All custom calligraphy items are made-to-order in our little Beijing artwork-mounting workshop.

Not what you want?

Try searching again using:
1. Other similar-meaning words.
2. Fewer words or just one word.

Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Body"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Body
  2. Body and Mind
  3. Mind, Body and Spirit
  4. Energy Sword Body in Concert
  5. Body / Karada
  6. Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body
  7. Strong Body, Strong Mind
  8. Strong Mind Strong Body
  9. Ghost / Soul / Spirit
10. Inhale
11. Great Sea
12. 7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness
13. Nichiren
14. Stay Strong / Indestructible / Unbreakable
15. Strong / Robust
16. Healthy Living
17. Exercise
18. Lake
19. Happiness / Contentment
20. Offering / Puja
21. Shingitai / Shin Gi Tai
22. Griffin / Gryphon
23. Pain
24. Brotherly and Sisterly Love
25. Dragon
26. Strong bones come from hard knocks
27. Avatar
28. Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication
29. Clarity
30. Namaste - Greeting
31. Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand
32. Tea
33. Kirin / Giraffe / Mythical Creature
34. You are only as old as you feel


Body

China shēn
Japan mi
Body Wall Scroll

身 is how to write "body" as in your human body, in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and Korean Hanja. Depending on context and certain language issues, this character can also mean: main part, hull, oneself, somebody, person, I, me, sword, lifetime, one's station in life, etc.

While this written word is universal in three languages, it still makes a rather odd selection for a wall scroll. Also, they tend to use 体 (karada) in Japanese for body (depending on context).


See Also:  Karada

Body and Mind

China shēn xīn
Japan shin shin
Body and Mind Wall Scroll

身心 means, "body and mind" or "mental and physical" in Chinese and Japanese.

In the Buddhist context, body and mind encompass the five elements (skandha) of a sentient being.
The body is the physical material (rūpa) of life. Mind embraces the other four skandhas which are consciousness, perception, action, and knowledge.

Mind, Body and Spirit

China shēn xīn líng
Japan mi shin rei
Mind, Body and Spirit Wall Scroll

身心靈 / 身心霊 is probably the best way to express the idea of "Body, Mind and Spirit" in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. We are actually using the word for "heart" here because for thousands of years, the heart was thought to be the place where your thoughts, feelings and emotions came from. We do something similar in the west when we say "warm-hearted" or "I love you with all of my heart." In this context, heart = mind in Asian language and culture.

The very literal translation of these three characters is "body, heart & spirit" which could also be interpreted as "body mind & soul."

We have arranged these characters in this order because it simply "feels" like the proper order in the Chinese language. Word lists like this are not so common for calligraphy artwork, so we have to be careful to put them in the most natural order. It should be noted that this is not a common title in Asia, nor is it considered an actual phrase (as it lacks a clear subject, verb, and object).


霊In Japanese Kanji, they use an alternate form of the character for soul or spirit. If you want this using the Japanese alternate, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the button above.

Japanese disclaimer: This is not a natural phrase/list in Japanese. While not totally-natural in Chinese, this word list is best if your audience is Chinese.

Energy Sword Body in Concert

Spirit, Sword & Body as One
Japan ki ken tai icchi
Energy Sword Body in Concert Wall Scroll

This often gets translated as "Mind Sword Body," or "Spirit, Sword and Body as One." But I think these translations don't tell you enough about what this is really saying.

In this context, 気, which is the modern Japanese version of 氣, means spiritual and unseen energy or "life energy." In some cases, 気 can be translated as spirit, feeling, or nature. If defined as mind, it's more about invisible or intangible part of one's mind (or soul).

剣 is the Japanese version of 劍 meaning sword.

体 is the modern Japanese version of 體 meaning body.

The Kanji 一 means one, and in this case suggests "all in one." The Kanji 到 means to send, deliver, or convey. But together, 一到 suggests all these things in agreement, union cooperation, or in concert.

Body / Karada

China
Japan karada / tai / te
Body / Karada Wall Scroll

体 is used in Japanese to mean "body."

体 can also refer to the form, style, corporeal existence, appearance, identity, or the state of something or someone. 體 is also used in Buddhism in regards to the corporeal existence of someone (their earthy vessel). It's kind of a broad term that can be used in a lot of different ways.

As a single character, it's usually pronounced "karada" but it can also be pronounced "tai" or "te" (Japanese pronunciation borrowed from the original Chinese).

