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1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Reason"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Love Without Reason
  2. Everything Happens for a Reason
  3. The Mysterious Bond Between People
  4. Wisdom
  5. Intelligence / Intellect
  6. Wisdom comes from Experience
  7. Failure is the Origin of Success
  8. Failure is a Stepping Stone to Success
  9. Science
10. Lee
11. Philip
12. Awesome / Really Cool
13. Death with Dignity
14. You Only Live Once
15. Flying / Flight / Rising Upward
16. Crazy / Mad
17. House of Red Delights
18. Perseverance / Fortitude
19. Proud / Pride / Lofty-Minded
20. Awesome / Awe-Inspiring
21. Yen
22. Good Intentions / Good Will...
23. Shit Happens
24. Body / Karada
25. Lost / Dazed and Confused
26. Heaven / Sky
27. No Pain No Gain
28. Bravery / Courage
29. Master / Skilled Worker
30. Asian Pride / Oriental Pride...
31. Broken Mirror Rejoined
32. Better Late Than Never

Love Without Reason

Japan ai ni ri yuu wa na i
Love Without Reason Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase means, "love without reason," or "love doesn't need a reason." It's a pretty cool phrase in Japanese

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Love Without Reason

China ài ér wú yóu
Love Without Reason Wall Scroll

愛而無由 is how to write "love without reason" in Mandarin Chinese (using proper grammar, etc).

愛而無由 is not a commonly used, nor ancient phrase in Chinese.

Everything Happens for a Reason

China wàn shì jiē yīn guǒ
Everything Happens for a Reason Wall Scroll

The first two characters mean "all things" or "everything."

The middle character kind of means, "in all cases."

The last two characters create a complex word that can be defined many ways such as, "karma," "cause and effect," "fate," "every cause has its effect, as every effect arises from a cause."

Keep in mind, Chinese grammar is a bit different than English, so trust me that this makes a natural proverb that means, "Everything happens for a reason" in Chinese.

Everything Happens for a Reason

Japan monogoto ha subete riyuu ga at te okiru
Everything Happens for a Reason Wall Scroll

物事は全て理由があって起きる is a work in progress. We're still trying to decide the best way to express this in Japanese. If you order this, we might have a discussion about the best version that fits you. Here's how the characters break down by meaning (keep in mind, Japanese grammar and sentence construction is very different from English, so it doesn't make complete sense in English)...

物事 = things, everything
は particle
全て all, the whole, entirely
理由 reason
が particle
あっ be, exist, have, take place, happens
て particle
起きる to occur, to happen; to take place (usually unfavorable incidents)

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

The Mysterious Bond Between People

The invisible force that brings people together forever
China yuán
Japan en
The Mysterious Bond Between People Wall Scroll

緣 / 縁 is a complicated single character. It can mean a lot of different things depending on how you read it.

In Japanese, it can mean fate; destiny; a mysterious force that binds two people together; a relationship between two people; bond; link; connection; family ties; affinity; opportunity; chance (to meet someone and start a relationship). It can also mean "someone to rely on," relative, reminder, memento, or the female given name, Yori.

It's basically the same in Chinese, where it's defined as cause, reason, karma, fate, or predestined affinity.

In Buddhist context, it's Pratyaya. 緣 / 縁 is the concept of indirect conditions, as opposed to direct causes. It's when something happens (meeting someone) by circumstance, or a contributing environment. Instead of a direct cause or act, it is a conditioning cause without direct input or action by the involved people.

Occasionally, this character is used in a facetious way to say hem, seam, or edge of clothing. In this case, it's the seam that brings or holds the clothing together.

縁Note: Japanese will tend to use the variant of this Kanji shown to the right. If you want this version (and are ordering this from the Japanese master calligrapher), click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above.


China zhì
Japan chi / tomo
Wisdom Wall Scroll

智 is the simplest way to write wisdom in Chinese, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.
Being a single character, the wisdom meaning is open to interpretation, and can also mean intellect, knowledge or reason, resourcefulness, or wit.

This character is also one of the five tenets of Confucius.

This character is sometimes included in the Bushido code but usually not considered part of the seven key concepts of the code.

See our Wisdom in Chinese, Japanese and Korean page for more wisdom-related calligraphy.

See Also:  Learn From Wisdom | Confucius

Intelligence / Intellect

China zhì néng
Japan chinou
Intelligence / Intellect Wall Scroll

These two characters mean intelligence or intelligent.

