All custom calligraphy items are made-to-order in our little Beijing artwork-mounting workshop.

Not what you want?

Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Feelings"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Passions / Feelings / Emotions
  2. 7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness
  3. Feeling of Bliss
  4. Compassion / Kindness
  5. Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart
  6. Omoi / Desire
  7. Flexibility
  8. Self-Discipline / Will-Power
  9. Follow Your Heart
10. With all the strength of your heart
11. Grim Reaper / God of Death
12. True Heart
13. Lust / Desire / Passion
14. Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony
15. Love and Honor
16. Tolerance
17. Keep Calm in Face of Adversity
18. Love and Honor
19. Mind, Body and Spirit
20. In Wine there is Truth
21. Happy
22. Mindfulness
23. Scorpion
24. Awareness
25. Dog
26. Big Dream
27. Courtesy / Politeness
28. Gassho
29. Kowtow - The deepest bow
30. Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu
31. Mother and Son
32. Renni
33. Spirit
34. Iron Heart
35. Joyfulness / Happiness
36. Lonely
37. Optimistic
38. Sorry / Feel Apologetic / Regret
39. Broken Hearted
40. Destiny Determined by Heaven
41. Gentleness
42. House of Good Fortune
43. Gratitude / Thanks
44. Inspiration
45. Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind
46. Pride
47. Sorrow / Feeling Sorry
48. Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things
49. Togetherness
50. Sorry / Apologetic / Repent / Regret
51. Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa
52. Longing for Lover
53. Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister
54. No Mercy
55. Sexy
56. Sadness / Sorrow
57. Orna
58. Sisterhood
59. Love and Hate
60. Reiki
61. Ba Ji Quan
62. Lorraine
63. Homosexual / Gay
64. House of Red Delights
65. Sisters at Heart
66. Wellness
67. Awesome / Awe-Inspiring
68. Enso - Japanese Zen Circle
69. Forgive and Forget
70. Inner Peace
71. Peace and Love
72. Better to be Happy than Rich
73. Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home
74. Lost Soul
75. A Traditional Warm Welcome
76. One Day Seems Like 1000 Years
77. Make Guests Feel at Home
78. Safe and Sound
79. Missing / Yearning
80. Let It Be / Be Relieved
81. Tranquil Midnight
82. Five Elements
83. Dragon Snake Tiger...
84. A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One
85. Gabriela
86. Spare No Effort
87. Do not shed a tear until you see the coffin
88. Better Late Than Never
89. To Know Hardship, One Must Experience It
90. Energy Sword Body in Concert
91. You are only as old as you feel
92. No man knows what he owes to his parents...
93. The Confident Helmsman...
94. Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark
95. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

Passions / Feelings / Emotions

China qíng
Japan jou / nasake
Passions / Feelings / Emotions Wall Scroll

情 means feelings, emotions, passions, and sometimes refers to the situation you are in (with your emotions). At least, this is the definition in Chinese and Japanese. This word is a bit stronger in Korean Hanja, where it means affection, love, compassion, sympathy, tender feelings, and emotions. Just as in Chinese and Japanese, this can also refer to your circumstances or your facts of life in Korean.

情 is also the original Korean Hanja for the surname Jeong (정).

In Japanese, this can be the surname Sei.

7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness

Samyak Smriti / Samyak Smrti / Samma Sati
China zhèng niàn
Japan sei nen
7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness Wall Scroll

正念 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Mindfulness, along with Right Effort and Right Concentration constitute the path to Concentration or Perfect Thought.

Right Mindfulness is about remaining focused on one's body, feelings, mind and mental qualities. It's also about being ardent, aware, and mindful, and supposes that you've already put aside worldly desire and aversion.

Monk Bhikkhu Bodhi described this as: The mind is deliberately kept at the level of bare attention, a detached observation of what is happening within us and around us in the present moment. In the practice of right mindfulness the mind is trained to remain in the present, open, quiet, and alert, contemplating the present event.

Another definition: Ongoing mindfulness of body, feelings, thinking, and objects of thought.

This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.

See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Feeling of Bliss

Japan shi fuku kan
Feeling of Bliss Wall Scroll

至福感 is "feelings of bliss" in Japanese.

A break down of the Kanji in this title:
至福 (shifuku) beatitude; supreme bliss.
感 (kan) feeling; sensation; emotion; admiration; impression.

Compassion / Kindness

Japan omoi yari
Compassion / Kindness Wall Scroll

思いやり is compassion, kindness, or sympathy in Japanese.

The first part of this word suggests feelings, emotion, sentiment, love, affection, wish, and hope are connected with this idea of compassion and sympathy.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart

Japan ki no tsuyo i
Strong-Willed / Strong of Heart  Wall Scroll

Here's the character breakdown of this Japanese title:
気 (ki) spirit; mind; heart; nature; motivation; intention; feelings; essence.
の (no) possessive particle.
強い (tsuyoi) strong; powerful; mighty; potent; resistant; resilient; durable.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Omoi / Desire

Japan omoi
Omoi / Desire Wall Scroll

想い is a Japanese word that is often translated as desire.

Other definitions include: thought; imagination; mind; heart; wish; hope; expectation; love; affection; feelings; emotion; sentiment; experience. The context in which this word is used determines how it is understood.


China líng huó xìng
Flexibility Wall Scroll

Flexibility is being open to change. You consider others' ideas and feelings and don't insist on your own way. Flexibility gives you creative new ways to get things done. Flexibility helps you to keep changing for the better. This Chinese word could also be defined as "flexible nature."

See Also:  Cooperation

Self-Discipline / Will-Power

China zì lǜ
Japan jiritsu
Self-Discipline / Will-Power Wall Scroll

Self-discipline means self-control. It is doing what you really want to do, rather than being tossed around by your feelings like a leaf in the wind. You act instead of react. You get things done in an orderly and efficient way. With self-discipline, you take charge of yourself.

Not sure if this one works for a Japanese audience.

See Also:  Discipline | Self-Control

Follow Your Heart

Japan kimochi ni shitagau
Follow Your Heart Wall Scroll

The first part of this Japanese proverb means, feeling, sensation, or mood. In this context, you could say it means your heart, as the whole proverb is suggesting that you follow the feelings that you have inside.
The second part suggests following, abiding by, or listening to this inner feeling.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

With all the strength of your heart

Japan omoi kiri
With all the strength of your heart Wall Scroll

This can be translated as, "with all one's strength," "with all one's heart," "to the limits of your heart," or "to the end of your heart/emotions."

