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The World in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy a The World calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "The World" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "The World" title below...

  1. The World
  2. Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home
  3. If you love your child, send them out into the world
  4. Impartial and Fair to the...
  5. Mark the boat to find the lost sword...
  6. World Peace
  7. Worldwide Wish for Peace and Prosperity
  8. Enlightenment
  9. Soccer / Football / Futbol
10. Every Creature Has A Domain
11. Shit Happens
12. One Family Under Heaven
13. In Flowers the Cherry Blossom,...
14. Live Love Die
15. Eye for an eye
16. Life Is But A Dream
17. Budokan
18. Gentleness
19. Ultimate Goodness of Water
20. John 3:16
21. River of Literacy, Sea of Learning
22. Hardships and Joys
23. Judo
24. Zen Understanding
25. Bright and Promising Future
26. 1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective...
27. Power of Understanding and Wisdom
28. Self-Respect / Self-Esteem
29. John 3:16
30. Hell / Judges of Hell
31. Learning is Eternal
32. Intense / Serious / Deep / Profound
33. Love and Hate
34. Creativity
35. Read 10,000 Books, Travel 10,000 Miles
36. Five Elements
37. Read
38. Hell
39. Caring
40. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible
41. Bonsai / Penzai
42. Mercy / Compassion...
43. Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding
44. Wolf
45. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching
46. Inspiration
47. Better to be Happy than Rich
48. Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude
49. A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding
50. Nothingness
51. Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight
52. Appreciation and Love for Your Parents
53. Taekwondo
54. Kung Fu / Gong Fu
55. Reiki
56. Hapkido
57. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

The World

China shì jiè
Japan sei kai
The World

世界 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for world.

Beyond the world, this can refer to society, the universe, space, a sphere or circle.

In Buddhism, this would mean the realm governed by one Buddha.

Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home

China sì hǎi wéi jiā
Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home

This literally reads, "Four Seas Serve-As [my/one's] Home."

Together, 四海 which literally means "four seas" is understood to mean, "the whole world" or "the seven seas." It's presumed to be an ancient word, from back when only four seas were known - so it equates to the modern English term, "seven seas."

This can be translated or understood a few different ways:
To regard the four corners of the world all as home.
To feel at home anywhere.
To roam about unconstrained.
To consider the entire country, or the world, to be one's own.

If you love your child, send them out into the world

Japan kawaii ko ni wa tabi o sa seyo
If you love your child, send them out into the world

This Japanese proverb means, "If you love your children, send them out on a journey into the world."

This is kind of similar to the western phrase, "Spare the rod and spoil the child."

More literally, this reads, "Cute child, a journey granted."
That "granted" could also be understood as "should be initiated."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

China yí shì tóng rén
Japan isshidoujin
Impartial and Fair to the / Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World

一視同仁 is how to write "universal benevolence." 一視同仁 is also how to express the idea that you see all people the same.

If you are kind and charitable to all people, this is the best way to state that virtue. It is the essence of being impartial to all mankind, regardless of social standing, background, race, sex, etc. You do not judge others but rather you see them eye to eye on the same level with you.


See Also:  Benevolence | Compassion | Equality | Justice | Right Decision | Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common

Mark the boat to find the lost sword
Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world

China kè zhōu qiú jiàn
Japan kokushuukyuuken
Mark the boat to find the lost sword / Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world

This originally-Chinese proverb is a warning to people that things are always in a state of change. Thus, you must take that into account, and not depend on the old ways, or a way that may have worked in the past but is no longer valid.

This idiom/proverb comes from the following story:
A man was traveling in a ferry boat across a river. With him, he carried a valuable and treasured sword. Along the way, the man became overwhelmed and intoxicated by the beautiful view, and accidentally dropped his prized sword into the river. Thinking quickly, he pulled out a knife, and marked on the rail of the boat where exactly he has lost his sword.

When the boat arrived on the other side of the river, the man jumped out of the boat and searched for his sword right under where he'd made the mark. Of course, the boat had moved a great distance since he made the mark, and thus, he could not find the sword.

While this man may seem foolhardy, we have to take a great lesson from this parable: Circumstances change, so one should use methods that can handle the change. In modern China, this is used in business to mean that one should not depend on old business models for a changing market.


This proverb dates back to the Spring and Autumn period (770–476 BC) of the territory now known as China. It has spread and is somewhat known in Japan and Korea.

World Peace

Japan sekaiheiwa
World Peace

世界平和 is the Japanese title for "world peace" or "peace of the world."

Worldwide Wish for Peace and Prosperity

China qǐ shèng shì kāi tài píng
Worldwide Wish for Peace and Prosperity

This means "To bring flourishing peace and security to the world (our current era)."

It's really a wish that a new door leading to peace and prosperity could be opened to mankind.

Character and word breakdown:
啟 to open; to start; to initiate; to enlighten or awaken.
盛世 a flourishing period; period of prosperity; a golden age.
開 to open; to start; to turn on.
太平 peace and security; peace and tranquility; peace; tranquility.
I don't really like to do breakdowns like this, as the words altogether create their own unique meaning (encompassed in the main title above). Please take that into consideration.

Enlightenment

China qǐ méng
Japan keimou
Enlightenment

啟蒙 is the Chinese word for enlightenment.

The first character means to open, to start, to begin, to commence or to explain. The second character means deception or ignorance. Basically, it suggests that enlightenment is the opening or cutting through what deceives you in the world or the ignorance of the world. This title can also mean "to educate."


啓The Japanese and Korean version of the first character of this title varies slightly from the Chinese. Please click on the Kanji to the right, instead of the button above, if you want the Japanese/Korean version.

Soccer / Football / Futbol

China zú qiú
Soccer / Football / Futbol

This the word for football or soccer in Chinese. As with most of the world, football is very popular in China. During the World Cup, the whole country seems to shut down to watch (regardless of whether Team China is playing or not).

Soccer is probably the 3rd most popular participation sport in China (after ping pong and badminton).

As you might expect, the first character means "foot" and the second character means "ball."


FYI: This game would never be confused with American Football in Chinese. As with the rest of the world, there is a vague awareness of what American Football is (often described as "that game kind of like rugby").

