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Human Being in Chinese / Japanese...

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The Tao or Dao of Being Human / Humanity

China rén dào
Japan jindou
The Tao or Dao of Being Human / Humanity Vertical Wall Scroll

人道 is literally the "The Way of Being Human," or "The Human Way." It can also be translated as "humanity."

人道 has a secondary meaning of "sidewalk" as in "the way for people to walk" (in Japanese and Korean only). But as calligraphy artwork, nobody will read it with that translation.

Please note that there are two ways to Romanized Dao or Tao as in Daoism = Taoism. It's the same word in Chinese.

Life in Balance / Balancing Life

The art of balancing your life
China píng héng rén shēng
Japan hei kou jin sei
Life in Balance / Balancing Life Vertical Wall Scroll

This title suggests that you are actively trying to keep your life in balance. Think of this as being the action-verb of seeking or having a balanced life.

The first two characters mean balance, equilibrium or keeping things equal.

The last two characters mean "life." Literally "human life."

Siddhartha

China xī dá duō
Japan shiddatta / shiddaruta
Siddhartha Vertical Wall Scroll

悉達多 is the name Siddhartha (as in Siddhartha Gautama), the personal name for Śākyamuni.

This same Buddha is also known as "Shakyamuni Gautama," "Gotama Buddha," or "Tathagata."

Siddhartha Gautama was a spiritual teacher in the northern region of the Indian subcontinent who founded Buddhism. He is generally seen by Buddhists as the Supreme Buddha (Sammāsambuddha) of known human history.

The actual meaning of this name in Chinese is the realization of all aims, or simply being prosperous.


This name is sometimes romanized from the original Sanskrit or Pali as Siddhattha (from Siddhattha Gotama), Siddharth, Siddhārtha, or Sarvāthasiddha.

Siddhārtha or Sarvāthasiddha can also be written as 悉達, 悉多, 悉多頞他, or 悉陀.

Body and Earth in Unity

Japan shindofuni / shindofuji
Body and Earth in Unity Vertical Wall Scroll

身土不二 (Shindofuni) is originally a Buddhist concept or proverb referring to the inseparability of body-mind and geographical circumstances.

身土不二 literally reads, "Body [and] earth [are] not two".

Other translations or matching ideas include:
Body and land are one.
Body and earth can not be separated.
Body earth sensory curation.
You are what you eat.
Indivisibility of the body and the land (because the body is made from food and food is made from the land).

Going further, this speaks of our human bodies and the land from which we get our food being closely connected. This phrase is used often when talking about natural and organic vegetables coming directly from the farm to provide the healthiest foods in Japan.

Character notes: 身(shin) in this context does not just mean your physical body rather a concept including both body and mind.
土 (do) refers to soil, earth, clay, land, or in some cases, locality. It's not the proper name of Earth, the planet. However, in can refer to the land or realm we live in.

Japanese note: This has been used in Japan, on and off since 1907 as a slogan for a governmental healthy eating campaign (usually pronounced as shindofuji instead of the original shindofuni in this context). It may have been hijacked from Buddhism for this propaganda purpose, but at least this is "healthy propaganda."

Korean note: The phrase 身土不二 was in use by 1610 A.D. in Korea where it can be found in an early medical journal.
In modern South Korea, it's written in Hangul as 신토불이. Korea used Chinese characters (same source for Japanese Kanji) as their only written standard form of the language until about a hundred years ago. Therefore, many Koreans will recognize 身土不二 as a native phrase and concept.


See Also:  Strength and Love in Unity


Not the results for human being that you were looking for?

Below are some entries from our dictionary that may match your human being search...

Characters

If shown, 2nd row is Simp. Chinese

Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition

see styles
Mandarin xiān / xian1
Taiwan hsien
Japanese sen / せん
Body and Earth in Unity Vertical Wall Scroll
Chinese immortal
Japanese hermit; wizard; (personal name) Hisa; (personal name) Nori; (personal name) Sonhi; (personal name) Senji; (surname, female given name) Sen
僊 ṛṣi, 哩始 an immortal. 仙人; 人仙 the genī, of whom there is a famous group of eight 八仙; an ascetic, a man of the hills, a hermit; the Buddha. The 楞嚴經 gives ten kinds of immortals, walkers on the earth, fliers, wanderers at will, into space, into the deva heavens, transforming themselves into any form, etc. The names of ten ṛṣis, who preceded Śākyamuni, the first being 闍提首那? Jatisena; there is also a list of sixty-eight 大仙 given in the 大孔雀咒經下 A classification of five is 天仙 deva genī, 神仙 spirit genī, 人仙 human genī, 地仙 earth, or cavern genī, and 鬼仙 ghost genī.

