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The name Four Noble Truths Buddhism in Chinese / Japanese...

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  1. 1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View

  2. Four Noble Truths: Suffering

  3. Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment

  4. Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment

  5. Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering

  6. Four Noble Truths


1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View

Samyag Dristhi / Samyag Drsti / Samma Ditthi

 zhèng jiàn
 sei ken
1. Right Understanding / Right Perspective / Right View / Perfect View Scroll

正見 is one of the Noble Eightfold Paths of Buddhism. Right View, along with the Right Thought, constitutes the path to Wisdom.

To get to the correct view of the world, you must first understand and follow Four Noble Truths.


Note: This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment | Noble Eightfold Path

Four Noble Truths: Suffering

Dukkha

 kǔ dì
 kutai
Four Noble Truths: Suffering Scroll

苦諦 relays that part of life in this universe is suffering.

All living things experience some form of suffering, according to Buddhist teaching. This title is about accepting and understanding that the world is full of suffering.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Chinese, Japanese and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment

Samudaya

 jí dì
 jittai
Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment Scroll

集諦 represents the idea that the core of suffering is often the concept of desire or attachment.

This can be carnal desire, monetary desire, or the attachment you have to something that you are unwilling to part with (such as a fancy car). 集諦 is a simplification of the second noble truth which is an exploration into the root causes of suffering - it's deeper than I can go in a few sentences.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Chinese, Japanese and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment

Nirodha

 miè dì
 mettai
Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment Scroll

滅諦 suggests that once you eliminate desire or attachment to worldly things, only then can you achieve enlightenment.

Realize that things are impermanent. That fancy car, beautiful spouse, big house, and impressive career are things you can't take with you. These things are a flash in the pan compared to the infinite span of history, generations to come, time, and space.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese, Korean, and Chinese people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering

Magga

 dào dì
 doutai
Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering Scroll

道諦 is the idea that once you have dealt with your desires and left all desire and attachment behind, only then are you on the path away from suffering (and on your way to enlightenment).

道諦 is also called the path to liberation in some English texts on Buddhism.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Chinese, Japanese and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Four Noble Truths (Buddhism)

 sì dì
 shitai
Four Noble Truths (Buddhism) Scroll

四諦 is the title of the Four Noble Truths as taught in virtually all sects of Buddhism.

These truths are suffering (dukkha), desire/attachment (samudaya), release from desire/attachment (nirodha), and the path leading away from suffering (magga).

The suggestion behind these truths is that all things in nature suffer. All things in nature have desire and attachment for things in the physical world. The enlightened can release themselves from the bonds of desire and attachment. And finally, once they release all desire and attachment, the enlightened will find a path that leads away from suffering.


This term is exclusively used by devout Buddhists. It is not a common term, and is remains an unknown concept to most Japanese, Chinese, and Korean people.


See Also:  Buddhism | Enlightenment

Four Noble Truths (Full List)

 kǔ dì jí dì miè dì dào dì
 kutai jittai mettai doutai
Four Noble Truths (Full List) Scroll

苦諦集諦滅諦道諦 is the list of tenets of the Four Noble Truths as taught in virtually all sects of Buddhism.

They are suffering (dukkha), desire/attachment (samudaya), release from desire/attachment (nirodha), and the path leading away from suffering (magga).




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Not the results for four noble truths buddhism that you were looking for?

Below are some entries from our dictionary that may match your four noble truths buddhism search...