For those familiar with American Football, there is some disgust regarding the fact that winners of the Superbowl call themselves "world champions" of a game that is only played in the USA. This is one of the reasons that jokes abound about how Americans are unaware that there is a world outside of their borders.

Every Creature Has A Domain

China hǎi wéi lóng shì jiè yún shì hè jiā xiāng
Every Creature Has A Domain

Every Creature has a Domain The first line (which is the column on the right) says, "The Ocean is the World of the Dragon." The next column says, "The Clouds are the Domain of the Cranes."

This is a somewhat poetic way to say that everyone and everything has its place in the world.

The image to the right is what this calligraphy can look like in xing-kaishu style by Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping.

Shit Happens

China shì shì nán liào
Shit Happens

世事難料 is a polite Chinese version of, "shit happens." This phrase just suggests that things happen (for no reason, and for which we have no control).

The first two characters mean: the affairs of life; things of the world; worldly affairs; ways of the world.

The third character means: disaster; distress; problem; difficulty; difficult; hardships; troubles; defect.

The last character in this context means: to expect; to anticipate; to guess.

If you put this back together, you have something like, "In life, troubles (should be) expected."

One Family Under Heaven

China tiān xià yī jiā
Japan tenka ikka
One Family Under Heaven

This proverb can also be translated as "The whole world is one family."

It is used to mean that all humans are related under heaven.

The first two characters can be translated as "the world," "whole country," "descended from heaven," "earth under heaven," "the public" or "the ruling power."

The second two characters can mean "one family," "a household," "one's folks," "a house" or "a home." Usually this is read as "a family."

Note: This proverb can be understood in Japanese, though not commonly used.

In Flowers the Cherry Blossom,
In Men the Samurai

Japan hana wa sakuragi hito wa bushi
In Flowers the Cherry Blossom, / In Men the Samurai

This Japanese proverb simply reads, "[In] Flowers it's Cherry Blossoms, [In] Men it's Warriors."

This is meant to say that of all the flowers in the world, the cherry blossom is the best. And of all men in the world, the Samurai or Warrior is the best

This proverb has been around for a long time. It's believed to have been composed sometime before the Edo Period in Japan (which started in 1603).

Some will drop one syllable and pronounce this, "hana wa sakura hito wa bushi." That's "sakura" instead of "sakuragi," which is like saying "cherry blossom" instead of "cherry tree."


The third character was traditionally written as 櫻. But in modern Japan, that became 桜. You may still see 櫻 used from time to time on older pieces of calligraphy. We can do either one, so just make a special request if you want 櫻.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Live Love Die

China shēng ài sǐ
Japan sei ai shi
Live Love Die

This came from a customer's request but it's not too bad. These three simple characters suggest that you are born, you learn to love, and then exit the world.

Eye for an eye

China yǐ yǎn huán yǎn
Eye for an eye

This same proverb seems to be used in virtually every language and culture around the world. Whether you are Arab, Persian, Jewish, European, British, Asian, or American, this proverb is well known as the "original form of justice."

Life Is But A Dream

China rén shēng rú mèng
Life Is But A Dream

人生如夢 is an old Chinese proverb that suggests, "life is but a dream."

This kind of follows the Buddhist idea that the world is a temporal place, where reality may not be as real as you think.

Budokan

Japan budoukan
Budokan

Budokan literally means "martial arts stadium."

However, the title Budokan is often used to refer to a certain style of karate. This style originated in Malaysia and has spread throughout the world.

Gentleness

China wēn róu
Gentleness

Gentleness is moving wisely, touching softly, holding carefully, speaking quietly and thinking kindly. When you feel mad or hurt, use your self-control. Instead of harming someone, talk things out peacefully. You are making the world a safer, gentler place.


See Also:  Kindness | Caring

Ultimate Goodness of Water

Quote from Lao Tzu
China shàng shàn ruò shuǐ
Ultimate Goodness of Water

This quote is sometimes presented as, "Be like water." However, this is an ancient quote from the great philosopher Lao Tzu. It basically suggests that the ultimate goodness and purity (in the world) is water. Many take this as a suggestion to be like pure/good water.

John 3:16 (first half)

China shén ài shì rén shèn zhì jiāng tā de dú shēng zǐ cì gè tā mén
John 3:16 (first half)

神愛世人甚至將他的獨生子賜給他們 is the first half of John 3:16 in Chinese.

It reads roughly, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son."

This came directly from the Chinese Union Bible first printed in 1919.

John 3:16

China shén ài shì rén shèn zhì jiāng tā de dú shēng zǐ cì gè tā mén jiào yí qiè xìn tā de bú zhì miè wáng fǎn dé yǒng shēng
John 3:16

神愛世人甚至將他的獨生子賜給他們叫一切信他的不至滅亡反得永生 is the full translation of John 3:16 into Chinese.

This is from the Chinese Union Bible which comes from a revised version of the King James. This Chinese Bible was originally translated and printed in 1919 (several revisions since then).

Because of the origin being the KJV, I'll say that in English, this would be, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish but have everlasting life."

As with any translation, there are interesting cultural and linguistic issues. For instance, the word used for "world" in Chinese can also mean "common people." So you could say that it means "For God so loved the common people..."
This does not take away from the text, as it will be understood with the same meaning and connotation.

There is no direct Greek to Chinese translation in print (that I know of), so this is the best available. Of course, you can ask any Greek person of faith, and they will claim that a bit is lost from the original Greek of the New Testament to any of the English versions of the Bible in print.

River of Literacy, Sea of Learning

China wén jiāng xué hǎi
River of Literacy, Sea of Learning

This Chinese proverb reads, "river of literacy, sea of learning"

This suggests that there is a lot to learn in the world, with an eternal amount of reading and things to study.

文江學海 is one way to translate the quote from Hippocrates, "ars longa, vita brevis," meaning, "it takes a long time to acquire and perfect one's expertise."


See Also:  Learning Is Eternal

Hardships and Joys

Japan shinsankanku
Hardships and Joys

This Japanese proverb speaks of the "hardships and joys" of life.

Some other translations include:
Tasting the sweets and bitters of life.
Being well-versed in the ways of the world (having seen much of life).

辛酸甘苦 is the Japanese "for better or worse," when speaking of life.