體 is not a common Kanji to use for a wall scroll. Only select this if you have a personal and meaningful reason to do so. Also, consider this version to be "Japanese only" - see below...


體 In Chinese and old Korean Hanja, this character is written in the traditional form shown to the right. If you want this version, click on the character to the right instead of the button above.

Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body

China téng tòng jiù shì shuāi ruò lí nǐ ér qù de shí hòu
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body Wall Scroll

I remember this being shouted a lot during U.S. Marine Corps boot camp. 疼痛就是衰弱離你而去的時候 is how to write that phrase in Chinese. At least, this is as close as we could compose/translate it, and hold the full original meaning and connotations.

The version shown here is really, "Pain is weakness leaving your body." Although, it's said in English both ways (the or your), it works better in Chinese with "your."

Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body

Japan itami wa karada kara nukeru yowasa
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body Wall Scroll

I remember this being shouted a lot during U.S. Marine Corps boot camp. 痛みは體から抜ける弱さ is how to write that phrase in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong Body, Strong Mind

Japan tsuyo i karada tsuyo i kokoro
Strong Body, Strong Mind Wall Scroll

強い体強い心 is a way to write "strong mind, strong body" in Japanese.

Each of the two lines starts with 強い (tsuyoi) which means: strong; powerful; mighty; potent; resistant; resilient; durable; tough; stiff; hard; inflexible.

Body is represented with 体 (ancient version is 體, romanized as karada) which means: body; build; physique; posture; torso; trunk; health.

Mind is represented with 心 (kokoro) which can mean heart, mind, or soul depending on context.

強い體強い心 is not a common phrase in Japanese, so it's not the most natural title for calligraphy. In English, you might want to write it, "strong mind, strong body" but, "strong mind, strong body," is more natural in Japanese.


Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Strong Mind Strong Body

China qiáng zhuàng de shēn tǐ jiān qiáng de xīn tài
Strong Mind Strong Body Wall Scroll

強壯的身體堅強的心態 is the Chinese phrase for "Strong Mind, Strong Body," however, the character order is actually "Strong Body, Strong Mind," as that's the more natural word order in Chinese.

Ghost / Soul / Spirit

China hún pò
Japan kon paku
Ghost / Soul / Spirit Wall Scroll

魂魄 is a Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja term for ghost, soul, or spirit.

It's used in the context of Buddhism as:
Animus and anima; the spiritual nature or mind, and the animal soul; the two are defined as mind and body or mental and physical, the invisible soul inhabiting the visible body, the former being celestial, the latter terrestrial.

Inhale

China xī rù
Japan kyuu nyuu
Inhale Wall Scroll

吸入 is a Chinese, Japanese, and old Korean word that means inhale, inhalation, or to breathe in.

吸 by itself can mean to inhale or suck in.
入 means to enter (in this case, the body) so it clarifies that this is true inhalation of air into the body.

If you need a reminder to breathe (slow down and take a deep breath) this may be the word you want hanging on your wall.

Great Sea

China dà yáng
Japan tai you
Great Sea Wall Scroll

大洋 is a rarely-used word for ocean in Japanese, Chinese, and Korean. 大洋 is here mostly for reference - please order a different ocean for your custom calligraphy wall scroll.

The first character means "big" or "great."
The second means "ocean" or "body of water" (it can sometimes mean "foreign" but not in this case).
The first character designates that you are talking about a great or huge body of water (certainly a major ocean and not a smaller sea).

7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness

Samyak Smriti / Samyak Smrti / Samma Sati
China zhèng niàn
Japan sei nen
7. Right Mindfulness / Right Memory / Perfect Mindfulness Wall Scroll

正念 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right Mindfulness, along with Right Effort and Right Concentration constitute the path to Concentration or Perfect Thought.

Right Mindfulness is about remaining focused on one's body, feelings, mind and mental qualities. It's also about being ardent, aware, and mindful, and supposes that you've already put aside worldly desire and aversion.

Monk Bhikkhu Bodhi described this as: The mind is deliberately kept at the level of bare attention, a detached observation of what is happening within us and around us in the present moment. In the practice of right mindfulness the mind is trained to remain in the present, open, quiet, and alert, contemplating the present event.

Another definition: Ongoing mindfulness of body, feelings, thinking, and objects of thought.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Nichiren

China rì lián
Japan nichi ren
Nichiren Wall Scroll

日蓮 is the title Nichiren.