Characters

If shown, 2nd row is Simp. Chinese

Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition


see styles

    di4
ti
 tai
    たい
to examine; truth (Buddhism)
{Buddh} satya; truth; (given name) Tai
To judge, examine into, investigate, used in Buddhism for satya, a truth, a dogma, an axiom; applied to the āryasatyāni, the four dogmas, or noble truths, of 苦, 集, 滅, and 道 suffering, (the cause of its) assembly, the ( possibility of its cure, or) extinction, and the way (to extinction), i.e. the eightfold noble path, v. 四諦 and 八聖道. There are other categories of 諦, e.g. (2) 眞 and 俗 Reality in contrast with ordinary ideas of things; (3) 空, 假 and 中 q.v. (6) by the 勝論宗; and(8) by the 法相宗.; Two forms of statement: (a) 俗諦 saṃvṛti-satya, also called 世諦, 世俗諦, 覆俗諦, 覆諦, meaning common or ordinary statement, as if phenomena were real; (b) 眞諦 paramartha-satya, also called 第一諦, 勝義諦, meaning the correct dogma or averment of the enlightened. Another definition is 王法 and 佛法, royal law and Buddha law.

小乘

see styles
xiǎo shèng
    xiao3 sheng4
hsiao sheng
 shōjō
Hinayana, the Lesser Vehicle; Buddhism in India before the Mayahana sutras; also pr. [Xiao3 cheng2]
Hīnayāna 希那衍. The small, or inferior wain, or vehicle; the form of Buddhism which developed after Śākyamuni's death to about the beginning of the Christian era, when Mahāyāna doctrines were introduced. It is the orthodox school and more in direct line with the Buddhist succession than Mahāyānism which developed on lines fundamentally different. The Buddha was a spiritual doctor, less interested in philosophy than in the remedy for human misery and perpetual transmigration. He "turned aside from idle metaphysical speculations; if he held views on such topics, he deemed them valueless for the purposes of salvation, which was his goal" (Keith). Metaphysical speculations arose after his death, and naturally developed into a variety of Hīnayāna schools before and after the separation of a distinct school of Mahāyāna. Hīnayāna remains the form in Ceylon, Burma, and Siam, hence is known as Southern Buddhism in contrast with Northern Buddhism or Mahāyāna, the form chiefly prevalent from Nepal to Japan. Another rough division is that of Pali and Sanskrit, Pali being the general literary language of the surviving form of Hīnayāna, Sanskrit of Mahāyāna. The term Hīnayāna is of Mahāyānist origination to emphasize the universalism and altruism of Mahāyāna over the narrower personal salvation of its rival. According to Mahāyāna teaching its own aim is universal Buddhahood, which means the utmost development of wisdom and the perfect transformation of all the living in the future state; it declares that Hīnayāna, aiming at arhatship and pratyekabuddhahood, seeks the destruction of body and mind and extinction in nirvāṇa. For arhatship the 四諦Four Noble Truths are the foundation teaching, for pratyekabuddhahood the 十二因緣 twelve-nidānas, and these two are therefore sometimes styled the two vehicles 二乘. Tiantai sometimes calls them the (Hīnayāna) Tripiṭaka school. Three of the eighteen Hīnayāna schools were transported to China: 倶舍 (Abhidharma) Kośa; 成實 Satya-siddhi; and the school of Harivarman, the律 Vinaya school. These are described by Mahāyānists as the Buddha's adaptable way of meeting the questions and capacity of his hearers, though his own mind is spoken of as always being in the absolute Mahāyāna all-embracing realm. Such is the Mahāyāna view of Hīnayāna, and if the Vaipulya sūtras and special scriptures of their school, which are repudiated by Hīnayāna, are apocryphal, of which there seems no doubt, then Mahāyāna in condemning Hīnayāna must find other support for its claim to orthodoxy. The sūtras on which it chiefly relies, as regards the Buddha, have no authenticity; while those of Hīnayāna cannot be accepted as his veritable teaching in the absence of fundamental research. Hīnayāna is said to have first been divided into minority and majority sections immediately after the death of Śākyamuni, when the sthāvira, or older disciples, remained in what is spoken of as "the cave", some place at Rājagṛha, to settle the future of the order, and the general body of disciples remained outside; these two are the first 上坐部 and 大衆部 q. v. The first doctrinal division is reported to have taken place under the leadership of the monk 大天 Mahādeva (q.v.) a hundred years after the Buddha's nirvāṇa and during the reign of Aśoka; his reign, however, has been placed later than this by historians. Mahādeva's sect became the Mahāsāṅghikā, the other the Sthāvira. In time the two are said to have divided into eighteen, which with the two originals are the so-called "twenty sects" of Hīnayāna. Another division of four sects, referred to by Yijing, is that of the 大衆部 (Arya) Mahāsaṅghanikāya, 上座部 Āryasthavirāḥ, 根本說一切有部 Mūlasarvāstivādaḥ, and 正量部 Saṃmatīyāḥ. There is still another division of five sects, 五部律. For the eighteen Hīnayāna sects see 小乘十八部.

