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Man of in Chinese / Japanese...

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  1. Man of Character

  2. Man of Remarkable Character...

  3. Trust No One / Trust No Man

  4. Iron Man

  5. Ip Man

  6. Iron Man

  7. Teach A Man To Fish

  8. Holy Man / Saint

  9. Adonis / Handsome Young Man

10. Time and Tide Wait for No Man

11. Flying Ace / Aviator / Bird Man

12. Time and Tide Wait for No Man

13. Person of Character

14. A Wise Man Changes His Mind

15. Character

16. Belief / Trust

17. No Fear

18. Fortitude / Strength of Character

19. Assassin

20. Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

21. Fear No Man / Fear Nothing

22. No man knows what he owes to his parents...

23. No Fear

24. Oneness of Heaven and Humanity

25. A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

26. Eternal Wheel of Life

27. Wisdom from Hard Knocks

28. Warrior

29. Gea

30. Mark the boat to find the lost sword...

31. Bodhidharma

32. The Saint

33. Love and Affection

34. Time Waits For No One

35. Journey / Travel

36. Brave Warrior

37. Adventure Lover

38. Kung Fu / Gong Fu

39. If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?

40. Superman

41. Tetsu / Wise Sage

42. Nothing is Impossible with Persistence

43. Spiritual Warrior

44. Hero

45. Power of Understanding and Wisdom

46. The Tree of Enlightenment...

47. Bodhi - Awakening Enlightenment

48. Immortal

49. Where There is a Will, There is a Way

50. Warrior Soul / Heroic Spirit

51. We are not born with knowledge,...

52. I Love You

53. Lao Tzu / Laozi

54. Shakyamuni / The Buddha

55. Fighter

56. Soul of a Warrior

57. Eternal Love

58. To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

59. Benevolence

60. Hua Mulan

61. Profound / Powerful Words

62. Beauty / Beautiful / Handsome

63. Musashi

64. Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened,...

65. Daoism / Taoism

66. Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

67. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

68. In Wine there is Truth

69. Islam

70. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Chapter 81

71. Push or Knock

72. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks


Man of Character

China dà zhàng fu
Japan dai jou bu
Man of Character Vertical Wall Scroll

大丈夫 is a Chinese, Korean, and Japanese title that means, a manly man, a man of character, a great man, or fine figure of a man.

In Japanese, this can also be used to mean safe, all right, alright, OK, sure, or "no problem." Basically, used in Japanese for something of that is undoubted or very acceptable.

Man of Remarkable Character
Hero

Japan ketsubutsu
Man of Remarkable Character / Hero Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese title can mean, "great man," "heroic figure," or "remarkable character." You would be giving someone a great honor by presenting this wall scroll to them as a gift.

Trust No One / Trust No Man

Japan dare mo shin ji ru na
Trust No One / Trust No Man Vertical Wall Scroll

The first two characters mean everyone or anyone but change to "no one" with the addition of a negative verb.

The third through fifth characters express the idea of to believe, to believe in, to place trust in, to confide in, or to have faith in.

The last character makes the sentence negative (without the last character, this would mean "trust everyone," with that last character it's "trust no one").

This is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man" in Japanese, though no gender is specified.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Trust No One / Trust No Man

China wú fǎ xìn rèn
Trust No One / Trust No Man Vertical Wall Scroll

無法信任 is the kind of thing you expect to hear in a spy movie.

"Trust no one, 007!"

The first two characters express the idea of "no way" or "cannot."

The last two characters mean "trust."

The characters must go in this order due to Chinese grammar issues and in order to sound natural.

Note: 無法信任 is not an ancient Chinese phrase by any means. It's just that we received a lot of requests for this phrase.

無法信任 is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man," though technically no gender is specified.

Iron Man

Japan tetsujin
Iron Man Vertical Wall Scroll

鉄人 is a Japanese title that means iron man or strong man.

鉄人 is sometimes used as a given name romanized as Tetsujin, Temujin, Tetsundo, Tetsuhito, or Tetsuto.

Ip Man

China yè wèn
HK Yip Man
Ip Man Vertical Wall Scroll

葉問 is the name of "Ip Man" or "Yip Man" (1893-1972). He was a martial arts practitioner and master. He is perhaps most famous for being the master of Bruce Lee.

Iron Man

China gāng tiě xiá
Iron Man Vertical Wall Scroll

鋼鐵俠 is the Chinese title for Iron Man, the comic book superhero.

Teach A Man To Fish

China shòu rén yǐ yú bù rú shòu rén yǐ yú
Teach A Man To Fish Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the Chinese version of the proverb, "Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day; teach a man to fish and you feed him for a lifetime."

This implies that knowledge is the best charity.

Holy Man / Saint

China shèng rén
Japan seijin
Holy Man / Saint Vertical Wall Scroll

聖人 can mean saint, sage, or holy man.

Note: There is more than one way to express this idea. This one really matches "Holy man" because the second character means "human" or "person" (therefore, this could equally mean "Holy woman").

Adonis / Handsome Young Man

Japan bi sei nen
Adonis / Handsome Young Man Vertical Wall Scroll

美青年 means handsome young man, or figuratively, Adonis, in Japanese.

Time and Tide Wait for No Man

China suì bù wǒ yǔ
Time and Tide Wait for No Man Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means is a way to express, "Time and tide wait for no man."

The literal meaning of these Chinese characters is, "Years don't [for] oneself wait." In more natural English, it's more like, "Years will pass by, with or without you."

There is also an alternate version, 时不我待, which literally means, "Time doesn't [for] oneself, wait." In natural English, it's more like, "Time waits for no man."

Flying Ace / Aviator / Bird Man

Japan chou jin
Flying Ace / Aviator / Bird Man Vertical Wall Scroll

鳥人 means "bird man" or "bird person" but it used colloquially in Japanese to mean a flying ace or aviator.

Time and Tide Wait for No Man

Japan kouinya no goto shi
Time and Tide Wait for No Man Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means, "time flies like an arrow." It's very similar to the English idiom, "time and tide wait for no man," or "life is short."

The Kanji breakdown:
光陰 = Time (the cycle of light and dark).
[and an]
矢 = Arrow
の = are
如し = Alike


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Person of Character

Japan jinkakusha
Person of Character Vertical Wall Scroll

人格者 is a Japanese and Korean title that means, "person of character."

人格者 is unisex, so it can also be used to mean, "man of character," or "woman of character."

A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will)

Japan kun shi hyou hen su
A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will) Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb suggests that a wise man is willing to change his mind but a fool will stubbornly never change his.

The first word is 君子 (kunshi) man of virtue, person of high rank, wise man.

The second word is 豹変 (hyouhen) sudden change, complete change.

The last part す (su) just modifies the verb to a more humble form.

The "fool" part is merely implied or understood. So if wise and noble people are willing to change their minds, it automatically says that foolish people are the ones unwilling to change.

Character

Japan hitogara
Character Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese word speaks of the quality of your personality, character, personal appearance, or gentility.

Belief / Trust

China xìn rèn
Japan shinnin
Belief / Trust Vertical Wall Scroll

信任 means belief or trust in Chinese characters, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

It can also mean, to have confidence in, or credence.

