Asian Art Gallery

Adventures in Asian Art



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1. Other similar-meaning words.
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Opportunity in Chinese / Japanese...

Buy an Opportunity calligraphy wall scroll here!

Start your custom "Opportunity" project by clicking the button next to your favorite "Opportunity" title below...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Opportunity
  2. Opportunity / Good Luck
  3. Fate / Opportunity / Chance
  4. Opportunity
  5. Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?
  6. Phoenix Rise from the Ashes
  7. Once in a Lifetime
  8. Confucius: Universal Education
  9. The Mysterious Bond Between People
10. Optimistic
11. Rat / Mouse


Opportunity

Opportune Time
China shí jī
knob
ribbon top
knob

This is a common way to express day-to-day opportunities. It's sometimes used to express "an occasion".

Opportunity

China
Japan hata
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knob

This is an odd one. I've seen this on coffee cups and posters with the meaning of "opportunity". This is a correct definition, but this character also means "machine". In fact, if you put the character for "flying" in front of this character, you have the Chinese word for "airplane" (literally: flying machine). Alone, on a wall scroll, it will be generally understood as "opportunity" but I want you to know this extra information before you make your selection. Note that in Japanese and Korean, this has a similar meaning, but can also mean machine or loom.


See Also...  Success

Opportunity / Good Luck

China jī yù
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This is the kind of opportunity that comes via good luck or good fortune.

This word is sometimes translated as "stroke of good luck".

While there are other ways to express "opportunity", I think this version is best for a calligraphy wall scroll or portrait.

Note: In Korean Hanja, this would also mean "Meeting someone under strange circumstances".


See Also...  Good Luck

Fate / Opportunity / Chance

Buddhist idea of Fate
China yīn yuán
Japan in nen
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This is the Buddhist concept of a chance meeting or an opportunity that presents itself by fate.

Sometimes this is used to describe a cosmic chain of events or cause and effect.

It also is used to describe predestined relationships between people - and sometimes married couples (although if you want one about marriage, try this: Fate / Destiny of Lovers.

This word can also be translated as origin, karma, destiny, affinity, connection, and relation. This all depends on context - seen alone on a wall scroll, this will be read with a "fate / chance" meaning by a Chinese person, or a Korean person who can read Hanja.

The more complex definition of this word would be, "Direct causes and indirect conditions, which underlie the actions of all things".

This concept is known as nidana in the original Sanskrit. Also sometimes presented as hetupratyaya (or "hetu and prataya") which I believe is Pali.


Note: Japanese will tend to use this version of the second Kanji: 縁
If you order this from the Japanese master calligrapher, expect that you'll get this version. However, this word often carries a negative connotation in Japanese (bad things happen), as it is used that way in a certain Japanese idiom. Therefore, this may not be the best choice if Japanese is your target language.


See Also...  Buddhism

Opportunity

Japanese
China jī huì
Japan kikai
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This is a common way to express "opportunity" in Japanese. The first character means "chance" and the second can be translated as "meeting". So in Japanese business a "chance meeting" represents a real "opportunity".

Note that this also means opportunity in Chinese, but it's more an oral or informal word in Mandarin. Also, the second Kanji is the same as the simplified version of the hui Chinese character.

Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?

China wēi jī
Japan kiki
knob
ribbon top
knob

Separately, the first character here does mean "danger" or "to endanger" and the second character can mean "opportunity".

However, I want to debunk a myth that was propagated by some westerners who did not have a clear understanding of Asian languages...

While often, Chinese/Japanese/Korean compound words (words of two or more characters) are the sum of their parts, this is not always the case. The compound is often understood with a completely different meaning than the two characters individually.

Many have said that the Chinese/Japanese/Korean word for Crisis is made up of the characters for "danger" and "opportunity". This is true when phrased this way.
However, it's not absolutely correct to say that "danger + opportunity = crisis" in Asian cultures.

English example:
If I tell you that...
Bovine creature + Guy behind the plate in baseball = Locomotive protection
...you would think I was mad. But consider that "cow + catcher = cowcatcher", which is the device that used to be found on steam engines to protect them if they hit an animal on the tracks. When we hear the word "cowcatcher" we don't separate the words into their individual meanings (necessarily).
The same is true with the word for crisis in Chinese/Japanese/Korean. While you can separate the characters, few Asian people would automatically do so in their minds.

The final answer:
It is a half-truth to say, "danger plus opportunity equals crisis" in Chinese/Japanese/Korean. Use this statement and concept with caution.

Also, the second character can mean "secret" or "machine" depending on context so I guess you have to say "a dangerous machine = crisis" or "danger + a secret = crisis". Both of these are only slightly more ridiculous than the first premise.

PS: This is probably not a great word for a scroll, unless you have a special use for it.

Phoenix Rise from the Ashes

China fèng huáng niè pán
knob
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This proverb suggests "Legendary Phoenix rises from the ashes". Literally, it means, "Legendary Phoenix [reaches] Nirvana".

