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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "House"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. House of Good Fortune
  2. House of Red Delights
  3. Bless this House
  4. Gecko / House Lizard
  5. Love the House and Its Crow
  6. A House Might be Worth 1 Million Dollars, But Good Neighbors are Worth 10 Million.
  7. There’s No Place Like Home
  8. Where There is a Will, There is a Way
  9. One Family Under Heaven
10. Shinobi / Ninja Outcast
11. Family / Household
12. Diligent Study Proverb
13. Tea Fate
14. Joshua 24:15
15. Bones
16. Family / Home
17. Courtesy / Politeness
18. Earth
19. Feng Shui
20. Hung Gar
21. Sasuga / Takaya
22. Hell / Judges of Hell
23. Confucius
24. Divine Grace
25. Hell
26. Roar of Laughter / Big Laughs
27. Growing Old Together
28. Hua Mulan
29. Hung Ga Kuen
30. Home of the Dragon
31. Fraternity
32. Family Over Everything
33. Forever Family
34. Healthy Living
35. Happy Family
36. Home is where the heart is
37. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks
38. Soul Mates
39. Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial
40. Happy Birthday
41. Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home
42. Home of the Black Dragon
43. Blessings on this Home
44. Make Guests Feel at Home
45. Happy Birthday
46. Choose Life
47. Safety and Well-Being of the Family
48. American Football
49. Welcome Home
50. Happy Family
51. Home of the Auspicious Golden Dragon
52. Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity
53. Home is where the heart is
54. Appreciation and Love for Your Parents
55. No Place Like Home
56. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching
57. Any success can not compensate...
58. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu
59. Wing Chun Fist Maxims

House of Good Fortune

China fú zhái
House of Good Fortune Wall Scroll

Perhaps the Chinese equivalent of "This blessed house" or perhaps "home sweet home."

This phrase literally means "Good fortune house" or "Good luck household." It makes any Chinese person who sees it feel that good things happen in the home in which this calligraphy is hung.

House of Red Delights

China yí hóng yuàn
House of Red Delights Wall Scroll

怡紅院 is from "The Story of the Stone" by Cao Xueqin.

For some reason, this phrase was translated as "House of Green Delights" when the novel was published in English. The translator took some liberties, and believed that "green" had a more positive feel than red, to a western audience. Therefore, the phrase shown to the right is "House of Red Delights" (which is the most original and correct way).

Bless this House

Japan kono-ka ni shukufuku o
Bless this House Wall Scroll

この家に祝福を means, "Bless this house" or "Bless this home," in Japanese.

Some may also translate this as, "Bless this family," since the Kanji for home can also mean family.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Gecko / House Lizard

China shǒu gōng
Japan shu ku
Gecko / House Lizard Wall Scroll

守宮 means gecko or house lizard.

This can also be the Japanese surname, Morimiya.

Love the House and Its Crow

China ài wū jí wū
Love the House and Its Crow Wall Scroll

愛屋及烏 is the Chinese idiom, “Love the house and its crow”.

It speaks to the fact that if you are involved an a relationship with somebody, you are also in a relationship with everyone connected to that person. In English, we say, “Love me, love my dog”.

A House Might be Worth 1 Million Dollars, But Good Neighbors are Worth 10 Million.

China bǎi wàn mǎi zhái qiān wàn mǎi lín
A House Might be Worth 1 Million Dollars, But Good Neighbors are Worth 10 Million. Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as:
[It may cost a] million to buy a house, [but] ten million to find [good] neighbors.

Figuratively, this means:
Good neighbors are hard to find.
Good neighbors are even more important than the quality of one's house.

There’s No Place Like Home

China jīn wō yín wō bù rú zì jǐ de gǒu wō
There’s No Place Like Home Wall Scroll

This Chinese slang proverb means: Golden house, [or a] silver house, not as good as my own dog house.

It's basically saying that even a house made of gold or silver is not as good as my own home (which may only be suitable for a dog but it's mine).

Where There is a Will, There is a Way

China yú gōng yí shān
Where There is a Will, There is a Way Wall Scroll

愚公移山 is the Chinese proverb (also somewhat known in Japan and Korea) for, "the silly old man moves a mountain."

Figuratively, this means, "where there's a will, there's a way."

