Did you mean: Ande Don Isa Who ?

Not what you want?

Try other similar-meaning words, fewer words, or just one word.

  

And Don is Who in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an And Don is Who calligraphy wall scroll here!

Personalize your custom “And Don is Who” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “And Don is Who” title below...


  1. Don’t Panic

  2. Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it

  3. One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet

  4. One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door

  5. The Tree of Enlightenment / The Bodhi Tree

  6. Angel

  7. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81

  8. Kowtow - The deepest bow

  9. Student

10. Tiger Rumor

11. Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?


Don’t Panic

bú yào kǒng huāng
Don’t Panic Scroll

If you need a strange homage to the Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, this might be it.

This simply says "Don't Panic" in Chinese. A Chinese person who is not familiar with this masterpiece of a book, will not see the humor but that will be your chance to suggest reading some Douglas Adams (which has been translated into Chinese).

Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it

chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it Scroll

This proverb suggests that one should always be grateful to those who helped you succeed.

And remember your ancestors and those that came before you whose sacrifices made your present life better.

Some Chinese will separate the intended meaning from this proverb and translate this as "Don't forget the people who once helped you". In Modern China, this idiom is virtually never used to refer to an actual well.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used phrase.

One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet

cháng zài hé biān zǒu nǎ néng bù shī xié
One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet Scroll

This is an old Chinese proverb that is sometimes compared to the English saying "Shit Happens".

It's a reflection that there are risks in life, and you should not be surprised when things don't go your way.

A secondary translation might be, "When walking by a river, often one cannot avoid wet shoes".

One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door

bái tiān bú zuò kuī xīn shì yè bàn qiāo mén bù chī jīng
One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door Scroll

This literally translates as: [If one does] not do bad things in the daytime, one need not be alarmed at knocks on the door in the middle of the night.

The meaning is something like, "A quiet conscience sleeps in thunder". Basically, the message is, "don't commit crimes and you won't be jumpy every time the doorbell rings (so don't do anything wrong and your life will have fewer worries and you can sleep at night)".

The Tree of Enlightenment / The Bodhi Tree

pú tí shù
bodaiju
The Tree of Enlightenment / The Bodhi Tree Scroll

菩提樹 is the full title of the Bodhi tree (a fig tree) under which Siddhartha Gautama (the legendary man and who established the Buddhist religion), achieved enlightenment.

Sometimes this is referred to as "the tree of enlightenment". If you don't have a Bodhi tree to sit under, maybe you can achieve your enlightenment under a wall scroll with this title.

Angel

(Name - Version 2)
ān hè ěr
Angel Scroll

安赫爾 is another common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Angel.

This one misses the mark too - It uses a hard "H" sound to simulate the "J" sound of the "G" in this name. I don't know who transliterated these first and how it became the standard.
Again, I recommend using the meaning of Angel above.

If anything, this is the more masculine form of Angel. 安赫爾 is also the form commonly used for the masculine Latin name Ángel.

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81 Scroll

信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭 is the Mawangdui version of Daodejing chapter 81.

It can be translated this way:
Credible words are not eloquent;
Eloquent words are not credible.

The wise are not erudite;
The erudite are not wise.

The adept are not all-around;
The all-around are not adept.
The sages do not accumulate things.
Yet the more they have done for others,
The more they have gained themselves;
The more they have given to others,
The more they have gotten themselves.

Thus, the way of tian (heaven) is to benefit without harming;
The way of sages is to do without contending.
Another translation:
Sincere words are not showy;
showy words are not sincere.
Those who know are not "widely learned";
those "widely learned" do not know.
The good do not have a lot;
Those with a lot are not good.
The Sage accumulates nothing.
Having used what he had for others,
he has even more.
Having given what he had to others,
what he has is even greater.
Therefore, the Way of Heaven is to benefit and not cause any harm,
The Way of Man is to act on behalf of others and not to compete with them.
And a third translation:
True words aren't charming,
charming words aren't true.
Good people aren't contentious,
contentious people aren't good.
People who know aren't learned,
learned people don't know.
Wise souls don't hoard;
the more they do for others the more they have,
the more they give the richer they are.
The Way of heaven provides without destroying.
Doing without outdoing
is the Way of the wise.