The character breakdown:
思い (omoi) thought; mind; heart; feelings; emotion; sentiment; love; affection; desire; wish; hope; expectation; imagination; experience
切り (kiri) bounds; limits.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Grim Reaper / God of Death

China sǐ shén
Japan shinigami
Grim Reaper / God of Death Wall Scroll

死神 is the title of the mythological figure (often called the Grim Reaper in western culture) in charge of taking the souls of those who die.

This title can be translated directly as "god of death" or "spirit of death." The first character literally means "death" and the second means "spirit" or "god."

死神 is a very strange title for a calligraphy wall scroll. I'm not even sure if my calligraphers will write it, as it has some bad superstitious feelings attached to it.

True Heart

China zhēn xīn
Japan mago koro
True Heart Wall Scroll

While these two characters literally read as "true heart" or "genuine heart," the understood meaning is sincerity, devotion, sincere, or heartfelt. Some will extend the meaning to be like, "true love." Basically, it's the idea of doing something or treating someone with genuine feelings.

真心 is valid and has the same meaning in both Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji.

Note: While not too common, this can be the female given name "Mami" in Japanese.

Lust / Desire / Passion

China qíng yù
Japan jouyoku
Lust / Desire / Passion Wall Scroll

This word can be defined as lust, sexual desire, sensual desire, carnal desire, carnal passions, sexual desire, and passion.

The first character means feeling, emotions, passionate, sympathy, affection, love, compassion, tender feelings, and sometimes circumstances or facts.

The second character means desire, longing, appetite, wish, covetousness, greed, passion, desire, and craving.

This word is universal in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja.

Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony

China hé měi
Japan wa mi
Beautiful Life / Life in Perfect Harmony Wall Scroll

These two characters create a word that means, "harmonious" or, "in perfect harmony." The deeper meaning or more natural translation would be something like, "beautiful life."

The first character means peace and harmony.

The second character means beautiful. But in this case, when combined with the first character, beautiful refers to being satisfied with what you have in your life. This can be having good relations, good feelings, comfort, and having enough (with no feeling of wanting).

Note: In Japanese, this is often used as the name "Wami." This title is probably more appropriate if your audience is Chinese.

Love and Honor

China shēn qíng hòu yì
Love and Honor Wall Scroll

深情厚義 means to love and honor. 深情厚義 is more or less the kind of thing you'd find in marriage vows.

The first two characters suggest deep love or deep emotions, passion, and feelings.
The last two characters mean generous justice or thick honor (the third character is an adjective that means generous or thick). It just means that you will honor your lover's wishes, and treat them justly and righteously (fairly).

This is the longer four-character version, there is also a short and sweet two character version.

See Also:  Love and Honor


China kuān róng
Japan kanyou
Tolerance Wall Scroll

Being tolerant is accepting differences. You don't expect others to think, look, speak or act just like you. You are free of prejudice, knowing that all people have feelings, needs, hopes and dreams. Tolerance is also accepting things you wish were different with patience and flexibility.

These characters can also be translated as magnanimity, generosity, or leniency.

Note: There is a tiny deviation in the first character when written in Japanese. If you choose our Japanese master calligrapher, the little dot on the lower right of the first character will be omitted. With or without the dot, this can be read in Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean.

See Also:  Patience

Keep Calm in Face of Adversity

Japan shitsuitaizen
Keep Calm in Face of Adversity Wall Scroll

失意泰然 is a very old Japanese proverb. It suggests, "keeping calm and collected at times of disappointment," or "maintaining a serene state of mind when faced with adversity."

It's hard to relate individual character meanings into the overall meaning unless you also understand Japanese grammar. The word order is very different than English. That being said, here's the character meaning breakdown:
失 To miss, lose or fail.
Feelings, thoughts, meaning.
泰 Safe, peaceful.
然 Like that, in that way, however, although.

Using these definitions in English, we might say, "Although you may fail or lose, have a feeling of peace and calm."

Love and Honor

China qíng yì
Love and Honor Wall Scroll

情義 means to love and honor in Chinese. 情義 is more or less the kind of thing you'd find in marriage vows.

The first character suggests emotions, passion, heart, humanity, sympathy, and feelings.

In this context, the second character means to honor your lover's wishes, and treat them justly and righteously (fairly). That second character can also be translated as "obligation," as in the obligation a husband and wife have to love each other even through difficult times.

In the context outside of a couple's relationship, this word can mean "comradeship."

Japanese may see this more as "humanity and justice" than "love and honor." It's probably best if your target is Chinese.

This is the short and sweet form, there is also a longer poetic form (you can find it here: Love and Honor if it's not on the page you are currently viewing).

See Also:  Love and Honor

Mind, Body and Spirit

China shēn xīn líng
Japan mi shin rei
Mind, Body and Spirit Wall Scroll

身心靈 / 身心霊 is probably the best way to express the idea of "Body, Mind and Spirit" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word for "heart" here because for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say "warm-hearted" or "I love you with all of my heart." In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is "body, heart & spirit" which could also be interpreted as "body mind & soul."

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply "feels" like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we have to be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).

霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

In Wine there is Truth

China jiǔ hòu tǔ zhēn yán
In Wine there is Truth Wall Scroll

酒后吐真言 / 酒後吐真言 is a nice Asian proverb if you know a vintner or wine seller - or wine lover - although the actual meaning might not be exactly what you think or hope.

The literal meaning is that someone drinking wine is more likely to let the truth slip out. It can also be translated as, "People speak their true feelings after drinking alcohol."

It's long-believed in many parts of Asia that one can not consciously hold up a facade of lies when getting drunk, and therefore the truth will come out with a few drinks.

I've had the experience where a Korean man would not trust me until I got drunk with him (I was trying to gain access to the black market in North Korea which is tough to do as an untrusted outsider) - so I think this idea is still well-practiced in many Asian countries.

后 VS 後

Please note that there are two common ways to write the second character of this phrase. The way it's written will be left up to the mood of the calligrapher, unless you let us know that you have a certain preference.

See Also:  Honesty | Truth


China xīn
Japan kin
Happy Wall Scroll

欣 is the type of happiness that you feel on the inside. It is the feeling of being released and delighted as well as being in a state of contentment. 欣 is a more internal happiness that perhaps only shows by the smile on your face. It can also be translated as "to take pleasure in" or "to rejoice."

Note: This character is often used in compound words - especially in Korean Hanja.
As Japanese Kanji, this is so rare, that most Japanese people are not aware of its existence.

See Also:  Happiness


China niàn
Japan nen
Mindfulness Wall Scroll

念 is the simplest way to write "mindfulness" in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

This character can be defined these ways: To read; to study (a degree course); to read aloud; to miss somebody (keeping them in your mind); idea; remembrance; sense; thought; feeling; desire; concern; attention; recollection; memory; to think on/about; reflect; repeat, intone; a moment.