豆佉

see styles
dòu qū
    dou4 qu1
tou ch`ü
    tou chü
 zukya
(Buddhism) suffering (from Sanskrit "dukkha")
duḥkha, trouble, suffering, pain, defined by 逼惱 harassed, distressed. The first of the four dogmas, or 'Noble Truths' 四諦 is that all life is involved, through impermanence, in distress. There are many kinds of 苦 q. v.

四聖諦


四圣谛

see styles
sì shèng dì
    si4 sheng4 di4
ssu sheng ti
 shishoutai / shishotai
    ししょうたい
the Four Noble Truths (Buddhism); see also 四諦|四谛[si4 di4] and 苦集滅道|苦集灭道[ku3 ji2 mie4 dao4]
{Buddh} (See 四諦) The Four Noble Truths
The four holy or noble truths, idem 四諦.

苦集滅道


苦集灭道

see styles
kǔ jí miè dào
    ku3 ji2 mie4 dao4
k`u chi mieh tao
    ku chi mieh tao
 kujuumetsudou; kujumetsudou; kushumetsudou / kujumetsudo; kujumetsudo; kushumetsudo
    くじゅうめつどう; くじゅめつどう; くしゅめつどう
the Four Noble Truths (Budd.), namely: all life is suffering 苦[ku3], the cause of suffering is desire 集[ji2], emancipation comes only by eliminating passions 滅|灭[mie4], the way 道[dao4] to emancipation is the Eight-fold Noble Way 八正道[ba1 zheng4 dao4]; also called 四諦|四谛[si4 di4]
{Buddh} (See 四諦) Suffering, Source of Suffering Desire, The Cessation of Suffering, The Way Leading to the Cessation of Suffering (The Four Noble Truths of Buddhism)
The four axioms or truths: i. e. duḥkha, pain; samudaya, as above; nirodha, the extinguishing of pain and reincarnation; mārga, the way to such extinction; cf. 四諦.

The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
1. Right Understanding
Right Perspective
Right View
Perfect View
正見
正见
sei ken / seikenzhèng jiàn
zheng4 jian4
zheng jian
zhengjian
cheng chien
chengchien
Four Noble Truths: Suffering苦諦
苦谛
kutaikǔ dì / ku3 di4 / ku di / kudik`u ti / kuti / ku ti
Four Noble Truths: Desire and Attachment集諦
集谛
jittaijí dì / ji2 di4 / ji di / jidichi ti / chiti
Four Noble Truths: Elimination of Desire or Attachment滅諦
灭谛
mettaimiè dì / mie4 di4 / mie di / miedimieh ti / miehti
Four Noble Truths: Path Leading Away From Suffering道諦
道谛
doutai / dotaidào dì / dao4 di4 / dao di / daoditao ti / taoti
Four Noble Truths (Buddhism)四諦
四谛
shitaisì dì / si4 di4 / si di / sidissu ti / ssuti
Four Noble Truths (Full List)苦諦集諦滅諦道諦
苦谛集谛灭谛道谛
kutai jittai mettai doutai
kutaijittaimettaidoutai
kutai jittai mettai dotai
kǔ dì jí dì miè dì dào dì
ku3 di4 ji2 di4 mie4 di4 dao4 di4
ku di ji di mie di dao di
kudijidimiedidaodi
k`u ti chi ti mieh ti tao ti
kutichitimiehtitaoti
ku ti chi ti mieh ti tao ti
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


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A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

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