This title refers to a Buddhist priest, who lived from 1222 to 1282. He is the founder of the Nichiren sect of Buddhism.
According to historical documents, the Nichiren sect was established in 1252. Adding the character for sect, this would be 日蓮宗 (Nichiren sect), which is also known as the 法華宗 or Lotus sect.

According to Soothill-Hodous...
Nichiren's chief tenets are the three great mysteries 三大祕法, representing the trikāya:
1. 本尊 or chief object of worship, being the great maṇḍala of the worlds of the ten directions, or universe, i.e. the body or nirmāṇakāya of Buddha.
2. 題目 the title of the Lotus Sutra 妙法蓮華經 Myo-ho-ren-ge-kyo, preceded by Namo, or, "Adoration to the scripture of the lotus of the wonderful law," for it is Buddha's spiritual body.
3. 戒壇 the altar of the law, which is also the title of the Lotus as above; the believer, wherever he is, dwells in the Pure-land of calm light 寂光淨土, the saṃbhogakāya.

Stay Strong / Indestructible / Unbreakable

China jīn gāng bù huài
Japan kon gou fu e
Stay Strong / Indestructible / Unbreakable Wall Scroll

金剛不壞 / 金剛不壊 is originally a Buddhist term for, "The diamond indestructible." Sometimes, it's written 金剛不壞身, The diamond indestructible body. Outside that context, it still means firm and solid, sturdy and indestructible, unshakable, or adamantine (a mythological indestructible material).


壊 Note: If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, the last Kanji will look like the one shown to the right.

Strong / Robust

China zhuàng
Japan sou
Strong / Robust Wall Scroll

This "strong" character means "to strengthen" or robust. This brings images of a muscle-bound hulk of a weight lifter or body builder to an Asian person who sees this character.

Note that in Korean and Japanese, this character is normally part of compound words, and is not seen alone too often.


壮Note that the this character was simplified in Japan after WWII (also simplified in mainland China but not for calligraphy). If you want the modern Japanese/simplified version, please click on the Kanji shown to the right.

Healthy Living

China jiàn kāng shēng huó
Japan kenkou seikatsu
Healthy Living Wall Scroll

If you are into healthy living, this might be an excellent selection for a wall scroll to hang in your home.

The first two characters speak of health, vitality, vigor, and being of sound body. The second two characters mean living or life (daily existence).


See Also:  Strength | Vitality | Health

Exercise

(for body or mind)
China duàn liàn
Exercise Wall Scroll

鍛煉 / 鍛鍊 means exercise in much the same way we use the word exercise in English. This can be exercising your body at the gym, or exercising your mind in studies. Most of the time, this refers to physical exercise.

This can also be translated as to temper, to toughen, to train, to drill, to forge, or simply discipline.

Lake

China
Japan mizumi
Lake Wall Scroll

湖 is lake in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

湖 is used in place names (like Lake Huron) and as a descriptive term for any large body of fresh water.

In Japanese, this can also be the female given name Reiku.

If your surname is Lake, this could be a good character for you.

Happiness / Contentment

Japan ko fuku
Happiness / Contentment Wall Scroll

鼓腹 means happiness and contentment in Japanese Kanji.

The first Kanji represents your internal beat or drum.
The second Kanji represents your mind and body.
Together, it suggests that your internal rhythm or beat is regular, soothing, and at proper tempo.


See Also:  Satisfaction | Pleasure | Well-Being

Offering / Puja

China gòng yǎng
Japan ku you
Offering / Puja Wall Scroll

供養 is the Chinese, Japanese, and Korean rough equivalent to the Sanskrit word, Pūjā.

The meaning is: To make offerings (to the Gods); to supply; to provide for one's elders; to support one's parents; memorial service for the dead; holding a service; any offering for body or mind; to make offerings of whatever nourishes (e.g. food, goods, incense, lamps, scriptures, the doctrine).

The final meaning varies greatly depending on the context it which the word is used.

Shingitai / Shin Gi Tai

China xīn jì tǐ
Japan shin gi tai
Shingitai / Shin Gi Tai Wall Scroll

心技体 is the Japanese title "shin gi tai" or "shingitai."

This can refer to the three elements of Sumo wrestlers or martial artists, "heart-technique-physique."

Here is what each character represents:

心 shin) mind, heart and spirit.

技 (gi) skill, knowledge and experience.

体 (ti) body and physical effort.