Obviously, the context in which the character is used determines which definition or meaning is perceived. As a single character, it's open and perhaps ambiguous. Thus, it can be read with any or all of these meanings.

This character is used in a Buddhist context (often written as 正念 or "right mindfulness") with similar meanings of thought and contemplation.

In Japanese, this character is sometimes used as a name "Nen."

See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment


China xiē
Japan sasori
Scorpion Wall Scroll

This character is the word for scorpion in Chinese, Korean and Japanese.

Note: Sometimes the radical on the right side of this character is omitted. If this is an issue for you, please specify whether or not you want that radical included (otherwise, it will depend on the mood or feeling of the calligrapher).
FYI: This radical is more often omitted in Korean and Chinese. Most often kept as part of the character in Japanese.


China jué / jiào
Japan gaku / satoru
Awareness Wall Scroll

This can mean to feel; to figure out; thinking; awake; aware; bodhi; knowing; understanding; enlightenment; illumination; apprehend; perceive; realize.

覺 is a character that is impossible to define in a single word.

This term is often associated with Buddhism where it's understood to be: Illumination, enlightenment, or awakening in regard to the real in contrast to the seeming. However, it can also refer to enlightenment in regard to morality and evil.


In Japanese, this can be the personal name Satoru.

In certain context, and only when pronounced as "jiao" in Chinese, it can refer to a nap, sleep or the state of sleeping. However, as a single character on a wall scroll, everyone will read this with the awareness or enlightenment context.

By no means is this the only way to write enlightenment. In fact, you should only choose this character if you are looking more for a word meaning awareness.

See Also:  Enlightenment | Wisdom | Knowledge


Year of the Dog / Zodiac Sign
China gǒu
Japan inu / ku
Dog Wall Scroll

狗 is the character for dog, canine or hound in Chinese.

If you were born in the year of the dog, you . . .

Are strong-willed
Loyal to your friends and mate.
Never compromise when you think you are right.

Note: Can be pronounced, and means dog in Japanese but feels like a very old word (see our other dog if you need a Japanese dog).

See also our Chinese Zodiac page.

Big Dream

China dà mèng
Japan daimu
Big Dream Wall Scroll

大夢 means, "Big Dream" in Chinese and Japanese. 大夢 is mostly a Buddhist term referring to the great dream that represents a long and winding life that feels like a dream (since reality is an illusion anyway in Buddhism).

This can also be a female given name, Hiromu or Oomu in Japanese. Also more rare unisex given names Daimu or Taimu.

Courtesy / Politeness

China lǐ mào
Courtesy / Politeness Wall Scroll

Courtesy is being polite and having good manners. When you speak and act courteously, you give others a feeling of being valued and respected. Greet people pleasantly. Bring courtesy home. Your family needs it most of all. Courtesy helps life to go smoothly.

If you put the words "fēi cháng bù" in front of this, it is like adding "very much not." It's a great insult in China, as nobody wants to be called "extremely discourteous" or "very much impolite."

See Also:  Kindness | Respect


China hé zhǎng
Japan gasshou
Gassho Wall Scroll

合掌 is the act of greeting someone (can also be done when departing) with hands brought together in a prayerful manner.

In India, this would be accompanied by the verbal greeting and blessing of "Namaste." In China, Japan, and Korea, this is how Buddhists will greet each other. Sometimes done by people who are not devout Buddhists in China, Japan, and Korea to show respect, reverence or great thanks to someone for a gift, forgiveness, or some honor that has been bestowed.

In Japan, this is almost always associated with a deep bow. In China where bowing is not an everyday occurrence, there may be a shallow bow but the act will be done with deep feeling. Korean culture seems to have more bowing than China but less than Japan.

See Also:  Namaste

Kowtow - The deepest bow

China kòu tóu
Japan koutou
Kowtow - The deepest bow Wall Scroll

叩頭 is the term that seems to be known worldwide as kowtow. In Japanese and Chinese, it simply means a deep bow, especially one so low that one's head touches the ground in submission. However, in western culture, it has sometimes come to mean "giving in" or "surrendering to someone else's will." Sometimes even said of a person who stoops to flattery at the expense of their own dignity.

I don't know if you would really want this on a wall scroll but enough people have searched for this term on our website, that I guess it was time to add it. It just feels strange to see such a word on a wall scroll, so please order with caution. This word is antiquated in both Japanese and Chinese. The act is seldom done anymore, and seen as an ancient ritual of sorts.

Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu

Martial Arts Teacher
China shī fu
HK si fu
Japan shi fu
Fatherly Master / Sifu / Shi Fu / Shifu Wall Scroll

師父 means master in Chinese (occasionally used in Korean Hanja and Japanese as well). In the context of Martial Arts, this is the master and teacher who instructs students.

The second character by itself means father. Thus, you get the "Fatherly Master" translation. There's an old Chinese saying that goes something like, "One who is your teacher for one day, is your father for life."

Language notes: I've often seen this romanized as "sifu," this is actually the Cantonese romanization. In Mandarin Chinese, it's "shifu." The pronunciation in Mandarin is actually like "sure foo" (using typical English pronunciation). There's an "R-sound" in there, which is not obvious from the romanization. Many martial arts studios incorrectly pronounce this like "she foo" (which is actually the Japanese pronunciation). In Cantonese, it sounds like "Sea foo" (almost like "sea food," minus the "d" on the end).

師父 is kind of a weird selection for a calligraphy wall scroll, this entry is more for educational purposes. But you are welcome to buy it if you feel it's appropriate for your circumstances.

Mother and Son

China mǔ zǐ
Japan bo shi
Mother and Son Wall Scroll

This simply means "mother and son," or the essence of the relationship and bond between mother and son.

母子 is really a single word that expresses this idea (showing how important or significant this bond is).

母子 is not the most common choice for a wall scroll, it is acceptable if you feel this term is important to you.

See Also:  Mother and Daughter


China rén nī
Renni Wall Scroll

仁妮 is a name Renni in Mandarin Chinese. The name literally means "benevolent girl" in Chinese.

I kind of made up this name when my second daughter was born. The idea came for a feeling I got after performing a benevolent act for a poor family in Southern China. I want my daughter to follow that mode, and experience the same feeling one can only experience by doing benevolent acts.


China jīng shén
Japan sei shin
Spirit Wall Scroll

精神 is the kind of spirit that you have if you perform well in sports or competition. It is the idea of having a good attitude, and putting your all into something - so much so that others can see or feel your spirit. It is the essence of your being that can only be subjectively described because there are no words that can fully explain what "spirit" really is.

