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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Endurance"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Endurance
  2. Stamina / Endurance
  3. Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant
  4. Diligence
  5. Physical Strength
  6. Patience / Perseverance
  7. Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do
  8. Ninja
  9. Diligence
10. Perseverance
11. Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude
12. Perseverance / Fortitude
13. Tenacious / Tenacity
14. Dedication
15. Enthusiasm
16. Passion for a Cause
17. Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause
18. Fortitude / Strength of Character
19. Determination to Achieve / Will-Power
20. Resilience / Restoration / Recovery
21. Stamina / Tenacity
22. Will-Power / Self-Control
23. Overcome
24. Indomitable / Unyielding
25. Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks
26. Islam
27. Indomitable Spirit / Indomitable Attitude
28. Shikataganai
29. Unwavering
30. Never Give In / Never Succumb...
31. You must endure a harsh winter...
32. Korean CKD Virtues
33. Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33


Endurance

China chí jiǔ
Japan ji kyuu
Endurance Wall Scroll

This word means "to endure" or "lasting." In some context, it can mean "persistent" or "persistence" (especially in Japanese and Korean).

Stamina / Endurance

China nài lì
Stamina / Endurance Wall Scroll

耐力 means stamina or endurance. However, depending on context, it can also mean patience or tolerance.

耐力 is the first part of titles like "endurance swimming."

The first character means, "to tolerate" or "to endure."

The second character is "power."

Together, you could say this word means, "the power to endure."

Stamina / Endurance

Japan tai kyu ryoku
Stamina / Endurance Wall Scroll

耐久力 means stamina or endurance in Japanese Kanji.

Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant

China rěn nài
Japan nin tai
Patience / Perseverance / To Endure / Tolerant Wall Scroll

Patience is quiet hope and trust that things will turn out right. You wait without complaining. You are tolerant and accepting of difficulties and mistakes. You picture the end in the beginning and persevere to meet your goals.

These characters can also mean "to endure," "restrain oneself," "forbearance," and in some context it can mean "perseverance" or "endurance."

忍耐 is also used as a tenet of Taekwondo, Tang Soo Do, and other Korean martial arts where it's titled "Endurance" and romanized as "In Neh."


忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the first character in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).


See Also:  Peace | Harmony | Perseverance

Diligence

China qín miǎn
Japan kinben
Diligence Wall Scroll

Diligence is working hard and doing your absolute best. You take special care by doing things step by step. Diligence helps you to get things done with excellence and enthusiasm. Diligence leads to success.

These characters can also be translated as industry, industrious, assiduity, assiduous, diligent, or sedulity.


See Also:  Hard Work | Tenacity | Commitment | Passion for a Cause

Physical Strength

China tǐ lì
Japan tairyoku
Physical Strength Wall Scroll

Means "physical strength" or "physical power."

The first character was first simplified in Japan. Then that simplified version became the standard in mainland China. Just in case you want this version, it is offered here. I suggest it if you audience is Japanese. Most Chinese know the older traditional version.

This word can also be defined: stamina; endurance; physical strength; resilience; resistance to disease; clout; stability.

Patience / Perseverance

China rěn
Japan nin
Patience / Perseverance Wall Scroll

This character contains the ideas of patience, equanimity, perseverance, forbearance, and endurance. Alone, this single character can be a bit ambiguous or flexible. It can also mean to endure, to bear, to put up with or to conceal. If you want to simply decide what this character means to you within the general meaning but keep it a mystery to others, this is a good choice.

If you want to be more direct, you may want to choose one of our other selections that mean perseverance or patience (you will see this character within those larger words/phrases).

There is a secondary meaning in Japanese, since this is the first character of the word ninja.

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write it in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).


See Also:  Perseverance | Patience | Tenacious

Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do

China tái quán dào jīng shén lǐ yì lián chǐ rěn nài kè jǐ bǎi zhé bù qū
Taekwondo Tenets / Spirit of Taekwon-do Wall Scroll

Taekwondo Tenets跆拳道精神禮義廉耻忍耐克己百折不屈 is General Choi's writing that is often called "The Tenets of Taekwon-do." The actual title would be translated as, "Taekwondo Spirit" or "The Spirit of Taekwondo." It was originally written in Korean Hanja (Chinese characters used in Korea for about 1600 years).

General Choi's original calligraphy is shown to the right. Your custom calligraphy will be unique, and not an exact match, as each calligrapher has their own style.

