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A Second Chance in Chinese / Japanese...

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Start your custom "A Second Chance" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "A Second Chance" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Fate / Opportunity / Chance
  2. Fate / Chance Meeting
  3. Serendipity / Chance Discovery
  4. Opportunity
  5. Sticky Hands / Chi Sau
  6. Failure is the Mother of Success
  7. Pushing Hands / Tui Sau
  8. Once in a Lifetime
  9. The Mysterious Bond Between People
10. Let Us Try
11. Don’t Panic
12. Benevolent Heart
13. Serendipity
14. Serendipity / Happy Coincidence
15. Serendipity / Lucky Coincidence
16. The More We Sweat in Training,...
17. Wu Wei / Without Action
18. Serendipity / Nice Coincidence


Fate / Opportunity / Chance

Buddhist idea of Fate
China yīn yuán
Japan in nen
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Fate / Opportunity / <mark>Chance</mark>

This is the Buddhist concept of a chance meeting or an opportunity that presents itself by fate.

Sometimes this is used to describe a cosmic chain of events or cause and effect.

It also is used to describe predestined relationships between people - and sometimes married couples (although if you want one about marriage, try this: Fate / Destiny of Lovers.

This word can also be translated as origin, karma, destiny, affinity, connection, and relation. This all depends on context - seen alone on a wall scroll, this will be read with a "fate / chance" meaning by a Chinese person, or a Korean person who can read Hanja.

The more complex definition of this word would be, "Direct causes and indirect conditions, which underlie the actions of all things".

This concept is known as nidana in the original Sanskrit. Also sometimes presented as hetupratyaya (or "hetu and prataya") which I believe is Pali.


Note: Japanese will tend to use this version of the second Kanji: 縁
If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect that you'll get this version. However, this word often carries a negative connotation in Japanese (bad things happen), as it is used that way in a certain Japanese idiom. Therefore, this may not be the best choice if Japanese is your target language.


See Also...  Buddhism | Opportunity

Fate / Chance Meeting

China yuán fèn
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Fate / <mark>Chance</mark> Meeting

These two characters contain the ideas of fate. But this is specifically the fate or destiny that brings two people together.

This is like the chance meeting of two people that leads some time later to marriage.

This could also be the chance meeting of two business people, who become partners and build a huge and successful company.

Basically, this is an idea often associated with a fateful meeting leading to good fortune.

Some will define this word as, "The destiny brings you two together", or "Meant to be".


分 Note: Second character can also be written without the left radical, as shown to the right. If you have a preference, please let use know in the special instructions for your project. There is no difference in meaning or pronunciation, just two (alternate) ways to write the same character.


See Also...  Soulmates | Good Fortune

Serendipity / Chance Discovery

Japan guuzen no hakken
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Serendipity / <mark>Chance</mark> Discovery

This is a way to express serendipity in Japanese. This title is more about discovery by chance like the melting candy bar in a Bell radar/communications laboratory that led to the invention of the microwave oven.

The first two Kanji mean incidentally, by chance, randomly, unexpectedly, suddenly, accident, fortuity, or by coincidence.

In the middle is a possessive article that connects these words/ideas together.

The last two Kanji mean discovery, detection, or finding.

Opportunity

China jī huì
Japan kikai
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Opportunity

This is a common way to express "opportunity" in Japanese. The first character means "chance" and the second can be translated as "meeting". So in Japanese business a "chance meeting" represents a real "opportunity".

Note that this also means opportunity in Chinese, but it's more an oral or informal word in Mandarin. Also, the second Kanji is the same as the simplified version of the hui Chinese character.

Sticky Hands / Chi Sau

China chī shǒu
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Sticky Hands / Chi Sau

The first character means "wood glue" or can be understood as "sticky" or "sticking".
The second character means "hand" (or "hands").

This term can be romanized as "Chi Sau", "Chi Sao", or from Mandarin, "Chi Shou".

This is a concept that comes from the Wing Chun (AKA: Ving Tsun, Wing Tsun, or Yong Chun) style of martial arts. If you are looking for this term, chances are, you already know the meaning within the context of Wing Chun.

Failure is the Mother of Success

China shī bài shì chéng gōng zhī mǔ
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Failure is the Mother of Success

This proverb means exactly what you think.

Every failure that you experience is a chance to learn from it and find success.

Knowing what does not work is just as important as finding out what does work.


See Also...  Experience Is The Mother Of Wisdom

Failure is the Mother of Success

Japan shippai wa seikou no haha
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Failure is the Mother of Success

This Japanese proverb means exactly what you think.

Every failure that you experience is a chance to learn from it and find success.

Knowing what does not work is just as important as finding out what does work.


Note: This is the Japanese version of a ancient Chinese proverb.


See Also...  Experience Is The Mother Of Wisdom

Pushing Hands / Tui Sau

China tuī shǒu
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Pushing Hands / Tui Sau

This is the martial arts title "Pushing Hands".