一視同仁


一视同仁

see styles
Mandarin yī shì tóng rén / yi1 shi4 tong2 ren2
Taiwan i shih t`ung jen / i shih tung jen
Japanese isshidoujin / isshidojin / いっしどうじん
Chinese to treat everyone equally favorably (idiom); not to discriminate between people
Japanese (yoji) loving every human being with impartiality; universal brotherhood; universal benevolence

see styles
Mandarin rén / ren2
Taiwan jen
Japanese hito(p);hito / ひと(P);ヒト    nin(p);tari;ri / にん(P);たり;り    to / と    jin / じん
Chinese man; person; people; CL:個|个[ge4],位[wei4]
Japanese (1) man; person; (2) human being; mankind; people; (3) (kana only) human (Homo sapiens); humans as a species; (4) character; personality; (5) man of talent; true man; (6) another person; other people; others; (7) adult; (counter) (1) counter for people; (2) (にん only) (usu. in compound words) person; (suffix) person; (suffix) (1) -ian (e.g. Italian); -ite (e.g. Tokyoite); indicates nationality, race, origin, etc.; (2) -er (e.g. performer, etc.); person working with ...; indicates expertise (in a certain field); (3) (usu. in compound words) man; person; people; (surname) Hitotaka; (surname) Hitozaki; (personal name) Hito; (given name) Jin
manuṣya; nara; puruṣa; pudgala. Man, the sentient thinking being in the desire-realm, whose past deeds affect his present condition; human being

see styles
Mandarin ā / a1
Taiwan a
Japanese hodo / ほど    hotori / ほとり    kuma / くま    oka / おか    o / お    akutsu / あくつ    a / あ
Chinese flatter; prefix used before monosyllabic names, kinship terms etc to indicate familiarity; used in transliteration; also pr. [a4]; abbr. for Afghanistan 阿富汗[A1 fu4 han4]
Japanese (1) corner; nook; recess; (2) a shadow; a shade; (surname) Hodo; (surname) Hotori; (surname) Kuma; (surname) Oka; (personal name) O; (surname) A
M077477 羅陀補羅 Anurādhapura, a northern city of Ceylon, at which tradition says Buddhism was introduced into the island; cf. Abhayagiri, 阿跋.; M077477 樓馱 v. 阿那律Aniruddha.; a or ā, अ, आ. It is the first letter of the Sanskrit Siddham alphabet, and is also translit. by 曷, 遏, 安, 頞, 韻, 噁, etc. From it are supposed to be born all the other letters, and it is the first sound uttered by the human mouth. It has therefore numerous mystical indications. Being also a negation it symbolizes the unproduced, the impermanent, the immaterial; but it is employed in many ways indicative of the positive. Amongst other uses it indicates Amitābha, from the first syllable in that name. It is much in use for esoteric purposes.

ヒト

see styles
Japanese hito / ヒト Japanese (1) man; person; (2) human being; mankind; people; (3) (kana only) human (Homo sapiens); humans as a species; (4) character; personality; (5) man of talent; true man; (6) another person; other people; others; (7) adult