For your information:
My Japanese dictionary further tries to explain this word by comparing it to mind, soul, heart or intention.
My Chinese dictionary compares these characters to meanings like vigor, vitality, drive and mentality.
My Korean dictionary defines this as mind, spirit and soul.

See Also:  Vitality | Heart | Soul

Iron Heart

China tiě xīn
Japan tetsu kokoro / tesshin
Iron Heart Wall Scroll

This can be translated as "iron heart," "steel core," "iron mind" in Chinese and Japanese Kanji.

鐵心 is not a common term, but I added it here since so many were looking for "iron heart." 鐵心 is almost like saying you are without emotions or feeling - a very stoic person. 鐵心 is not a Buddhist trait.

Joyfulness / Happiness

China kuài lè
Japan kai raku
Joyfulness / Happiness Wall Scroll

Joyfulness is an inner sense of peace and happiness. You appreciate the gifts each day brings. Without joyfulness, when the fun stops, our happiness stops. Joy can carry us through the hard times even when we are feeling very sad.

This word can also mean pleasure, enjoyment, delight, cheerful, or merry. In some ways, this is the essence that makes someone to be perceived as a charming person.

See Also:  Happiness


China gū dú
Japan ko doku
Lonely Wall Scroll

孤獨 means lonely, solitude, loneliness, and lonesome.
In some context, it can mean reclusive, isolation, single or solo.

孤獨 is a Japanese word but not a good selection for a wall scroll.
In Chinese, this will relay a rather sad feeling to anyone who reads this calligraphy on your wall.

独The version shown to the left is the Traditional Chinese and ancient Japanese version. In modern Japan and China they often use a different more simplified version of the second character (as shown to the right). If you want this Japanese/Simplified version, please click on the character shown to the right instead of the button above.


China huò dá
Japan katsudatsu
Optimistic Wall Scroll

Beyond optimistic, this word can also be defined as sanguine; magnanimous; open-minded; openhearted; broad-minded.

豁達 is appropriate if you are, or want to be, the kind of person who is not bothered by the little things or minor troubles of life. This signifies a person who always feels things will get better. 豁達 is great for the person who figuratively sees a window of opportunity opening even as a door closes.

While a valid word in Japanese, this is kind of antiquated, and not in common use in modern Japan.

Sorry / Feel Apologetic / Regret

China bào qiàn
Sorry / Feel Apologetic / Regret Wall Scroll

抱歉 is the feeling of being or feeling sorry or apologetic. Basically the idea of being regretful. Not quite the same thing as sorrow.

Note: This is a strange thing to write on a wall scroll for Chinese people - but you can bend the rules if you want in the west.

Broken Hearted

Japan shitsuren
Broken Hearted Wall Scroll

In Chinese, this can mean to lose one's love; to break up (in a romantic relationship); to feel jilted.

In Japanese Kanji, this means disappointed love, broken heart, unrequited love, or being lovelorn.

失戀 is also valid in old Korean Hanja, where is means unrequited love, unreturned love, a disappointment in love, or a broken heart.

Note: In modern Japan, they will tend to write the more simple 失恋 form instead of 失戀. If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect the more simple modern version to be written (unless you give us instructions to use the older or more traditional version).

Destiny Determined by Heaven

China tiān yì
Japan teni
Destiny Determined by Heaven Wall Scroll

天意 is a way to express destiny in a slightly religious way. Literally this means "Heaven's Wish" or "Heaven's Desire" with the idea of fate and destiny being derived as well. It suggests that your destiny comes from God / Heaven and that your path has already been chosen by a higher power.

My Japanese dictionary defines this word as "divine will" or "providence" but it also holds the meaning of "the will of the emperor." Therefore, I don't suggest this phrase if your audience is Japanese - it feels a little strange in Japanese anyway.


China wēn róu
Gentleness Wall Scroll

Gentleness is moving wisely, touching softly, holding carefully, speaking quietly and thinking kindly. When you feel mad or hurt, use your self-control. Instead of harming someone, talk things out peacefully. You are making the world a safer, gentler place.

See Also:  Kindness | Caring

House of Good Fortune

China fú zhái
House of Good Fortune Wall Scroll

Perhaps the Chinese equivalent of "This blessed house" or perhaps "home sweet home."

This phrase literally means "Good fortune house" or "Good luck household." It makes any Chinese person who sees it feel that good things happen in the home in which this calligraphy is hung.

Gratitude / Thanks

China gǎn xiè
Japan kan sha
Gratitude / Thanks Wall Scroll

感謝 is gratitude; the feeling of being grateful or thankful. You can think of this as being a formal way of expressing thankfulness in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.


China líng gǎn
Japan reikan
Inspiration Wall Scroll

靈感 is the Chinese word that is the closest to hitting the mark for the English word "inspiration." In a more extended context, I have even seen this translated as "brain wave."

The first character means alert, departed soul, efficacious, quick, effective or intelligence. The second character means to feel, to move, to touch or to affect. The combined meaning of these two characters changes a bit but I think it's nice to know the individual meanings to give you a better understanding of where a word comes from.

You could describe this word as, "the thought that pops into your head just before you patent the greatest widget ever invented, that everyone in the world will want."
…At least, that's the idea.

This term can also mean "intelligent thought" if you were to translate it directly from each of these characters. If you are looking for inspiration or otherwise need to be inspired, this is the word for you.

霊When the first character was absorbed into Japanese from Chinese, an alternate form became the standard in Japan. The Kanji shown to the right is the form currently used in Japan. This is still considered an alternate form in China to this day. It's readable by both Chinese and Japanese people but if your audience is Japanese, I recommend the Kanji shown to the right - just click on that Kanji to order that version.

Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind

China ān xīn
Japan an shin
Peaceful Heart / Peace of Mind / Calm Mind Wall Scroll

安心 is a nice word that encompasses great meanings within just two characters. This can be defined as relief, peace of mind, feeling at ease, to be relieved, set one's mind at rest. easiness. To put it another way, it's the idea of feeling a sense of security, safety, and confidence in your state of well-being.


China zì háo
Pride Wall Scroll

This word is used to convey "feeling a sense of pride." This can be the pride you feel in yourself, or the sense of pride in belonging to a certain group, team or organization.

Sorrow / Feeling Sorry

China wàn xí
Sorrow / Feeling Sorry Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means, "to feel sorry for a person over something that should have happened."

Note: This is a strange thing to write on a wall scroll for Chinese people.

Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things

China zhēn rú
Japan shinnyo
Tathata / Ultimate Nature of All Things Wall Scroll

This comes from the Sanskrit and Pali word often romanized as "tathata" or "tathatā." Originally written, "तथता."