This is the title for two-person training routines practiced in internal Chinese martial arts such as Baguazhang, Xingyiquan, Tai Chi Chuan (Taijiquan), Liuhebafa, Chuan Fa, and Yiquan.

The first character means "pushing".
The second character means "hand" (or "hands").

This term can be romanized as "Tui Sau", "Tui Sao", or from Mandarin, "Tui Shou".

If you are looking for this term, chances are, you already know the meaning within the context of Tai Chi and other martial arts.

Once in a Lifetime

China yī qī yī huì
Japan ichigoichie
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Once in a Lifetime

This Japanese title can be translated as "for this time only", "chance meeting", "one meeting, one opportunity", "never again", or "one chance in a lifetime".

The characters literally mean "one time one meeting" - of course, the Kanji characters have meaning far beyond a direct translation like this.

Some might use this proverb to talk of an opportunity that presents itself just once in your life. It could also be the single chance-meeting with your true soul mate. Basically an expression for any event that might happen once in a lifetime.


This is primarily a Japanese title, however, there is also a Traditional Chinese (and old Korean) version of this proverb. Just the last character is different.
會The traditional form was used in Japan before WWII and in Korea prior to 1900. This title is somewhat known in China.

If you want the older traditional form, just click on the character to the right.

The Mysterious Bond Between People

The invisible force that brings people together forever
China yuán
Japan en
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The Mysterious Bond Between People

This is a complicated single character. It can mean a lot of different things depending on how you read it.

In Japanese, it can mean fate; destiny; a mysterious force that binds two people together; a relationship between two people; bond; link; connection; family ties; affinity; opportunity; chance (to meet someone and start a relationship). It can also mean "someone to rely on", relative, reminder, memento, or the female given name, Yori.

It's basically the same in Chinese, where it's defined as cause, reason, karma, fate, or predestined affinity.

In Buddhist context, it's Pratyaya. This is the concept of indirect conditions, as opposed to direct causes. It's when something happens (meeting someone) by circumstance, or a contributing environment. Instead of a direct cause or act, it is a conditioning cause without direct input or action by the involved people.

Occasionally, this character is used in a facetious way to say hem, seam, or edge of clothing. In this case, it's the seam that brings or holds the clothing together.


縁Note: Japanese will tend to use the variant of this Kanji shown to the right. If you want this version (and are ordering this from the Japanese master calligrapher), click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above.

Let Us Try

Essayons
China cháng shì
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Let Us Try

This is a close match for the English phrase, "let us try" or the French word "Essayons" as used by Combat Engineers in the U.S. Army.

This word can also be translated as "to try" or "to attempt".

Even if you're not a Combat Engineer, this word should inspire you to attempt to accomplish difficult things. If you don't try, you are certain to fail, if you do try, at least there is a chance of success.

The worst thing is not failure, the worst thing is not trying at all.

Don’t Panic

China bú yào kǒng huāng
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Don’t Panic

If you need a strange homage to the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, this might be it. This simply says "Don't Panic" in Chinese. A Chinese person who is not familiar with this masterpiece of a book, will not see the humor, but that will be your chance to suggest reading some Douglas Adams (which has been translated into Chinese).

Benevolent Heart

Japan ji hi no kokoro
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Benevolent Heart

This means benevolent heart, compassionate heart, or merciful heart in Japanese. This is a Japanese only phrase, and should be ordered from our Japanese master calligrapher. This is because the third character is special Hiragana.

Chances are you are into Inuyasha and are seeking the title of chapter 471 which is often translated as "Merciful Heart".


See Also...  Love | Altruism

Serendipity

China ǒu rán xìng
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Serendipity

This is a Chinese and Korean word that means chance, fortuity, or serendipity.

Serendipity

Short Version
China ǒu rán
Japan guu zen
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Serendipity

This is a a short way to write serendipity in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This can also be translated as incidentally, by chance, randomly, unexpectedly, suddenly, accident, fortuity, or by coincidence.

Serendipity / Happy Coincidence

Japan shiawa se na guu zen
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Serendipity / Happy Coincidence

This is one of many ways to express serendipity in Japanese.

The first two characters mean happiness, good fortune, luck, or blessing.

In the middle is a Japanese Hiragana character that serves to connect these words/ideas together.

The last two Kanji mean incidentally, by chance, randomly, unexpectedly, suddenly, accident, fortuity, or by coincidence.

Serendipity / Lucky Coincidence

Japan kou un na guu zen
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Serendipity / Lucky Coincidence

This is one of many ways to express serendipity in Japanese.

The first two Kanji mean fortunate, lucky, fortune, or good luck.

In the middle is a Japanese Hiragana character that serves to connect these words/ideas together.

The last two Kanji mean incidentally, by chance, randomly, unexpectedly, suddenly, accident, fortuity, or by coincidence.

The More We Sweat in Training,
The Less We Bleed in Battle

China píng shí duō liú hàn zhàn shí shǎo liú xuè
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The More We Sweat in Training,<br>The Less We Bleed in Battle

There is more than one way to translate this ancient Chinese military proverb. Here are a few interpretations:

A drop of sweat spent in a drill is a drop of blood saved in war.