三界

see styles
Mandarin sān jiè / san1 jie4
Taiwan san chieh
Japanese sangai / さんがい
Japanese (1) {Buddh} (See 欲界,色界,無色界) the three realms of existence; (2) (abbreviation) {Buddh} (See 三千大千世界) the whole universe (of a billion worlds) that Buddha enlightened; (3) {Buddh} (See 三世・さんぜ・1) past, present and future existences; (suffix) (4) far-off ...; distant ...; (surname) Mikai
Trailokya or Triloka; the three realms; also 三有. It is the Buddhist metaphysical equivalent for the Brahmanic cosmological bhuvanatraya, or triple world of bhūr, bhuvaḥ, and svar, earth, atmosphere, and heaven. The Buddhist three are 欲, 色, and 無色界, i.e. world of sensuous desire, form, and formless world of pure spirit. (a) 欲界 Kāmadhātu is the realm of sensuous desire, of 婬 and 食 sex and food; it includes the six heavens of desire, the human world, and the hells. (b) 色界 Rūpadhātu is the realm of form, meaning 質礙 that which is substantial and resistant: it is above the lust-world and contains (so to speak) bodies, palaces, things, all mystic and wonderful一a semi-material conception like that in Revelation; it is represented in the 四禪天, or Brahmalokas. (c) 無色界 Arūpadhātu, or ārūpyadhātu, is the formless realm of pure spirit, where there are no bodies, places, things, at any rate none to which human terms would apply, but where the mind dwells in mystic contemplation; its extent is indefinable, but it is, conceived of in four stages, i,e. 四空處 the four "empty" regions, or regions of space in the immaterial world, which are 四無色 the four "formless" realms, or realms beyond form; being above the realm of form, their bounds cannot be defined. v. 倶舍論世間品.

五蘊


五蕴

see styles
Mandarin wǔ yùn / wu3 yun4
Taiwan wu yün
Japanese goun / gon / ごうん
Chinese the Five Aggregates (from Sanskrit "skandha") (Buddhism)
Japanese {Buddh} the five skandhas (the five aggregates: matter, sensation, perception, mental formations and consciousness)
The five skandhas, pañca-skandha: also 五陰; 五衆; 五塞犍陀 The five cumulations, substances, or aggregates, i. e. the components of an intelligent being, specially a human being: (1) 色 rūpa, form, matter, the physical form related to the five organs of sense; (2) 受 vedana, reception, sensation, feeling, the functioning of the mind or senses in connection with affairs and things; (3) 想 saṃjñā, conception, or discerning; the functioning of mind in distinguishing; (4) 行 saṃskāra, the functioning of mind in its processes regarding like and dislike, good and evil, etc.; (5) 識 vijñāna, mental faculty in regard to perception and cognition, discriminative of affairs and things. The first is said to be physical, the other four mental qualities; (2), (3), and (4) are associated with mental functioning, and therefore with 心所; (5) is associated with the faculty or nature of the mind 心王 manas. Eitel gives— form, perception, consciousness, action, knowledge. See also Keith's Buddhist Philosophy, 85-91; five aggregates

人因

see styles
Mandarin rén yīn / ren2 yin1
Taiwan jen yin
Japanese ninin
The causative influences for being reborn as a human being, i.e. a good life. Those in positions of honour have obtained them by former deeds of benevolence, reverence to Buddhas and monks, patience, humility, devotion to the sutras, charity, morality, zeal and exhortation, obedience, loyalty - hence they have obtained affluence, long life, and are held in high regard. Those in mean condition are thus born because of the opposite characteristics in previous incarnation; causes of human rebirth

人間


人间

see styles
Mandarin rén jiān / ren2 jian1
Taiwan jen chien
Japanese ningen / にんげん    jinkan / じんかん
Chinese the human world; the earth
Japanese (1) human being; person; man; mankind; humankind; (2) character (of a person); the world
This term is used in Buddhism, but due to a licensing issue, we cannot show the definition

仁道

see styles
Japanese jindou / jindo / じんどう Japanese the path that one should follow as a human being; the path of benevolence; (surname) Nidou; (surname, given name) Jindou

佛月

see styles
Mandarin fú yuè / fu2 yue4
Taiwan fu yüeh
Japanese butsu gatsu
The Buddha-moon, Buddha being mirrored in the human heart like the moon in pure water. Also a meaning similar to 佛日.