No Fear

Japan oso re zu
No Fear Vertical Wall Scroll

恐れず is probably the best way to express "No Fear" in Japanese.

The first Kanji and following Hiragana character create a word that means: to fear, to be afraid of, frightened, or terrified.

The last Hiragana character serves to modify and negate the first word (put it in negative form). Basically, they carry a meaning like "without" or "keeping away." 恐れず is almost like the English modifier "-less."

Altogether, you get something like, "Without Fear" or "Fearless."

Here's an example of using this in a sentence: 彼女かのじょは思い切ったことを恐れずにやる。
Translation: She is not scared of taking big risks.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Bravery | Courage

Fortitude / Strength of Character

China gāng yì
Japan gouki
Fortitude / Strength of Character Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese and Chinese word means, "resolute and firm," "fortitude," "firmness of character," "hardihood," "manliness" or "macho."


See Also:  Perseverance | Strength | Tenacity

Assassin

China cì kè
Japan shikaku / shikyaku
Assassin Vertical Wall Scroll

刺客 is the most sophisticated way to write "assassin" in Chinese, Korean and Japanese. The unsophisticated way just means murderer.

Work Unselfishly for the Common Good

China kè jǐ fèng gōng
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good Vertical Wall Scroll

This can also mean: "Place Strict Standards on Oneself in Public Service."
This Chinese proverb is often used to express how one should act as a government official. Most of us wish our public officials would hold themselves to higher standards. I wish I could send this scroll, along with the meaning to every member of Congress, and the President (or if I was from the UK, all the members of Parliament, and the PM)

The story behind this ancient Chinese idiom:
A man named Cai Zun was born in China a little over 2000 years ago. In 24 AD, he joined an uprising led by Liu Xiu who later became the emperor of the Eastern Han Dynasty.

Later, the new emperor put Cai Zun in charge of the military court. Cai Zun exercised his power in strict accordance with military law, regardless of the offender's rank or background. He even ordered the execution of one of the emperor's close servants after the servant committed a serious crime.

Cai Zun led a simple life but put great demands on himself to do all things in an honorable way. The emperor rewarded him for his honest character and honorable nature by promoting him to the rank of General and granting him the title of Marquis.

Whenever Cai Zun would receive an award, he would give credit to his men and share the reward with them.
Cai Zun was always praised by historians who found many examples of his selfless acts that served the public interest.
Sometime, long ago in history, people began to refer to Cai Zun as "ke ji feng gong."


See Also:  Unselfish | Selflessness | Altruism

Fear No Man / Fear Nothing

China wú suǒ wèi jù
Fear No Man / Fear Nothing Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means "fear nothing" but it's the closest thing in Chinese to the phrase "fear no man" which many of you have requested. This would also be the way to say "fear nobody" and can also be translated simply as "undaunted."

No man knows what he owes to his parents
till he comes to have children of his own

Japan ko wo motte shiru oya no on
No man knows what he owes to his parents / till he comes to have children of his own Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Only after you have a baby, you would appreciate your parents (feel the way they do, etc).

This is a bit like the "walk a mile in another man's shoes" saying. Basically, it's about you cannot fully understand the plight of others until you experience it yourself. It also shows appreciation for the plight of parents.

This Japanese proverb can also be translated a few more ways:

No man knows what he owes to his parents till he comes to have children of his own.

One knows not what one owes to one's parents till one comes to have children of one's own.

Only after you have a baby, you will appreciate your parents or feel the way they do.

Only after becoming a parent yourself do you realize how much you owe [how indebted you are] to your own parents.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

No Fear

(four-character version)
China yǒng zhě wú wèi
No Fear Vertical Wall Scroll

勇者無畏 is a complete sentence that means literally "Brave People Have No Fear" or "A Brave Person Has No Fear" (plural or singular is not implied). We translated "No Fear" into the two variations that you will find on our website. Then we checked Chinese Google and found that others had translated "No Fear" in the exact same ways. Pick the one you like best. A great gift for your fearless friend.


See Also:  Fear No Man

No Fear

(2 characters)
China wú wèi
Japan mui
No Fear Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally means "No Fear." But perhaps not the most natural Chinese phrase (see our other "No Fear" phrase for a more complete thought). However, this two-character version of "No Fear" seems to be a very popular way to translate this into Chinese, when we checked Chinese Google.

Note: This also means "No Fear" in Japanese and Korean but this character pair is not often used in Japan or Korea.

This term appears in various Chinese dictionaries with definitions like "without fear," intrepidity, fearless, dauntless, and bold.

In Buddhist context, this is a word derived from abhaya meaning: Fearless, dauntless, secure, nothing and nobody to fear. Also from vīra meaning: courageous, bold.


See Also:  Never Give Up | No Worries | Undaunted | Bravery | Courage | Fear No Man

Oneness of Heaven and Humanity

China tiān rén hé yī
Oneness of Heaven and Humanity Vertical Wall Scroll

This title represents the oneness of heaven and humanity. It conveys the idea that man is an integral part of nature.

You can also read this as "heaven and man in unity," or "nature and man in unity." The "man" is really "people" or "humans" and is not gender-specific in Chinese.

A sly rabbit has three openings to its den

-or- The crafty rabbit has three different entrances to its lair
China jiǎo tù sān kū
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den Vertical Wall Scroll

This speaks to the cunning character of a sly rabbit. Such a rabbit will not have just one hole but rather a few entrances and exits from his liar.

About 2,250 years ago a very rich man told his assistant to go and buy something wonderful that he did not yet posses. He was a man that already had everything, so the assistant went to a local village that owed a great deal of money to the rich man. The assistant told the village elders that all debts were forgiven. All the villagers rejoiced and praised the rich man's name. The assistant returned to the rich man and told him he had purchased "benevolence" for him. The rich man was mildly amused but perhaps a bit confused by the action.

Some time later, the rich man fell from the favor of the Emperor, and was wiped out without a penny to his name. One day he was walking aimlessly and stumbled into the village in which the debts had been forgiven. The villagers recognized the man and welcomed him with open arms, clothed, fed, and gave him a place to live.

Without trying, the man had become like the sly and cunning rabbit. When his exit was blocked, he had another hole to emerge from - and was reborn. This story and idiom comes from a book titled "The Amendment" - it's unclear whether this man actually existed or not. But the book did propel this idiom into common use in China.

Still today this idiom about the rabbit is used in China when suggesting "backup plans" alternate methods, and anyone with a good escape plan.

Eternal Wheel of Life

China fǎ lún
Japan hourin / horin
Eternal Wheel of Life Vertical Wall Scroll

法輪 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja title, "The Eternal Wheel of Life," in Buddhism.

Also known as the wheel of the law, or Buddha-truth which is able to crush all evil and all opposition. It is likened to Indra's wheel which rolls on from man to man, place to place, age to age.

Colloquially used in some sects to mean preaching or spreading Buddha-truth.

Wisdom from Hard Knocks

The school of hard knocks
China ái yī quán dé yī zhāo ái shí quán biàn zhū gě
Wisdom from Hard Knocks Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Receive on blow, [and one] learns a lesson; Receive ten blows, [and one] becomes a great Zhuge [Liang]. You must first understand that a man named Zhuge Liang was one of the great strategists and philosophers in Chinese history. He's known as a man of great wisdom.