Judo

China róu dào
Japan judo
Judo

柔道 is the martial art invented in Japan and known as "Judo" around the world.

Translated directly, it means "Gentle Way" or "Flexible Way"

More about Judo

Zen Understanding

China cān chán
Zen Understanding

This title speaks of reaching an understanding (of Zen or the world). It also means "to practice meditation." The two concepts lead you to the idea that meditation leads to understanding. 參禪 is pretty deep, so you can do your own research, or decide what this means for you.

This can also be defined in a more complex way as "thoroughly penetrating with meditative insight."

Bright and Promising Future

Japan akarui mirai
Bright and Promising Future

This Japanese proverb means, "Bright Future." It suggests a lot of possibility and potential awaits in your future. A great gift for a graduate.

The first part of this proverb literally means bright or light. The second part means future but can also be translated as, "the world to come."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective
Right View / Perfect View

Samyag Dristhi / Samyag Drsti / Samma Ditthi
China zhèng jiàn
Japan sei ken
1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View

正見 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right View, along with Right Thought constitutes the path to Wisdom.

To get to the right view of the world, you must first understand and follow Four Noble Truths.


Note: This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Power of Understanding and Wisdom

China wù xìng
Japan gosei
Power of Understanding and Wisdom

悟性 means the power of understanding and insight in Chinese.

It is often associated with Neo-Confucianism. In that regard, it means to realize, perceive, or have the perception of man's true nature. It can also mean to find your soul, the soul of others, or the soul of the world. Some will translate this simply as the state of being "savvy."

In Japanese, this is often translated as wisdom and understanding.

Self-Respect / Self-Esteem

China zì zūn
Japan jison
Self-Respect / Self-Esteem

自尊 means self-respect or self-esteem in Chinese, Korean and Japanese. It can also mean "pride in oneself."

Note: Japanese sometimes put the character for heart after these two. However, this two-character word is universal between all three languages (which is often better since more than a third of the world's population can read this version as a native word).

John 3:16

Japan kami wa, minoru ni, sono hitori ko o o atae ni natta hodo ni, yo o aisare ta. Sore wa miko o shinjiru mono ga, hitori toshite horobiru koto naku, eien no inochi o motsu tame de aru.
John 3:16

神は實にそのひとり子をお與えになったほどに世を愛されたそれは御子を信じる者がひとりとして滅びることなく永遠のいのちを持つためである is the full translation of John 3:16 into Japanese.

This translation comes from the Shinkaiyaku Bible (a preferred translation by many Japanese Christians).

Just for reference, from the KJV, this reads, "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish but have everlasting life."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Hell / Judges of Hell

Ancient way to say Hell
China yīn sī
Hell / Judges of Hell

陰司 is the ancient way to say "Hell" or "Netherworld" in Chinese.

This title can also refer to the officials of Hell or the judges of Hades or the Netherworld.

Please note that this is a somewhat terrible selection for a wall scroll. Hanging this in your home is like telling the world that your home is hell. Oddly, a lot of people search for this on my website, so I added it for reference.

Learning is Eternal

China xué wú zhǐ jìng
Learning is Eternal

This Chinese philosophy tells of how we continue to learn throughout our lives. This proverb can be translated in a few ways such as "Study has no end," "Knowledge is infinite," "No end to learning," "There's always something new to study," or "You live and learn."

The deeper meaning: Even when we finish school we are still students of the world gaining more knowledge from our surroundings with each passing day.


See Also:  An Open Book Benefits Your Mind | Wisdom | Learn From Wisdom

Intense / Serious / Deep / Profound

China shēn kè
Japan shinkoku / misa
Intense / Serious / Deep / Profound

This Chinese word is the form of intense that describes a person who is deep, serious, and a true thinker.

If you find yourself contemplating the world and coming up with profound ideas, this might we the word for you. In some context (especially Korean), it can mean seriousness, gravity, or acuteness.

In Japanese, this can mean "serious problem," or can be a rare given name, Misa. You should not use this if your audience is Japanese.

Love and Hate

China ài yǔ hèn
Love and Hate

Whether you want to make a joke about what marriage really is, or just feel that the world in full of love and hate, this selection is for you.

愛與恨 happen to literally translate. So the first character is love. The middle character is a connecting particle like "and" in English. The last character is hate.

Upon request, we can omit the "and" character and just put a dot to separate love and hate if you prefer.

Creativity

China chuàng zào lì
Japan souzouryoku
Creativity

Creativity is the power of imagination. It is discovering your own special talents. Daring to see things in new ways and find different ways to solve problems. With your creativity, you can bring something new into the world.

The first character means "to create" the second means "to make or build." Together they mean "creative." The third character means "strength." So altogether, these three characters are a word that means "strength of creativity" or sort of "creativity (is your) strength." This can also be translated as "ingenuity."

Read 10,000 Books, Travel 10,000 Miles

China dú wàn juǎn shū, xíng wàn lǐ lù
Read 10,000 Books, Travel 10,000 Miles

This is a lifelong suggestion for expanding your horizons by gaining knowledge, experience, and seeing the world.

Of course, this was written long ago when it was hard to travel 10,000 miles (at least 1000 years before the invention of the airplane).
With air travel and the business I'm in, I often achieve that lifetime goal on a monthly basis.
However, I am a little behind in the book count.

Note: An ancient Chinese mile (里 or lǐ) referred to in this proverb is about a third of a British/American mile. However, at that time, this was a great distance to travel.

Five Elements

China wǔ xíng
Japan gogyou
Five Elements

五行 is the title of the five elements which are: wood, fire, water, earth, and metal.

The first character means "5" and the second character is simply "elements."

According to ancient Chinese science, all matter in the world is made up of these elements. One idea presented with the five elements is that when energy is added, matter is believed to expand. When energy is removed, matter contracts. Oddly, this concept is not far from Einstein's theories, and modern science. Just a few thousand years before Einstein.


More info: Wikipedia - Five Elements (Wu Xing).


See Also:  Wood | Fire | Water | Earth | Metal | Five Elements

Read

China yuè
Read

This Chinese character means to read. It can also refer to observing (the world, and learning from it), or gaining life experiences. 閱 is a good character to relay the idea of being "well read," which can include reading books, studying, and learning through experience.