劫波

see styles
Mandarin jié bō / jie2 bo1
Taiwan chieh po
Japanese kōhi
Chinese kalpa (loanword) (Hinduism)
kalpa; also劫簸; 劫跛; v. 劫. Aeon, age. The period of time between the creation and recreation ofa world or universe; also the kalpas offormation, existence, destruction, and non-existence, which four as acomplete period are called mahākalpa 大劫. Eachgreat kalpa is subdivided into four asaṇkhyeya-kalpas (阿僧企耶 i.e. numberless,incalculable): (1) kalpa of destructionsaṃvarta; (2)kalpaof utter annihilation, or empty kalpa 増滅劫; 空劫 saṃvarta-siddha; (3) kalpa of formation 成劫 vivarta; (4) kalpa ofexistence 住劫 vivartasiddha; or they may betaken in the order 成住壤空. Each of the four kalpas is subdivided into twenty antara-kalpas, 小劫 or small kalpas, so that a mahākalpaconsists of eighty small kalpas. Each smallkalpa is divided into a period of 増 increaseand 減 decrease; the increase period is ruled over by the four cakravartīs in succession, i.e. the four ages of iron,copper, silver, gold, during which the length of human life increases by oneyear every century to 84,000 years, and the length of the human body to8,400 feet. Then comes the kalpa of decreasedivided into periods of the three woes, pestilence, war, famine, duringwhich the length of human life is gradually reduced to ten years and thehuman body to 1 foot in height. There are other distinctions of the kalpas. A small kalpa isrepresented as 16,800,000 years, a kalpa as336,000,000 years, and a mahākalpa as1,334,000,000 years. There are many ways of illustrating the length of akalpa, e.g. pass a soft cloth over a solid rock40 li in size once in a hundred years, whenfinally the rock has been thus worn away a kalpa will not yet have passed; or a city of 40 li, filled with mustard seeds, one being removed everycentury till all have gone, a kalpa will notyet have passed. Cf. 成劫.

噍類


噍类

see styles
Mandarin jiào lèi / jiao4 lei4
Taiwan chiao lei
Chinese a living being (esp. human)

小乘

see styles
Mandarin xiǎo chéng / xiao3 cheng2
Taiwan hsiao ch`eng / hsiao cheng
Japanese shōjō
Chinese Hinayana, the Lesser Vehicle; Buddhism in India before the Mayahana sutras; also pr. [Xiao3 cheng2]
Hīnayāna 希那衍. The small, or inferior wain, or vehicle; the form of Buddhism which developed after Śākyamuni's death to about the beginning of the Christian era, when Mahāyāna doctrines were introduced. It is the orthodox school and more in direct line with the Buddhist succession than Mahāyānism which developed on lines fundamentally different. The Buddha was a spiritual doctor, less interested in philosophy than in the remedy for human misery and perpetual transmigration. He "turned aside from idle metaphysical speculations; if he held views on such topics, he deemed them valueless for the purposes of salvation, which was his goal" (Keith). Metaphysical speculations arose after his death, and naturally developed into a variety of Hīnayāna schools before and after the separation of a distinct school of Mahāyāna. Hīnayāna remains the form in Ceylon, Burma, and Siam, hence is known as Southern Buddhism in contrast with Northern Buddhism or Mahāyāna, the form chiefly prevalent from Nepal to Japan. Another rough division is that of Pali and Sanskrit, Pali being the general literary language of the surviving form of Hīnayāna, Sanskrit of Mahāyāna. The term Hīnayāna is of Mahāyānist origination to emphasize the universalism and altruism of Mahāyāna over the narrower personal salvation of its rival. According to Mahāyāna teaching its own aim is universal Buddhahood, which means the utmost development of wisdom and the perfect transformation of all the living in the future state; it declares that Hīnayāna, aiming at arhatship and pratyekabuddhahood, seeks the destruction of body and mind and extinction in nirvāṇa. For arhatship the 四諦Four Noble Truths are the foundation teaching, for pratyekabuddhahood the 十二因緣 twelve-nidānas, and these two are therefore sometimes styled the two vehicles 二乘. Tiantai sometimes calls them the (Hīnayāna) Tripiṭaka school. Three of the eighteen Hīnayāna schools were transported to China: 倶舍 (Abhidharma) Kośa; 成實 Satya-siddhi; and the school of Harivarman, the律 Vinaya school. These are described by Mahāyānists as the Buddha's adaptable way of meeting the questions and capacity of his hearers, though his own mind is spoken of as always being in the absolute Mahāyāna all-embracing realm. Such is the Mahāyāna view of Hīnayāna, and if the Vaipulya sūtras and special scriptures of their school, which are repudiated by Hīnayāna, are apocryphal, of which there seems no doubt, then Mahāyāna in condemning Hīnayāna must find other support for its claim to orthodoxy. The sūtras on which it chiefly relies, as regards the Buddha, have no authenticity; while those of Hīnayāna cannot be accepted as his veritable teaching in the absence of fundamental research. Hīnayāna is said to have first been divided into minority and majority sections immediately after the death of Śākyamuni, when the sthāvira, or older disciples, remained in what is spoken of as "the cave", some place at Rājagṛha, to settle the future of the order, and the general body of disciples remained outside; these two are the first 上坐部 and 大衆部 q. v. The first doctrinal division is reported to have taken place under the leadership of the monk 大天 Mahādeva (q.v.) a hundred years after the Buddha's nirvāṇa and during the reign of Aśoka; his reign, however, has been placed later than this by historians. Mahādeva's sect became the Mahāsāṅghikā, the other the Sthāvira. In time the two are said to have divided into eighteen, which with the two originals are the so-called "twenty sects" of Hīnayāna. Another division of four sects, referred to by Yijing, is that of the 大衆部 (Arya) Mahāsaṅghanikāya, 上座部 Āryasthavirāḥ, 根本說一切有部 Mūlasarvāstivādaḥ, and 正量部 Saṃmatīyāḥ. There is still another division of five sects, 五部律. For the eighteen Hīnayāna sects see 小乘十八部.