Figuratively, this phrase means:
One can learn much from failure or "hard knocks."

Warrior

China wǔ shì
Japan bu shi
Warrior Vertical Wall Scroll

The first character is the spirit or essence of a warrior. The second character means soldier, officer, or official. 武士 is also used appropriately enough to describe a piece of a chess game. This can also be translated as soldier, cavalier, palace guard, or samurai and sometimes as knight. I've occasionally seen this translated as strong man or tough man (gender not necessarily implied).

By far, this is the most common way to write warrior in Chinese characters, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

Note: In Japanese, this is Bushi, as in Bushido.


See Also:  Knight | Army | Marines | Samurai

Gea

China jí yǎ
Gea Vertical Wall Scroll

吉亞 is the transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Gea in a neutral or unisex version. Okay for a man or woman.

Mark the boat to find the lost sword
Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world

China kè zhōu qiú jiàn
Japan kokushuukyuuken
Mark the boat to find the lost sword / Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world Vertical Wall Scroll

This originally-Chinese proverb is a warning to people that things are always in a state of change. Thus, you must take that into account, and not depend on the old ways, or a way that may have worked in the past but is no longer valid.

This idiom/proverb comes from the following story:
A man was traveling in a ferry boat across a river. With him, he carried a valuable and treasured sword. Along the way, the man became overwhelmed and intoxicated by the beautiful view, and accidentally dropped his prized sword into the river. Thinking quickly, he pulled out a knife, and marked on the rail of the boat where exactly he has lost his sword.

When the boat arrived on the other side of the river, the man jumped out of the boat and searched for his sword right under where he'd made the mark. Of course, the boat had moved a great distance since he made the mark, and thus, he could not find the sword.

While this man may seem foolhardy, we have to take a great lesson from this parable: Circumstances change, so one should use methods that can handle the change. In modern China, this is used in business to mean that one should not depend on old business models for a changing market.


This proverb dates back to the Spring and Autumn period (770–476 BC) of the territory now known as China. It has spread and is somewhat known in Japan and Korea.

Bodhidharma

China pú tí dá mó
Japan bo dai daru ma
Bodhidharma Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the Chinese and Japanese title for Bodhidharma. This refers to a man commonly known as Damo, reputed as the founder of the Chan (Zen) Buddhism. His original name is believed to be Bodhitara (菩提多羅).


Note: In Japanese, they tend to write the last character as 磨 versus 摩. If you choose the Japanese master calligrapher, expect it to be written in the Japanese version.

The Saint

China shèng zhě
Japan seija
The Saint Vertical Wall Scroll

聖者 is the religious way to express the idea of "Saint" in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji. Some may translate this as "Holy man" or "Holy person."

Love and Affection

China ài qíng
Japan aijou
Love and Affection Vertical Wall Scroll

愛情 is a universal word in Japanese, Korean and Chinese which means love and affection. Some may translate this as "love between a man and a woman." Depending on context, it can mean utter devotion or favorite.

Time Waits For No One

Japan sai getsu hito o ma ta zu
Time Waits For No One Vertical Wall Scroll

This Japanese idiom "Saigetsu hito o matazu" which means, "Time waits for no-one."

Another way to put it, "Time and tide stay for no man."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Journey / Travel

China
Japan ryo / tabi
Journey / Travel Vertical Wall Scroll

旅 is the single Chinese character, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for trip, travel, or journey.

In older context, this could refer to an army brigade or a 500-man battalion from the Zhou-dynasty Chinese army.

Brave Warrior

China yǒng shì
Japan yuu shi
Brave Warrior Vertical Wall Scroll

勇士 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for brave warrior, a brave person, hero, or brave man.

In Japanese, this can be a given name, Yuuji.

Adventure Lover

Japan bou ken ya rou
Adventure Lover Vertical Wall Scroll

冒険野郎 is a Japanese title which means "adventure lover."

This literally means something like "adventure wild man."

冒険野郎 is a funny choice for a wall scroll, but it's legitimate word in Japanese.

Kung Fu / Gong Fu

China gōng fu
HK gung fu
Japan kan fu / ku fu
Kung Fu / Gong Fu Vertical Wall Scroll

One of the most famous types of martial arts in the world - and not just because of Bruce Lee.

Some translate the meaning as "Accomplishment by Great Effort." I think this is partially true but directly translated it literally means "Merit/Achievement/Accomplishment Man." The word "fu" can sometimes mean "husband" or "porter" but in this case, it can only mean "man." However, few in China will think "man" when they hear the word "Gong Fu" spoken.

This term is also used for things other than martial arts. In fact, it's used to refer to a person with excellent skills in crafts that require a great deal of effort such as cooking, tea ceremonies, and calligraphy.

What a lot of people don't know is that the spelling of "Kung Fu" was actually taken from the old Wade Giles form of Romanization. Using this method, the sounds of the English "G" and "K" were both written as "K" and an apostrophe after the "K" told you it was supposed to sound like a "G." Nobody in the west knew this rule, so most people pronounce it with a "K-sound." And so Gong Fu will always be Kung Fu for most westerners.

Also, just to educate you a little more, the "O" in "Gong" has a sound like the English word "oh."

The popular Chinese dish "Kung Pao Chicken" suffers from the same problem. It should actually be "Gong Bao Chicken."

Historical note: Many will claim that Kung Fu was invented by the monks of the Shaolin monastery. This fact is argued in both directions by scholars of Chinese history. Perhaps it is more accurate to say that the Shaolin Monks brought the original fame to Kung Fu many generations ago.


Japanese note: While most Japanese martial artists will recognize these characters, Katakana is more often used to approximate the pronunciation of "Kung Fu" with "カンフー." Some will argue as to whether this should be considered a Japanese word at all.


See Also:  Bruce Lee

If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?

Only by experiencing hardship will allow you to understand the plight of others
China bù dāng hé shang bù zhī zhāi jiè kǔ
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally translates as:
[One who has] not been a monk [does not] know the suffering of [being on a] vegetarian diet.

This is a bit like the "walk a mile in another man's shoes" saying. Basically it's about you cannot fully understand the plight of others until you experience it yourself.

Superman

China chāo rén
Japan chou jin
Superman Vertical Wall Scroll

超人 is the Chinese title for the comic book hero, Superman.

In Japanese, this can also refer to a superman or superwoman but may refer to Nietzsche's ideal man of the future or the "Ubermensch" or "overman."

超人 is also a word in old Korean Hanja but more a generic term for a super or excellent person or hero.

Tetsu / Wise Sage

China zhé
Japan tetsu
Tetsu / Wise Sage Vertical Wall Scroll

哲 is a Japanese name that is often romanized as Tetsu.

The meaning of the character can be: philosophy; wise; sage; wise man; philosopher; disciple; sagacity; wisdom; intelligence.

哲 can also be romanized as: Yutaka; Masaru; Hiroshi; Tooru; Tetsuji; Choru; Satoru; Satoshi; Akira; Aki.