The dictionary definition also includes: to inspect; to review; to peruse; to go through; to experience.

Technically, this is also a Japanese Kanji but it only used by some Japanese Buddhists (most of the population will not recognize it).

In both Chinese and Japanese Buddhism, this means: Examine, inspect, look over.

Hell

China dì yù
Japan jigoku
Hell

地獄 is the way that hell is written in modern Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

There's more than one way to express hell but this is the one that has stood the test of time.

The first character refers to the ground or the earth.
The second character means jail or prison.

You can also translate this word as infernal, inferno, Hades, or underworld.

It should be noted that this is a somewhat terrible selection for a wall scroll. Hanging this in your home is like telling the world that your home is hell. Oddly, a lot of people search for this on our website, so I added it for reference.

Caring

China guān xīn
Caring

關心 means caring in Chinese.

Caring is giving love and attention to people and things that matter to you and anyone who is in need of help. When you care about people, you help them. You do a careful job, giving your very best effort. You treat people and things gently and respectfully. Caring makes the world a safer place.

Note: 關心 is also a word in Korean Hanja but in Korean, it means taking interest or concern. In Korean it's still a good word but it doesn't quite have the "caring for a person" meaning that it does in Chinese.


See Also:  Benevolence | Altruism

To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way
China yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

This old Chinese proverb has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to do it.
A willful man will have his way.
If you wish it, you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible to a strong mind.


Bonsai / Penzai

Dwarf Tree Culture
China pén zāi
Japan bon sai
Bonsai / Penzai

盆栽 is the word that refers to the culture, hobby and to the miniature trees themselves that have become popular around the world. Like many things, this art migrated from China to Japan some time ago but we tend to associate it with Japanese culture and even use the Japanese word in English.

Granted, in present day, this hobby seems to be more popular in Japan but still has a great following in China and even a little in Korea as well.

Note: Many people confuse the title of the bonsai tree with "banzai" which is a form of "hooray" in Japanese. I have also seen it misspelled as "bansai." The correct Romanization (Romaji) is "bonsai."

Mercy / Compassion
Buddhist Loving Kindness

China cí bēi
Japan ji hi
Mercy / Compassion / Buddhist Loving Kindness

Besides the title above, 慈悲 can also be defined as clemency or lenience and sometimes the act of giving charity.

In Buddhist context, it can be defined as, "benevolence," "loving kindness and compassion," or "mercy and compassion."

This Buddhist virtue is perhaps the most important to employ in your life. All sentient beings that you encounter should be given your loving kindness. And trust me, however much you can give, it comes back. Make your life and the world a better place!

This Chinese/Japanese Buddhist term is the equivalent of Metta Karuna from Pali or Maitri Karuna from Sanskrit.

慈 can mean loving-kindness by itself.
悲 adds a component of sorrow, empathy, compassion, and sympathy for others.


See Also:  Benevolence

Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding

China níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding

Zhuge Liang

诸葛亮 Zhuge Liang

寧靜而致遠 is five characters from a longer ten-character proverb composed by Zhuge Liang about 1800 years ago.

The proverb means, "Your inner peace / tranquility / serenity will help you see or reach far (into the world)."

The last word means "far" but the deeper meaning is that you will surpass what you can currently see or understand. Perhaps even the idea of opening up vast knowledge and understanding of complex ideas.

Wolf

China láng
Japan okami
Wolf

狼 is the character used to represent the elusive animal known as the wolf in both Chinese and Japanese.

If you are a fan of the wolf or the wolf means something special to you, this could make a great addition to your wall.

Do keep in mind, that much like our perception of wolves in the history of western culture, eastern cultures do not have a very positive view of wolves (save the scientific community and animal lovers). The wolf is clearly an animal that is misunderstood or feared the world over.

狼 is seldom used alone in Korean Hanja, but is used in a compound word that means utter failure (as in a wolf getting into your chicken pen - or an otherwise ferocious failure). Not a good choice if your audience is Korean.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

Except from Chapter 67
China yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

This is an except from the 67th Chapter of Lao Tzu's (Lao Zi's) Te-Tao Ching (Dao De Jing). This is the part where the three treasures are discussed. In English, we'd say these three treasures are compassion, frugality, and humility. Some may translate these as love, moderation, and lack of arrogance. I have also seen them translated as benevolence, modesty, and "Not presuming to be at the forefront in the world." You can mix them up the way you want, as translation is not really a science but rather an art.

I should also explain that the first two treasures are single-character ideas, yet the third treasure was written out in six characters (there are also some auxiliary characters to number the treasures).

If Lao Tzu's words are important to you, then a wall scroll with this passage might make a great addition to your home.

Inspiration

China líng gǎn
Japan reikan
Inspiration

靈感 is the Chinese word that is the closest to hitting the mark for the English word inspiration.

In a more extended context, I have even seen this translated as "brain wave."

The first character means alert, departed soul, efficacious, quick, effective or intelligence.
The second character means to feel, to move, to touch or to affect.
The combined meaning of these two characters changes a bit but I think it's nice to know the individual meanings to give you a better understanding of where a word comes from.

You could describe this word as, "the thought that pops into your head just before you patent the greatest widget ever invented, that everyone in the world will want."
At least, that's the idea.

This term can also mean "intelligent thought" if you were to translate it directly from each of these characters. If you are looking for inspiration or otherwise need to be inspired, this is the word for you.


霊When the first character was absorbed into Japanese from Chinese, an alternate form became the standard in Japan. The Kanji shown to the right is the form currently used in Japan. This is still considered an alternate form in China to this day. It's readable by both Chinese and Japanese people but if your audience is Japanese, I recommend the Kanji shown to the right - just click on that Kanji to order that version.

Better to be Happy than Rich

China ān pín lè dào
Better to be Happy than Rich

Even if you are poor, you should still feel satisfied in your life...

...Satisfaction, happiness, and the meaning of your life come from within yourself and not from money or riches of the world.

In Chinese, there are a lot of four-character proverbs which express some very old philosophies.
Though there are only four characters on this scroll, in Chinese the meanings often surpass the dictionary definition of each character.

In this case, you should not set your expectations too high for the amount to money or riches you wish to have. One who sets their expectations too high is almost always disappointed. Instead, you should cherish what you have, and seek to improve yourself from within, and not measure your personal worth by the size of your bank account.