心霊

see styles
Japanese shinrei / shinre / しんれい Japanese (noun - becomes adjective with の) (1) spirit (e.g. human spirit); soul; (2) spirit; ghost; ethereal being; (female given name) Kokoa

殺生


杀生

see styles
Mandarin shā shēng / sha1 sheng1
Taiwan sha sheng
Japanese setsuna / せつな
Chinese to take the life of a living creature
Japanese (noun/participle) (1) killing; destruction of life; (adjectival noun) (2) barbarous; callous; brutal; cruel; (female given name) Setsuna
To take life, kill the living, or any conscious being; the taking of human life offends against the major commands, of animal life against the less stringent commands. Suicide also leads to severe penalties; taking of life

法界

see styles
Mandarin fǎ jiè / fa3 jie4
Taiwan fa chieh
Japanese hokkai;houkai / hokkai;hokai / ほっかい;ほうかい
Japanese (1) {Buddh} universe; (2) {Buddh} realm of thought; (3) {Buddh} underlying principle of reality; manifestation of true thusness; (4) (ほうかい only) (abbreviation) (See 法界悋気) being jealous of things that have nothing to do with one; being jealous of others who are in love with each other
dharmadhātu, 法性; 實相; 達磨馱都 Dharma-element, -factor, or-realm. (1) A name for "things" in general, noumenal or phenomenal; for the physical universe, or any portion or phase of it. (2) The unifying underlying spiritual reality regarded as the ground or cause of all things, the absolute from which all proceeds. It is one of the eighteen dhātus. These are categories of three, four, five, and ten dharmadhātus; the first three are combinations of 事 and 理 or active and passive, dynamic and static; the ten are: Buddha-realm, Bodhisattva-realm, pratyekabuddha-realm, śrāvaka, deva, Human, asura, Demon, Animal, and Hades realms-a Huayan category. Tiantai has ten for meditaton, i.e. the realms of the eighteen media of perception (the six organs, six objects, and six sense-data or sensations), of illusion, sickness, karma, māra, samādhi, (false) views, pride, the two lower Vehicles, and the Bodhisattva Vehicle; experiential realm

爪土

see styles
Mandarin zhǎo tǔ / zhao3 tu3
Taiwan chao t`u / chao tu
Japanese sōdo
(爪上土) The quantity of earth one can put on a toe-nail, i. e. in proportion to the whole earth in the world, such is the rareness of being reborn as a human being; or, according to the Nirvana Sutra 33, of attaining nirvana; a toenail's amount of dirt

畜生

see styles
Mandarin chù shēng / chu4 sheng1
Taiwan ch`u sheng / chu sheng
Japanese chikushou(p);chikishou / chikusho(p);chikisho / ちくしょう(P);ちきしょう
Chinese domestic animal; brute; bastard
Japanese (1) beast (i.e. any animal other than man); (2) {Buddh} (See 畜生道) person reborn into the animal realm; (3) brute (i.e. a contemptible human being); (interjection) (4) son of a bitch; for Christ's sake; damn it
tiryagyoni, 底栗車; 傍生 'Born of or as an animal, ' rebirth as an animal; animals in general; especially domestic animals.