Based on a fable of Lord Yu (愚公). He moved the soil of the mountain in front of his house. After years of effort, he finally moved the entire mountain.

The moral of the story: Anything can be accomplished if one works at it ceaselessly.

The Japanese version of this is 愚公山を移す (gu kou yama wo utsu su). But better to get the Chinese version, since this is originally a Chinese proverb.

See Also:  Nothing Is Impossible

One Family Under Heaven

China tiān xià yī jiā
Japan tenka ikka
One Family Under Heaven Wall Scroll

This proverb can also be translated as "The whole world is one family." It is used to mean that all humans are related under heaven.

The first two characters can be translated as "the world," "whole country," "descended from heaven," "earth under heaven," "the public" or "the ruling power."

The second two characters can mean "one family," "a household," "one's folks," "a house" or "a home." Usually this is read as "a family."

Note: This proverb can be understood in Japanese, though not commonly used.

Shinobi / Ninja Outcast

Japan shino-bi
Shinobi / Ninja Outcast Wall Scroll

忍び (Shinobi) is a term often associated with ninjas of ancient Japan.

忍び really means stealing (into), a spy, a sneaking thief, stealth, or a surreptitious visit to a house of ill repute. However, 忍び is sometimes used to refer to an outcast ninja.

This term was somehow given a better report when various video games, TV series, and even a movie came out with this Shinobi title.

These characters are sometimes Romanized as two words: Shin obi, or Shin-obi.

Note: The first character can be written as 忍 or 忍.

Family / Household

China jiā tíng
Japan ka tei
Family / Household Wall Scroll

家庭 / 傢庭 is a common way to express family, household, or home in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

However, for a wall scroll, we recommend the single-character form (which is just the first character of this two-character word). If you want that, just click here: Family Single-Character

The first character means "family" or "home." The second means "courtyard" or "garden." When combined, the meaning is a bit different, as it becomes "household" or "family." The home and/or property traditionally has a strong relationship with family in Asia. Some Chinese, Korean, and Japanese families have lived in the same house for 7 or more generations!

Diligent Study Proverb

Drill a hole in the wall to get light to read by.
China záo bì tōu guāng
Diligent Study Proverb Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "Bore a hole on the wall to make use of the neighbor's light to study."

鑿壁偷光 is a nice gift for a very studious person.

Kuang Heng was born during the Western Han period. He was very fond of reading ever since he was young. However, he could not go to school since his family was poor, and he had to borrow books from people to learn.

In order to borrow these books he normally did chores for people who had them. When he became older, he had to work in the field from sunrise to sunset since his family's financial situation did not get any better. Thus, he tried to study at night but he had no lamp.

One day, he noticed that there was light from the neighbor's house coming through a crack in the wall. This made him very happy, so he dug a larger hole from the crack and read in the light that shone through. This diligent study eventually made him an accomplished person.

Tea Fate

China chá yuán
Tea Fate Wall Scroll

茶緣 is a special title for the tea lover. This kind of means "tea fate" but it's more spiritual and hard to define. Perhaps the tea brought you in to drink it. Perhaps the tea will bring you and another tea-lover together. Perhaps you were already there, and the tea came to you. Perhaps it's the ah-ha moment you will have when drinking the tea.

I've been told not to explain this further, as it will either dilute or confuse the purposefully-ambiguous idea embedded in this enigma.

I happen to be the owner of a piece of calligraphy written by either the son or nephew of the last emperor of China, and this is the title he wrote. It was given to me at a Beijing tea house in 2001. 茶緣 is where I learned to love tea after literally spending weeks tasting and studying everything I could about Chinese tea. I did not understand the significance of the authorship, or meaning of the title at all. Some 10 years later, I realized the gift was so profound and had such providence. Only now I realize the value of a gift that it is too late to give proper thanks for. It was also years later that I ended up in this business, and could have the artwork properly mounted as a wall scroll. It has been borrowed for many exhibitions and shows, and always amazes native Chinese and Taiwanese who read the signature. This piece of calligraphy which I once thought just a bit of ink on a thin and wrinkled piece of paper is now one of my most valued possessions. And by fate, it has taught me to be more thankful of seemingly simple gifts.

Joshua 24:15

This House Serves the LORD
China zhì yú wǒ hé wǒ jiā wǒ men bì dìng shì fèng yē hé huá
Joshua 24:15 Wall Scroll

至於我和我家我們必定事奉耶和華 is Joshua 24:15 in Chinese.