The first character means wisdom, intellect or knowledge.

The second means ability, talent, skill, capacity, capable, able, and can even mean competent.

Together, the compound word can mean "capacity for wisdom," "useful knowledge," or even "mental power." Obviously this translates more clearly into English as "intelligence."

Note: 智能 / 知能 is not the same word used to mean "military intelligence." See our other entry for that.

知In modern Japan, they tend to use a version of the first character without the bottom radical. If your audience for this artwork is Japanese, please click on the Kanji to the right instead of the button above.

Wisdom comes from Experience

China bù jīng yī shì
Wisdom comes from Experience Wall Scroll

不經一事 means, "You can't gain knowledge without practical experience."

不經一事 is the short form (first half) of a longer Chinese proverb. These 4 characters remind you that wisdom only comes from experience.

Failure is the Origin of Success

Japan shippai wa seikou no moto
Failure is the Origin of Success Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb literally reads, "failure/mistake/blunder/defeat is the origin of success."

Basically, it suggests that failures or defeats are a necessary part of success.

失敗は成功の元 is often translated as, "Failure is a stepping stone to success."

Note: There are a few similar variations of this idiom in Japanese.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

See Also:  Failure Is a Stepping Stone to Success

Failure is a Stepping Stone to Success

Japan sittpai wa seikou no moto
Failure is a Stepping Stone to Success Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb literally reads, "failures/mistakes/blunders are the yeast-starter/yeast-mash of success."

Basically, it suggests that failures are a necessary part of success; Just as bread or beer requires yeast to successfully rise or brew/ferment.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


The rules of life, the universe, and everything.
Japan kotowari
Science Wall Scroll

At essence, this word means science. But it's a very ambiguous and open term. This character speaks to the reason that all things exist, and how things work from the microscopic to the cosmic level.

There are many translations for this word, including: inner essence; intrinsic order; reason; logic; truth; science; natural science (esp. physics); principle; the underlying principles of the cosmos; way of things; ruling principle; fundamental law; intrinsicality; universal basis; essential element.

If you are a scientist, or just searching for, "the answer to life, the universe, and everything," this could be the character for you.


Lee Wall Scroll

理 is an alternate transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the masculine western name Lee.

This character means "reason," "logic" or sometimes, "science."

Note: This can sometimes be used as a male given name in China. It is not the only given name that sounds like Lee or Li in China.


China fēi lì pǔ
Philip Wall Scroll

菲力普 is a secondary transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Philip. Not the most popular version but valid. For no apparent reason, this one is the most popular for the "double L spelling" version.

Awesome / Really Cool

Chinese Slang
China zhēn niú
Awesome / Really Cool Wall Scroll

真牛 is Chinese slang for something really cool or awesome.

真牛 is probably not appropriate for a calligraphy wall scroll unless you have a specific reason.

This literally translates as "the real bull" or "the genuine cow."

Death with Dignity

Japan son gen shi
Death with Dignity Wall Scroll

This was added at the request of a customer. This is not a good choice for a wall scroll unless you have a very specific and personal reason.

尊厳死 means "death with dignity" or "natural death" (as opposed to extending one's life unnaturally with life support).

You Only Live Once

China shēng mìng zhǐ yǒu yí cì
You Only Live Once Wall Scroll

生命隻有一次 is the translation to Chinese of the popular English phrase, "You only live once."

生命隻有一次 is a more modern idea for Chinese people. The reason is, most Chinese people were taught quite the opposite idea from Buddhism.

Flying / Flight / Rising Upward

China fēi yáng
Japan hi you
Flying / Flight / Rising Upward Wall Scroll

飛揚 means flight, flying, or to rise upwards in Chinese and Japanese Kanji.

飛揚 is not the most common title for a wall scroll but if you have a personal reason, or this idea is important to you, then go for it.

This can also be the personal name "Hiyou" in Japanese.

Crazy / Mad

China fā kuáng
Crazy / Mad Wall Scroll

髮狂 is the nicest/coolest way to write "crazy" in Chinese. There are several other ways to express "insane" or "mentally disturbed" but they are either clinical terms, or very serious afflictions.

髮狂 is not a great or normal selection for a wall scroll. Please only order this if you really want this idea for some personal reason.

To put it another way: It's a little crazy to have a "crazy" wall scroll.

House of Red Delights

China yí hóng yuàn
House of Red Delights Wall Scroll

怡紅院 is from "The Story of the Stone" by Cao Xueqin.