神仙

see styles
Mandarin shén xiān / shen2 xian1
Taiwan shen hsien
Japanese shinsen / しんせん
Chinese Daoist immortal; supernatural entity; (in modern fiction) fairy, elf, leprechaun etc; fig. lighthearted person
Japanese (1) immortal mountain wizard (in Taoism); Taoist immortal; supernatural being; (2) (in Japan) 11th note of the ancient chromatic scale (approx. C)
神僊 The genī, immortals, ṛṣi, of whom the five kinds are 天, 神, 人, 地, and 鬼仙, i.e. deva, spirit, human, earth (or cave), and preta immortals.

糞嚢

see styles
Japanese kusobukuro / くそぶくろ Japanese (1) (archaism) stomach; intestines; (2) (archaism) human being; human body; (3) poop bag; doggy bag

糞袋

see styles
Japanese kusobukuro / くそぶくろ Japanese (1) (archaism) stomach; intestines; (2) (archaism) human being; human body; (3) poop bag; doggy bag

至人

see styles
Mandarin zhì rén / zhi4 ren2
Taiwan chih jen
Japanese shinin
Chinese fully realized human being; sage; saint
The perfect man, i. e. Śākyamuni; perfected person

人非人

see styles
Mandarin rén / ren2
Taiwan jen
Japanese ninpinin / にんぴにん
Japanese (derogatory term) (See 人でなし) inhuman person; fiend; beast; brute
A being resembling but not a human being, i.e. a kinnara; human-yet-not-human

十六物

see styles
Mandarin shí liù wù / shi2 liu4 wu4
Taiwan shih liu wu
The thirty-six physical parts and excretions of the human body, all being unclean, i. e. the vile body.

塞建陀

see styles
Mandarin sāi jiàn tuó / sai1 jian4 tuo2
Taiwan sai chien t`o / sai chien to
Japanese saikenda
(塞建陀羅); 塞健陀 skandha, 'the shoulder'; 'the body'; 'the trunk of a tree'; 'a section,' etc. M.W. 'Five psychological constituents.' 'Five attributes of every human being.' Eitel. Commonly known as the five aggregates, constituents, or groups; the pañcaskandha; under the Han dynasty 陰 was used, under the Jin 衆, under the Tang 蘊. The five are: 色 rūpa, form, or sensuous quality; 受 vedana, reception, feeling, sensation; 想 sañjñā , thought, consciousness, perception; 行 karman, or saṃskāra, action, mental activity; 識 vijñāna, cognition. The last four are mental constituents of the ego. Skandha is also the name of an arhat, and Skanda, also 塞建那, of a deva.

有上士

see styles
Mandarin yǒu shàng shì / you3 shang4 shi4
Taiwan yu shang shih
Japanese ujō shi
A bodhisattva who has reached the stage of 等覺 and is above the state of being, or the existing, i. e. as conceivable by human minds; surpassed bodhisattva

胎藏界

see styles
Mandarin tāi cáng jiè / tai1 cang2 jie4
Taiwan t`ai ts`ang chieh / tai tsang chieh
Japanese taizō kai
Garbhadhātu, or Garbhakośa-(dhātu), the womb treasury, the universal source from which all things are produced; the matrix; the embryo; likened to a womb in which all of a child is conceived— its body, mind, etc. It is container and content; it covers and nourishes; and is the source of all supply. It represents the 理性 fundamental nature, both material elements and pure bodhi, or wisdom in essence or purity; 理 being the garbhadhātu as fundamental wisdom, and 智 acquired wisdom or knowledge, the vajradhātu. It also represents the human heart in its innocence or pristine purity, which is considered as the source of all Buddha-pity and moral knowledge. And it indicates that from the central being in the maṇḍala, viz. the Sun as symbol of Vairocana, there issue all the other manifestations of wisdom and power, Buddhas, bodhisattvas, demons, etc. It is 本覺 original intellect, or the static intellectuality, in contrast with 始覺 intellection, the initial or dynamic intellectuality represented in the vajradhātu; hence it is the 因 cause and vajradhātu the 果 effect; though as both are a unity, the reverse may be the rule, the effect being also the cause; it is also likened to 利他 enriching others, as vajradhātu is to 自利 enriching self. Kōbō Daishi, founder of the Yoga or Shingon 眞言 School in Japan, adopted the representation of the ideas in maṇḍalas, or diagrams, as the best way of revealing the mystic doctrine to the ignorant. The garbhadhātu is the womb or treasury of all things, the universe; the 理 fundamental principle, the source; its symbols are a triangle on its base, and an open lotus as representing the sun and Vairocana. In Japan this maṇḍala is placed on the east, typifying the rising sun as source, or 理. The vajradhātu is placed west and represents 智 wisdom or knowledge as derived from 理 the underlying principle, but the two are essential one to the other, neither existing apart. The material and spiritual; wisdom-source and intelligence; essence and substance; and similar complementary ideas are thus portrayed; the garbhadhātu may be generally considered as the static and the vajradhātu as the dynamic categories, which are nevertheless a unity. The garbhadhātu is divided into 三部 three sections representing samādhi or quiescence, wisdom-store, and pity-store, or thought, knowledge, pity; one is called the Buddha-section, the others the Vajra and Lotus sections respectively; the three also typify vimokṣa, prajñā, and dharmakāya, or freedom, understanding, and spirituality. There are three heads of these sections, i. e. Vairocana, Vajrapāṇi, and Avalokiteśvara; each has a mother or source, e. g. Vairocana from Buddha's-eye; and each has a 明王 or emanation of protection against evil; also a śakti or female energy; a germ-letter, etc. The diagram of five Buddhas contains also four bodhisattvas, making nine in all, and there are altogether thirteen 大院 or great courts of various types of ideas, of varying numbers, generally spoken of as 414. Cf. 金剛界; 大日; 兩部; womb-container world