In modern times, the common form of written Korean is Hangul (a phonetic character set). The table below shows the text in Hangul and Hanja along with a pronunciation guide and a brief English translation:

Traditional Korean HanjaModern Korean HangulPronunciationEnglish
跆拳道精神태권도정신tae gweon do jeong sinTaekwondo Spirit
禮儀예의ye yiCourtesy / Etiquette / Propriety / Decorum / Formality
廉耻염치yeom ciIntegrity / Sense of Honor
忍耐인내in naePatience / Perseverance / Endurance
克己극기geug giSelf-Control / Self-Denial / Self-Abnegation
百折不屈백절불굴baeg jeor bur gurIndomitable Spirit (Undaunted even after repeated attacks from the opponent)
Note that the pronunciation is the official version now used in South Korea. However, it is different than what you may be used to. For instance, "Taekwon-do" is "tae gweon do." This new romanization is supposed to be closer to actual Korean pronunciation.

Ninja

China rěn
Japan nin
Ninja Wall Scroll

忍 is just the first character of "Ninja." It means to beat, to endure, or to tolerate. Some use this as the short form of "Ninja" but it would be more correct to use the two-character version in most cases (and for clarity). Other definitions of this Kanji include: to bear, put up with, conceal, spy or sneak. It is also a character in Korean Hanja and Chinese but not well-known with this meaning but rather a definition like "patience."

忍Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write it in the form shown to the right. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect this Kanji form (yes, it's just one stroke that is slightly different in location, crossing another stroke in the Japanese Kanji form).

Diligence

China qín
Japan kin
Diligence Wall Scroll

This single-character means diligence or "sense of duty" in Chinese and Korean (also understood in Japanese but not commonly-seen as a stand-alone Kanji).

As a single character on a wall scroll, this will only be seen with this meaning. However, it can also mean industrious, hardworking, frequent, regular, constant, energy, zeal, fortitude, or virility.

In Buddhism this can represent vīrya (viriya), the idea of energy, diligence, enthusiasm, or effort. It can be defined as an attitude of gladly engaging in wholesome activities, and it functions to cause one to accomplish wholesome or virtuous actions. Some Buddhists may even define this as "manliness" (a definition from a hundred years ago, before equality).

If you, or someone you know is a hard-worker (or needs a reminder to be diligent), then this is the wall scroll to have in your/their office.


See Also:  Tenacity | Undaunted

Perseverance

China
Japan see note
Perseverance Wall Scroll

毅 is the simplest way to express perseverance in Chinese and Korean Hanja.
This single-character version leaves a bit of mystery about what kind of perseverance you might want to convey.

In Korean, this is usually associated with "strength of character."

In Japanese, this character can be pronounced about a dozen different ways (so we have left out the Japanese pronunciation guide that normally appears above). In Japanese this Kanji would usually be translated "strong" (perhaps strong-willed).


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude

China bù qū
Japan fukutsu
Indomitable / Persistence / Fortitude Wall Scroll

不屈 is the short form of a longer Chinese word, and also a word used in Korean and Japanese to express the idea of being indomitable. It literally means, "will not bend," "will not crouch," "will not yield," "will not flinch," or "will not submit."

Note: Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Perseverance / Fortitude

China jiǎn rěn
Japan ken nin
Perseverance / Fortitude Wall Scroll

The first character means "strong," "solid," "firm," "unyielding" or "resolute."
The second character means "to beat," "to endure," or "to tolerate."
Together they speak of the strength from within yourself. Some may also translate this as "long-suffering" in a more Biblical sense.

堅忍 is a common term in Chinese and Korean Hanja but a little less commonly used in modern Japanese Kanji. For that reason, this selection is best if your audience is Chinese or Korean.


忍忍 Note that when writing this as Kanji, Japanese will tend to write the second Kanji a little differently. If you select our Japanese master calligrapher, please expect the form where the little horizontal stroke crosses the vertical stroke. See differences in the images to the right. Technically, they are both the same character, and will be read the same in either language.

Tenacious / Tenacity

China wán qiáng
Japan gan kyou
Tenacious / Tenacity Wall Scroll

These two characters together mean "Tenacious," "Hard to Defeat," or "Dogged."

Alone, the first character means mischievous, obstinate or stubborn. But it loses some of the mischievous meaning when the second character is added.

The second character means strength, force, powerful or better.


See Also:  Determination | Dedication | Devotion | Never Give Up

Dedication

Dedicated to One Thing
China zhuān yòng
Dedication Wall Scroll

專用 is the kind of dedication you might have to your job, or a person.

