hope your majesty will weight such rumors appropriately."

The king replied, "I have every trust in you, do not worry"

While the minister was gone, the king's enemies gossiped about minister Pang Cong on many occasions. At first, the king thought nothing of these comments and rumors. But slowly as the rumors mounted, the king began to suspect ill of his minister.

Some time later when peace was well-established, the minister and prince were freed and returned to the kingdom of Wei. The king received his son, BUT DID NOT EVEN SUMMON MINISTER PANG CONG TO THE PALACE!

Hopefully this story will help you see how dangerous words can be when used to promote rumors, or create ill will. And perhaps will inspire you to not believe everything you hear.

There is also a secondary suggestion in this idiom that gossip is as ferocious as a tiger. Some Chinese people who don't know the ancient story above may believe that this scroll means that rumors are as vicious as three tigers.

Note: This proverb appears in my Korean dictionary but is not well-known in Korea.

Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis

China dào tiān dì jiàng fǎ
Japan dou ten chi shou hou
Art of War: 5 Points of Analysis Wall Scroll

The first chapter of Sun Tzu's Art of War lists five key points to analyzing your situation.

It reads like a 5-part military proverb. Sun Tzu says that to sharpen your skills, you must plan. To plan well, you must know your situation. Therefore, you must consider and discuss the following:

1. Philosophy and Politics: Make sure your way or your policy is agreeable among all of your troops (and the citizens of your kingdom as well). For when your soldiers believe in you and your way, they will follow you to their deaths without hesitation, and will not question your orders.

2. Heaven/Sky: Consider climate / weather. This can also mean to consider whether God is smiling on you. In the modern military, this could be waiting for clear skies so that you can have air support for an amphibious landing.

3. Ground/Earth: Consider the terrain in which the battle will take place. This includes analyzing defensible positions, exit routes, and using varying elevation to your advantage. When you plan an ambush, you must know your terrain, and the best location from which to stage that ambush. This knowledge will also help you avoid being ambushed, as you will know where the likely places in which to expect an ambush from your enemy.

4. Leadership: This applies to you as the general, and also to your lieutenants. A leader should be smart and be able to develop good strategies. Leaders should keep their word, and if they break a promise, they should punish themselves as harshly as they would punish subordinates. Leaders should be benevolent to their troops, with almost a fatherly love for them. Leaders must have the ability to make brave and fast decisions. Leaders must have steadfast principles.

5. [Military] Methods: This can also mean laws, rules, principles, model, or system. You must have an efficient organization in place to manage both your troops and supplies. In the modern military, this would be a combination of how your unit is organized, and your SOP (Standard Operating Procedure).


Notes: This is a simplistic translation and explanation. Much more is suggested in the actual text of the Art of War (Bing Fa). It would take a lot of study to master all of these aspects. In fact, these five characters can be compared to the modern military acronyms such as BAMCIS or SMEAC.

CJK notes: I have included the Japanese and Korean pronunciations but in Chinese, Korean and Japanese, this does not make a typical phrase (with subject, verb, and object) it is a list that only someone familiar with Sun Tzu's writings would understand.

Namu Amida Butsu

Japan namu amida butsu
Namu Amida Butsu Wall Scroll

南無阿弥陀仏 is the modern Japanese version of "Namu Amida Butsu" or "The Compassionate Amitabha Buddha."

Some will translate this as, "I sincerely believe in Amitabha; Lord have mercy on me."

This phrase especially applies to Japanese Pure Land Buddhists.

There is a more universal version using ancient characters (with more strokes) for the 4th and last characters. That version is also used in Chinese, Korean, and occasionally Vietnamese. 南無阿弥陀仏 is used to pay homage to Amitabha Buddha.


See Also:  Bodhisattva | Buddhism | Nirvana

Namo Shakyamuni Buddha

China nán wú shì jiā móu ní fó
Japan namu shakamuni butsu
Namo Shakyamuni Buddha Wall Scroll

南無釋迦牟尼佛 is a Buddhist chant or prayer of respect to the Shakyamuni Buddha.

Some will translate this as the Buddhist vow.

The first two characters, 南無, are sometimes translated as "amen"; others will translate it as, "believe in," or "homage to."
To expand on this, 南無 can also mean, "taking of refuge in," while also representing devotion or conviction. 南無 as with most religious concepts or words, different people or denominations will have varying definitions.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Faith 信念shinnenxìn niàn / xin4 nian4 / xin nian / xinnian hsin nien / hsinnien
Religious Devotion
Faith in God
Religious Faith
信仰shin kou / shinkou / shin ko / shinkoxìn yǎng / xin4 yang3 / xin yang / xinyang hsin yang / hsinyang
Trust
To Have Faith
信賴
信赖
shinraixìn lài / xin4 lai4 / xin lai / xinlai hsin lai / hsinlai
Believe
Faith
Trust
shinxìn / xin4 / xin hsin
Trust in God
Faith in God
神を信ぜよkami wo shin ze yo
kamiwoshinzeyo
Firm Belief
Strong Faith
堅信
坚信
ken shin / kenshinjiān xìn / jian1 xin4 / jian xin / jianxin chien hsin / chienhsin
Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark 信唸是在黎明前的黑闇中能感到光明的鳥
信念是在黎明前的黑暗中能感到光明的鸟
xìn niǎn shì zài lí míng qián de hēi àn zhōng néng gǎn dào guāng míng de niǎo
xin4 nian3 shi4 zai4 li2 ming2 qian2 de hei1 an4 zhong1 neng2 gan3 dao4 guang1 ming2 de niao3
xin nian shi zai li ming qian de hei an zhong neng gan dao guang ming de niao
hsin nien shih tsai li ming ch`ien te hei an chung neng kan tao kuang ming te niao
hsin nien shih tsai li ming chien te hei an chung neng kan tao kuang ming te niao
Faithful
Honorable
Trustworthy
Fidelity
Loyalty
信義
信义
shingixìn yì / xin4 yi4 / xin yi / xinyi hsin i / hsini
Believe 相信xiāng xìn
xiang1 xin4
xiang xin
xiangxin
hsiang hsin
hsianghsin
Sincerity and Devotion 至誠
至诚
shiseizhì chéng
zhi4 cheng2
zhi cheng
zhicheng
chih ch`eng
chihcheng
chih cheng
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki
Aikido
Angie
Beautiful
Belierve in Yourself
Beloved Daughter
Benjamin
Benny
Best Friends Forever
Black
Blessed
Courage
Craig
Crystal
Dallas
Dance
Daughter
David
Dragon Soul
Earth
Enough
Faith
Father
Forever in My Heart
Four Noble Truths
Happy
Heroic Spirit
Hope
Jean
Jenna
John
Kari
Karma
Kind Heart
Lotus
Love
Loyalty
Luna
Meiya
Michael
Miranda
Namaste
Noah
Pablo
Patricia
Prince
Ravi
Rebirth
Revenge
Robert
Sara
Senpai
Sensei
Shotokan
Shotokan Karate-Do
Spirit
Strong Will
Travis
True Love
Warrior
Wolf

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Faith Kanji, Faith Characters, Faith in Mandarin Chinese, Faith Characters, Faith in Chinese Writing, Faith in Japanese Writing, Faith in Asian Writing, Faith Ideograms, Chinese Faith symbols, Faith Hieroglyphics, Faith Glyphs, Faith in Chinese Letters, Faith Hanzi, Faith in Japanese Kanji, Faith Pictograms, Faith in the Chinese Written-Language, or Faith in the Japanese Written-Language.