These characters have the same meanings in Chinese, though this title is used much more often in Japanese.

Griffin / Gryphon

China yīng tóu shī
Griffin / Gryphon Wall Scroll

Griffin 鷹頭獅 is the Chinese title for a Griffin.

This refers to the legendary creature with the head, talons, and wings of an eagle and the body of a lion. Sometimes also spelled Gryphon or Griffon. From the Greek γρύφων or γρύπων, or Latin Gryphus.

This Chinese title, 鷹頭獅, literally means, "Eagle Head Lion."

Pain

ache / sorrow
China tòng
Japan tsuu / ita
Pain Wall Scroll

This word means pain in Chinese and old Korean Hanja. It also means pain/hurt/bruise in Japanese but is seldom seen as a single Kanji (usually at least a Hiragana is added to make the word "itai" which is what a Japanese person will scream when they are in pain).

Depending on context, this word can mean hurt, ache, sorrow, or refer to damage to a human body. As a single character, the possible meanings are very open - so you can decide what it means to you, as long as the general meaning is still "painful."


See Also:  Hurt

Brotherly and Sisterly Love

China shǒu zú qíng
Brotherly and Sisterly Love Wall Scroll

手足情 is the love between siblings. When you love, protect, care for, and have a deep bond that only brothers or sisters can.

The actual translation is "Hand and Foot" but it is said the relationship between brothers or sisters is like that of hands and feet. They belong together, and complete the body. Even though this says "hand and foot," it will always be read with the brotherly and sisterly love meaning in Chinese.

Note: During the past 20 years, the "One child policy" in China is slowly making this term obsolete.

Dragon

Year of the Dragon / Zodiac Sign
China lóng
Japan ryuu / tatsu
Dragon Wall Scroll

龍 is the character for dragon in Chinese, old Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

The dragon is the creature of myth and legend that dominates Chinese, Japanese, and even European folklore. In China, the dragon is the symbol of the Emperor, strength and power, and the Chinese dragon is known as the god of water.

From the Chinese Zodiac, if you were born in the year of the Dragon, you . . .

Have a strong body and spirit.
Are full of energy.
Have vast goals.
Have a deep level of self-awareness.
Will do whatever you can to "save face."


See also our Chinese Zodiac or Dragon Calligraphy pages.

Strong bones come from hard knocks

China bù kē bù pèng gǔ tóu bù yìng
Strong bones come from hard knocks Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb literally translates as: Without being knocked around a bit, [one's] bones won't become hard.

Figuratively, this means: One can't become strong without first being tempered by "hard knocks."

While true for everyone, this sounds like the "Iron Body" form of Kung Fu, where practitioners bodies are beaten (and often bone fractured) in order to become stronger.
For the rest of us, this is just about how we can be tempered and build character through the hardships in our lives.

不磕不碰骨頭不硬 is not a common title for a wall scroll in China.

Avatar

China huà shēn
Japan keshin
Avatar Wall Scroll

化身 is a way to say avatar in Chinese characters, Korean Hanja, and Japanese Kanji.

化身 is the original Buddhist idea of avatar (not the movie). This word can also mean: incarnation; reincarnation; embodiment; personification; impersonation.

化身 is the Chinese word used for the original Sanskrit, nirmāṇakāya. Alternates for nirmāṇakāya include 應身, 應化身, or 變化身. In the context of Buddhism, this is a Buddha's metamorphosic body, which has the power to assume any shape to propagate the Truth. This title, 化身, is used for the appearance of a Buddha's many forms.

Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication

(complete bodily devotion)
China xiàn shēn
Japan ken shin
Sacrifice / Devotion / Dedication Wall Scroll

This word is used to describe being so devoted to something that you will make sacrifices for that goal/thing/person. You can also translate this word as any of the following:
Give one's life for...
Sacrifice one's life for...
To dedicate oneself to...
Self-devotion
Dedication
Commit ones energy to...
Devote to...
Self-sacrifice
Giving your whole body to...

This can be a dedication to or for someone but more often is used in reference to a dedication or making sacrifices for your country, public service, or a cause. For instance, an Olympic athlete makes great sacrifices to train in his/her sport for their country and compatriots.


献
身
While the form shown to the upper-left is considered an ancient Japanese version, in modern Japan, they use the simplified version of the first Kanji (shown to the right). Click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above if you want this modern Japanese version.

If you are looking for a more religious meaning of devotion, see Faith.