For some reason, this phrase was translated as "House of Green Delights" when the novel was published in English. The translator took some liberties, and believed that "green" had a more positive feel than red, to a western audience. Therefore, the phrase shown to the right is "House of Red Delights" (which is the most original and correct way).

Perseverance / Fortitude

China jiǎn rěn
Japan ken nin
Perseverance / Fortitude Wall Scroll

The first character means "strong," "solid," "firm," "unyielding" or "resolute."
The second character means "to beat," "to endure," or "to tolerate."
Together they speak of the strength from within yourself. Some may also translate this as "long-suffering" in a more Biblical sense.

堅忍 is a common term in Chinese and Korean Hanja but a little less commonly used in modern Japanese Kanji. For that reason, this selection is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean.

忍忍 Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the second Kanji a little differently. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect the form where the little horizontal stroke crosses the vertical stroke. See differences in the images to the right. Technically, they are both the same character, and will be read the same in either language.

Proud / Pride / Lofty-Minded

China ào shì
Proud / Pride / Lofty-Minded Wall Scroll

傲世 is a word used to describe someone that is very proud, and holds themselves above others but with a valid (earned) reason to do so. 傲世 is what you would use to describe the way a mighty general of ancient China like Cao Cao acted or a more modern person like General Patton carried himself.

If you hang this word on your wall it suggests that you hope to achieve that same level of pride from accomplishment.

Awesome / Awe-Inspiring

Japan osore ooi
Awesome / Awe-Inspiring Wall Scroll

恐れ多い is a Japanese word for something awe-inspiring or awesome (in some odd context, it can refer to the month of August).

恐れ多い is probably not appropriate for a calligraphy wall scroll unless you have a specific reason.

The word awesome is misused a lot in English, or used too casually. This Japanese word is the real form of awesome, and kind of means numerous fears and anxiety that you would feel in response to encountering something truly awesome (such as God, a tornado, a tsunami, etc).

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


Japanese Currency
China yuán
Japan yen
Yen Wall Scroll

円 / 圓 is Yen, the Japanese currency.

円 / 圓 is actually the Japanese variant of the original Chinese 圓 or 圆. It means circle, entirety, whole, full, or complete. It was actually the slang usage that became money, dough, or moola.

Occasionally, this is used as a given name, or other interesting uses. This version of the character is almost never used in Chinese, unless referring to Japanese money.

Unless you have a specific reason to request it, this is a strange selection for a wall scroll.

Good Intentions / Good Will
Good Faith

China shàn yì
Japan zen i
Good Intentions / Good Will / Good Faith Wall Scroll

善意 is a word that means good intentions, good will, or to things done in good faith in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean Hanja.

It's sort of the reason you do good deeds, or the desire you have inside yourself to do the right thing.

This can also be translated as benevolence, kindness, virtuous mind, positive mindset, or favorable sense.

This word is also used in legal context for things that are done in good faith (regardless of outcome).

In Japanese, this can be the personal name Yoshi or Yoshii.

Shit Happens

China shì shì nán liào
Shit Happens Wall Scroll

世事難料 is a polite Chinese version of, "shit happens." This phrase just suggests that things happen (for no reason, and for which we have no control).

The first two characters mean: the affairs of life; things of the world; worldly affairs; ways of the world.

The third character means: disaster; distress; problem; difficulty; difficult; hardships; troubles; defect.

The last character in this context means: to expect; to anticipate; to guess.

If you put this back together, you have something like, "In life, troubles (should be) expected."

Body / Karada

Japan karada / tai / te
Body / Karada Wall Scroll

体 is used in Japanese to mean "body."

体 can also refer to the form, style, corporeal existence, appearance, identity, or the state of something or someone. 體 is also used in Buddhism in regards to the corporeal existence of someone (their earthy vessel). It's kind of a broad term that can be used in a lot of different ways.

As a single character, it's usually pronounced "karada" but it can also be pronounced "tai" or "te" (Japanese pronunciation borrowed from the original Chinese).

體 is not a common Kanji to use for a wall scroll. Only select this if you have a personal and meaningful reason to do so. Also, consider this version to be "Japanese only" - see below...

體 In Chinese and old Korean Hanja, this character is written in the traditional form shown to the right. If you want this version, click on the character to the right instead of the button above.