It's a Buddhist term that is often translated as "thusness" or "suchness" but this does not explain it.
A better explanation may be, "the ultimate nature of all things." However, this gives it too strong of a feeling. This concept is sometimes described as being in awe of the simple nature of something - like a blade of grass blowing in the wind, or ripples on water. It is what it is supposed to be, these things are following their nature. Amazing in their mundane simplicity.

Every sect of Buddhism will have a slightly different flavor, or explanation, so don't get fixated on one definition.

Notes: Sometimes Buddhists use the word dharmatā, a synonym to tathatā.

In Japan, this can also be the female given name Mayuki, or the surname Majo.


China tǒng gǎn
Togetherness Wall Scroll

統感 is a Chinese word that expresses, "the feeling of togetherness."

Sorry / Apologetic / Repent / Regret

China hòu huǐ
Japan kou kai / go ke
Sorry / Apologetic / Repent / Regret Wall Scroll

後悔 is the feeling of being or feeling repentant, apologetic, and regret.

後悔 is not sorrow.

This term is often used in the context of Buddhism and other religions.

Note: This is a strange thing to write on a wall scroll for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people - but you can bend the rules if you want in the west.

Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa

China quán fǎ
Japan kenpou
Kenpo / Kempo / Quan Fa / Chuan Fa Wall Scroll

This form of martial arts can be translated in several ways. Some will call it "fist principles" or "the way of the fist," or even "law of the fist." The first character literally means fist. The second can mean law, method, way, principle or Buddhist teaching.

Kempo is really a potluck of martial arts. Often a combination of Chinese martial arts such as Shaolin Kung Fu with Japanese martial arts such as Karate, Jujutsu (Jujitsu), Aikido, and others. You may see the term "Kempo Karate" which basically means Karate with other disciplines added. In this way, Kempo becomes an adjective rather than a title or school of martial arts.

These facts will long be argued by various masters and students of Kempo. Even the argument as to whether it should be spelled "kenpo" or "Kempo" ensues at dojos around the world (the correct Romaji should actually be "kenpou" if you precisely follow the rules).

The benefit of Kempo is that the techniques are easier to learn and master compared to pure Kung Fu (wu shu). Students are often taught basic Karate moves, kicks, and punches before augmenting the basic skills with complex Kung Fu techniques. This allows students of Kempo achieve a level where they can defend themselves or fight in a relatively short amount of time (a few years rather than a decade or more).

Because the definition of this word is so fluid, I should make some notes here:

1. Purists in Okinawa will claim that "Okinawa Kenpo" or "Ryukyu Hon Kenpo" is the original and true version of this martial art from the old kingdom. There is actually little or no connection between Okinawa Kenpo and the way the word is used elsewhere.

2. In Chinese, where these characters are pronounced "quan fa" (sometimes Romanized as "chuan fa" because the Chinese-pinyin "q" actually sounds like an English "ch" sound), these characters do not hold the connotation of being a mixed martial art. It is simply defined as "the law of the fist."

3. In my Japanese dictionary, it oddly defines Kenpo as "Chinese art of self-defense." I personally don't feel this is the most common way that people perceive the word but just something you should know.

Longing for Lover

China sī liàn
Longing for Lover Wall Scroll

思戀 is a term used for when you miss a lover. It suggests that you are separated (not by choice) and have longing for each other. It's a strong feeling of missing your lover.

Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister

China xiān shēng
Japan sen sei
Sensei / Master / Teacher / Mister Wall Scroll

If you've taken even a single karate class in your life, you know this term. 先生 is sensei, which is associated in the west with a master or instructor of karate, aikido, judo, and other Japanese martial arts.

In reality, this is a term of respect for almost any professional or skilled person (doctor, lawyer, teacher, etc). In some cases, it is used for musicians and artists who have achieved a certain level of fame, skill, or accomplishment.

It should be noted that this is also a courtesy title in Chinese but more like calling someone "mister" or "gentleman." It doesn't really have the "master" or "teacher" meaning in Chinese - see our Chinese "Master / Sifu / Shi Fu" entry if your audience is Chinese.

In Korean Hanja, this means teacher, instructor, schoolmaster, or schoolmistress.

This entry is more for educational purposes. 先生 is kind of a strange thing to put on a wall scroll. It's a title that is used more orally to show respect, rather than something written in calligraphy. If you feel that it is appropriate in your circumstances, we are very willing to create a piece of sensei Japanese calligraphy artwork for you.

No Mercy

China wú qíng
Japan mujou
No Mercy Wall Scroll

無情 is a terrible phrase for a calligraphy wall scroll. I'm not even sure any of my calligraphers will write this. It's just that many people have searched my website for "no mercy."

This word means pitiless, ruthless, merciless, heartless, heartlessness, hardness, cruelty, or ruthless.

In the context of Buddhism, this is used to describe something or someone that is non-sentient (inhuman or without feeling).


sex appeal / eroticism / sexuality
China xing gǎn
Japan seikan
Sexy Wall Scroll

性感 is the closest word in Chinese that matches the way we use "sexy" in English.

In China, this could be used to refer to a hot girl, or a hot car.

In Japanese, this is translated as "sexual feeling."

性感 is not really appropriate for a wall scroll.

Sadness / Sorrow

China bēi āi
Japan hi ai
Sadness / Sorrow Wall Scroll

悲哀 means grieved, sorrowful, sorrow, grief, and sadness in Chinese, old Korean Hanja and Japanese Kanji. In Buddhist context, it suggests the kind feeling in your heart toward others (as the result of feeling sorrow).

Note: This is a strange selection for a calligraphy wall scroll.


China ào ěr nà
Orna Wall Scroll

奧爾娜 is a secondary way to transliterate the name Orna into Mandarin Chinese. While this is not the most popular way, we feel the pronunciation is closer with proper emphasis on the "r" sound within "Orna."


China jiě mèi qíng
Sisterhood Wall Scroll

姐妹情 is one way to say "sisterhood."

Literally, this means "sisters feeling/emotion/passion/situation."

Love and Hate

China ài yǔ hèn
Love and Hate Wall Scroll

Whether you want to make a joke about what marriage really is, or just feel that the world in full of love and hate, this selection is for you.

These characters happen to literally translate. So the first character is love. The middle character is a connecting particle like "and" in English. The last character is hate.

Upon request, we can omit the "and" character and just put a dot to separate love and hate if you prefer.


China líng qì
Japan reiki
Reiki Wall Scroll

靈氣 is the title of a healing practice that is now found throughout the world but with origins in Japan.

Special note: Outside of the context of the healing practice of Reiki, this means "aura" or "spiritual essence that surrounds all living things." A Japanese person not familiar with the practice will take the "aura" meaning.