Nothing is Impossible with Persistence

China yí shān
Japan isan
Nothing is Impossible with Persistence Vertical Wall Scroll

移山 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for, "to remove mountains," or "to move a mountain."

Figuratively, this means you can accomplish the impossible by sheer persistence.

移山 is the short form of a proverb about a man who had much persistence, and was able to move a whole mountain (a bucket of soil at a time).

Spiritual Warrior

Japan rei sen shi
Spiritual Warrior Vertical Wall Scroll

霊戦士 is a Japanese title that means, "Spiritual Warrior."

The first Kanji means spiritual.

The second Kanji means war, warfare, or battle.

The third Kanji means soldier, officer, man or pawn.

Hero

China yīng xióng
Japan ei yuu
Hero Vertical Wall Scroll

英雄 is the best way to write hero in Chinese and Japanese - especially for calligraphy. 英雄 is also the name of the Chinese movie titled Hero starring Jet Li.

The first character means brave (it can also mean British or English but not in this case).
The second character means heroic but also suggests a male person.
My Japanese dictionary also defines this as "a great man."

Power of Understanding and Wisdom

China wù xìng
Japan gosei
Power of Understanding and Wisdom Vertical Wall Scroll

悟性 means the power of understanding and insight in Chinese.

It is often associated with Neo-Confucianism. In that regard, it means to realize, perceive, or have the perception of man's true nature. It can also mean to find your soul, the soul of others, or the soul of the world. Some will translate this simply as the state of being "savvy."

In Japanese, this is often translated as wisdom and understanding.

The Tree of Enlightenment
The Bodhi Tree

China pú tí shù
Japan bodaiju
The Tree of Enlightenment / The Bodhi Tree Vertical Wall Scroll

These three characters are the full title of the Bodhi tree (a fig tree) under which Siddhartha Gautama (the legendary man and who established the Buddhist religion), achieved enlightenment. Sometimes this is referred to as "the tree of enlightenment." If you don't have a Bodhi tree to sit under, maybe you can achieve your enlightenment under a wall scroll with this title.

Bodhi - Awakening Enlightenment

China pú tí
Japan bodai
Bodhi - Awakening Enlightenment Vertical Wall Scroll

The Bodhi is the moment of completion in Buddhism. It is when all things become known, and you have completed your journey to enlightenment.

The reference is to the Bodhi tree where Siddhartha Gautama (the legendary man and who established the Buddhist religion), achieved enlightenment. Sometimes this is referred to as "the tree of enlightenment" but if you want the full version with the character for tree on the end, please see our other entry.


See Also:  Buddhism | Buddha | Nirvana | Enlightenment

Immortal

China xiān
Japan sento / sen
Immortal Vertical Wall Scroll

仙 means immortal (as in a being or person).

In some context, it can mean hermit, ascetic, man of the hills, or wizard. The Buddha is often put in this category.

In Chinese mythology and folklore, there is a famous group of eight immortals (八仙).

The 楞嚴經 (Śūraṅgama Sūtra) speaks of many kinds of immortals including walkers on the earth, fliers, wanderers at will (into space or into the deva heavens), beings with the ability to transform themselves into any form, etc.

Where There is a Will, There is a Way

China yú gōng yí shān
Where There is a Will, There is a Way Vertical Wall Scroll

愚公移山 is the Chinese proverb (also somewhat known in Japan and Korea) for, "the silly old man moves a mountain."

Figuratively, this means, "where there's a will, there's a way."

Based on a fable of Lord Yu (愚公). He moved the soil of the mountain in front of his house. After years of effort, he finally moved the entire mountain.

The moral of the story: Anything can be accomplished if one works at it ceaselessly.


The Japanese version of this is 愚公山を移す (gu kou yama wo utsu su). But better to get the Chinese version, since this is originally a Chinese proverb.


See Also:  Nothing Is Impossible

Warrior Soul / Heroic Spirit

China yǒng shì jīng shén
Warrior Soul / Heroic Spirit Vertical Wall Scroll

This can be translated as the warrior's spirit or warrior's soul. The first two characters can be translated as "warrior" or literally "brave soldier/man" although some will translate this word as "hero." Therefore, this is also how to say "heroic spirit."

The second two characters mean vigor, vitality, drive, spirit, mind, heart, mental essence and psychological component. Basically "your soul."


We have two versions of this phrase. The only difference is the first two and last two characters are swapped. The version here suggests that you admire or like the idea of the spirit of a warrior. The other version suggests that you are the warrior or hero.

We are not born with knowledge,
how does one achieve maturity?

China rén fēi shēng ér zhī zhī zhě shú néng wú huò
We are not born with knowledge, / how does one achieve maturity? Vertical Wall Scroll

This figuratively means, "Without a teacher, how can we learn/mature?"

This is a philosophic pondering by Han Yu, a Tang Dynasty essayist and philosopher (618-907 A.D.). This Chinese proverb can be translated as, "Knowledge is not innate to man, how can we overcome doubt?" or, "We are not born with knowledge, how does one achieve maturity?."

This infers that we need the guidance of a teacher if we wish to learn, mature, and become better.

I Love You

Japan ai shi te ru
I Love You Vertical Wall Scroll

It's very uncommon (some will say taboo) to say, "I love you" in Japanese culture. It's especially awkward for a man to tell a woman this in Japanese. Everyone is more likely to say "Watashi wa anata ga suki desu" or "I like you" (literally, "I regarding you, have like."

If you have to say, "I love you" in Japanese, this selection of Kanji and Hiragana shown to the left is the way.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Lao Tzu / Laozi

China lǎo zǐ
Japan roushi
Lao Tzu / Laozi Vertical Wall Scroll

Depending on the romanization scheme you use, this man's name can be spelled Laozi, Lao Tzu, or Lao Tze. In older English usage, he was known as Laocius. He is believed to have lived around 500 B.C.

He was a Chinese philosopher, founder of Daoism/Taoism, credited with being the author of the sacred and wise book of Daoism/Taoism.

There is a theory that Lao Tzu's soul traveled to India and was reborn as the Buddha.

Shakyamuni / The Buddha

China shì jiā móu ní
Japan sha ka mu ni
Shakyamuni / The Buddha Vertical Wall Scroll

釋迦牟尼 is a transliteration of "Shakyamuni" or "Sakyamuni" in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

The perceived meaning of the name is roughly translated as, "Sage of the Sakyas."
This same Buddha is also known as "Siddhartha Gautama," "Gotama Buddha," "Tathagata," or simply, "The Supreme Buddha."

釋迦牟尼 is the legendary man and prince who eventually established the Buddhist religion.

Note: Occasionally Romanized as "Siddhattha Gotama."

This combination of characters is sometimes seen and used in South Korea and Japan as well (with the same meaning).


Note: 釋迦牟尼 came from the Sanskrit शाक्यमुनि and can also be romanized with diuretics as Śākyamuni.

Fighter

Warrior / Soldier
China zhàn shì
Japan sen shi
Fighter Vertical Wall Scroll

The first character means war, warfare, or battle.
The second character means soldier, officer, man or pawn.