Trivia: It is the same word used as an adjective in front of the word for "network" to say "dedicated network" in Chinese.

Please note: While this is a word in Korean, the meaning is private or "exclusive use." So this is best if your audience is Chinese.


See Also:  Devotion | Passion | Tenacious | Commitment

Enthusiasm

China rè qíng
Enthusiasm Wall Scroll

This Chinese and Korean word for enthusiasm can also be translated as "Passion for a cause."

Enthusiasm is being cheerful, happy, and full of spirit. It is doing something wholeheartedly and eagerly. When you are enthusiastic, you have a positive attitude.

In some context, this could have a meaning of being extremely fond of something or having a fondness for a cause or person.


This Chinese word can also be translated as "sincere and warm" or literally "warm sentiment / affection."


See Also:  Motivation | Passion | Commitment | Tenacity | Happiness

Passion for a Cause

China rè qíng
Japan netsujou
Passion for a Cause Wall Scroll

Depending on context, this word can mean "cordial," "enthusiastic," "passionate" or "passionately."

This version is sometimes used in Japanese but the character order is more common in Chinese and Korean Hanja. The meaning in Japanese for this Kanji order is "ardour" or "zeal" but rarely used in modern Japan. I suggest you choose a different version of "passion" if your audience is Japanese.


See Also:  Persistence | Devotion | Tenacity | Commitment | Motivation

Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause

China qíng rè
Japan jou netsu
Enthusiasm / Passion for a Cause Wall Scroll

情熱 is the Japanese word that means enthusiasm, or "passion for a cause."

In some context, this could have a meaning of being extremely fond of something, or having fondness for a cause or person.

Can also be translated as passion, zeal, ardour, or fervor.

Note: This character order is not natural in Chinese. However, a typical Chinese person can guess that this is a Japanese or Korean word and also understand the intended the meaning. This selection is best if your audience is Japanese or old-school Korean.


See Also:  Persistence | Devotion | Tenacity | Commitment | Motivation

Fortitude / Strength of Character

China gāng yì
Japan gouki
Fortitude / Strength of Character Wall Scroll

This Japanese and Chinese word means, "resolute and firm," "fortitude," "firmness of character," "hardihood," "manliness" or "macho."


See Also:  Perseverance | Strength | Tenacity

Determination to Achieve / Will-Power

China yì zhì
Japan ishi
Determination to Achieve / Will-Power Wall Scroll

This Chinese, Korean, and Japanese word means, "determination to achieve." It can also be translated as: will; willpower; determination; volition; intention; intent.

In Japanese, this can also be the given name Ishi.

Resilience / Restoration / Recovery

China huī fù lì
Resilience / Restoration / Recovery Wall Scroll

This title suggests having the power to recover, restore, rehabilitate. This can refer to yourself, someone else, or even to something, like rehabilitating a burned forest. 恢復力 is the essence of resilience in life.

The first two characters are a word that means to reinstate, to resume, to restore, to recover, to regain, to rehabilitate, restoration, rehabilitation, recovery, return, improvement, recovery (from an illness), recuperation, or convalescence.

The last character means strength or power.


See Also:  Tenacity | Perseverance

Stamina / Tenacity

Japan jikyuuryoku
Stamina / Tenacity Wall Scroll

持久力 means tenacity or stamina in Japanese Kanji.

Will-Power / Self-Control

China yì zhì lì
Japan ishi ryoku
Will-Power / Self-Control Wall Scroll

意志力 is the form of will power or self-control is about having the determination or tenacity to keep going.

In Japanese, this is the power of will, strength of will, volition, intention, intent, or determination.

Overcome

Overcoming Hardships
China kè fú
Japan koku fuku
Overcome Wall Scroll

In Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja, this means "overcome" (as in overcome hardships, etc). It can also mean to conquer, to put up with, or to endure.
This can be a conquest over a problem, disease, handicap, poverty, or illness. Other definitions include overcoming, bringing under control, subjugation, or victory over something.

This can be used as an inspirational wall scroll to remind someone to try to overcome difficulties that may arise in life.

Indomitable / Unyielding

China bù qū bù náo
Japan fukutsu futou
Indomitable / Unyielding Wall Scroll

不屈不撓 means "Indomitable" or "Unyielding."

不屈不撓 is a long word by Chinese standards. At least, it is often translated as a single word into English. It's actually a proverb in Chinese.

If you want to break it down, you can see that the first and third characters are the same. Both meaning "not" (they work as a suffix to make a negative or opposite meaning to whatever character follows).

The second character means "bendable."