Reiki is a technique for stress reduction and relaxation that also heals. It can be compared to massage but is based on the idea that an unseen "life force energy" flows through us and is what causes us to be alive. If your life force energy is low, you'll be more likely to get sick or feel stress. If your life force energy is abundant and flowing well, you become more capable of being happy and healthy.

There is a lot of information available if you want to Google this term - my job is to offer the calligraphy, while you can decide if it is right for you.

Note: We are showing the ancient (traditional) form of the Reiki Kanji. I have seen Reiki written with both the slightly simplified version and this more classic form. If you want the form of Reiki with the two strokes in the shape of an X on the second character and the modern first character, simply click on the Kanji characters to the right.

Note: 靈氣 is also a Chinese word but in Chinese, these characters create a word that refers to a smart person or someone with high aspirations. It is not read as a healing method in Chinese.
In Korean Hanja, this can be read as "mysterious atmosphere" by a Korean who is not familiar with the practice of Reiki (still has a cool meaning in Korean).

Ba Ji Quan

China bā jí quán
Japan hakkyo ku ken
Ba Ji Quan Wall Scroll

八極拳 is "Ba Ji Quan" or "Eight Extremes Fist."

Some also translate this as "Eight Extremities Fist," though I don't feel that's accurate.

八極拳 (Bājíquán) is a Chinese martial art that features explosive, short-range power and is famous for its elbow strikes. It originated in the Hebei Province in Northern China but spread to Taiwan and other places.

The full title is 開門八極拳 (Kāimén Bājíquán), which means Open-Door Bajiquan.

You may also see this romanized as "BaJiQuan," "Pa Chi Ch`üan," or "Pa Chi Chuan."

In Japan, this is known as, "Hakkyokuken."


The most accurate Lorraine in Chinese
China luó ruì ēn
Lorraine Wall Scroll

羅瑞恩 is a transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Lorraine that we feel is more accurate to the way the name is supposed to sound in English.

Homosexual / Gay

China tóng xìng liàn
Homosexual / Gay Wall Scroll

A great way to tell your Chinese friends about your lifestyle, while keeping your Anglo friends in the dark.

Kind of a huge bold sign to say "I'm Gay" without anybody knowing.

These characters literally mean "same sex feeling" or "same sex affection" in Chinese.

House of Red Delights

China yí hóng yuàn
House of Red Delights Wall Scroll

怡紅院 is from "The Story of the Stone" by Cao Xueqin.

For some reason, this phrase was translated as "House of Green Delights" when the novel was published in English. The translator took some liberties, and believed that "green" had a more positive feel than red, to a western audience. Therefore, the phrase shown to the right is "House of Red Delights" (which is the most original and correct way).

Sisters at Heart

The love between sisters
Japan kokoro no shi mai
Sisters at Heart Wall Scroll

心の姉妹 is "heart of sisters," "soul sisters," or "sisters of the heart." This can be used for actual sisters to celebrate the heartfelt love they feel. It can even be used by two women who feel a connection as if they are sisters.


China shēn tǐ jiàn kāng
Japan shin tai ken kou
Wellness Wall Scroll

身體健康 is how to express "wellness" in Chinese. The meaning is not much different than the idea of "good health." In fact, the first two characters alone are often translated as "health." Some will also translate this title as "physical health."

If you want to fill your room with a feeling of wellness, this is the wall scroll for you.

身體健康 is also the ancient way to express wellness in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja. The modern Japanese form is only different on the second Kanji but Koreans have completely changed their common writing system in the last 100 years.

See Also:  Health | Vitality

Awesome / Awe-Inspiring

Japan osore ooi
Awesome / Awe-Inspiring Wall Scroll

恐れ多い is a Japanese word for something awe-inspiring or awesome (in some odd context, it can refer to the month of August).

恐れ多い is probably not appropriate for a calligraphy wall scroll unless you have a specific reason.

The word awesome is misused a lot in English, or used too casually. This Japanese word is the real form of awesome, and kind of means numerous fears and anxiety that you would feel in response to encountering something truly awesome (such as God, a tornado, a tsunami, etc).

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Enso - Japanese Zen Circle

Japan en sou
Enso - Japanese Zen Circle Wall Scroll

〇 / 円相 is Enso, which is really NOT a regular Japanese Kanji character. It falls more into the category of a symbol. In this case, it can be considered a religious symbol, as it is strongly-associated with Japanese Zen Buddhism.

Enso Circle

〇 / 円相 is a typical appearance of Enso with an inscription by master calligrapher Bishou Imai.

Some call this "The Circle of Enlightenment." Others call it the "Infinity Circle." If you actually took the meanings of the two Kanji that make up the word "Enso," you could read it as "Mutual Circle" or "Circle of Togetherness." I think the Enso symbol can simply mean different things to different people. Therefore, you should let it have the meaning that you perceive.

Please note when you start making your customizations for an Enso wall scroll, you will see some possible ways it might be written, listed under the different calligraphy styles that we normally offer. However, Enso does not really conform to normal Asian calligraphy styles. Therefore, do not expect that you can make a style selection and expect the actual result to be identical. The appearance of your Enso will be determined by the artist's personal style, feeling, mood, etc. You cannot control or constrain that, as you cannot constrain art, without removing some of the artistic quality. Note: Our calligraphy selection process does not take this into account, as it was designed for Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji selection.

Please ignore the part where you are invited to pick a calligraphy style in the following pages.

Both our Japanese and Chinese master calligraphers are Buddhist (not as devout as monks but Buddhist none the less). Therefore, you can be assured that your Enso symbol will be written with the utmost effort and feeling.

By the way, when "Enso" is written in Kanji, it looks like this: 円相

Forgive and Forget

China lüè è jì yuán qíng
Forgive and Forget Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means, "to overlook past faults," or "forgive and forget."

It's more literally, "Abridge or make small the scars from your past emotions." Basically, you should let it go.

The character breakdown:
略 (lüè) abbreviation; omission; abridge.
跡 (jī) ruins; scar; traces.
原 (yuán) former.
情 (qíng) feeling; emotion.

Inner Peace

China nèi xīn píng jìng
Japan naishin heizyou
Inner Peace Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Japanese phrase is a direct translation for the western idea of inner peace.

The first two characters contain the idea of "heart," "innermost being," or "deep in the/your inner mind."

The last two characters mean "tranquil" and "serene."

I have seen this phrase used as "inner peace" for art prints and even on the side of coffee cups. But I think the translation is too literal. It feels like a direct translation from English rather than a nicely composed Chinese or Japanese phrase. See my other entries for "inner peace."