戰士 is how to write "fighter" in Chinese, ancient Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja. 戰士 can also mean soldier or warrior but there are better terms for those two ideas. This one is more specifically "fighter" or "one who fights." 戰士 is an odd selection for a wall scroll, unless you are a boxer, ultimate fighter, or otherwise participate in combat sports.

Other translations include combatant or champion.


戦Note that after WWII, the first Kanji was reformed/simplified. This modern Japanese version is shown to the right. If you want this version, click on the Kanji to the right, instead of the button above.

Soul of a Warrior

China jīng shén yǒng shì
Soul of a Warrior Vertical Wall Scroll

This can be translated as the spirit or soul of a warrior. The first two characters can be translated as vigor, vitality, drive, spirit, mind, heart, mental essence and psychological component. Basically "your soul."

The second two characters mean "warrior" or literally "brave soldier/man" although some will translate this word as "hero." Therefore, this is also how to say "soul of a hero."

Note: This title is best for Chinese and old Korean. It does make sense in Japanese but is not a common or natural Kanji combination in Japanese.


We have two versions of this phrase. The only difference is the first two and last two characters are swapped. The version here suggests that you are the warrior or hero. The other version suggests that you admire or like the idea of the spirit of a warrior.

Eternal Love

Japan ei en no ai
Eternal Love Vertical Wall Scroll

The first two characters mean eternal, eternity, perpetuity, forever, immortality, and permanence.

The third character is a possessive article which sort of makes this selection mean "Love, of the eternal kind."

The last character is "love."

Cultural note: Most of the time, it is taboo to use the word "love" in Japanese. For instance, a Japanese man will say, "I like you," rather than, "I love you," to his spouse/girlfriend. However, this entry for eternal love is acceptable because of the way it is composed.

This entry is only appropriate if your audience is Japanese. We also have a Chinese version of this phrase.

To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible

Where there is a will, there is a way
China yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible Vertical Wall Scroll

This old Chinese proverb has been translated many different ways into English. As you read the translations below, keep in mind that in Chinese, heart=mind.

Nothing is impossible to a willing heart.
Nothing is impossible to a willing mind.
Nothing is difficult to a willing heart.
Where there is a will, there is a way.
Nothing in the world is impossible if you set your mind to do it.
A willful man will have his way.
If you wish it, you will do it.
A determined heart can accomplish anything.
All things are possible to a strong mind.


Benevolence

China rén
Japan jin
Benevolence Vertical Wall Scroll

Beyond "benevolence" this character can be also be defined as "charity" or "mercy" depending on context.

The deeper meaning suggests that one should pay alms to the poor, care for those in trouble, and take care of his fellow man (or woman).

仁 is one of the five tenets of Confucius. In fact, it is a subject in which Confucius spent a great deal of time explaining to his disciples.

I have also seen this benevolent-related word translated as perfect virtue, selflessness, love for humanity, humaneness, goodness, good will, or simply "love" in the non-romantic form.

仁 is so important to me that I named my second daughter with this character. Her name is "Renni" which means "Benevolent Girl."
-Gary.


This is also a virtue of the Samurai Warrior
See our page with just Code of the Samurai / Bushido here


See Also:  Altruism | Kindness | Charity | Confucius

Hua Mulan

China huā mù lán
Hua Mulan Vertical Wall Scroll

花木蘭 is the name of the famous Chinese woman warrior Hua Mulan.

She was made famous in the west by Disney's animated movie, "Mulan."

Most of the historical information about her comes from an ancient poem. It starts with a concerned Mulan, as she is told a man from each family is to serve conscription in the army. Her father is too old, and her brother is too young. Mulan decides to take the place of her father. After twelve years of war, the army returns and the best warriors are awarded great posts in the government and riches. Mulan turns down all offers, and asks only for a good horse for the long trip home. When Mulan greets visiting comrades wearing her old clothes, they are shocked to find the warrior they rode into battle with for years was actually a woman.

Profound / Powerful Words

China rù mù sān fēn
Profound / Powerful Words Vertical Wall Scroll

These four characters together translate in English to a strong form of "profound" or "written with a forceful hand."

But there is much more to the story...

The deep meaning behind this proverb comes from a man named Wan Xizhi who lived in the third century.

He was a great writer and calligrapher whose writing style influenced generations of other writers and calligraphers.

He once wrote words on a piece of wood to be taken to an engraver.
When the engraver began to carve the characters into the wood, he found that Wang Xizhi's writing had penetrated the wood about 3/8 of an inch.

Thus people believed that his words were so powerful, and so profound this it caused the ink from his brush to penetrate the wood deeply.

The proverb literally means "penetrated wood three fen" (fen is an ancient Chinese measurement a little over to 1/8 of an inch or almost 4mm).

Beauty / Beautiful / Handsome

China měi
Japan bi
Beauty / Beautiful / Handsome Vertical Wall Scroll

美 is often used to describe the beauty of a woman. However, when applied to a man, it can mean handsome. It's also the first character in the word for "beauty salon" which you will see all over China and Japan.

This can be used as the given name for a girl (spell it or say it as "Mei" or "May").

For a bit of trivia: The title for the "USA" in Chinese is "Mei Guo" which literally means "Beautiful Country." This name was bestowed at a time before Chairman Mao came to power and decided that China didn't like the USA anymore (even though we fought together against the Japanese in WWII). But these days, Chinese people love Americans (but have distaste for American politics and policy). But I digress...

美 is also how "Beautiful" is written in Japanese Kanji and Korean Hanja. 美 can also mean: very satisfactory; good; to be pleased with oneself; abbreviation for the USA; fine; handsome; admirable; madhura; sweet; pleasant.


See Also:  Beautiful Woman | Beautiful Girl

Musashi

The most famous Samurai
Japan mu sashi
Musashi Vertical Wall Scroll

武蔵 is the short title for a man long in legend. Miyamoto Musashi is probably the most famous Samurai in all of Japanese history. While coming from a lower class, his new sword and fighting techniques put him on par with the best that feudal Japan had to offer. His long career started with his first duel was at age 13!

He is credited both with using two swords at once, and never losing a single battle in his career. After becoming a Buddhist, and getting older, like many old warriors, he took up a peaceful and solitary life until his death around 1645 A.D.

Note: Technically, Musashi is his given name, and Miyamoto is his surname. However, it's suggested that he assumed both of these names, and also had a few other names at childhood, as well as being given a Buddhist name. It's hard to know what to call him, as with most Kanji, there are multiple pronunciations. The characters for Musashi can also be pronounced "Takezō." But, everyone in modern times seems to know him by the name Musashi.

Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened,
Listen to One Side and be in the Dark

China jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, / Listen to One Side and be in the Dark Vertical Wall Scroll

A man named Wei Zheng lived between 580-643 AD. He was a noble and wise historian and minister in the court of the early Tang Dynasty.

The emperor once asked him, "What should an emperor do to understand the real-world situation and what makes an emperor out-of-touch with reality?"

Wei Zheng replied, "Listen to both sides and you will be enlightened; listen to only one side and you will be left in the dark."

Then Wei Zheng went on to site examples of leaders in history that were victorious after heeding both sides of the story, and other leaders that met their doom because they believed one-sided stories which often came from flattering lips.