The last means "scratched" or "bothered."

So this really means "Won't be bent, can't be bothered." I have also seen it written as "Will not crouch, will not submit." This comes from the fact that the second character can mean, "to crouch" and the last can mean "to submit" (as in "to give in" such as "submitting to the rule of someone else"). This may explain better why these four characters mean "indomitable."

Notes:
Some will translate this as "indomitable spirit"; however, technically, there is no character to suggest the idea of "spirit" in this word.
The first two characters can be a stand-alone word in Chinese.
In Japanese, this is considered to be two words (with very similar meanings).
The same characters are used in Korean, but the 2nd and 4th characters are swapped to create a word pronounced "불요불굴" in Korean.
Just let me know if you want the Korean version, which will also make sense in Japanese, and though not as natural, will also make sense in Chinese as well.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Undaunted

Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks

Persistence to overcome all challenges
China bǎi zhé bù náo
Japan hyaku setsu su tou
Undaunted After Repeated Setbacks Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb means "Be undaunted in the face of repeated setbacks." More directly-translated, it reads, "[Overcome] a hundred setbacks, without flinching." 百折不撓 is of Chinese origin but is commonly used in Japanese, and somewhat in Korean (same characters, different pronunciation).

This proverb comes from a long, and occasionally tragic story of a man that lived sometime around 25-220 AD. His name was Qiao Xuan and he never stooped to flattery but remained an upright person at all times. He fought to expose corruption of higher-level government officials at great risk to himself.

Then when he was at a higher level in the Imperial Court, bandits were regularly capturing hostages and demanding ransoms. But when his own son was captured, he was so focused on his duty to the Emperor and common good that he sent a platoon of soldiers to raid the bandits' hideout, and stop them once and for all even at the risk of his own son's life. While all of the bandits were arrested in the raid, they killed Qiao Xuan's son at first sight of the raiding soldiers.

Near the end of his career a new Emperor came to power, and Qiao Xuan reported to him that one of his ministers was bullying the people and extorting money from them. The new Emperor refused to listen to Qiao Xuan and even promoted the corrupt Minister. Qiao Xuan was so disgusted that in protest he resigned his post as minister (something almost never done) and left for his home village.

His tombstone reads "Bai Zhe Bu Nao" which is now a proverb used in Chinese culture to describe a person of strength will who puts up stubborn resistance against great odds.

My Chinese-English dictionary defines these 4 characters as, "keep on fighting in spite of all setbacks," "be undaunted by repeated setbacks" and "be indomitable."

Our translator says it can mean, "never give up" in modern Chinese.

Although the first two characters are translated correctly as "repeated setbacks," the literal meaning is "100 setbacks" or "a rope that breaks 100 times." The last two characters can mean "do not yield" or "do not give up."
Most Chinese, Japanese, and Korean people will not take this absolutely literal meaning but will instead understand it as the title suggests above. If you want a single big word definition, it would be indefatigability, indomitableness, persistence, or unyielding.


See Also:  Tenacity | Fortitude | Strength | Perseverance | Persistence

Islam

(phonetic version)
China yī sī lán jiào
Islam Wall Scroll

This both means and sounds like "Islam" in Mandarin Chinese.

The first three characters sound like the word "Islam," and the last character means "religion" or "teaching." It's the most general term for "Islam" in China. The highest concentration of Muslims in China is Xinjiang (the vast region in northwest China that was called The East Turkistan Republic until 1949 and is sometimes called Chinese Turkistan, Uyghuristan). Here you will find Uygurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz and others that are descendants of Turkmen (possibly mixed with Persians and Arabs). Many of their ancestors were traders who traveled the silk road to buy and sell spices, silk, and exchange other goods from the Orient and the Middle East.

I spent some time in Xinjiang and got to know this community. They are strong people who can endure much. They are friendly and love to have a good time. I was a stranger but treated by villagers (near China's border with Afghanistan) as if I was a good friend.
However, I have heard that it's best not to cross them, as in this land, the law is the blade, and everything is "eye for an eye." The Chinese government has little control in Xinjiang with almost no police officers except in the capital of Urumqi (so it's a 60-hour roundtrip train ride to seek the aid of law enforcement in most cases).

While few seem to be devout, there are at least small mosques in every village. And you will never see a man or woman outside without a head covering.

It should be noted that these people are all citizens of China, but they are officially of the Caucasian race. A visit to Xinjiang will change your idea what it means to be Chinese.