See Also:  Confidence | Dedication

Clarity

China qīng
Japan sei
Clarity Wall Scroll

This word means clarity or clear in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja. Looking at the parts of this character, you have three splashes of water on the left, "life" on the top right, and the moon on the lower right.

Because of something Confucius said about 2500 years ago, you can imagine that this character means "live life with clarity like bright moonlight piercing pure water." The Confucian idea is something like "Keep clear what is pure in yourself, and let your pure nature show through." Kind of like saying, "Don't pollute your mind or body, so that they remain clear."

This might be stretching the definition of this single Chinese character but the elements are there, and "clarity" is a powerful idea.


Korean note: Korean pronunciation is given above but this character is written with a slight difference in the "moon radical" in Korean. However, anyone who can read Korean Hanja, will understand this character with no problem (this is considered an alternate form in Korean). If you want the more standard Korean Hanja form (which is an alternate form in Chinese), just let me know.

Japanese note: When reading in Japanese, this Kanji has additional meanings of pure, purify, or cleanse (sometimes to remove demons or "exorcise"). Used more in compound words in Japanese than as a stand-alone Kanji.

Namaste - Greeting

China hé shí
Japan gou juu
Namaste - Greeting Wall Scroll

The word namaste comes from Sanskrit and is a common greeting in the Hindi and Nepali languages exchanged by devout Hindu or Buddhist people in Southern Asia (especially India).

Here you can see the Chinese form (and Japanese but not well-known in Japan) of this word which is used describe a Buddhist (or Hindu) greeting with palms closed together in a prayerful manner, generally at chest level. However, this selection of characters describes the act, and is not a word spoken during the greeting. In fact, words or a greeting is seldom spoken when two Chinese or Japanese Buddhists meet. The greeting is silent, and respectful but composed completely of body language.

Note that the greeting namaste as well as the act of placing palms together are used both as a hello and goodbye (kind of like the word aloha in Hawaiian).


If you are looking for a welcoming hello and goodbye, you may want to consider gassho or a simple welcome.

Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand

China kōng shǒu quán fǎ
Japan kara te ken pou
Kempo Karate / Law of the Fist Empty Hand Wall Scroll

The first two characters mean "karate" - technically they express "empty hand."

The last two express "fist law" which is Romanized from Japanese as "Kenpo" or "Kempo."

That "empty hand" translation can be understood better when you grasp the idea that karate is a martial art without weapons (other than the weapons organic to your body, such as your foot, hand, fist, etc). When you practice karate, you do so with empty hands (no weapons).

Note: There is also an antiquated way to write karate. It has the same pronunciation but a different first character which means "Tang" as in the Tang Dynasty. Some dojos use that form - let us know if you need that alternate form, and we'll add it for you.

Tea

China chá
Japan cha
Tea Wall Scroll

This character means tea. It can refer to prepared tea (ready-to-drink) or to dry tea leaves.

The origin of tea is China but the same character is used in Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja with the exact same meaning. Japanese and Korean even borrowed the pronunciation from Chinese (pronounced "cha" in all three languages).

It's said that an early doctor (or herbologist) in ancient China kept poisoning himself as he tried different new herb concoctions. He invented tea as a means to detoxify himself as he recovered from 1 of the 76 times he nearly poisoned himself to death. Tea is seen not just as a drink but as a form of medicine used to remove impurities from the body.

The word "chai" (used in many languages to refer to various teas) is derived from this Chinese word.

Kirin / Giraffe / Mythical Creature

China qí lǐn
HK keilun
Japan kirin
Kirin / Giraffe / Mythical Creature Wall Scroll

This word is the title of a mythical beast of Asia.

The animal is thought to be related to the giraffe, and in some ways, it is a giraffe. However, it is often depicted with the horns of a dragon or deer and sometimes with the body like a horse but many variations exist.

In Japanese it is pronounced “Kirin” as in “Kirin Ichiban” beer.

Kirin - Mythical Beast and Great Japanese Beer!
Notes:

1. 麒麟 is sometimes spelled as “kylin”.

2. In Japanese, this is the only Kanji word for giraffe. Therefore in Japan, this word needs context to know whether you are talking about the mythical creature or the long-necked giraffe of Africa.