Please note that there is an unwritten rule when the same character appears twice in the same phrase, the calligrapher will alter the appearance so that no two characters are exactly alike in the same piece. This calligraphy has two repeating characters that will be written differently than they appear here.

Daoism / Taoism

Literally: The Way or Road
China dào
Japan michi / -do
Daoism / Taoism Vertical Wall Scroll

道 is the character "dao" which is sometimes written as "tao" but pronounced like "dow" in Mandarin.

道 is the base of what is known as "Taoism." If you translate this literally, it can mean "the way" or "the path."

Dao is believed to be that which flows through all things, and keeps them in balance. It incorporates the ideas of yin and yang (e.g. there would be no love without hate, no light without dark, no male without female.)

The beginning of Taoism can be traced to a mystical man named
Lao Zi (604-531 BC), who followed, and added to the teachings of Confucius.

More about Taoism / Daoism here.

Note that this is pronounced "dou" and sometimes "michi" when written alone in Japanese but pronounced "do" in word compounds such as Karate-do and Bushido. It's also "do" in Korean.

Alternate translations and meanings: road, way, path; truth, principle province.

Important Japanese note: In Japanese, this will generally be read with the road, way, or path meaning. Taoism is not as popular or well-known in Japan, so that Daoist/Taoist philosophy is not the first thing a Japanese person will think of then they read this character.


See our Taoism Page

Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan

China tài jí quán
Japan tai kyoku ken
Tai Chi Chuan / Tai Ji Quan Vertical Wall Scroll

太極拳 is the famous Taoist meditation and martial art exercise. The direct translation of these characters would be something like "grand ultimate fist" but that does not quite hit the mark for what this title really means.

An early-morning walk through any city in China near a park or open area will yield a view of Chinese people practicing this ancient technique.

The typical scene is an old man of no less than 80 years on this earth, with a wispy white beard and perhaps a sword in one hand. He makes slow moves that are impossibly smooth. He is steady-footed, and always in balance. For him, time is meaningless and proper form and technique is far more important than speed.

For the younger generation, faster moves may look impressive and seem smooth to the casual observer. But far more discipline and mental strength is needed to create perfectly smooth moves in virtual slow motion.

Note: There are two ways to Romanize these Chinese characters as seen in the title above. The pronunciation and actual characters are the same in Chinese. If you really used English sounds/words to pronounce this, it would be something like "tie jee chew-on" (just make the "chew-on" as one flowing syllable).

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair."

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self."

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish." The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice."

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair." So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.


See Also:  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common Good | Altruism

In Wine there is Truth

China jiǔ hòu tǔ zhēn yán
In Wine there is Truth Vertical Wall Scroll

This is a nice Asian proverb if you know a vintner or wine seller - or wine lover - although the actual meaning might not be exactly what you think or hope.

The literal meaning is that someone drinking wine is more likely to let the truth slip out. It can also be translated as, "People speak their true feelings after drinking alcohol."

It's long-believed in many parts of Asia that one can not consciously hold up a facade of lies when getting drunk, and therefore the truth will come out with a few drinks.

I've had the experience where a Korean man would not trust me until I got drunk with him (I was trying to gain access to the black market in North Korea which is tough to do as an untrusted outsider) - so I think this idea is still well-practiced in many Asian countries.

后 VS 後

Please note that there are two common ways to write the second character of this phrase. The way it's written will be left up to the mood of the calligrapher, unless you let us know that you have a certain preference.


See Also:  Honesty | Truth

Islam

(phonetic version)
China yī sī lán jiào
Islam Vertical Wall Scroll

This both means and sounds like "Islam" in Mandarin Chinese.

The first three characters sound like the word "Islam," and the last character means "religion" or "teaching." It's the most general term for "Islam" in China. The highest concentration of Muslims in China is Xinjiang (the vast region in northwest China that was called The East Turkistan Republic until 1949 and is sometimes called Chinese Turkistan, Uyghuristan). Here you will find Uygurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz and others that are descendants of Turkmen (possibly mixed with Persians and Arabs). Many of their ancestors were traders who traveled the silk road to buy and sell spices, silk, and exchange other goods from the Orient and the Middle East.

I spent some time in Xinjiang and got to know this community. They are strong people who can endure much. They are friendly and love to have a good time. I was a stranger but treated by villagers (near China's border with Afghanistan) as if I was a good friend.
However, I have heard that it's best not to cross them, as in this land, the law is the blade, and everything is "eye for an eye." The Chinese government has little control in Xinjiang with almost no police officers except in the capital of Urumqi (so it's a 60-hour roundtrip train ride to seek the aid of law enforcement in most cases).

While few seem to be devout, there are at least small mosques in every village. And you will never see a man or woman outside without a head covering.

It should be noted that these people are all citizens of China, but they are officially of the Caucasian race. A visit to Xinjiang will change your idea what it means to be Chinese.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Chapter 81

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Chapter 81 Vertical Wall Scroll

This is the Mawangdui version of Daodejing chapter 81.

It can be translated this way:
Credible words are not eloquent;
Eloquent words are not credible.

The wise are not erudite;
The erudite are not wise.

The adept are not all-around;
The all-around are not adept.
The sages do not accumulate things.
Yet the more they have done for others,
The more they have gained themselves;
The more they have given to others,
The more they have gotten themselves.

Thus, the way of tian (heaven) is to benefit without harming;
The way of sages is to do without contending.
Another translation:
Sincere words are not showy;
showy words are not sincere.
Those who know are not "widely learned";
those "widely learned" do not know.
The good do not have a lot;
Those with a lot are not good.
The Sage accumulates nothing.
Having used what he had for others,
he has even more.
Having given what he had to others,
what he has is even greater.
Therefore, the Way of Heaven is to benefit and not cause any harm,
The Way of Man is to act on behalf of others and not to compete with them.
And a third translation:
True words aren't charming,
charming words aren't true.
Good people aren't contentious,
contentious people aren't good.
People who know aren't learned,
learned people don't know.
Wise souls don't hoard;
the more they do for others the more they have,
the more they give the richer they are.
The Way of heaven provides without destroying.
Doing without outdoing
is the Way of the wise.

Push or Knock

To weigh one's words
China fǎn fù tuī qiāo
Push or Knock Vertical Wall Scroll

During the Tang Dynasty, a man named Jia Dao (born in the year 779), a well studied scholar and poet, went to the capital to take the imperial examination.

One day as he rides a donkey through the city streets, a poem begins to form in his mind. A portion of the poem comes into his head like this:

"The bird sits on the tree branch near a pond,
A monk approaches and knocks at the gate..."


At the same time, he wondered if the word "push" would be better than "knock" in his poem.

As he rides down the street, he imagines the monk pushing or knocking. Soon he finds himself making motions of pushing, and shaking a fist in a knocking motion as he debates which word to use. He is quite a sight as he makes his way down the street on his donkey with hands and fists flying about as the internal debate continues.

As he amuses people along the street, he becomes completely lost in his thoughts and does not see the mayor's procession coming in the opposite direction. Jia Bao is blocking the way for the procession to continue down the road, and the mayor's guards immediately decide to remove Jia Bao by force. Jia Bao, not realizing that he was in the way, apologizes, explains his poetic dilemma, and awaits his punishment for blocking the mayor's way.

