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Allow in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an Allow calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom “Allow” project by clicking the button next to your favorite “Allow” title below...

  1. Settai

  2. Open Mind

  3. Let It Be / Be Relieved

  4. Forgive Yourself / Release Yourself

  5. No Surrender

  6. Forgiveness

  7. Death Before Dishonor

  8. Purity of Mind

  9. Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

10. Death Before Dishonor

11. The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

12. If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?


Settai

China jiē dài
Japan settai
Settai Vertical Wall Scroll

接待 is the Japanese surname Settai.

This also is a word that means to receive (a visitor), to admit (allow somebody to enter), reception, welcome, to receive and treat, to entertain, or wait upon.

Open Mind

China kāi jué
Japan kaikaku
Open Mind Vertical Wall Scroll

開覺 is a Buddhist term meaning "open mind."

The more full definition as used in Buddhism is, "To arouse, awaken; to allow the original Buddha-nature to open and enlighten the mind."

Let It Be / Be Relieved

Japan mayu o hira ku
Let It Be / Be Relieved Vertical Wall Scroll

眉を開く is a Japanese proverb and expression that means, "to feel relieved," "to forget about one's troubles," or "to settle into peace of mind."

The literal words suggest relaxing your eyebrows or face. Allow worry or concern to go away, and just be content "letting it be."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Forgive Yourself / Release Yourself

Japan ware o yuru su
Forgive Yourself / Release Yourself Vertical Wall Scroll

我を許す is how to write "forgive yourself" in Japanese.

The first two characters mean, "regarding myself."

The last two characters mean, "to forgive," "to excuse (from)," "to pardon," "to release," "to let off," "to permit," "to allow," and/or "to approve."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

No Surrender

Honor Does Not Allow Second Thoughts
China yì wú fǎn gù
No Surrender Vertical Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb can be translated a few different ways. Here are some examples:

Honor does not allow one to glance back.
Duty-bound not to turn back.
No surrender.
To pursue justice with no second thoughts.
Never surrender your principles.

This proverb is really about having the courage to do what is right without questioning your decision to take the right and just course.

Forgiveness (from the top down)

China róng shè
Japan you sha
Forgiveness (from the top down) Vertical Wall Scroll

容赦 is the kind of forgiveness that a king might give to his subjects for crimes or wrong-doings.

容赦 is a rather high-level forgiveness. Meaning that it goes from a higher level to lower (not the reverse).

Alone, the first character can mean "to bear," "to allow" and/or "to tolerate," and the second can mean "to forgive," "to pardon" and/or "to excuse."

When you put both characters together, you get forgiveness, pardon, mercy, leniency, or going easy (on someone).


See Also:  Benevolence

Death Before Dishonor

You can die or kill, but never dishonor or disgrace yourself
China kě shā bù kě rǔ
Death Before Dishonor Vertical Wall Scroll

This almost directly matches the idea of "Death Before Dishonor," while also being an ancient Chinese proverb.

The direct meaning is, "[you] can die/kill [but you] cannot [allow] dishonor/disgrace [upon yourself]." Chinese grammar, and especially ancient grammar, is a little different than English. Not nearly as many articles are needed, and a lot is implied.

There are a lot of ways to express ideas similar to "Death Before Dishonor" in Chinese, and I would rate this one in the top two.

Purity of Mind

China xīn chéng jìng
Japan shin chou jou
Purity of Mind Vertical Wall Scroll

心澄淨 is the Buddhist concept of the pure and calm mind. It is believed that once you achieve a meditative state of pure focused thought, the mind becomes clear and calm. Although, others will say this means that achieving a calm mind will allow you to reach pure thought.

From Sanskrit, this is known as citta-prasāda. The concept of citta-prasāda is sometimes defined as, "clear heart-mind," or "the single and definitive aspiration."

Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart

China suí xīn ér xíng
Listen to Your Heart / Follow Your Heart Vertical Wall Scroll

隨心而行 is the closest way to express this idea in Chinese. Literally translated, this phrase means, "Allow your heart to dictate your behavior" or "Let your heart guide your conduct" in Chinese. You could also translate this as "follow your heart." Or, with a bit of imagination, it could mean: "let your spirit be your guide."

Note that in some cases, "heart" can mean "mind," "soul" or even "spirit" in Chinese. In ancient China, it was thought that the big pumping organ in your chest was where your thoughts came from, or where your soul resides.
Ancient western thought followed a similar belief. Thus phrases like "I love you with all my heart" and "I give you my whole heart."

Death Before Dishonor

A soldier can die or kill, but never dishonor or disgrace himself
China shì kě shā bù kě rǔ
Death Before Dishonor Vertical Wall Scroll

This almost directly matches the military idea of "Death Before Dishonor," while also being an ancient Chinese proverb.

The direct meaning is, "[A] soldier/warrior can die/kill [but he/she] cannot [allow] dishonor/disgrace [upon himself/herself]." Chinese grammar, and especially ancient grammar, is a little different than English. Not nearly as many articles are needed, and a lot is implied.