Joshua 24:15 in Chinese

What your
might look like
from our
Chinese Master

Joshua 24:15 (KJV) And if it seem evil unto you to serve the LORD, choose you this day whom ye will serve; whether the gods which your fathers served that were on the other side of the flood, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land ye dwell: but as for me and my house, we will serve the LORD.

Joshua 24:15 (NIV) But if serving the LORD seems undesirable to you, then choose for yourselves this day whom you will serve, whether the gods your forefathers served beyond the River, or the gods of the Amorites, in whose land you are living. But as for me and my household, we will serve the LORD.

These characters here just dwell on the last line of the verse, " for me and my household, we will serve the LORD."

We used the only official Christian Chinese Bible that I know of so that the translation would be as accurate and standard as possible. Any Chinese Christian worth their salt will easily be able to identify this verse from the Chinese words on this scroll.

I think it is a bit like having a secret code on your wall that quietly expresses to whom your are faithful.

A great gift for your devout Christian or Jewish friend if they happen to be fond of Asian art.

Or perhaps a wonderful "conversation starter" for your own home.

Note: If you are curious, the last three characters represent they way "LORD" is used in most English Bibles. In Chinese, this is actually the phonetic name in Mandarin Chinese for "Jehovah."


Japan hone / kotsu
Bones Wall Scroll

骨 is the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean for bone or bones. If your name happens to be Bone or Bones, this is a cool character for a wall scroll to hang in your home or office.

Family / Home

China jiā
Japan ei / uchi / ke
Family / Home Wall Scroll

家 / 傢 is the single-character that means family in Chinese and Japanese. It can also mean home or household depending on context.

Hanging this on your wall suggests that you put "family first."

Pronunciation varies in Japanese depending on context. When pronounced "uchi" in Japanese, it means home but when pronounced "ke," it means family.

傢Note that there is an alternate form of this character. It has an additional radical on the left side but no difference in meaning or pronunciation. The version shown above is the most universal, and is also ancient/traditional. The image shown to the right is only for reference.

Courtesy / Politeness

China lǐ mào
Courtesy / Politeness Wall Scroll

Courtesy is being polite and having good manners. When you speak and act courteously, you give others a feeling of being valued and respected. Greet people pleasantly. Bring courtesy home. Your family needs it most of all. Courtesy helps life to go smoothly.

If you put the words "fēi cháng bù" in front of this, it is like adding "very much not." It's a great insult in China, as nobody wants to be called "extremely discourteous" or "very much impolite."

See Also:  Kindness | Respect


China dì qiú
Japan chi kyuu
Earth Wall Scroll

地球 is the name of the earth (our planet) in Chinese, old Korean Hanja and Japanese Kanji.

If you love the earth, or want to be reminded of where your home is in the solar system, this is the wall scroll for you.

Feng Shui

China fēng shuǐ
Japan fuu sui
Feng Shui Wall Scroll

風水 is the famous technique and approach to arranging your home externally around natural features, and internally to create balance and peace.

These two characters literally mean "wind water." Obviously, the title is far more simple than the concept behind this subject.

It may enlighten you slightly to know that the character for "wind" can also mean "style," "custom" or "manner" in some context. This may apply somewhat to this title.

In a very technical sense, this title is translated as "Chinese geomancy."

Hung Gar

China hóng jiā
HK hung gaa
Hung Gar Wall Scroll

洪家 is the martial arts title Hung Ga or Hung Gar.

The first character means flood, big, immense, or great but it can also be the surname, Hong or Hung.

The last character means family or home.

This can also be read as "The Hung Family" or "The Hung Household." This title is mostly associated as a style of Kung Fu.

Sasuga / Takaya

Japan takaya / takatsuka / sasuga / kiya / kika
Sasuga / Takaya Wall Scroll

This can romanizes as the Japanese surnames Takaya, Takatsuka, Sasuga, Kiya, or Kika.

As a word, it is a respectful way to refer to someone's home (or family).

Hell / Judges of Hell

Ancient way to say Hell
China yīn sī
Hell / Judges of Hell Wall Scroll

陰司 is the ancient way to say "Hell" or "Netherworld" in Chinese.