See Also:  Serenity | Simplicity | Peace

Peace and Love

China hé píng bó ài
Japan wahei hakuai
Peace and Love Wall Scroll

和平博愛 is the Chinese and Japanese way to express "Peace and Love." These are two separate words, so the calligrapher will put a slight space between the first two characters which mean peace, and the last two which represent universal love. This space is not shown on the sample character images for this phrase.

A special note: Word lists may seem okay in English but feel strange in Chinese and Japanese. We don't offer too many of them but this one is often-requested, and feels okay in Chinese and Japanese, though a bit uncommon in Korean.

See Also:  Peace | Love

Better to be Happy than Rich

China ān pín lè dào
Better to be Happy than Rich Wall Scroll

Even if you are poor, you should still feel satisfied in your life...

...Satisfaction, happiness, and the meaning of your life come from within yourself and not from money or riches of the world.

In Chinese, there are a lot of four-character proverbs which express some very old philosophies.
Though there are only four characters on this scroll, in Chinese the meanings often surpass the dictionary definition of each character.

In this case, you should not set your expectations too high for the amount to money or riches you wish to have. One who sets their expectations too high is almost always disappointed. Instead, you should cherish what you have, and seek to improve yourself from within, and not measure your personal worth by the size of your bank account.

See Also:  A Sly Rabbit Will Have Three Openings to Its Den

Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home

China sì hǎi wéi jiā
Feel at Ease Anywhere / The World is My Home Wall Scroll

This literally reads, "Four Seas Serve-As [my/one's] Home."

Together, 四海 which literally means "four seas" is understood to mean, "the whole world" or "the seven seas." It's presumed to be an ancient word, from back when only four seas were known - so it equates to the modern English term, "seven seas."

This can be translated or understood a few different ways:
To regard the four corners of the world all as home.
To feel at home anywhere.
To roam about unconstrained.
To consider the entire country, or the world, to be one's own.

Lost Soul

China sàng hún shī pò
Lost Soul Wall Scroll

This Chinese idiom means, "lost soul, vanished spirit." It relays a feeling of being distraught, at a loss, or heart-broken.

A Traditional Warm Welcome

China huān yíng guāng lín
A Traditional Warm Welcome Wall Scroll

This would be the ultimate Chinese "welcome mat." Except it will be on your wall, and people will not step on it.

In a somewhat literal translation, you could say it means, "I feel happiness as I welcome you, as you have brought a shining light to this place with your arrival" or in a more simple way, "I am happy you've come as your presents really brightens up the place."

It has become common for this greeting to be announced by the staff upon the arrival of any customer in to a fancy store in China. You will also see these characters on the "welcome mats" in front of 4 and 5 star hotels in China.

Having this on a wall scroll is an extra nice touch. I have seen a few horizontal scrolls with this phrase on the wall behind the reception desk of better hotels, or near the front door of fine shops. At the most fancy department stores and restaurants in China, several greeters (almost always young women) will stand by the front door all wearing sashes with this phrase embroidered on them. As you walk in, they will bow and say "huan ying guang lin" to welcome you to the establishment.

Note: The first two and last two characters do make words in Korean Hanja but seldom used as a sentence like this in Korean.

One Day Seems Like 1000 Years

Japan ichi jitsu sen shuu
One Day Seems Like 1000 Years Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb is really about missing someone.

一日千秋 is often used to express how hard it is to wait for someone's return, or to be away from someone.

Some will translate this as, "one day feels like a very long time," or "waiting for someone (something) is hard."

If we break down this Ichijitsusenshuu Kanji one-by-one, we get:
一 = one / a
日 = day / sun (can also represent time, or a date)
千 = 1000 / a thousand
秋 = autumn / fall

Together, 千秋 can mean, "autumn comes thousand times" (or 1000 years). It can also be read as 1000 periods of time.
So, you can read this as, "1 day is like 1000 years," or "1 day is like 1000 years." Either way, it relays the idea of heartache as you wait for someone that you miss.

Make Guests Feel at Home

Home away from home
China bīn zhì rú guī
Make Guests Feel at Home Wall Scroll

This Chinese phrase suggests that a good host will make guests feel like they are returning home or are as comfortable as they would be at their own home.

賓至如歸 is also the Chinese equivalent of, "a home away from home," and is used by Chinese hotels, guest houses, and inns to suggest the level of their hospitality will make you feel at home during your stay.

Safe and Sound

China píng ān wú shì
Japan heian buji
Safe and Sound Wall Scroll

This proverb means "safe and sound without toil or trouble." It kind of means that all is well with a feeling of complete safety. The ideas contained in these characters include well-being, peace, tranquility, quietness, calmness, and non-problematic.

Missing / Yearning

I miss you
Japan koishi garu
Missing / Yearning Wall Scroll

戀しがる is the most common Japanese verb for missing someone or yearning for someone (it could also be missing a place).

戀しがる is the shortest way to say, "I miss you" or "I yearn for you" in Japanese.

Breaking down the characters:
恋し (koishi) yearned for; longed for; missed (acts as an adjective in Japanese).
がる (garu) to feel, behavior (this represents emotion, and turns the whole word into a verb in Japanese).

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Let It Be / Be Relieved

Japan mayu o hira ku
Let It Be / Be Relieved Wall Scroll

眉を開く is a Japanese proverb and expression that means, "to feel relieved," "to forget about one's troubles," or "to settle into peace of mind."

The literal words suggest relaxing your eyebrows or face. Allow worry or concern to go away, and just be content "letting it be."

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Tranquil Midnight

China yōu jìng de wǔ yè
Tranquil Midnight Wall Scroll

幽靜的午夜 is a way to express the emotions that you might feel at midnight. Beyond peaceful, quiet or tranquil, there is an idea of being remote or lonesome, buried in the meaning of the first two characters.

Five Elements

China jīn mù shuǐ huǒ tǔ
Five Elements Wall Scroll

金木水火土 is a list of the Chinese characters for the five elements in a comfortable order (meaning that they simply "feel right" to a Chinese person who views this arrangement).

The order is metal, wood, water, fire, earth.

Note that sometimes the metal element is translated as gold. And earth refers to soil versus the whole planet earth.

Dragon Snake Tiger
Leopard Crane

China lóng shé hǔ bào hè
Japan ryuu hebi tora hyou tsuru
Dragon Snake Tiger / Leopard Crane Wall Scroll

龍蛇虎豹鶴 is a list of the Chinese characters for the five animals of Shaolin Kung Fu in a comfortable order (meaning that they are in the proper order and will simply "feel right" to a Chinese person who views this arrangement).

A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One

Japan sen ri mo ichi ri
A Journey of 1000 Miles Feels Like One Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb states that, "A journey of a thousand miles feels like only one mile." It is understood that in the proverb, this applies when going to see the one you love.