Indomitable Spirit / Indomitable Attitude

Fukutsu no Seishin
Japan fu kutsu no sei shin
Indomitable Spirit / Indomitable Attitude Wall Scroll

不屈の精神 is one of several versions or ways to write "Indomitable Spirit" in Japanese.

This one is the famous, "Fukutsu no Seishin" phrase.

Shikataganai

Japan shikataganai
Shikataganai Wall Scroll

Shikataganai is a Japanese phrase meaning, "it cannot be helped," or "nothing can be done about it."

Other translations include: It can't be helped; it's inevitable; it's no use.

This phrase is sometimes used in Japan to refer to when (Japanese) people as a whole must endure things that are beyond their control.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Unwavering

Japan haragasuwaru
Unwavering Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb means to have guts, or to be unwavering in one's resolution.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Never Give In / Never Succumb
Never Lose

Japan kesshite akirameruna
Never Give In / Never Succumb / Never Lose Wall Scroll

決して諦めるな is a Japanese term that informally means "never give up." It's also a Japanese way to say "never surrender."


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.


See Also:  Tenacity | Perseverance | Hope

You must endure a harsh winter
to appreciate the warmth of springtime

You must know hardship to appreciate happiness
China bù jīng dōng hán bù zhī chūn nuǎn
You must endure a harsh winter / to appreciate the warmth of springtime Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Without having experienced the cold of winter, one cannot appreciate the warmth of spring.

Figuratively, this means: One cannot truly appreciate happiness without having gone through hardship.

There are many contrasts in life. One simply cannot fully know what joy is without having experienced misery, difficulty, and pain. How could you explain "light" if you did not have "darkness" to compare it to?

Embrace hardship, as it makes the good times seem even better.

Korean CKD Virtues

China qiān xùn zhèng zhí wēn róu rěn nài kè jǐ bù qū
Korean CKD Virtues Wall Scroll

These are the virtues used by Choi Kwang Do Martial Arts.

EnglishHanjaHangulPronunciation
1. Humility (Humble / Modesty)謙遜겸손gyeom son
2. Honesty (Integrity)正直정직jeong jig
3. Gentleness溫柔온유on yu
4. Perseverance (To Endure)忍耐인내in nae
5. Self-Control (Self-Restraint)克己극기geug gi
6. Unbreakable Spirit (Unyielding / Unbending)不屈불굴bur gur

The characters shown here are the ancient Korean Hanja form of writing. If you wish for a Korean Hangul form of these tenets, we can arrange that with our Master Calligrapher Xing An-Ping (click on the Hangul next to the South Korean flag above to order this in Hangul).

Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33

China zhī rén zhě zhī yě zì zhī zhě míng yě shèng rén zhě yǒu lì yě zì shèng zhě qiáng yě zhī zú zhě fù yě qiáng xíng zhě yǒu zhì yě bù zhī qí suǒ zhě jiǔ yě sǐ ér bù wáng zhě shòu yě
Daodejing / Tao Te Ching - Chapter 33 Wall Scroll

知人者知也自知者明也勝人者有力也自勝者強也知足者富也強行者有志也不失其所者久也死而不亡者壽也 is referred to as passage or chapter 33 of the Dao De Jing (often Romanized as "Tao Te Ching"). These are the words of the philosopher Laozi (Lao Tzu).

The following is one translation of this passage:
To know others is wisdom;
To know oneself is acuity/intelligence.
To conquer others is power,
To conquer oneself is strength.
To know contentment is to have wealth.
To act resolutely is to have purpose.
To stay one's ground is to be enduring.
To die and yet not be forgotten is to be long-lived.


Another translation:
To understand others is to be knowledgeable;
To understand yourself is to be wise.
To conquer others is to have strength;
To conquer yourself is to be strong.
To know when you have enough is to be rich.
To go forward with strength is to have ambition.
To not lose your place is to be long lasting.
To die but not be forgotten -- that's true long life.


A third translation of the second half:
He who is content is rich;
He who acts with persistence has will;
He who does not lose his roots will endure;
He who dies physically but preserves the Dao will enjoy a long after-life.


Notes:

During our research, the Chinese characters shown here are probably the most accurate to the original text of Laozi. These were taken for the most part from the Mawangdui 1973 and Guodan 1993 manuscripts which pre-date other Daodejing texts by about 1000 years.

Grammar was a little different in Laozi's time. So you should consider this to be the ancient Chinese version. Some have modernized this passage by adding, removing, or swapping articles and changing the grammar (we felt the oldest and most original version would be more desirable). You may find other versions printed in books or online - sometimes these modern texts are simply used to explain to Chinese people what the original text really means.