There are a lot of ways to express ideas similar to "Death Before Dishonor" in Chinese, and I would rate this one in the top two.

This is the original form of this proverb with the character for "soldier/warrior" at the beginning. Most of the time, this character is dropped, and this becomes a five-character proverb (the soldier/warrior part is implied, even without the character being present in the proverb). We also offer the shorter version.

The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100

The pot calls the kettle black
China wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100 Vertical Wall Scroll

During the Warring States Period of what is now China (475 - 221 B.C.), the King of Wei was in love with war. He often fought with other kingdoms just for spite or fun.

One day, the King of Wei asked the philosopher Mencius, "I love my people, and all say I do the best for them. I move the people from famine-stricken areas to places of plenty, and transport grains from rich areas to the poor. Nobody goes hungry in my kingdom, and I treat my people far better than other kings. But why does the population of my kingdom not increase, and why does the population of other kingdoms not decrease?"

Mencius answered, "Since you love war, I will make this example: When going to war, and the drums beat to start the attack, some soldiers flee for their lives in fear. Some run 100 paces in retreat, and others run 50 steps. Then the ones who retreated 50 paces laugh and taunt those who retreated 100 paces, calling them cowards mortally afraid of death. Do you think this is reasonable?

The King of Wei answered, "Of course not! Those who run 50 paces are just as timid as those who run 100 paces."

Mencius then said, "You are a king who treats his subjects better than other kings treat their people but you are so fond of war, that your people suffer from great losses in battle. Therefore, your population does not grow. While other kings allow their people to starve to death, you send your people to die in war. Is there really any difference?"

This famous conversation led to the six-character proverb shown here. It serves as a warning to avoid hypocrisy. It goes hand-in-hand with the western phrase, "The pot calls the kettle black," or the Biblical phrase, "Before trying to remove a splinter from your neighbor's eye, first remove the plank from your own eye."

If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?

Only by experiencing hardship will allow you to understand the plight of others
China bù dāng hé shang bù zhī zhāi jiè kǔ
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Wall Scroll

This literally translates as:
[One who has] not been a monk [does not] know the suffering of [being on a] vegetarian diet.

This is a bit like the "walk a mile in another man's shoes" saying. Basically it's about you cannot fully understand the plight of others until you experience it yourself.

Many custom options...


If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Wall Scroll
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Wall Scroll
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Wall Scroll
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Wall Scroll


And formats...

If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Portrait
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Horizontal Wall Scroll
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian? Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Allow in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Settai接待settaijiē dài / jie1 dai4 / jie dai / jiedaichieh tai / chiehtai
Open Mind開覺
开觉
kaikaku / kaikakukāi jué / kai1 jue2 / kai jue / kaijuek`ai chüeh / kaichüeh / kai chüeh
Let It Be
Be Relieved
眉を開くmayu o hira ku
mayuohiraku
Forgive Yourself
Release Yourself
我を許すware o yuru su
wareoyurusu
No Surrender義無反顧
义无反顾
yì wú fǎn gù
yi4 wu2 fan3 gu4
yi wu fan gu
yiwufangu
i wu fan ku
iwufanku
Forgiveness (from the top down)容赦you sha / yousha / yo sha / yosharóng shè / rong2 she4 / rong she / rongshejung she / jungshe
Death Before Dishonor可殺不可辱
可杀不可辱
kě shā bù kě rǔ
ke3 sha1 bu4 ke3 ru3
ke sha bu ke ru
keshabukeru
k`o sha pu k`o ju
koshapukoju
ko sha pu ko ju
Purity of Mind心澄淨shin chou jou
shinchoujou
shin cho jo
shinchojo
xīn chéng jìng
xin1 cheng2 jing4
xin cheng jing
xinchengjing
hsin ch`eng ching
hsinchengching
hsin cheng ching
Listen to Your Heart
Follow Your Heart
隨心而行
随心而行
suí xīn ér xíng
sui2 xin1 er2 xing2
sui xin er xing
suixinerxing
sui hsin erh hsing
suihsinerhhsing
Death Before Dishonor士可殺不可辱
士可杀不可辱
shì kě shā bù kě rǔ
shi4 ke3 sha1 bu4 ke3 ru3
shi ke sha bu ke ru
shikeshabukeru
shih k`o sha pu k`o ju
shihkoshapukoju
shih ko sha pu ko ju
The one who retreats 50 paces mocks the one to retreats 100五十步笑百步wù shí bù xiào bǎi bù
wu4 shi2 bu4 xiao4 bai3 bu4
wu shi bu xiao bai bu
wushibuxiaobaibu
wu shih pu hsiao pai pu
wushihpuhsiaopaipu
If you have not been a monk, how can you know what it is like to be a vegetarian?不當和尚不知齋戒苦
不当和尚不知斋戒苦
bù dāng hé shang bù zhī zhāi jiè kǔ
bu4 dang1 he2 shang bu4 zhi1 zhai1 jie4 ku3
bu dang he shang bu zhi zhai jie ku
pu tang ho shang pu chih chai chieh k`u
pu tang ho shang pu chih chai chieh ku
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



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All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

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