This title can also refer to the officials of Hell or the judges of Hades or the Netherworld.

Please note that this is a somewhat terrible selection for a wall scroll. Hanging this in your home is like telling the world that your home is hell. Oddly, a lot of people search for this on my website, so I added it for reference.


China kǒng zǐ
Japan koushi
Confucius Wall Scroll

孔子 is how to write the name of the great sage, known in the west as Confucius. His real name is Kongzi (The name Confucius is a westernized version of his name - his family name is Kong, and "zi" was added as a title of distinction). He lived some 2500 years ago in Qufu, a town in modern-day Shandong Province of Northern China (about 6 hours south of Beijing by bus). He was a consort to Emperors, and after his death, the impact of his philosophies still served to advise emperors, officials, and common people for generations. Also during these thousands of years, the Kong family remained powerful in China, and the Kong estate was much like the Vatican in Rome. The Kong estate existed as if on sovereign ground with its own small garrison of guards and privileges of a kingdom within an empire.

This was true up until the time the Kong family had to flee to Taiwan in 1949 when the Red Army took victory over the Nationalists during the Revolution. The home of Confucius was later razed and all statues defaced or stolen during the Cultural Revolution. Finally, after years of smearing his name and image, it is once again okay to celebrate the teachings of Confucius in mainland China.

Divine Grace

China tiān yòu
Japan ten yuu
Divine Grace Wall Scroll

天佑 is a Chinese and Japanese word that means divine aid, divine grace, Heaven blessed, or providential help.

Some Chinese people will use this to infer that this means a home or family blessed by heaven or God. 天佑 is the shortest way to express that idea anyway.


China dì yù
Japan jigoku
Hell Wall Scroll

地獄 is the way that hell is written in modern Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

There's more than one way to express hell but this is the one that has stood the test of time.

The first character refers to the ground or the earth.
The second character means jail or prison.

You can also translate this word as infernal, inferno, Hades, or underworld.

It should be noted that this is a somewhat terrible selection for a wall scroll. Hanging this in your home is like telling the world that your home is hell. Oddly, a lot of people search for this on our website, so I added it for reference.

Roar of Laughter / Big Laughs

China dà xiào
Japan taishou
Roar of Laughter / Big Laughs Wall Scroll

This can be translated as "roar of laughter," "loud laughter," "hearty laugh" or "cachinnation."

The first character means big or great, and the second character means laugh or smile.

If you like humor, this is a great wall scroll to hang in your home.

See Also:  The Whole Room Rocks With Laughter

Growing Old Together

China xié lǎo
Japan kairou
Growing Old Together Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Japanese, and Korean word means to grow old together, or growing old together.

This will be a nice wall scroll to hang in your home if your plan is to grow old with your mate.

Hua Mulan

China huā mù lán
Hua Mulan Wall Scroll

花木蘭 is the name of the famous Chinese woman warrior Hua Mulan.

She was made famous in the west by Disney's animated movie, "Mulan."

Most of the historical information about her comes from an ancient poem. It starts with a concerned Mulan, as she is told a man from each family is to serve conscription in the army. Her father is too old, and her brother is too young. Mulan decides to take the place of her father. After twelve years of war, the army returns and the best warriors are awarded great posts in the government and riches. Mulan turns down all offers, and asks only for a good horse for the long trip home. When Mulan greets visiting comrades wearing her old clothes, they are shocked to find the warrior they rode into battle with for years was actually a woman.

Hung Ga Kuen

China hóng jiā quán
HK hung gaa kyun
Hung Ga Kuen Wall Scroll

洪家拳 is the martial arts title Hung Ga Kuen.

The first character means flood, big, immense, or great but it can also be the surname, Hong or Hung.

The second character means family or home.

The last character is a fist.

Home of the Dragon

China lóng zhī jiā
Home of the Dragon Wall Scroll

Added by special request of a customer. This phase is natural in Chinese but it is not a common or ancient title.

The first character is dragon.
The second is a possessive modifier (like making "dragon" into "dragon's").
The third character means home (but in some context can mean "family" - however, here it would generally be understood as "home").


University Brotherhood / House
China xiōng dì huì
Fraternity Wall Scroll

兄弟會 is the word in Chinese for a college fraternity or some other kind of fraternal order. Literally, these characters mean "Elder brother younger brother association." The last character can also be translated as a group, union, gathering, assembly, meeting, or conference.