See Also:  A Sly Rabbit Will Have Three Openings to Its Den

Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude

A Japanese martial arts title/concept
China xǐ xīn
Japan sen shin
Purified Spirit / Enlightened Attitude

The first Kanji alone means to wash, to bathe, primness, cleanse or purify.

The second Kanji means heart, mind, soul, or essence.

Together, these two Kanji create a word that is defined as "purified spirit" or "enlightened attitude" within the context of Japanese martial arts.

洗心 is one of the five spirits of the warrior (budo), and is often used as a Japanese martial arts tenet. Under that context it's often defined this way: A spirit that protects and harmonizes the universe. Senshin is a spirit of compassion that embraces and serves all humanity and whose function is to reconcile discord in the world. It holds all life to be sacred. It is the Buddha mind.

This title will only be familiar to Japanese who practice certain martial arts. Others may not recognize this word at all.

洗心 does not show up as a word in too many Chinese dictionaries but it can be read and has the same meaning in Chinese.


先心 There is an issue with the first character. The original, and probably most correct version is shown above. However, many dojo documents and other sources have used a more simple first character. Arguments ensue about which version is correct. If you want to be correct in the Japanese language, use the "Select and Customize" button above. If you want to match the Kanji used by your dojo, click the Kanji shown to the right. There is a slightly different meaning with this first character which means before, ahead, previous, future, precedence.

A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

China dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding

This is a kind of complex ten-character proverb composed by Zhuge Liang about 1800 years ago.

This Chinese proverb means "Leading a simple life will yield a clear mind, and having inner peace will help you see far (into the world)."

What I have translated as "simple life" means NOT being materialistic and NOT competing in the rat race.

The last word means "far" but the deeper meaning is that you will surpass what you can currently see or understand. Perhaps even the idea of opening up vast knowledge and understanding of complex ideas.

The whole phrase has a theme that suggests if you are NOT an aggressive cut-throat person who fights his way to the top no matter how many people he crushes on the way, and instead seek inner peace, you will have a happier existence and be more likely to understand the meaning of life.


See Also:  Serenity

Nothingness

China kōng wú
Japan kuu mu
Nothingness

空無 is "nothingness" in a Buddhist context.

The first character means empty but can also mean air or sky (air and sky have no form).

The second character means have not, no, none, not or to lack.

Together these characters reinforce each other into a word that means "absolute nothingness."

I know this is a term used in Buddhism but I have not yet figured out the context in which it is used. I suppose it can be the fact that Buddhists believe that the world in a non-real illusion, or perhaps it's about visualizing yourself as "nothing" and therefore leaving behind your desire and worldliness.
Buddhist concepts and titles often have this element of ambiguity or rather "mystery." Therefore, such ideas can have different meanings to different people, and that's okay. If you don't get it right in this lifetime, as there will be plenty more lifetimes to master it (whatever "it" is, and if "it" really exists at all).

Soothill defines this as "Unreality, or immateriality, of things, which is defined as nothing existing of independent or self-contained nature."

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

Always rising after a fall or repeated failures
Japan shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight

This Japanese proverb relays the vicissitudes of life, with the meaning "seven times down eight times up."

Some would more naturally translate it into English as "Always rising after a fall or repeated failures" or compare it to the English, "If at first you don't succeed, try, try again."

The first Kanji is literally "7." The second means "fall down" (sometimes this Kanji means "turn around," "revolve" or "turn over" but in this case, it holds the meaning of "fall"). The third is "8." And the last is "get up," "rouse," or "rise."

Basically, if you fail 7 times, you should recover from those events and be prepared to rise an 8th time. This also applies if it is the world or circumstances that knock you down seven times...
...just remember that you have the ability to bounce back from any kind of adversity.

Note: This can be pronounced two ways. One is "shichi ten hakki" or "shichitenhakki." The other is "nana korobi ya oki" also written, "nanakorobi-yaoki."

Special Note: The second character is a Kanji that is not used in China. Therefore, please only select our Japanese master calligrapher for this selection.

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

China shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

This is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parent's or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is "You Zi Yin" which means "The Traveler's Recite."

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sun light which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt which you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

Taekwondo

China tái quán dào
Japan te kon do
Taekwondo

跆拳道 is one of the most widespread types of martial arts in the world as well as being an Olympic sport. Taekwondo was born in Korea with influences of Chinese and Japanese styles, combined with traditional Korean combat skills. Some will define it as the "Korean art of empty-handed self-defense."

In the simplest translation, the first character means "kick," the second character can mean either "fist" or "punching" the third means "way" or "method." Altogether, you could say this is "Kick Punch Method." When heard or read in various Asian languages, all will automatically think of this famous Korean martial art. It is written the same in Japanese Kanji, Chinese, and Korean Hanja characters - so the appearance of the characters are rather universal. However, you should note that there is another way to write this in modern Korean Hangul characters which looks like the image to the right. Taekwondo Hangul Characters

We suggest the original Korean Hanja (Chinese characters) for a wall scroll but if you really need the Hangul version, you must use master calligrapher Xing An-Ping: Order Taekwondo in Korean Hangul

Note: Taekwondo is sometimes Romanized as Tae-Kwondo, Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-do, Taegwondo, Tae Gweon Do, Tai Kwon Do, Taikwondo, Taekwando, Tae Kwan Do and in Chinese Taiquandao, Tai Quan Dao, Taichuando, or Tai Chuan Tao.

Kung Fu / Gong Fu

China gōng fu
HK gung fu
Japan kan fu / ku fu
Kung Fu / Gong Fu

One of the most famous types of martial arts in the world - and not just because of Bruce Lee.

Some translate the meaning as "Accomplishment by Great Effort." I think this is partially true but directly translated it literally means "Merit/Achievement/Accomplishment Man." The word "fu" can sometimes mean "husband" or "porter" but in this case, it can only mean "man." However, few in China will think "man" when they hear the word "Gong Fu" spoken.

This term is also used for things other than martial arts. In fact, it's used to refer to a person with excellent skills in crafts that require a great deal of effort such as cooking, tea ceremonies, and calligraphy.