3. Apparently, this was the first word used for regular giraffes in China (some were brought from Africa to China during the Ming Dynasty - probably around the year 1400). Though the mythical creature may have existed before, the name “qilin” was given to the “new giraffe”. 麒麟 is because, more than 600 years ago, giraffes somewhat matched the mythical creature's description when Chinese people saw them for the first time. Later, to avoid such an ambiguous title, a three-character word was devised to mean a “giraffe of Africa”. The characters for “qilin” shown here are only for the mythological version in modern Chinese.

4. More information about the qilin / kirin from Wikipedia.

5. This creature is sometimes translated as the “Chinese Unicorn”, even though it is generally portrayed with two horns. I think this is done more for the fantasy aspect of the unicorn and because most westerners don't know what a qilin or kirin is (this avoids a long explanation by the translator).

6. In Korean, this can mean kirin or simply giraffe (usually the mythological creature is what they would think of when seeing these characters alone on a wall scroll).

You are only as old as you feel

You're only old if you think you're old
China bú pà rén lǎo zhǐ pà xīn lǎo
You are only as old as you feel Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Do not be concerned about being old; be concerned about a mind which is old.

Figuratively, this means: Your are not as old as you look, you are only as old as you think you are.


The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Body mishēn / shen1 / shen
Body and Mind 身心shin shin / shinshinshēn xīn / shen1 xin1 / shen xin / shenxin shen hsin / shenhsin
Mind, Body and Spirit 身心靈 / 身心霊
身心灵
mi shin rei
mishinrei
shēn xīn líng
shen1 xin1 ling2
shen xin ling
shenxinling
shen hsin ling
shenhsinling
Energy Sword Body in Concert 気剣体一致 / 氣劍體一致
气剑体一致
ki ken tai icchi
kikentaiicchi
ki ken tai ichi
kikentaiichi
Body
Karada

karada / tai / tetǐ / ti3 / ti t`i / ti
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body 疼痛就是衰弱離你而去的時候
疼痛就是衰弱离你而去的时候
téng tòng jiù shì shuāi ruò lí nǐ ér qù de shí hòu
teng2 tong4 jiu4 shi4 shuai1 ruo4 li2 ni3 er2 qu4 de shi2 hou4
teng tong jiu shi shuai ruo li ni er qu de shi hou
t`eng t`ung chiu shih shuai jo li ni erh ch`ü te shih hou
teng tung chiu shih shuai jo li ni erh chü te shih hou
Pain is Weakness Leaving the Body 痛みは體から抜ける弱さ
痛みは体から抜ける弱さ
itami wa karada kara nukeru yowasa
Strong Body, Strong Mind 強い體強い心
強い体強い心
tsuyo i karada tsuyo i kokoro
tsuyoikaradatsuyoikokoro
Strong Mind Strong Body 強壯的身體堅強的心態
强壮的身体坚强的心态
qiáng zhuàng de shēn tǐ jiān qiáng de xīn tài
qiang2 zhuang4 de shen1 ti3 jian1 qiang2 de xin1 tai4
qiang zhuang de shen ti jian qiang de xin tai
ch`iang chuang te shen t`i chien ch`iang te hsin t`ai
chiang chuang te shen ti chien chiang te hsin tai
Ghost
Soul
Spirit
魂魄kon paku / konpakuhún pò / hun2 po4 / hun po / hunpo hun p`o / hunpo / hun po
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aikido
Angie
Beautiful
Belierve in Yourself
Beloved Daughter
Benjamin
Benny
Best Friends Forever
Black
Blessed
Courage
Craig
Crystal
Dance
Daughter
David
Dragon Soul
Earth
Enough
Faith
Family
Father
Fire
Fire Dragon
Friendship
Golden Dragon
Happy
Heroic Spirit
Honor
Hope
Jean
Jeanine
Jenna
Kari
Karma
Kind Heart
Life Force
Lotus
Love
Luna
Meiya
Miranda
Namaste
Noah
Pablo
Prince
Ravi
Rebirth
Revenge
Robert
Sara
Senpai
Sensei
Shotokan
Shotokan Karate-Do
Spirit
Strong Will
Travis
True Love
Vermillion Dragon
Warrior
Wolf

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Body Kanji, Body Characters, Body in Mandarin Chinese, Body Characters, Body in Chinese Writing, Body in Japanese Writing, Body in Asian Writing, Body Ideograms, Chinese Body symbols, Body Hieroglyphics, Body Glyphs, Body in Chinese Letters, Body Hanzi, Body in Japanese Kanji, Body Pictograms, Body in the Chinese Written-Language, or Body in the Japanese Written-Language.