Family Over Everything

China jiā tíng zhì shàng
Family Over Everything Wall Scroll

This Chinese phrase means, "family above all else." The first two characters mean family, household, or home (they will be read as "family" in this case).

The last two characters mean supreme, paramount, or above all else.

Forever Family

China yǒng yuǎn de jiā
Forever Family Wall Scroll

永遠的家 is a special phrase that we composed for a "family by adoption" or "adoptive family."

It's the dream of every orphan and foster child to be formally adopted and find their "forever family."

The first two characters mean forever, eternal, eternity, perpetuity, immortality, and/or permanence. The third character connects this idea with the last character which means "family" and/or "home."

See Also:  Family

Healthy Living

China jiàn kāng shēng huó
Japan kenkou seikatsu
Healthy Living Wall Scroll

If you are into healthy living, this might be an excellent selection for a wall scroll to hang in your home.

The first two characters speak of health, vitality, vigor, and being of sound body. The second two characters mean living or life (daily existence).

See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Happy Family

China hé xié zhī jiā
Happy Family Wall Scroll

和諧之家 means, "harmonious family" or "happy family" in Chinese.

The first two characters relay the idea of happiness and harmony.
The third character is a connecting or possessive article (connects harmony/happiness to family).
The last character means family but can also mean home or household.

Home is where the heart is

China jiā yóu xīn shēng
Home is where the heart is Wall Scroll

This old Chinese proverb is roughly equal to the English idiom "Home is where the heart is." If you know Chinese, you may recognize the first character as home and the third as the heart.

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.

See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Soul Mates

China tiān shēng yí duì
Soul Mates Wall Scroll

It was tough to find the best way to say "soul mates" in Chinese. We settled on this old way to say "A couple selected by heaven."

The first two characters together mean "natural" or "innate." Separated, they mean "heaven" and "born." The last two characters mean "couple." So this can be translated as "A couple that is together by nature," or "A couple brought together by heaven's decree," with a slight stretch, you could say "A couple born together from heaven."

It's a struggle to find the best way to describe this idea in English but trust me, it is pretty cool and it is a great way to say "soulmates."

If you're in a happy relationship or marriage and think you have found your soul mate, this would be a wonderful wall scroll to hang in your home.

Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial

China dà gōng wú sī
Unselfish: Perfectly Impartial Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb comes from an old story from some time before 476 BC. About a man named Qi Huangyang, who was commissioned by the king to select the best person for a certain job in the Imperial Court.

Qi Huangyang selected his enemy for the job. The king was very confused by the selection but Qi Huangyang explained that he was asked to find the best person for the job, not necessarily someone that he personally liked or had a friendship with.

Later, Confucius commented on how unselfish and impartial Qi Huangyang was by saying "Da Gong Wu Si" which if you look it up in a Chinese dictionary, is generally translated as "Unselfish" or "Just and Fair."

If you translate each character, you'd have something like,

"Big/Deep Justice Without Self."

Direct translations like this leave out a lot of what the Chinese characters really say. Use your imagination, and suddenly you realize that "without self" means "without thinking about yourself in the decision" - together, these two words mean "unselfish." The first two characters serve to really drive the point home that we are talking about a concept that is similar to "blind justice."

One of my Chinese-English dictionaries translates this simply as "just and fair." So that is the short and simple version.

Note: This can be pronounced in Korean but it's not a commonly used term.

See Also:  Selflessness | Work Unselfishly for the Common Good | Altruism

Happy Birthday

China shēng rì kuài lè
Happy Birthday Wall Scroll

生日快樂 is how to write "Happy Birthday" in Chinese. The first two characters mean "birthday," and the second two characters mean "happiness," or rather a wish for happiness.

Because a birthday only lasts one day per year, we strongly suggest that you find an appropriate and personal calligraphy gift that can be hung in the recipient's home year round.

Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home

China sì hǎi wéi jiā
Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home Wall Scroll

This literally reads, "Four Seas Serve-As [my/one's] Home."

Together, 四海 which literally means "four seas" is understood to mean, "the whole world" or "the seven seas." It's presumed to be an ancient word, from back when only four seas were known - so it equates to the modern English term, "seven seas."