The mayor, Han Yu, a scholar and author of prose himself, finds himself intrigued by Jia Dao's poem and problem. Han Yu gets off his horse, and addresses Jia Bao, stating, "I think knock is better." The relieved Jia Bao raises his head, and is invited by the mayor to join the procession, and are seen riding off together down the street exchanging their ideas and love of poetry.

In modern Chinese, this idiom is used when someone is trying to decide which word to use in their writing or when struggling to decide between two things when neither seems to have a downside.

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Search for Man of in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Man of Character大丈夫dai jou bu / daijoubu / dai jo bu / daijobudà zhàng fu
da4 zhang4 fu5
da zhang fu
dazhangfu
ta chang fu
tachangfu
Man of Remarkable Character
Hero
傑物
杰物
ketsubutsu
Trust No One
Trust No Man
誰も信じるなdare mo shin ji ru na
daremoshinjiruna
Trust No One
Trust No Man
無法信任
无法信任
wú fǎ xìn rèn
wu2 fa3 xin4 ren4
wu fa xin ren
wufaxinren
wu fa hsin jen
wufahsinjen
Iron Man鉄人tetsujin
Ip Man葉問
叶问
yè wèn / ye4 wen4 / ye wen / yewenyeh wen / yehwen
Iron Man鋼鐵俠gāng tiě xiá
gang1 tie3 xia2
gang tie xia
gangtiexia
kang t`ieh hsia
kangtiehhsia
kang tieh hsia
Teach A Man To Fish授人以魚不如授人以漁
授人以鱼不如授人以渔
shòu rén yǐ yú bù rú shòu rén yǐ yú
shou4 ren2 yi3 yu2 bu4 ru2 shou4 ren2 yi3 yu2
shou ren yi yu bu ru shou ren yi yu
shou jen i yü pu ju shou jen i yü
Holy Man
Saint
聖人
圣人
seijinshèng rén
sheng4 ren2
sheng ren
shengren
sheng jen
shengjen
Adonis
Handsome Young Man
美青年bi sei nen / biseinen
Time and Tide Wait for No Man歲不我與
岁不我与
suì bù wǒ yǔ
sui4 bu4 wo3 yu3
sui bu wo yu
suibuwoyu
sui pu wo yü
suipuwoyü
Flying Ace
Aviator
Bird Man
鳥人chou jin / choujin / cho jin / chojin
Time and Tide Wait for No Man光陰矢の如し
光阴矢の如し
kouinya no goto shi
kouinyanogotoshi
koinya no goto shi
koinyanogotoshi
Person of Character人格者jinkakusha
A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will)君子豹変すkun shi hyou hen su
kunshihyouhensu
kun shi hyo hen su
kunshihyohensu
Character人柄hitogara
Belief
Trust
信任shinninxìn rèn / xin4 ren4 / xin ren / xinrenhsin jen / hsinjen
No Fear恐れずoso re zu / osorezu
Fortitude
Strength of Character
剛毅
刚毅
gouki / gokigāng yì / gang1 yi4 / gang yi / gangyikang i / kangi
Assassin刺客shikaku / shikyakucì kè / ci4 ke4 / ci ke / ciketz`u k`o / tzuko / tzu ko
Work Unselfishly for the Common Good克己奉公kè jǐ fèng gōng
ke4 ji3 feng4 gong1
ke ji feng gong
kejifenggong
k`o chi feng kung
kochifengkung
ko chi feng kung
Fear No Man
Fear Nothing
無所畏懼
无所畏惧
wú suǒ wèi jù
wu2 suo3 wei4 ju4
wu suo wei ju
wusuoweiju
wu so wei chü
wusoweichü
No man knows what he owes to his parents
till he comes to have children of his own
子を持って知る親の恩ko wo motte shiru oya no on
kowomotteshiruoyanoon
No Fear勇者無畏
勇者无畏
yǒng zhě wú wèi
yong3 zhe3 wu2 wei4
yong zhe wu wei
yongzhewuwei
yung che wu wei
yungchewuwei
No Fear無畏
无畏
muiwú wèi / wu2 wei4 / wu wei / wuwei
Oneness of Heaven and Humanity天人合一tiān rén hé yī
tian1 ren2 he2 yi1
tian ren he yi
tianrenheyi
t`ien jen ho i
tienjenhoi
tien jen ho i
A sly rabbit has three openings to its den狡兔三窟jiǎo tù sān kū
jiao3 tu4 san1 ku1
jiao tu san ku
jiaotusanku
chiao t`u san k`u
chiaotusanku
chiao tu san ku
Eternal Wheel of Life法輪
法轮
hourin / horin
horin / horin
horin/horin
fǎ lún / fa3 lun2 / fa lun / falun
Wisdom from Hard Knocks挨一拳得一招挨十拳變諸葛
挨一拳得一招挨十拳变诸葛
ái yī quán dé yī zhāo ái shí quán biàn zhū gě
ai2 yi1 quan2 de2 yi1 zhao1 ai2 shi2 quan2 bian4 zhu1 ge3
ai yi quan de yi zhao ai shi quan bian zhu ge
ai i ch`üan te i chao ai shih ch`üan pien chu ko
ai i chüan te i chao ai shih chüan pien chu ko
Warrior武士bu shi / bushiwǔ shì / wu3 shi4 / wu shi / wushiwu shih / wushih
Gea吉亞
吉亚
jí yǎ / ji2 ya3 / ji ya / jiyachi ya / chiya
Mark the boat to find the lost sword
Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world
刻舟求劍
刻舟求剑
kokushuukyuuken
kokushukyuken
kè zhōu qiú jiàn
ke4 zhou1 qiu2 jian4
ke zhou qiu jian
kezhouqiujian
k`o chou ch`iu chien
kochouchiuchien
ko chou chiu chien
Bodhidharma菩提達摩 / 菩提達磨
菩提达摩 / 菩提达磨
bo dai daru ma
bodaidaruma
pú tí dá mó
pu2 ti2 da2 mo2
pu ti da mo
putidamo
p`u t`i ta mo
putitamo
pu ti ta mo
The Saint聖者
圣者
seijashèng zhě
sheng4 zhe3
sheng zhe
shengzhe
sheng che
shengche
Love and Affection愛情
爱情
aijou / aijoài qíng / ai4 qing2 / ai qing / aiqingai ch`ing / aiching / ai ching
Time Waits For No One歳月人を待たずsai getsu hito o ma ta zu
saigetsuhitoomatazu
Journey
Travel
ryo / tabilǚ / lu:3 / lu:
Brave Warrior勇士yuu shi / yuushi / yu shi / yushiyǒng shì / yong3 shi4 / yong shi / yongshiyung shih / yungshih
Adventure Lover冒険野郎bou ken ya rou
boukenyarou
bo ken ya ro
bokenyaro
Kung Fu
Gong Fu
功夫kan fu / ku fu
kanfu / kufu
gōng fu / gong1 fu / gong fu / gongfukung fu / kungfu
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?不當和尚不知齋戒苦
不当和尚不知斋戒苦
bù dāng hé shang bù zhī zhāi jiè kǔ
bu4 dang1 he2 shang bu4 zhi1 zhai1 jie4 ku3
bu dang he shang bu zhi zhai jie ku
pu tang ho shang pu chih chai chieh k`u
pu tang ho shang pu chih chai chieh ku