There is a legend in China of a great bird which is reborn once every 500 years. This bird gathers all the ill-will, suffering, desire, and other negative things of the whole world. The bird then plunges into the fire to burn away all negative things, sacrificing itself in the process (achieving Nirvana, or perhaps allowing others the opportunity to reach Nirvana).

500 years later, the phoenix is reborn from the ashes again, and the cycle repeats.

Once in a Lifetime

China yī qī yī huì
Japan ichigoichie
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This Japanese title can be translated as "for this time only", "chance meeting", "one meeting, one opportunity", "never again", or "one chance in a lifetime".

The characters literally mean "one time one meeting" - of course, the Kanji characters have meaning far beyond a direct translation like this.

Some might use this proverb to talk of an opportunity that presents itself just once in your life. It could also be the single chance-meeting with your true soul mate. Basically an expression for any event that might happen once in a lifetime.


This is primarily a Japanese title, however, there is also a Traditional Chinese (and old Korean) version of this proverb. Just the last character is different.
會The traditional form was used in Japan before WWII and in Korea prior to 1900. This title is somewhat known in China.

If you want the older traditional form, just click on the character to the right.

Confucius: Universal Education

China zì xíng shù xiū yǐ shàng wú wèi cháng wú huì yān
knob
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knob

This quote from the Analects of Confucius translates as:

For anyone who brings even the smallest token of appreciation, I have yet to refuse instruction.

Another way to put it is: If a student (or potential student) shows just an ounce of interest, desire, or appreciation for the opportunity to learn, a teacher should offer a pound of knowledge.


This was written over 2500 years ago. The composition is in ancient Chinese grammar and phrasing. A modern Chinese person would need a background in Chinese literature to understand this without aid of a reference.

The Mysterious Bond Between People

The invisible force that brings people together forever
China yuán
Japan en
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This is a complicated single character. It can mean a lot of different things depending on how you read it.

In Japanese, it can mean fate; destiny; a mysterious force that binds two people together; a relationship between two people; bond; link; connection; family ties; affinity; opportunity; chance (to meet someone and start a relationship). It can also mean "someone to rely on", relative, reminder, memento, or the female given name, Yori.

It's basically the same in Chinese, where it's defined as cause, reason, karma, fate, or predestined affinity.

In Buddhist context, it's Pratyaya. This is the concept of indirect conditions, as opposed to direct causes. It's when something happens (meeting someone) by circumstance, or a contributing environment. Instead of a direct cause or act, it is a conditioning cause without direct input or action by the involved people.

Occasionally, this character is used in a facetious way to say hem, seam, or edge of clothing. In this case, it's the seam that brings or holds the clothing together.


縁Note: Japanese will tend to use the variant of this Kanji shown to the right. If you want this version (and are ordering this from the Japanese master calligrapher), click on the Kanji at the right instead of the button above.

Optimistic

China huò dá
Japan katsudatsu
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Beyond optimistic, this word can also be defined as sanguine; magnanimous; open-minded; openhearted; broad-minded.

This is appropriate if you are, or want to be, the kind of person who is not bothered by the little things or minor troubles of life. This signifies a person who always feels things will get better. This is great for the person who figuratively sees a window of opportunity opening even as a door closes.


While a valid word in Japanese, this is kind of antiquated, and not in common use in modern Japan.

Rat / Mouse

Year of the Rat / Zodiac Sign
China shǔ
Japan nezumi
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This is the character for rat (and sometimes mouse) in Chinese, old Korean, and Japanese.

If you were born in the year of the Rat, you . . .


Are sensitive and smart.
Easily to adapt to the new environments.
Have a curious nature.
Are good at using the opportunities that are presented to you.

In some contexts, this character could mean "mouse".


See also our Chinese Zodiac page.


Check dictionary for opportunity


You should look at these ready-to-ship pieces of artwork:


Compare: $200.00

Your Price: $98.88

More Info

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The scroll that I am holding in this picture is a "medium size"
4-character wall scroll.
As you can see, it is a great size to hang on your wall.
(We also offer custom wall scrolls in larger sizes)

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.


A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.