Note that the "mile" or 里 used in this proverb is an old Chinese "li" (pronounced "ri" in Japanese). It's not actually a mile, as the measurement is really closer to 500 meters (it would take 3 of these to get close to a western mile). Still, 1000里 (333 miles) is a long way.


China gài bù lǐ ài lā
Gabriela Wall Scroll

蓋布裡艾拉 is an alternate transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Gabriela.

There are more common versions of Gabriela but we like this one the best because we feel it sounds more like the original pronunciation of Gabriela.

Spare No Effort

China bù yí yú lì
Spare No Effort Wall Scroll

不遺餘力 / 不遺余力 is a Chinese proverb that can be translated many ways. Here's some of them: go to any lengths; with all one's might; spare no pain; do one's utmost.

If you feel hard work and holding nothing back is your philosophy, then this is the phrase for you.

Do not shed a tear until you see the coffin

China bú jiàn guān cái bú luò lèi
Do not shed a tear until you see the coffin Wall Scroll

It should first be noted that this is one of the oddest selections for a wall scroll in our whole Asian calligraphy database. All of our translators are convinced that no Chinese person would ever hang this on their wall.

On to the phrase...
不見棺材不落淚 is a suggestion that you should not cry or feel sad until you see the coffin (not until the worst has happened, or until you are sure it has happened).

However, others will say this means doing something bad and not looking back - Then the worst happens.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

To Know Hardship, One Must Experience It

China bù dāng hé shàng bù zhī tóu lěng
To Know Hardship, One Must Experience It Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: [One who has] not been a monk [does] not know [the feeling of a] cold head.
I need to explain that a Chinese Buddhist monk always has a shaved head, and thus a cold head in winter.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot know the true meaning of hardship until one has experienced it oneself.

This is an idiom in Chinese, so the figurative meaning is what people perceive when they hear or read this phrase. Just as in English, when someone says, "The grass is always greener," one will think about the idea of jealousy, rather than the quality of one's lawn.

Energy Sword Body in Concert

Spirit, Sword & Body as One
Japan ki ken tai icchi
Energy Sword Body in Concert Wall Scroll

This often gets translated as "Mind Sword Body," or "Spirit, Sword and Body as One." But I think these translations don't tell you enough about what this is really saying.

In this context, 気, which is the modern Japanese version of 氣, means spiritual and unseen energy or "life energy." In some cases, 気 can be translated as spirit, feeling, or nature. If defined as mind, it's more about invisible or intangible part of one's mind (or soul).

剣 is the Japanese version of 劍 meaning sword.

体 is the modern Japanese version of 體 meaning body.

The Kanji 一 means one, and in this case suggests "all in one." The Kanji 到 means to send, deliver, or convey. But together, 一到 suggests all these things in agreement, union cooperation, or in concert.

You are only as old as you feel

You're only old if you think you're old
China bú pà rén lǎo zhǐ pà xīn lǎo
You are only as old as you feel Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Do not be concerned about being old; be concerned about a mind which is old.

Figuratively, this means: Your are not as old as you look, you are only as old as you think you are.

No man knows what he owes to his parents
till he comes to have children of his own

Japan ko wo motte shiru oya no on
No man knows what he owes to his parents / till he comes to have children of his own Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Only after you have a baby, you would appreciate your parents (feel the way they do, etc).

子を持って知る親の恩 is a bit like the "walk a mile in another man's shoes" saying. Basically, it's about you cannot fully understand the plight of others until you experience it yourself. It also shows appreciation for the plight of parents.

This Japanese proverb can also be translated a few more ways:

No man knows what he owes to his parents till he comes to have children of his own.

One knows not what one owes to one's parents till one comes to have children of one's own.

Only after you have a baby, you will appreciate your parents or feel the way they do.

Only after becoming a parent yourself do you realize how much you owe [how indebted you are] to your own parents.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

The Confident Helmsman
Inspires Confidence in the Passengers

China bǎ tuò de bù huāng chéng chuán de wěn dang
The Confident Helmsman / Inspires Confidence in the Passengers Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: [If the] helmsman is not nervous, the passengers [will feel] secure.

Figuratively, this means: If the leader appears confident, his/her followers will gain confidence also.

把舵的不慌乘船的穩當 is a great suggestion that a confident leader inspires confidence in his/her troops or followers. Of course, a nervous leader will create fear in troops or followers.

Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark

China xìn niǎn shì zài lí míng qián de hēi àn zhōng néng gǎn dào guāng míng de niǎo
Faith is the bird that feels the light when the dawn is still dark Wall Scroll

信唸是在黎明前的黑闇中能感到光明的鳥 is a philosophical poem/quote from Indian Poet and Philosopher, Rabindranath Tagore.

Rabindranath Tagore

Rabindranath Tagore, 1915

This quote is not sourced, and therefore several variations exist in English. Some suggest the original was in the Bengali language.

This, of course, is the Chinese translation which has the meaning of, "Faith is the bird that feels the light and sings when the dawn is still dark."

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Wall Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty. It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.

Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds peoples homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.

Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.

Buy some related in-stock artwork?

Compare: $70.00

Your Price: $38.88

The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
jou / nasake
jo / nasake
qíng / qing2 / qing ch`ing / ching
7. Right Mindfulness
Right Memory
Perfect Mindfulness
正念sei nen / seinenzhèng niàn
zheng4 nian4
zheng nian
cheng nien
Feeling of Bliss 至福感shi fuku kan
思いやりomoi yari / omoiyari
Strong of Heart
ki no tsuyo i
Flexibility 靈活性
líng huó xìng
ling2 huo2 xing4
ling huo xing
ling huo hsing
自律jiritsuzì lǜ / zi4 lv4 / zi lv / zilv tzu lü / tzulü
Follow Your Heart 気持ちに従うkimochi ni shitagau
With all the strength of your heart 思い切りomoi kiri / omoikiri
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Beautiful Princess
Flowers Bloom
God Loves You
Good Luck
Keep Calm
Live for What You Love
Never Give Up
Noble Eightfold Path
Once in a Lifetime
Semper Fi
Tae Kwon Do
Wing Chun

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.

Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Feelings Kanji, Feelings Characters, Feelings in Mandarin Chinese, Feelings Characters, Feelings in Chinese Writing, Feelings in Japanese Writing, Feelings in Asian Writing, Feelings Ideograms, Chinese Feelings symbols, Feelings Hieroglyphics, Feelings Glyphs, Feelings in Chinese Letters, Feelings Hanzi, Feelings in Japanese Kanji, Feelings Pictograms, Feelings in the Chinese Written-Language, or Feelings in the Japanese Written-Language.