This can be translated or understood a few different ways:
To regard the four corners of the world all as home.
To feel at home anywhere.
To roam about unconstrained.
To consider the entire country, or the world, to be one's own.

Home of the Black Dragon

China hēi lóng zhī jiā
Home of the Black Dragon Wall Scroll

Added by special request of a customer. This phase is natural in Chinese but it is not a common or ancient title.

The first character is black.
The second is dragon.
The third is a possessive modifier (like making "dragon" into "dragon's").
The fourth character means home (but in some context can mean "family" - however, here it would generally be understood as "home").

Blessings on this Home

China wǔ fú lín mén
Blessings on this Home Wall Scroll

This literally means, "five good-fortunes arrive [at the] door." It is understood to mean, "may the five blessings descend upon this home."

These blessing are known in ancient China to be: longevity, wealth, health, virtue, and a natural death (living to old age). 五福臨門 is one of several auspicious sayings you might hear during Chinese New Years.

Make Guests Feel at Home

Home away from home
China bīn zhì rú guī
Make Guests Feel at Home Wall Scroll

This Chinese phrase suggests that a good host will make guests feel like they are returning home or are as comfortable as they would be at their own home.

賓至如歸 is also the Chinese equivalent of, "a home away from home," and is used by Chinese hotels, guest houses, and inns to suggest the level of their hospitality will make you feel at home during your stay.

Happy Birthday

Japan shuku tan jou bi
Happy Birthday Wall Scroll

祝誕生日 is the shortest way to write "Happy Birthday" in Japanese. The first Kanji means "wish" or "express good wishes," and the last three characters mean "birthday."

Because a birthday only lasts one day per year, we strongly suggest that you find an appropriate and personal calligraphy gift that can be hung in the recipient's home year round.

Choose Life

China xuǎn zé shēng huó
Choose Life Wall Scroll

This can mean to choose life instead of death (or suicide) or to choose to live life to the fullest.

I think of it as the key phrase used by Renton (Ewan McGregor) in the movie Trainspotting. While Chinese people will not think of Trainspotting when they see this phrase, for me, it will always be what comes near the end of this colorful rant:

Choose life. Choose a job. Choose a career. Choose a family. Choose a fucking big television, Choose washing machines, cars, compact disc players, and electrical tin can openers. Choose good health, low cholesterol, and dental insurance. Choose fixed-interest mortgage repayments. Choose a starter home. Choose your friends. Choose leisure wear and matching luggage. Choose a three piece suite on hire purchase in a range of fucking fabrics. Choose DIY and wondering who the fuck you are on a Sunday morning. Choose sitting on that couch watching mind-numbing spirit-crushing game shows, stuffing fucking junk food into your mouth. Choose rotting away at the end of it all, pissing your last in a miserable home, nothing more than an embarrassment to the selfish, fucked-up brats you have spawned to replace yourself. Choose your future. Choose life.

Safety and Well-Being of the Family

Kanai Anzen
Japan ka nai an zen
Safety and Well-Being of the Family Wall Scroll

家內安全 is kind of the Japanese way of saying, "Family First." It's really a Japanese proverb about the safety and well-being of your family, and/or, peace and prosperity in the household.

Some Japanese will hang an amulet in their home with these Kanji on it. The purpose being to keep your family safe from harm.

According to Shinto followers, hanging this in your home is seen as an invocation to God to always keep members of the family free from harm.

We were actually looking for a way to say "family first" in Japanese when this proverb came up in the conversation and research. While it doesn't literally say "family first," it shows that the safety and well-being of your family is your first or most important priority. So, this proverb is the most natural way to express the idea that you put your family first.

See Also:  Peace and Prosperity

American Football

China měi shì gǎn lǎn qiú
American Football Wall Scroll

美式橄欖球 is the Chinese title for "American football" (not to be confused with international football known as soccer in the USA).

If you are a player or fan of American football, this would make a great wall scroll for your home.

The first two characters mean "American style."
The last three characters mean football or rugby (a game involving an oblong or ovoid ball).
The "American" adjective is needed in this title to differentiate from Canadian football, Australian rules football, and rugby.

See Also:  Soccer

Welcome Home

Japan okaerinasai
Welcome Home Wall Scroll

お帰りなさい is a common Japanese way to say, "welcome home."