This language issue can be compared in English by thinking how the King James (known as the Authorized version in Great Britain) Bible from 1611 was written, and comparing it to modern English. Now imagine that the Daodejing was probably written around 403 BCE (2000 years before the King James Version of the Bible). To a Chinese person, the original Daodejing reads like text that is 3 times more detached compared to Shakespeare's English is to our modern-day speech.

Extended notes:

While on this Biblical text comparison, it should be noted, that just like the Bible, all the original texts of the Daodejing were lost or destroyed long ago. Just as with the scripture used to create the Bible, various manuscripts exist, many with variations or copyist errors. Just as the earliest New Testament scripture (incomplete) is from 170 years after Christ, the earliest Daodejing manuscript (incomplete) is from 100-200 years after the death of Laozi.

The reason that the originals were lost probably has a lot to do with the first Qin Emperor. Upon taking power and unifying China, he ordered the burning and destruction of all books (scrolls/rolls) except those pertaining to Chinese medicine and a few other subjects. The surviving Daodejing manuscripts were either hidden on purpose or simply forgotten about. Some were not unearthed until as late as 1993.

We compared a lot of research by various archeologists and historians before deciding on this as the most accurate and correct version. But one must allow that it may not be perfect, or the actual and original as from the hand of Laozi himself.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Endurance 持久ji kyuu / jikyuu / ji kyu / jikyuchí jiǔ / chi2 jiu3 / chi jiu / chijiu ch`ih chiu / chihchiu / chih chiu
Stamina
Endurance
耐力nài lì / nai4 li4 / nai li / naili
Stamina
Endurance
耐久力tai kyu ryoku
taikyuryoku
Patience
Perseverance
To Endure
Tolerant
忍耐nin tai / nintairěn nài / ren3 nai4 / ren nai / rennai jen nai / jennai
Diligence 勤勉kinbenqín miǎn / qin2 mian3 / qin mian / qinmian ch`in mien / chinmien / chin mien
Physical Strength 體力
体力
tairyokutǐ lì / ti3 li4 / ti li / tili t`i li / tili / ti li
Patience
Perseverance
ninrěn / ren3 / ren jen
Taekwondo Tenets
Spirit of Taekwon-do
跆拳道精神禮義廉耻忍耐克己百折不屈
跆拳道精神礼义廉耻忍耐克己百折不屈
tái quán dào jīng shén lǐ yì lián chǐ rěn nài kè jǐ bǎi zhé bù qū
tai2 quan2 dao4 jing1 shen2 li3 yi4 lian2 chi3 ren3 nai4 ke4 ji3 bai3 zhe2 bu4 qu1
tai quan dao jing shen li yi lian chi ren nai ke ji bai zhe bu qu
t`ai ch`üan tao ching shen li i lien ch`ih jen nai k`o chi pai che pu ch`ü
tai chüan tao ching shen li i lien chih jen nai ko chi pai che pu chü
Ninja ninrěn / ren3 / ren jen
Diligence kinqín / qin2 / qin ch`in / chin
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Adventure
Alison
Apollo
Balance
Billy
Caleb
Calm Mind
Cassie
Cheyenne
Chloe
Clint
Colin
Courage
Dragon
Dylan
Empty
Ethan
Family
Fire
Fire Dragon
Fist
Flower
Freedom
Friendship
Golden Dragon
Goldfish
Honor
Hope
Horse
Humble
I Miss You
Independence
Indomitable Spirit
Inner Power
Inner Strength
Jack
Jade
Jeanine
Jesus
Jose
Juliet
Kirin
Kristin
Kyokushinkai
Life Force
Live in the Moment
Lotus Flower
Love
Mackenzie
Maddie
Nothingness
Paladin
Peace
Power of Understanding
Priyanka
Rafael
Renee
Respect
River
Saint
Sara
Sarah
Success
Susan
Tai Chi Chuan
Three
Vermillion Dragon
Water
Wisdom

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Endurance Kanji, Endurance Characters, Endurance in Mandarin Chinese, Endurance Characters, Endurance in Chinese Writing, Endurance in Japanese Writing, Endurance in Asian Writing, Endurance Ideograms, Chinese Endurance symbols, Endurance Hieroglyphics, Endurance Glyphs, Endurance in Chinese Letters, Endurance Hanzi, Endurance in Japanese Kanji, Endurance Pictograms, Endurance in the Chinese Written-Language, or Endurance in the Japanese Written-Language.