More practice will give one a better chance of success in real situation.

The more you sweat in training, the less you bleed in battle.

I heard this many times when I was a U.S. Marine, but I had no idea at the time that it was actually an old Chinese proverb.

Wu Wei / Without Action

Daoist / Taoist Tenet
China wú wéi
Japan mui
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Wu Wei / Without Action

Wu Wei is a Daoist (Taoist) tenet, that speaks to the idea of letting nature take its course.

Some will say it's about knowing when to take action and when not to. In reality, it's more about not going against the flow. What is going to happen is controlled by the Dao (Tao), for which one who follows the Dao will not resist or struggle against.

There is a lot more to this concept, but chances are, if you are looking for this entry, you already know the expanded concept.

Warning: Outside of Daoist context, this means idleness or inactivity (especially in Japanese where very few know this as a Daoist concept).

Serendipity / Nice Coincidence

Japan Su teki na guu zen
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Serendipity / Nice Coincidence

This is a common way to express serendipity in Japanese.

The first two characters mean nice, lovely, dreamy, beautiful, great, fantastic, superb, or cool.

In the middle is a Japanese Hiragana character that serves to connect these words/ideas together.

The last two Kanji mean incidentally, by chance, randomly, unexpectedly, suddenly, accident, fortuity, or by coincidence.


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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

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With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Romaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Fate / Opportunity / Chance因缘 / 因縁
因緣
in nen
innen
yīn yuán
yin yuan
yin yüan
yin1 yuan2
yinyuan
Fate / Chance Meeting缘份 / 缘分
緣份 / 緣分
n/ayuán fèn
yuan fen
yüan fen
yuan2 fen4
yuanfen
Serendipity / Chance Discovery偶然の発見
偶然の発見
guuzen no hakken
guuzennohakken
guzen no haken
n/a
Opportunity机会
機會
kikaijī huì
ji hui
chi hui
ji1 hui4
jihui
Sticky Hands / Chi Sau黐手
黐手
n/achī shǒu
chi shou
ch`ih shou
chi1 shou3
chishou
chihshou
chih shou
Failure is the Mother of Success失败是成功之母
失敗是成功之母
n/ashī bài shì chéng gōng zhī mǔ
shi bai shi cheng gong zhi mu
shih pai shih ch`eng kung chih mu
shi1 bai4 shi4 cheng2 gong1 zhi1 mu3
shibaishichenggongzhimu
shih pai shih cheng kung chih mu
Failure is the Mother of Success失敗は成功の母
失敗は成功の母
shippai wa seikou no haha
shippaiwaseikounohaha
shipai wa seiko no haha
n/a
Pushing Hands / Tui Sau推手
推手
n/atuī shǒu
tui shou
t`ui shou
tui1 shou3
tuishou
tuishou
tui shou
Once in a Lifetime一期一会
一期一會
ichigoichieyī qī yī huì
yi qi yi hui
i ch`i i hui
yi1 qi1 yi1 hui4
yiqiyihui
ichiihui
i chi i hui
The Mysterious Bond Between People
緣 / 縁
enyuán
yuan
yüan
yuan2
Let Us Try尝试
嘗試
n/acháng shì
chang shi
ch`ang shih
chang2 shi4
changshi
changshih
chang shih
Don’t Panic不要恐慌
不要恐慌
n/abú yào kǒng huāng
bu yao kong huang
pu yao k`ung huang
bu2 yao4 kong3 huang1
buyaokonghuang
puyaokunghuang
pu yao kung huang
Benevolent Heart慈悲の心
慈悲の心
ji hi no kokoro
jihinokokoro
n/a
Serendipity偶然性
偶然性
n/aǒu rán xìng
ou ran xing
ou jan hsing
ou3 ran2 xing4
ouranxing
Serendipity偶然
偶然
guu zen
guuzen
gu zen
ǒu rán
ou ran
ou jan
ou3 ran2
ouran
Serendipity / Happy Coincidence幸せな偶然
幸せな偶然
shiawa se na guu zen
shiawasenaguuzen
shiawa se na gu zen
n/a
Serendipity / Lucky Coincidence幸運な偶然
幸運な偶然
kou un na guu zen
kouunnaguuzen
ko un na gu zen
n/a
The More We Sweat in Training, The Less We Bleed in Battle平时多流汗战时少流血
平時多流汗戰時少流血
n/apíng shí duō liú hàn zhàn shí shǎo liú xuè
ping shi duo liu han
zhan shi shao liu xue
p`ing shih to liu shih shao liu hsüeh
ping2 shi2 duo1 liu2 han4
zhan4 shi2 shao3 liu2 xue4
ping shih to liu shih shao liu hsüeh
Wu Wei / Without Action无为
無為
muiwú wéi
wu wei
wu2 wei2
wuwei
Serendipity / Nice Coincidence素敵な偶然
素敵な偶然
Su teki na guu zen
Sutekinaguuzen
Su teki na gu zen
n/a

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