お帰りなさい is said by a person greeting another as they return home. It's a typical phrase that is almost said by reflex as part of Japanese courtesy or etiquette.

Sometimes written as 御帰りなさい (just first character is Kanji instead of Hiragana).

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Happy Family

Japan nago ya ka na ka tei
Happy Family Wall Scroll

和やかな家庭 means "happy family" or "harmonious family" in Japanese. The first three Kanji create a word that means mild, calm, gentle, quiet, or harmonious. After that is a connecting article. The last two Kanji mean family, home, or household.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Home of the Auspicious Golden Dragon

China jīn ruì xiáng lóng zhī jiā
Home of the Auspicious Golden Dragon Wall Scroll

This "home golden auspicious dragon" title was added by special request of a customer.

The first character means gold or golden.
The second and third characters hold the meaning of auspiciousness and good luck.
The fourth character is dragon.
The fifth is a possessive modifier (like making "dragon" into "dragon's").
The last character means home (but in some context can mean "family" - however, here it would generally be understood as "home").

Note: The word order is different than the English title, because of grammar differences between English and Chinese. This phrase sounds very natural in Chinese in this character order. If written in the English word order, it would sound very strange and lose its impact in Chinese.

Note: Korean pronunciation is included above, but this has not been reviewed by a Korean translator.

Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity

Do not do to others what you do not want done to yourself
China jǐ suǒ bú yù wù shī yú rén
Confucius: Golden Rule / Ethic of Reciprocity Wall Scroll

Some may think of this as a "Christian trait" but actually it transcends many religions.

This Chinese teaching dates back to about 2,500 years ago in China. Confucius had always taught the belief in being benevolent (ren) but this idea was hard to grasp for some of his students, as benevolence could be kind-heartedness, or an essence of humanity itself.

When answering Zhong Gong's question as to what "ren" actually meant, Confucius said:

"When you go out, you should behave as if you were in the presence of a distinguished guest, when people do favors for you, act as if a great sacrifice was made for you. Whatever you wouldn't like done to you, do not do that thing to others. Don't complain at work or at home."

Hearing this, Zhong Gong said humbly, "Although I am not clever, I will do what you say."

From this encounter, the Chinese version of the "Golden Rule" or "Ethic of Reciprocity" came to be.
The characters you see above express, "Do not do to others whatever you do not want done to yourself."

See Also:  Confucius Teachings | Benevolence

Home is where the heart is

Japan ie to wa kokoro ga aru basho da
Home is where the heart is Wall Scroll

家とは心がある場所だ is, "Home is where the heart is," in Japanese.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Appreciation and Love for Your Parents

China shuí yán cùn cǎo xīn bào dé sān chūn huī
Appreciation and Love for Your Parents Wall Scroll

誰言寸草心報得三春暉 is the last line of a famous poem. It is perceived as a tribute or ode to your parent's or mother from a child or children that have left home.

The poem was written by Meng Jiao during the Tang Dynasty (about 1200 years ago). The Chinese title is "You Zi Yin" which means "The Traveler's Recite."

The last line as shown here speaks of the generous and warm spring sun light which gives the grass far beyond what the little grass can could ever give back (except perhaps by showing its lovely green leaves and flourishing). The metaphor is that the sun is your mother or parents, and you are the grass. Your parents raise you and give you all the love and care you need to prepare you for the world. A debt which you can never repay, nor is repayment expected.

The first part of the poem (not written in the characters to the left) suggests that the thread in a loving mother's hands is the shirt of her traveling offspring. Vigorously sewing while wishing them to come back sooner than they left.
...This part is really hard to translate into English that makes any sense but maybe you get the idea. We are talking about a poem that is so old that many Chinese people would have trouble reading it (as if it was the King James Version of Chinese).

No Place Like Home

China zài jiā qiān rì hǎo chū mén yī shí nán
No Place Like Home Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally means, "At home, one can spend a thousand days in comfort but spending a day away from home can be challenging."

Figuratively, this means, "There's no place like home," or roughly a Chinese version of "Home sweet home."