If your search is not successful, just post your request on our forum, and we'll be happy to do research or translation for any reasonable request.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiden
Aikido
Andy
Anita
Autumn
Balance
Balanced Life
Beautiful Girl
Beautiful Princess
Beautiful Woman
Beauty
Beauty of Spirit
Beginner
Benjamin
Best Love
Black Eagle
Bless and Protect
Blood
Blossom
Brave
Brayden
Brendan
Brotherly Love
Bryan
Buddha
Buddhism
Cause and Effect
Cherry Blossom
Cliff
Courage
Daring
Destiny
Dragon
Dragon Tiger
Dragon Tiger Spirit
Ethan
Ever
Fish
Flowers
Flying
Forever
Fortune
Francisco
Ghost
God Bless
God Child
God is Always With You
God is Love
Gold
Gold Fish
Golden
Goldfish
Good Fortune
Good Health
Good Luck
Grace from Heaven
Grace of God
Great
Guan Gong
Happiness
Happy
Harmony
Home
Honor
Horse
I Need You
Indomitable Spirit
Iris Flower
Jasmine Flower
Jason
Javier
Jayden
Jenny
Journey
Koi Fish
Little
Live for the Moment
Live for Today
Longevity
Lotus
Love
Love Always
Love and Devotion
Love Forever
Love You Forever
Lover
Luck
Lucky
Maria
Marriage
Nathan
No Regrets
Noah
One Life One Chance
One True Love
Only God Can Judge Me
Panda Bear
Patrick
Peace
Peace of Mind
Perserverance
Plum
Power
Power of the Dragon
Prosperity
Quiet
Rain
Reason
River
Sara
Serenity
Sister Love
Solid
Spiritual Strength
Star
Strength
Strength Power
Strong
Taekwondo
Taylor
Tea Fate
The Red String
Tiger
Tree
Trust
Tyler
Vicky
Warrior
White
Wilson
Winter
Wisdom
Wisdom from Hard Knocks
Wolf
Xi Shi
Year of the Dragon
Yin Yang
Zara

With so many searches, we had to upgrade to our own Linux server.
Of course, only one in 500 searches results in a purchase - Hey buy a wall scroll!!!



See: Our list of specifically Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls. And, check out Our list of specifically old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

The following table is only helpful for those studying Chinese (or Japanese), and perhaps helps search engines to find this page when someone enters Romanized Chinese or Japanese

Title
Characters 
Simplified
Traditional
Japanese Romaji
(Romanized Japanese)
Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Opportunity时机
時機
n/ashí jī
shi ji
shih chi
shi2 ji1
shiji
Opportunity
hata
ji
chi
ji1
Opportunity / Good Luck机遇
機遇
n/ajī yù
ji yu
chi yü
ji1 yu4
jiyu
Fate / Opportunity / Chance因缘 / 因縁
因緣
in nen
innen
yīn yuán
yin yuan
yin yüan
yin1 yuan2
yinyuan
Opportunity (Japanese)机会
機會
kikaijī huì
ji hui
chi hui
ji1 hui4
jihui
Crisis equals Danger plus Opportunity?危机
危機
kikiwēi jī
wei ji
wei chi
wei1 ji1
weiji
Phoenix Rise from the Ashes凤凰涅磐
鳳凰涅磐
n/afèng huáng niè pán
feng huang nie pan
feng huang nieh p`an
feng4 huang2 nie4 pan2
fenghuangniepan
fenghuangniehpan
feng huang nieh pan
Once in a Lifetime一期一会
一期一會
ichigoichieyī qī yī huì
yi qi yi hui
i ch`i i hui
yi1 qi1 yi1 hui4
yiqiyihui
ichiihui
i chi i hui
Confucius: Universal Education自行束脩以上吾未尝无诲焉
自行束脩以上吾未嘗無誨焉 (note 嘗 = 嚐)
n/azì xíng shù xiū yǐ shàng wú wèi cháng wú huì yān
zi xing shu xiu yi shang wu wei chang wu hui yan
tzu hsing shu hsiu i shang wu wei ch`ang wu hui yen
zi4 xing2 shu4 xiu1 yi3 shang4 wu2 wei4 chang2 wu2 hui4 yan1
tzu hsing shu hsiu i shang wu wei chang wu hui yen
The Mysterious Bond Between People
緣 / 縁
enyuán
yuan
yüan
yuan2
Optimistic豁达
豁達
katsudatsuhuò dá
huo da
huo ta
huo4 da2
huoda
Rat / Mouse
nezumishǔ
shu
shu3

If you have not set up your computer to display Chinese, the characters in this table probably look like empty boxes or random text garbage.
This is why I spent hundreds of hours making images so that you could view the characters in the "opportunity" listings above.
If you want your Windows computer to be able to display Chinese characters you can either head to your Regional and Language options in your Win XP control panel, select the [Languages] tab and click on [Install files for East Asian Languages]. This task will ask for your Win XP CD to complete in most cases. If you don't have your Windows XP CD, or are running Windows 98, you can also download/run the simplified Chinese font package installer from Microsoft which works independently with Win 98, ME, 2000, and XP. It's a 2.5MB download, so if you are on dial up, start the download and go make a sandwich.

Some people may refer to this entry as Opportunity Kanji, Opportunity Characters, Opportunity in Mandarin Chinese, Opportunity Characters, Opportunity in Chinese Writing, Opportunity in Japanese Writing, Opportunity in Asian Writing, Opportunity Ideograms, Chinese Opportunity symbols, Opportunity Hieroglyphics, Opportunity Glyphs, Opportunity in Chinese Letters, Opportunity Hanzi, Opportunity in Japanese Kanji, Opportunity Pictograms, Opportunity in the Chinese Written-Language, or Opportunity in the Japanese Written-Language.

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