Kowtow - The deepest bow

kòu tóu
koutou
Kowtow - The deepest bow Scroll

叩頭 is the term that seems to be known worldwide as kowtow.

In Japanese and Chinese, it simply means a deep bow, especially one so low that one's head touches the ground in submission. However, in western culture, it has sometimes come to mean "giving in" or "surrendering to someone else's will". Sometimes even said of a person who stoops to flattery at the expense of their own dignity.

I don't know if you would really want this on a wall scroll but enough people have searched for this term on our website, that I guess it was time to add it. It just feels strange to see such a word on a wall scroll, so please order with caution. 叩頭 is antiquated in both Japanese and Chinese. The act is seldom done anymore and seen as an ancient ritual of sorts.

xué shēng
gakusei
Student Scroll

學生 is how to write "student" in Chinese, pre-WWII Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

If you are a "student of life", this might be an interesting wall scroll to hang in your reading room.

The first character means "study" or "learning".
The second character means "life" or "birth". Don't read too much into that second character, unless you decide that this means "the birth of studies" or "the life of learning". Everyone in China, Japan, (and those who can read Hanja in Korea) will just read this word with the meaning of "student".

If you put the character for "little" in front of this word, it becomes "elementary school student". Prefixed with "middle" it becomes "middle school student". Prefixed with "big" it becomes "university student" (though when these two characters for student are seen alone, it often suggests "university student"). The term "high school student" is written differently.


学There is a very common simplified version of the first character for this word. You will see this form in modern Japan and mainland China, Singapore, and other places. If you want this simplified version, please click on the character shown to the right instead of the "select and customize" button above.

sān rén chéng hǔ
Tiger Rumor Scroll

These four characters together relay the meaning that can be expressed in English as, "When three people say there's a tiger running in the street, you believe it".

Of course, there is an ancient story behind this idiom...

三人成虎 is actually a proverb that resulted from a conversation that occurred around 300 B.C.

The conversation was between the king of the Wei kingdom and one of the king's ministers named Pang Cong.

It was near the end of one of many wars, this time with the Zhao kingdom. Pang Cong was to be sent by the king to the Zhao kingdom with the king's son who was to be held hostage. It was common at the time for a king to make his son a hostage to secure stable peace between warring kingdoms.

Before minister Pang Cong departed, he asked his king, "If one person told you there was a tiger running in the street, would you believe it?".

"No", the king said.

The minister continued, "What if two people told you?"

The king replied, "Well, I would have my doubts but I might believe it".

The minister continued, "So, what if three people told you that there is a tiger running in the streets?"

The king replied, "Yes, I would believe it, it must be true if three people say it".

The minister then reminded the king, "Your son and I are now traveling far away to live in the distant Zhao kingdom - much farther from your palace than the street. Rumors may fly about me in my absence, so I hope your majesty will weight such rumors appropriately".

The king replied, "I have every trust in you, do not worry"

While the minister was gone, the king's enemies gossiped about minister Pang Cong on many occasions. At first, the king thought nothing of these comments and rumors. But slowly as the rumors mounted, the king began to suspect ill of his minister.

Some time later when peace was well-established, the minister and prince were freed and returned to the kingdom of Wei. The king received his son, BUT DID NOT EVEN SUMMON MINISTER PANG CONG TO THE PALACE!

Hopefully this story will help you see how dangerous words can be when used to promote rumors, or create ill will. And perhaps will inspire you to not believe everything you hear.

There is also a secondary suggestion in this idiom that gossip is as ferocious as a tiger. Some Chinese people who don't know the ancient story above may believe that this scroll means that rumors are as vicious as three tigers.

Note: This proverb appears in my Korean dictionary but is not well-known in Korea.

Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?

wēi jī
kiki
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Scroll

Separately, the first character here does mean "danger" or "to endanger" and the second character can mean "opportunity".

However, I want to debunk a myth that was propagated by some westerners who did not have a clear understanding of Asian languages...