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching

Except from Chapter 67
China yī yuē cí èr yuē jiǎn sān yuē bù gǎn wéi tiān xià xiān
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching Wall Scroll

一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先 is an except from the 67th Chapter of Lao Tzu's (Lao Zi's) Te-Tao Ching (Dao De Jing). 一曰慈二曰儉三曰不敢為天下先 is the part where the three treasures are discussed. In English, we'd say these three treasures are compassion, frugality, and humility. Some may translate these as love, moderation, and lack of arrogance. I have also seen them translated as benevolence, modesty, and "Not presuming to be at the forefront in the world." You can mix them up the way you want, as translation is not really a science but rather an art.

I should also explain that the first two treasures are single-character ideas, yet the third treasure was written out in six characters (there are also some auxiliary characters to number the treasures).

If Lao Tzu's words are important to you, then a wall scroll with this passage might make a great addition to your home.

Any success can not compensate
for failure in the home

China suǒ yǒu de chéng gōng dōu
wú fǎ bǔ cháng jiā tíng de shī bài
Any success can not compensate / for failure in the home Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb could also be translated in English as "No success can compensate for failure in the home."

Also, the word for "home" can be exchanged with "family."

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Wall Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty. It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.

Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds peoples homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.

Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.

Wing Chun Fist Maxims (Part 1)

Wing Chun Fist Maxims (Part 1) Wall Scroll

A customer asked me to split these Wing Chun maxims into two parts, so he could order a couplet. It thought this was a good idea, so it's been added here.

Chinese text of part 1:
1 有手黐手,無手問手
2 來留區送, 甩手直沖
3 怕打終歸打, 貪打終被打
4 粘連迫攻, 絕不放鬆
5 來力瀉力, 借力出擊

A couplet is a set of two wall scrolls that start and finish one phrase or idea. Often, couplets are hung with the first wall scroll on the right side, and the second on the left side of a doorway or entrance. The order in Chinese is right-to-left, so that's why the first wall scroll goes on the right as you face the door.

Of course, couplets can also be hung together on a wall. Often they can be hung to flank an alter, or table with incense, or even flanking a larger central wall scroll. See an example here from the home of Confucius

Be sure to order both part 1 and 2 together. One without the other is like Eve without Adam.

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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
House of Good Fortune 福宅fú zhái / fu2 zhai2 / fu zhai / fuzhai fu chai / fuchai
House of Red Delights 怡紅院
yí hóng yuàn
yi2 hong2 yuan4
yi hong yuan
i hung yüan
Bless this House この家に祝福をkono-ka ni shukufuku o
House Lizard
shu ku / shukushǒu gōng
shou3 gong1
shou gong
shou kung
Love the House and Its Crow 愛屋及烏
ài wū jí wū
ai4 wu1 ji2 wu1
ai wu ji wu
ai wu chi wu
A House Might be Worth 1 Million Dollars, But Good Neighbors are Worth 10 Million. 百萬買宅千萬買鄰
bǎi wàn mǎi zhái qiān wàn mǎi lín
bai3 wan4 mai3 zhai2 qian1 wan4 mai3 lin2
bai wan mai zhai qian wan mai lin
pai wan mai chai ch`ien wan mai lin
pai wan mai chai chien wan mai lin
There’s No Place Like Home 金窩銀窩不如自己的狗窩
jīn wō yín wō bù rú zì jǐ de gǒu wō
jin1 wo1 yin2 wo1 bu4 ru2 zi4 ji3 de5 gou3 wo1
jin wo yin wo bu ru zi ji de gou wo
chin wo yin wo pu ju tzu chi te kou wo
Where There is a Will, There is a Way 愚公移山yú gōng yí shān
yu2 gong1 yi2 shan1
yu gong yi shan
yü kung i shan
One Family Under Heaven 天下一家tenka ikka / tenkaikka / tenka ika / tenkaikatiān xià yī jiā
tian1 xia4 yi1 jia1
tian xia yi jia
t`ien hsia i chia
tien hsia i chia
Ninja Outcast
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Good Luck
Heart Sutra
I Love You
Keep Calm
Lasting Love
Love and Protect
Love Forever
Martial Arts
Never Give Up
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.

Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as House Kanji, House Characters, House in Mandarin Chinese, House Characters, House in Chinese Writing, House in Japanese Writing, House in Asian Writing, House Ideograms, Chinese House symbols, House Hieroglyphics, House Glyphs, House in Chinese Letters, House Hanzi, House in Japanese Kanji, House Pictograms, House in the Chinese Written-Language, or House in the Japanese Written-Language.