Superman超人chou jin / choujin / cho jin / chojinchāo rén / chao1 ren2 / chao ren / chaorench`ao jen / chaojen / chao jen
Tetsu
Wise Sage
tetsuzhé / zhe2 / zheche
Nothing is Impossible with Persistence移山isanyí shān / yi2 shan1 / yi shan / yishani shan / ishan
Spiritual Warrior霊戦士rei sen shi
reisenshi
Hero英雄ei yuu / eiyuu / ei yu / eiyuyīng xióng
ying1 xiong2
ying xiong
yingxiong
ying hsiung
yinghsiung
Power of Understanding and Wisdom悟性goseiwù xìng / wu4 xing4 / wu xing / wuxingwu hsing / wuhsing
The Tree of Enlightenment
The Bodhi Tree
菩提樹
菩提树
bodaijupú tí shù
pu2 ti2 shu4
pu ti shu
putishu
p`u t`i shu
putishu
pu ti shu
Bodhi - Awakening Enlightenment菩提bodaipú tí / pu2 ti2 / pu ti / putip`u t`i / puti / pu ti
Immortalsento / senxiān / xian1 / xianhsien
Where There is a Will, There is a Way愚公移山yú gōng yí shān
yu2 gong1 yi2 shan1
yu gong yi shan
yugongyishan
yü kung i shan
yükungishan
Warrior Soul
Heroic Spirit
勇士精神yǒng shì jīng shén
yong3 shi4 jing1 shen2
yong shi jing shen
yongshijingshen
yung shih ching shen
yungshihchingshen
We are not born with knowledge, how does one achieve maturity?人非生而知之者熟能無惑rén fēi shēng ér zhī zhī zhě shú néng wú huò
ren2 fei1 sheng1 er2 zhi1 zhi1 zhe3 shu2 neng2 wu2 huo4
ren fei sheng er zhi zhi zhe shu neng wu huo
jen fei sheng erh chih chih che shu neng wu huo
I Love You愛してるai shi te ru
aishiteru
Lao Tzu
Laozi
老子roushi / roshilǎo zǐ / lao3 zi3 / lao zi / laozilao tzu / laotzu
Shakyamuni
The Buddha
釋迦牟尼
释迦牟尼
sha ka mu ni
shakamuni
shì jiā móu ní
shi4 jia1 mou2 ni2
shi jia mou ni
shijiamouni
shih chia mou ni
shihchiamouni
Fighter戰士
战士 / 戦士
sen shi / senshizhàn shì / zhan4 shi4 / zhan shi / zhanshichan shih / chanshih
Soul of a Warrior精神勇士jīng shén yǒng shì
jing1 shen2 yong3 shi4
jing shen yong shi
jingshenyongshi
ching shen yung shih
chingshenyungshih
Eternal Love永遠の愛ei en no ai
eiennoai
To a Willing Heart, All Things Are Possible有志者事竟成 / 有誌者事竟成
有志者事竟成
yǒu zhì zhě shì jìng chéng
you3 zhi4 zhe3 shi4 jing4 cheng2
you zhi zhe shi jing cheng
youzhizheshijingcheng
yu chih che shih ching ch`eng
yuchihcheshihchingcheng
yu chih che shih ching cheng
Benevolencejinrén / ren2 / renjen
Hua Mulan花木蘭
花木兰
huā mù lán
hua1 mu4 lan2
hua mu lan
huamulan
Profound
Powerful Words
入木三分rù mù sān fēn
ru4 mu4 san1 fen1
ru mu san fen
rumusanfen
ju mu san fen
jumusanfen
Beauty
Beautiful
Handsome
biměi / mei3 / mei
Musashi武蔵mu sashi / musashi
Listen to Both Sides and be Enlightened, Listen to One Side and be in the Dark兼聽則明偏聽則暗
兼听则明偏听则暗
jiān tīng zé míng, piān tīng zé àn
jian1 ting1 ze2 ming2, pian1 ting1 ze2 an4
jian ting ze ming, pian ting ze an
chien t`ing tse ming, p`ien t`ing tse an
chien ting tse ming, pien ting tse an
Daoism
Taoism
michi / -dodào / dao4 / daotao
Tai Chi Chuan
Tai Ji Quan
太極拳
太极拳
tai kyoku ken
taikyokuken
tài jí quán
tai4 ji2 quan2
tai ji quan
taijiquan
t`ai chi ch`üan
taichichüan
tai chi chüan
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial大公無私
大公无私
dà gōng wú sī
da4 gong1 wu2 si1
da gong wu si
dagongwusi
ta kung wu ssu
takungwussu
In Wine there is Truth酒后吐真言 / 酒後吐真言
酒后吐真言
jiǔ hòu tǔ zhēn yán
jiu3 hou4 tu3 zhen1 yan2
jiu hou tu zhen yan
jiuhoutuzhenyan
chiu hou t`u chen yen
chiuhoutuchenyen
chiu hou tu chen yen
Islam伊斯蘭教
伊斯兰教
yī sī lán jiào
yi1 si1 lan2 jiao4
yi si lan jiao
yisilanjiao
i ssu lan chiao
issulanchiao
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching Chapter 81
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善圣人无积既以为人己愈有既以予人矣已愈多故天之道利而不害圣人之道为而不争
Push or Knock反復推敲
反复推敲
fǎn fù tuī qiāo
fan3 fu4 tui1 qiao1
fan fu tui qiao
fanfutuiqiao
fan fu t`ui ch`iao
fanfutuichiao
fan fu tui chiao
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks百折不撓
百折不挠
hyaku setsu su tou
hyakusetsusutou
hyaku setsu su to
hyakusetsusuto
bǎi zhé bù náo
bai3 zhe2 bu4 nao2
bai zhe bu nao
baizhebunao
pai che pu nao
paichepunao
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Ambition
Aries
Brief
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Bushi
Calm
Calm Mind
Change
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Enso
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Family Bond
Future
Goku
Hanawa
Happy Buddha
Harmony
Hidden Dragon
Ikigai
Judo
Justice
Kenjutsu
Knowledge
Light
Love
Mercy
Mind Body Spirit
Namaste
Namo Amitabha Buddha
Non Violence
One Family Under Heaven
Panda Bear
Personal Integrity
Resilience
Rose
Sakura
Scorpio
Scorpion
Strength
Tiger
Wolf
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Man of Kanji, Man of Characters, Man of in Mandarin Chinese, Man of Characters, Man of in Chinese Writing, Man of in Japanese Writing, Man of in Asian Writing, Man of Ideograms, Chinese Man of symbols, Man of Hieroglyphics, Man of Glyphs, Man of in Chinese Letters, Man of Hanzi, Man of in Japanese Kanji, Man of Pictograms, Man of in the Chinese Written-Language, or Man of in the Japanese Written-Language.

1 people have searched for Man of in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Man of was last searched for by someone else on Apr 11th, 2018