那羅延


那罗延

see styles
Mandarin nà luō yán / na4 luo1 yan2
Taiwan na lo yen
Japanese Naraen
(那羅延那); 那羅野拏 Nārāyaṇa, 'son of Nara or the original man, patronymic of the personified Purusha or first living being, author of the Purusha hymn,' M. W. He is also identified with Brahmā, Viṣṇu, or Kṛṣṇa; intp. by 人生本 the originator of human life; 堅固 firm and stable; 力士 or 天界力士 hero of divine power; and 金剛 vajra; the term is used adjectivally with the meaning of manly and strong. Nārāyaṇa is represented with three faces, of greenish-yellow colour, right hand with a wheel, riding a garuḍa-bird.

一視同人

see styles
Japanese isshidoujin / isshidojin / いっしどうじん Japanese (yoji) loving every human being with impartiality; universal brotherhood; universal benevolence

Search for Human Being in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
The Tao or Dao of Being Human
Humanity
人道jindou / jindorén dào / ren2 dao4 / ren dao / rendaojen tao / jentao
Life in Balance
Balancing Life
平衡人生hei kou jin sei
heikoujinsei
hei ko jin sei
heikojinsei
píng héng rén shēng
ping2 heng2 ren2 sheng1
ping heng ren sheng
pinghengrensheng
p`ing heng jen sheng
pinghengjensheng
ping heng jen sheng
Siddhartha悉達多
悉达多
shiddatta / shiddarutaxī dá duō
xi1 da2 duo1
xi da duo
xidaduo
hsi ta to
hsitato
Body and Earth in Unity身土不二shindofuni / shindofuji
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.



Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

Aiki Jujutsu
Aikido
Ancestors
Archangel
Bamboo
Beautiful
Benevolence
Bushido
Dance
Death Before Dishonor
Destiny
Divine
Double Happiness
Enso
Faith
Fire
Fish
Goldfish
Good Health
Guardian
Hapkido
Health
Hentai
Humility
Inner Beauty
Jasmine
Lightning
Lone Wolf
Lotus Flower
Love
Loyalty
Marine
Martial Arts
Mercy
Mixed Martial Arts
Mushin
Never Give Up
One True Love
Peace and Good Health
Pisces
Power
Protect
Protector
Rainbow
Resolve
Saint
Satoshi
Scarecrow
Soulmate
Spirit of Taekwondo
Tai Chi Chuan
Wish

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.


A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Human Being Kanji, Human Being Characters, Human Being in Mandarin Chinese, Human Being Characters, Human Being in Chinese Writing, Human Being in Japanese Writing, Human Being in Asian Writing, Human Being Ideograms, Chinese Human Being symbols, Human Being Hieroglyphics, Human Being Glyphs, Human Being in Chinese Letters, Human Being Hanzi, Human Being in Japanese Kanji, Human Being Pictograms, Human Being in the Chinese Written-Language, or Human Being in the Japanese Written-Language.