Lost / Dazed and Confused

Japan mei
Lost / Dazed and Confused Wall Scroll

迷 is one of those characters that can mean a lot of different things depending on context. When written alone, as a single character on a wall scroll, it opens up the possibilities, and allows you to decide what it means to you.

The key definition is "to be lost." This could be physically or mentally lost. It can be someone lost in their thoughts, lost in an ocean, or just confused about where they are. The reason for the confused state may be due to internal or external reasons.

Here are some entries from various Asian dictionaries...

Chinese: lost, confused, bewilder, crazy about, fan, enthusiast, mystery.

Japanese: lost, astray, be perplexed, in doubt, err, illusion.

Korean: lost, bewildered, fascinated, deluded.

Heaven / Sky

China tiān
Japan ten
Heaven / Sky Wall Scroll

This character means "heaven" or "sky" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The context determines if you are talking about heaven or the sky above (often they are the same concept).

When combined with other characters, words like "today" and "tomorrow" are created. While sometimes the character for "sun" is used to mean "day," often "sky" represents "day" in Asian languages.
Example: 今天 (this sky) = "today," 明天 (next sky) = "tomorrow" in modern Chinese and Japanese.

In Chinese culture, regardless of which religion, it's almost always assumed that God (and any other deities) live up above in the sky. The concept of God living in the sky is likely the reason heaven is associated with this character.
The equation goes something like this: God's domain is the sky, thus, the sky is heaven.

Note: As a single character, this is a little ambiguous, so you might want to choose our Kingdom of Heaven selection instead.

See Also:  Heaven | God | Today | Sun

No Pain No Gain

Japan itami naku shite erumono wa nashi
No Pain No Gain Wall Scroll

This Japanese phrase means "no pain, no gain."

Literally, this suggests that with pain, a gain must follow.

The pain Kanji here can also be translated as sorrow or suffering. The gain can also mean profit, advantage, or benefit. In Japanese Buddhist context, that gain Kanji can mean rebirth in paradise, entering nirvana.

The character break down:
痛みなく (itami naku) pain; ache; sore; grief; distress. The naku part adds a meaning of "a lot of" or "extended"
して (shite) and then. (indicates a causative expression; acts as a connective particle)
得る (eru) to get; to acquire; to obtain; to procure; to earn; to win; to gain; to secure; to attain.
もの (mono) conjunctive particle indicating a cause or reason.
なし (nashi) none of; -less; without; no.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Bravery / Courage

Courageous Energy
China yǒng qì
Japan yuuki
Bravery / Courage Wall Scroll

There are several ways to express bravery and courage in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. This version is the most spiritual. 勇氣 is the essence of bravery from deep within your being. 勇氣 is the mental state of being brave versus actual brave behavior. You'd more likely use this to say, "He is very courageous," rather than "He fought courageously in the battle."

The first character also means bravery or courage when it's seen alone. With the second character added, an element of energy or spirit is added. The second character is the same "chi" or "qi" energy that Kung Fu masters focus when they strike. For this reason, you could say this means "spirit of courage" or "brave spirit."

勇氣 is certainly a stronger word than just the first character alone.

Beyond bravery or courage, dictionaries also translate this word as valor/valour, nerve, audacity, daring, pluck, plucky, gallantry, guts, gutsy and boldness.

勇氣 is also one of the 8 key concepts of tang soo do.

Japanese 気 While the version shown to the left is commonly used in Chinese and Korean Hanja (and ancient Japanese Kanji), please note that the second character is written with slightly fewer strokes in modern Japanese. If you want the modern Japanese version, please click on the character to the right. Both styles would be understood by native Chinese, Japanese, and many (but not all) Korean people. You should make your selection based on the intended audience for your calligraphy artwork. Or pick the single-character form of bravery/courage which is universal.

Master / Skilled Worker

Secondary version of Sifu
China shī fu
HK si fu
Master / Skilled Worker Wall Scroll

師傅 is “sifu” as in the “master” in the context of martial arts.

But there are two sifu titles floating around. This one can simply mean “skilled worker.”

Historically, this term has been used for a lot of things, such as, “The tutor of a king or emperor.” But now it's more commonly used to mean, master worker, or qualified worker.

Currently, within the field of skilled labor, a master (shifu) is higher than a journeyman, and is considered to be one worthy to teach others.

Note: In the 1970's and 1980's this term was used as a common form of polite address between people. You might say, "master, do you know were Tian'anmen Square is?" to just a person on the street at that time. This usage has almost passed, however, for some reason, people still often refer to taxi cab drivers as "master" in China (though I think/hope this is fading).