While often, Chinese/Japanese/Korean compound words (words of two or more characters) are the sum of their parts, this is not always the case. The compound is often understood with a completely different meaning than the two characters individually.

Many have said that the Chinese/Japanese/Korean word for Crisis is made up of the characters for "danger" and "opportunity". 危機 is true when phrased this way.
However, it's not absolutely correct to say that "danger + opportunity = crisis" in Asian cultures.

English example:
If I tell you that...
Bovine creature + Guy behind the plate in baseball = Locomotive protection
...you would think I was mad. But consider that "cow + catcher = cowcatcher", which is the device that used to be found on steam engines to protect them if they hit an animal on the tracks. When we hear the word "cowcatcher" we don't separate the words into their individual meanings (necessarily).
The same is true with the word for crisis in Chinese/Japanese/Korean. While you can separate the characters, few Asian people would automatically do so in their minds.

The final answer:
It is a half-truth to say, "danger plus opportunity equals crisis" in Chinese/Japanese/Korean. Use this statement and concept with caution.

Also, the second character can mean "secret" or "machine" depending on context so I guess you have to say "a dangerous machine = crisis" or "danger + a secret = crisis". Both of these are only slightly more ridiculous than the first premise.

PS: 危機 is probably not a great word for a scroll, unless you have a special use for it.




This in-stock artwork might be what you are looking for, and ships right away...

Gallery Price: $61.00

Your Price: $33.88

Gallery Price: $61.00

Your Price: $33.88

Gallery Price: $61.00

Your Price: $33.88

Gallery Price: $61.00

Your Price: $33.88

Gallery Price: $61.00

Your Price: $33.88

Gallery Price: $90.00

Your Price: $49.88

Gallery Price: $60.00

Your Price: $36.88

Gallery Price: $60.00

Your Price: $36.88

Gallery Price: $90.00

Your Price: $49.88

Gallery Price: $36.00

Starting at: $20.00

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $88.88

Gallery Price: $200.00

Your Price: $79.88


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Don’t Panic不要恐慌bú yào kǒng huāng
bu2 yao4 kong3 huang1
bu yao kong huang
buyaokonghuang
pu yao k`ung huang
puyaokunghuang
pu yao kung huang
Drinking the water of a well: One should never forget who dug it吃水不忘掘井人chī shuǐ bú wàng jué jǐng rén
chi1 shui3 bu2 wang4 jue2 jing3 ren2
chi shui bu wang jue jing ren
chishuibuwangjuejingren
ch`ih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
chih shui pu wang chüeh ching jen
One who walks by the river may end up with wet feet常在河邊走哪能不濕鞋
常在河边走哪能不湿鞋
cháng zài hé biān zǒu nǎ néng bù shī xié
chang2 zai4 he2 bian1 zou3 na3 neng2 bu4 shi1 xie2
chang zai he bian zou na neng bu shi xie
ch`ang tsai ho pien tsou na neng pu shih hsieh
chang tsai ho pien tsou na neng pu shih hsieh
One Who Does Not Do Bad Things, Worries Not of Knocks at His Door白天不做虧心事夜半敲門不吃驚
白天不做亏心事夜半敲门不吃惊
bái tiān bú zuò kuī xīn shì yè bàn qiāo mén bù chī jīng
bai2 tian1 bu2 zuo4 kui1 xin1 shi4 ye4 ban4 qiao1 men2 bu4 chi1 jing1
bai tian bu zuo kui xin shi ye ban qiao men bu chi jing
pai t`ien pu tso k`uei hsin shih yeh pan ch`iao men pu ch`ih ching
pai tien pu tso kuei hsin shih yeh pan chiao men pu chih ching
The Tree of Enlightenment
The Bodhi Tree
菩提樹
菩提树
bodaijupú tí shù
pu2 ti2 shu4
pu ti shu
putishu
p`u t`i shu
putishu
pu ti shu
Angel安赫爾
安赫尔
ān hè ěr
an1 he4 er3
an he er
anheer
an ho erh
anhoerh
Daodejing
Tao Te Ching - Chapter 81
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善聖人無積既以為人己癒有既以予人矣已癒多故天之道利而不害聖人之道為而不爭
信言不美美言不信知者不博博者不知善者不多多者不善圣人无积既以为人己愈有既以予人矣已愈多故天之道利而不害圣人之道为而不争
Kowtow - The deepest bow叩頭
叩头
koutou / kotokòu tóu / kou4 tou2 / kou tou / koutouk`ou t`ou / koutou / kou tou
Student學生
学生
gakuseixué shēng
xue2 sheng1
xue sheng
xuesheng
hsüeh sheng
hsüehsheng
Tiger Rumor三人成虎sān rén chéng hǔ
san1 ren2 cheng2 hu3
san ren cheng hu
sanrenchenghu
san jen ch`eng hu
sanjenchenghu
san jen cheng hu
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?危機
危机
kikiwēi jī / wei1 ji1 / wei ji / weijiwei chi / weichi
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Many custom options...


Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Scroll
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Scroll
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Scroll
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Scroll


And formats...

Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Vertical Portrait
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Horizontal Wall Scroll
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity? Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup And Don is Who in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

5 Tenets of Taekwondo9 Koi FishA Journey of a Thousand MilesA Moment of Time is as Precious as GoldA Quiet Conscience Sleeps in ThunderAaliyahAaronAbbieAbbyAbelAbgailAbundance and ProsperityAchievementAdamAdanaryAdapt and OvercomeAddieAdhiAdnanAftabAhmedAiki JujutsuAikidoAikoAilaAileeAileenAir ForceAishuAizaAjayAkaneAkashAkemiAkitaAkshayAkumaAlasAldrinAlessiaAlexaAlexisAlfredAlinaAlixAliyahAllahAllyAlmaAlways Striving for Inner StrengthAmanAmandaAmarAmazing GraceAmberAmbitionAmenAmitAnahiAnandAncient WarriorAncient Warrior CodeAndiAndrewAngelAngeloAnicaAnkitAnkitaAnnaAnnalynAnneAnthonyAntonioAntonyAnuragAnyaAphroditeAquariusAquarius Zodiac Symbol SignAquinoAranArchangelAriaAriasAriesArigatoArjayArjunArloArmaanArmanArmelArminArnieArt of WarArvinAryanAshaAshrafAstridAthenaAtulAudreyAuroraAvengerAwakenAwakeningAwarenessAxelAyakaAyanAzuraAzzyBagua ZhangBaileyBajutsuBarbarBe MyselfBe True to YourselfBe Water My FriendBe YourselfBeautifulBeautiful PrincessBelieveBentleyBetelgeuseBhavyaBibleBible VerseBirdBird ScrollBlackBlacksmithBless This HouseBlessed by GodBlessingsBoboBodhidharmaBon VoyageBonsaiBradenBrandyBraveBrave the Wind and the WavesBrave WarriorBreatheBrennanBrianBrigitteBrodyBrotherhoodBrotherly and Sisterly LoveBruce LeeBryanBuddhaBuddha HeartBurtonBushidoBushido CodeButterflyCalistaCalmCameronCammieCancer Zodiac Symbol SignCaraCarlosCarolynCarpe DiemCarsonCarterCastroCeciliaCesarChandraChaosCharanCharismaCheerCheersChelseaChen SurnameCherieCherry BlossomCherylChetanCheyChi EnergyChiaraChloeChoiChrisChrissyChristianityChristopherChristyChuckCillianCindy

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as And Don is Who Kanji, And Don is Who Characters, And Don is Who in Mandarin Chinese, And Don is Who Characters, And Don is Who in Chinese Writing, And Don is Who in Japanese Writing, And Don is Who in Asian Writing, And Don is Who Ideograms, Chinese And Don is Who symbols, And Don is Who Hieroglyphics, And Don is Who Glyphs, And Don is Who in Chinese Letters, And Don is Who Hanzi, And Don is Who in Japanese Kanji, And Don is Who Pictograms, And Don is Who in the Chinese Written-Language, or And Don is Who in the Japanese Written-Language.

4 people have searched for And Don is Who in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
And Don is Who was last searched for by someone else on Oct 10th, 2021