What a lot of people don't know is that the spelling of "Kung Fu" was actually taken from the old Wade Giles form of Romanization. Using this method, the sounds of the English "G" and "K" were both written as "K" and an apostrophe after the "K" told you it was supposed to sound like a "G." Nobody in the west knew this rule, so most people pronounce it with a "K-sound." And so Gong Fu will always be Kung Fu for most westerners.

Also, just to educate you a little more, the "O" in "Gong" has a sound like the English word "oh."

The popular Chinese dish "Kung Pao Chicken" suffers from the same problem. It should actually be "Gong Bao Chicken."

Historical note: Many will claim that Kung Fu was invented by the monks of the Shaolin monastery. This fact is argued in both directions by scholars of Chinese history. Perhaps it is more accurate to say that the Shaolin Monks brought the original fame to Kung Fu many generations ago.


Japanese note: While most Japanese martial artists will recognize these characters, Katakana is more often used to approximate the pronunciation of "Kung Fu" with "カンフー." Some will argue as to whether this should be considered a Japanese word at all.


See Also:  Bruce Lee

Reiki

China líng qì
Japan reiki
Reiki

靈氣 is the title of a healing practice that is now found throughout the world but with origins in Japan.

Special note: Outside of the context of the healing practice of Reiki, this means "aura" or "spiritual essence that surrounds all living things." A Japanese person not familiar with the practice will take the "aura" meaning.

Reiki is a technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also heals. It can be compared to massage but is based on the idea that an unseen "life force energy" flows through us and is what causes us to be alive. If your life force energy is low, you'll be more likely to get sick or feel stress. If your life force energy is abundant and flowing well, you become more capable of being happy and healthy.

There is a lot of information available if you want to Google this term - my job is to offer the calligraphy, while you can decide if it is right for you.

Note: We are showing the ancient (traditional) form of the Reiki Kanji. I have seen Reiki written with both the slightly simplified version and this more classic form. If you want the form of Reiki with the two strokes in the shape of an X on the second character and the modern first character, simply click on the Kanji characters to the right.

Note: 靈氣 is also a Chinese word but in Chinese, these characters create a word that refers to a smart person or someone with high aspirations. It is not read as a healing method in Chinese.
In Korean Hanja, this can be read as "mysterious atmosphere" by a Korean who is not familiar with the practice of Reiki (still has a cool meaning in Korean).

Hapkido

Korean Martial Art of re-directing force
China hé qì dào
Japan ai ki do
Hapkido

Hapkido is a mostly-defensive martial art of Korea. It has some connection to Aikido of Japan. In fact, they are written with the same characters in both languages. However, it should be noted that the Korean Hanja characters shown here are the traditional Chinese form - but in modern Japan, the middle character was slightly simplified.
Note: You can consider this to be the older Japanese written form of Aikido. Titles on older books and signs about Aikido use this form.

The connection between Japanese Aikido and Korean Hapkido is a bit muddled in history. 合氣道 is probably due to the relationship between the two countries - especially during WWII when many Koreans became virtual slaves for the Japanese (many Koreans are still bitter about that, so many things were disassociated from having any Japanese origin).

Looking at the characters, the first means "union" or "harmony."
The second character means "universal energy" or "spirit."
The third means "way" or "method."
One way to translate this into English is "Harmonizing Energy Method." This makes since, as Hapkido has more to do with redirecting energy, rather that fighting with strength against strength.

More Hapkido info

More notes:
1. Sometimes Hapkido is Romanized as "hap ki do," "hapki-do" "hab gi do" or "hapgido."

2. Korean Hanja characters are actually Chinese characters that usually hold the same meaning in both languages. There was a time when these characters were the standard and only written form of Korean. The development of modern Korean Hangul characters is a somewhat recent event in the greater scope of history. There was a time when Chinese characters were the written form of many languages in places known in modern times as North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Vietnam, Singapore, Hong Kong, Taiwan, Mainland China, and a significant portion of Malaysia. Even today, more people in the world can read Chinese characters than can read English.

3. While these Korean Hanja characters can be pronounced in Chinese, this word is not well-known in China and is not considered part of the Chinese lexicon.

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

China quán fǎ
Japan kenpou
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist," or even "law of the fist." The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist."

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense." I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