In Mandarin Chinese, this is pronounced like "Sure Foo," and in Cantonese like, "See Foo."

The second character is the difference between this sifu and the other. In this case, the second character by itself means tutor, instructor, or teacher.

Asian Pride / Oriental Pride
Asian Pryde / AZN Pryde

China dōng fāng zì zūn
HK dung fong chi juen
Japan tou hou zi son
Asian Pride / Oriental Pride / Asian Pryde / AZN Pryde Wall Scroll

東方自尊 is the most universal way to write "Asian Pride."

We worked on this one for a long time. The effort involved both Chinese and Japanese translators and lengthy discussions. If you have been searching for this term, there is a reason that it's hard to find the way to write "Asian Pride" in Chinese and Japanese - it's because of the inherent difficulties in figuring out a universal combination of characters that can be read in all languages that use forms of Chinese characters.

This final solution that you see to the left creates a reasonable title in Chinese, and an exotic (perhaps unusual) title in Japanese (This could be read as "Eastern Self-Respect" in Japanese").
Although not as natural, it does have the same meaning in Korean Hanja and the older-generation of Vietnamese people will be able to read it too.

The first two characters literally mean "Oriental" and the second two mean "pride," "self-esteem," or "self-respect" (we chose the most non-arrogant way to say "pride"). If you have "Asian Pride" (sometimes spelled Asian Pryde) these are the characters for you.

Note: For those of you that wonder, there is nothing technically wrong with the word "Oriental." It is a correct word, and any bad meanings were created by so-called "Asian Americans" and Caucasians in the United States. To say "Asian" would not completely correct to the intended meaning, since that would include people from Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Iran, India, and portions of Russia.

For further proof, if you were of East Asian ancestry and born in England, you would be known as a "British Oriental" (The "Oriental stigma" is basically an American creation and, therefore, applies mostly to the American English language - where they get a bit overzealous with political correctness).

Further, since the Chinese and Japanese word for Oriental is not English, it can not be construed having ill-meaning. One trip to China or Japan, and you will find many things titled with these two characters such as malls, buildings, and business names. These places also use "Oriental" as their English title (much as we do, since our Chinese business name starts with these same two characters).

In short, the first two character have the meaning that Americans attach to "Asian" but is more technically correct.

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Wall Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:

You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.

The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb in Chinese is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Love Without Reason 愛に理由は無いai ni ri yuu wa na i
ai ni ri yu wa na i
Love Without Reason 愛而無由
ài ér wú yóu
ai4 er2 wu2 you2
ai er wu you
ai erh wu yu
Everything Happens for a Reason 萬事皆因果
wàn shì jiē yīn guǒ
wan4 shi4 jie1 yin1 guo3
wan shi jie yin guo
wan shih chieh yin kuo
Everything Happens for a Reason 物事は全て理由があって起きるmonogoto ha subete riyuu ga at te okiru
monogoto ha subete riyu ga at te okiru
The Mysterious Bond Between People 緣 / 縁
enyuán / yuan2 / yuan yüan
Wisdom chi / tomozhì / zhi4 / zhi chih
智能 / 知能
chinou / chinozhì néng / zhi4 neng2 / zhi neng / zhineng chih neng / chihneng
Wisdom comes from Experience 不經一事
bù jīng yī shì
bu4 jing1 yi1 shi4
bu jing yi shi
pu ching i shih
Failure is the Origin of Success 失敗は成功の元shippai wa seikou no moto
shipai wa seiko no moto
Failure is a Stepping Stone to Success 失敗は成功のもとsittpai wa seikou no moto
sittpai wa seiko no moto
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Good Luck
Heart Sutra
I Love You
Keep Calm
Lasting Love
Live for What You Love
Love and Protect
Love Forever
Martial Arts
Never Give Up
Noble Eightfold Path
Once in a Lifetime
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.

Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Reason Kanji, Reason Characters, Reason in Mandarin Chinese, Reason Characters, Reason in Chinese Writing, Reason in Japanese Writing, Reason in Asian Writing, Reason Ideograms, Chinese Reason symbols, Reason Hieroglyphics, Reason Glyphs, Reason in Chinese Letters, Reason Hanzi, Reason in Japanese Kanji, Reason Pictograms, Reason in the Chinese Written-Language, or Reason in the Japanese Written-Language.