Search for The World in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
The World世界sei kai / seikaishì jiè / shi4 jie4 / shi jie / shijieshih chieh / shihchieh
Feel at Ease Anywhere
The World is My Home
四海為家
四海为家
sì hǎi wéi jiā
si4 hai3 wei2 jia1
si hai wei jia
sihaiweijia
ssu hai wei chia
ssuhaiweichia
If you love your child, send them out into the world可愛い子には旅をさせよkawaii ko ni wa tabi o sa seyo
kawaiikoniwatabiosaseyo
kawai ko ni wa tabi o sa seyo
kawaikoniwatabiosaseyo
Impartial and Fair to the
Brotherhood and Sisterhood of the World
一視同仁
一视同仁
isshidoujin
ishidojin
yí shì tóng rén
yi2 shi4 tong2 ren2
yi shi tong ren
yishitongren
i shih t`ung jen
ishihtungjen
i shih tung jen
Mark the boat to find the lost sword
Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world
刻舟求劍
刻舟求剑
kokushuukyuuken
kokushukyuken
kè zhōu qiú jiàn
ke4 zhou1 qiu2 jian4
ke zhou qiu jian
kezhouqiujian
k`o chou ch`iu chien
kochouchiuchien
ko chou chiu chien
World Peace世界平和sekaiheiwa
Worldwide Wish for Peace and Prosperity啟盛世開太平
启盛世开太平
qǐ shèng shì kāi tài píng
qi3 sheng4 shi4 kai1 tai4 ping2
qi sheng shi kai tai ping
qishengshikaitaiping
ch`i sheng shih k`ai t`ai p`ing
chishengshihkaitaiping
chi sheng shih kai tai ping
Enlightenment啟蒙
启蒙
keimou / keimoqǐ méng / qi3 meng2 / qi meng / qimengch`i meng / chimeng / chi meng
Soccer
Football
Futbol
足球zú qiú / zu2 qiu2 / zu qiu / zuqiutsu ch`iu / tsuchiu / tsu chiu
Every Creature Has A Domain海為龍世界雲是鶴家鄉
海为龙世界云是鹤家乡
hǎi wéi lóng shì jiè yún shì hè jiā xiāng
hai3 wei2 long2 shi4 jie4 yun2 shi4 he4 jia1 xiang1
hai wei long shi jie yun shi he jia xiang
hai wei lung shih chieh yün shih ho chia hsiang
Shit Happens世事難料
世事难料
shì shì nán liào
shi4 shi4 nan2 liao4
shi shi nan liao
shishinanliao
shih shih nan liao
shihshihnanliao
One Family Under Heaven天下一家tenka ikka / tenkaikka / tenka ika / tenkaikatiān xià yī jiā
tian1 xia4 yi1 jia1
tian xia yi jia
tianxiayijia
t`ien hsia i chia
tienhsiaichia
tien hsia i chia
In Flowers the Cherry Blossom, In Men the Samurai花は櫻木人は武士
花は桜木人は武士
hana wa sakuragi hito wa bushi
Live Love Die生愛死
生爱死
sei ai shi / seiaishishēng ài sǐ
sheng1 ai4 si3
sheng ai si
shengaisi
sheng ai ssu
shengaissu
Eye for an eye以眼還眼
以眼还眼
yǐ yǎn huán yǎn
yi3 yan3 huan2 yan3
yi yan huan yan
yiyanhuanyan
i yen huan yen
iyenhuanyen
Life Is But A Dream人生如夢
人生如梦
rén shēng rú mèng
ren2 sheng1 ru2 meng4
ren sheng ru meng
renshengrumeng
jen sheng ju meng
jenshengjumeng
Budokan武道館budoukan / budokan
Gentleness溫柔
温柔
wēn róu / wen1 rou2 / wen rou / wenrouwen jou / wenjou
Ultimate Goodness of Water上善若水shàng shàn ruò shuǐ
shang4 shan4 ruo4 shui3
shang shan ruo shui
shangshanruoshui
shang shan jo shui
shangshanjoshui
John 3:16 (first half)神愛世人甚至將他的獨生子賜給他們
神爱世人甚至将他的独生子赐给他们
shén ài shì rén shèn zhì jiāng tā de dú shēng zǐ cì gè tā mén
shen2 ai4 shi4 ren2 shen4 zhi4 jiang1 ta1 de du2 sheng1 zi3 ci4 gei3 ta1 men2
shen ai shi ren shen zhi jiang ta de du sheng zi ci gei ta men
shen ai shih jen shen chih chiang t`a te tu sheng tzu tz`u kei t`a men
shen ai shih jen shen chih chiang ta te tu sheng tzu tzu kei ta men
John 3:16神愛世人甚至將他的獨生子賜給他們叫一切信他的不至滅亡反得永生
神爱世人甚至将他的独生子赐给他们叫一切信他的不至灭亡反得永生
shén ài shì rén shèn zhì jiāng tā de dú shēng zǐ cì gè tā mén jiào yí qiè xìn tā de bú zhì miè wáng fǎn dé yǒng shēng
shen2 ai4 shi4 ren2 shen4 zhi4 jiang1 ta1 de du2 sheng1 zi3 ci4 gei3 ta1 men2 jiao4 yi2 qie4 xin4 ta1 de bu2 zhi4 mie4 wang2 fan3 de2 yong3 sheng1
shen ai shi ren shen zhi jiang ta de du sheng zi ci gei ta men jiao yi qie xin ta de bu zhi mie wang fan de yong sheng
shen ai shih jen shen chih chiang t`a te tu sheng tzu tz`u kei t`a men chiao i ch`ieh hsin t`a te pu chih mieh wang fan te yung sheng
shen ai shih jen shen chih chiang ta te tu sheng tzu tzu kei ta men chiao i chieh hsin ta te pu chih mieh wang fan te yung sheng
River of Literacy, Sea of Learning文江學海
文江学海
wén jiāng xué hǎi
wen2 jiang1 xue2 hai3
wen jiang xue hai
wenjiangxuehai
wen chiang hsüeh hai
wenchianghsüehhai
Hardships and Joys辛酸甘苦shinsankanku
Judo柔道judoróu dào / rou2 dao4 / rou dao / roudaojou tao / joutao
Zen Understanding參禪
参禅
cān chán / can1 chan2 / can chan / canchants`an ch`an / tsanchan / tsan chan
Bright and Promising Future明るい未来akarui mirai
akaruimirai
1. Right Understanding
Right Perspective
Right View
Perfect View
正見
正见
sei ken / seikenzhèng jiàn
zheng4 jian4
zheng jian
zhengjian
cheng chien
chengchien
Power of Understanding and Wisdom悟性goseiwù xìng / wu4 xing4 / wu xing / wuxingwu hsing / wuhsing
Self-Respect
Self-Esteem
自尊jisonzì zūn / zi4 zun1 / zi zun / zizuntzu tsun / tzutsun
John 3:16神は, 實に, そのひとり 子をお 與えになったほどに, 世を 愛された. それは 御子を 信じる 者が, ひとりとして 滅びることなく, 永遠のいのちを 持つためである.kami wa, minoru ni, sono hitori ko o o atae ni natta hodo ni, yo o aisare ta. Sore wa miko o shinjiru mono ga, hitori toshite horobiru koto naku, eien no inochi o motsu tame de aru.
Hell
Judges of Hell
陰司
阴司
yīn sī / yin1 si1 / yin si / yinsiyin ssu / yinssu
Learning is Eternal學無止境
学无止境
xué wú zhǐ jìng
xue2 wu2 zhi3 jing4
xue wu zhi jing
xuewuzhijing
hsüeh wu chih ching
hsüehwuchihching
Intense
Serious
Deep
Profound
深刻shinkoku / misashēn kè / shen1 ke4 / shen ke / shenkeshen k`o / shenko / shen ko
Love and Hate愛與恨
爱与恨
ài yǔ hèn
ai4 yu3 hen4
ai yu hen
aiyuhen
ai yü hen
aiyühen
Creativity創造力
创造力
souzouryoku
sozoryoku
chuàng zào lì
chuang4 zao4 li4
chuang zao li
chuangzaoli
ch`uang tsao li
chuangtsaoli
chuang tsao li
Read 10,000 Books, Travel 10,000 Miles讀萬卷書行萬里路
读万卷书行万里路
dú wàn juǎn shū, xíng wàn lǐ lù
du2 wan4 juan3 shu1 xing2 wan4 li3 lu4
du wan juan shu xing wan li lu
duwanjuanshuxingwanlilu
tu wan chüan shu hsing wan li lu
Five Elements五行gogyou / gogyowǔ xíng / wu3 xing2 / wu xing / wuxingwu hsing / wuhsing
Read
yuè / yue4 / yueyüeh
Hell地獄
地狱
jigokudì yù / di4 yu4 / di yu / diyuti yü / tiyü
Caring關心
关心
guān xīn / guan1 xin1 / guan xin / guanxinkuan hsin / kuanhsin
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible有志者事竟成 / 有誌者事竟成
有志者事竟成
yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
you3 zhi4 zhe3 shi4 jing4 cheng2
you zhi zhe shi jing cheng
youzhizheshijingcheng
yu chih che shih ching ch`eng
yuchihcheshihchingcheng
yu chih che shih ching cheng
Bonsai
Penzai
盆栽bon sai / bonsaipén zāi / pen2 zai1 / pen zai / penzaip`en tsai / pentsai / pen tsai
Mercy
Compassion
Buddhist Loving Kindness
慈悲ji hi / jihicí bēi / ci2 bei1 / ci bei / cibeitz`u pei / tzupei / tzu pei
Achieve Inner Peace; Find Deep Understanding寧靜而致遠
宁静而致远
níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
ning2 jing4 er2 zhi4 yuan3
ning jing er zhi yuan
ningjingerzhiyuan
ning ching erh chih yüan
ningchingerhchihyüan
Wolfokamiláng / lang2 / lang
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching
一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先
一曰慈二曰俭三曰不敢为天下先
yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
yi1 yue1 ci2 er4 yue1 jian3 san1 yue1 bu4 gan3 wei2 tian1 xia4 xian1
yi yue ci er yue jian san yue bu gan wei tian xia xian
i yüeh tz`u erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei t`ien hsia hsien
i yüeh tzu erh yüeh chien san yüeh pu kan wei tien hsia hsien
Inspiration靈感
灵感
reikanlíng gǎn / ling2 gan3 / ling gan / lingganling kan / lingkan
Better to be Happy than Rich安貧樂道
安贫乐道
ān pín lè dào
an1 pin2 le4 dao4
an pin le dao
anpinledao
an p`in le tao
anpinletao
an pin le tao
Purified Spirit
Enlightened Attitude
洗心
先心
sen shin / senshinxǐ xīn / xi3 xin1 / xi xin / xixinhsi hsin / hsihsin
A Life of Serenity Yields Understanding淡泊以明志寧靜而致遠
淡泊以明志宁静而致远
dàn bó yǐ míng zhì, níng jìng ér zhì yuǎn
dan4 bo2 yi3 ming2 zhi4, ning2 jing4 er2 zhi4 yuan3
dan bo yi ming zhi, ning jing er zhi yuan
tan po i ming chih, ning ching erh chih yüan
Nothingness空無
空无
kuu mu / kuumu / ku mu / kumukōng wú / kong1 wu2 / kong wu / kongwuk`ung wu / kungwu / kung wu
Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight七転八起shichi ten hakki / nana korobi ya oki
shichi ten haki / nana korobi ya oki
shichitenhaki/nanakorobiyaoki
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents誰言寸草心報得三春暉
谁言寸草心报得三春晖
shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
shui2 yan2 cun4 cao3 xin1 bao4 de2 san1 chun1 hui1
shui yan cun cao xin bao de san chun hui
shui yen ts`un ts`ao hsin pao te san ch`un hui
shui yen tsun tsao hsin pao te san chun hui
Taekwondo跆拳道te kon do / tekondotái quán dào
tai2 quan2 dao4
tai quan dao
taiquandao
t`ai ch`üan tao
taichüantao
tai chüan tao
Kung Fu
Gong Fu
功夫kan fu / ku fu
kanfu / kufu
gōng fu / gong1 fu / gong fu / gongfukung fu / kungfu
Reiki靈氣
灵气 霊気
reikilíng qì / ling2 qi4 / ling qi / lingqiling ch`i / lingchi / ling chi
Hapkido合氣道
合气道
ai ki do / aikidohé qì dào
he2 qi4 dao4
he qi dao
heqidao
ho ch`i tao
hochitao
ho chi tao
Kenpo
Kempo
Quan Fa
Chuan Fa
拳法kenpou / kenpoquán fǎ / quan2 fa3 / quan fa / quanfach`üan fa / chüanfa / chüan fa
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Angel
Beautiful Woman
Blessings
Bonsai
Bushido
Calm Mind
Charity
Christ
Daughter
Death Before Dishonor
Death Before Dishonor Chinese
Death Before Surrender
Devil
Dignity
Endurance
Energy
Enso
General
Guardian
Harmony
Heart of a Warrior
Heart Sutra
Honor
Humble
Humility
I Love You
I Love You Forever and Always
Jesus
Kempo
Kung Fu
Learning is Eternal
Light
Love
Love Hate
Loyalty
Mindfulness
Mulan
Mushin
Ninjutsu
No Surrender
Passion
Passionate
Patience
Peace and Tranquility
Peace of Mind
Peaceful Heart
Perserverance
Power
Powerful
Princess
Protect
Purple
Pursuit of Happiness
Qi Gong
Reiki
Respect
River
Samurai
Serenity
Sexy Princess
Silk Scroll
Snake
Spring
Storm
Strength
Strength and Courage
Strength from Within
Strong Body
Sword
Taekwondo
Thunder and Lightning
Thunder Lightning
Tolerance
Tranquility
Trust
Trust No Man
Water
Will Power

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as The World Kanji, The World Characters, The World in Mandarin Chinese, The World Characters, The World in Chinese Writing, The World in Japanese Writing, The World in Asian Writing, The World Ideograms, Chinese The World symbols, The World Hieroglyphics, The World Glyphs, The World in Chinese Letters, The World Hanzi, The World in Japanese Kanji, The World Pictograms, The World in the Chinese Written-Language, or The World in the Japanese Written-Language.