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Your Chinese / Japanese Calligraphy Search for "Changing"...

Quick links to words on this page...

  1. Changing Oneself / Self Reformation
  2. Mark the boat to find the lost sword...
  3. Change
  4. Flexibility
  5. Dynamic
  6. Impermanence
  7. Dynamic
  8. Sing / Singing
  9. Glory and Honor
10. Life Energy / Spiritual Energy
11. Chauncey
12. Prosperity
13. Desire
14. Dojo / Martial Arts Studio
15. Let Us Try
16. The Great Wall of China
17. Innovation
18. Inspiration
19. Longevity / Long Life
20. Lover / Spouse / Sweetheart
21. Progress Day by Day
22. Adapt Oneself
23. The Book of Changes / I Ching
24. Evolve / Evolution
25. Iris Flower
26. Shaolin
27. Kai Zen / Kaizen
28. Heijoshin / Presence of Mind
29. Ba Gua Zhang
30. Ivy
31. Xing Yi Quan
32. Distance Runner
33. Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do
34. Never Forget
35. High Mountain Long River
36. Wellness
37. Happy New Year
38. Everyday Life
39. Broken Mirror Rejoined
40. Islam
41. Shaolin Chang Chuan
42. Battle of Chosin Reservoir
43. A Wise Man Changes His Mind
44. Ch'ang Hon Taekwondo
45. Distance Runner
46. Move On / Change Way of Thinking
47. God is Always With You
48. Gay Pride
49. Trust No One / Trust No Man
50. Better Late Than Never
51. Warriors Adapt and Overcome
52. United Arab Emirates
53. One who walks by the river...
54. Only the sleepless know the length of night
55. Confucius: Universal Education
56. Any success can not compensate...
57. Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu
58. Tom Clan Generational Poem
59. Serenity Prayer

Changing Oneself / Self Reformation

Japan ji ko kai kaku
Changing Oneself / Self Reformation Wall Scroll

This Japanese title refers to one who changes themselves or improves themselves by reforming their lives.

Another way to translate it is, "A person who changes their attitude or something about themselves."

Mark the boat to find the lost sword
Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world

China kè zhōu qiú jiàn
Japan kokushuukyuuken
Mark the boat to find the lost sword / Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world Wall Scroll

This originally-Chinese proverb is a warning to people that things are always in a state of change. Thus, you must take that into account, and not depend on the old ways, or a way that may have worked in the past but is no longer valid.

This idiom/proverb comes from the following story:
A man was traveling in a ferry boat across a river. With him, he carried a valuable and treasured sword. Along the way, the man became overwhelmed and intoxicated by the beautiful view, and accidentally dropped his prized sword into the river. Thinking quickly, he pulled out a knife, and marked on the rail of the boat where exactly he has lost his sword.

When the boat arrived on the other side of the river, the man jumped out of the boat and searched for his sword right under where he'd made the mark. Of course, the boat had moved a great distance since he made the mark, and thus, he could not find the sword.

While this man may seem foolhardy, we have to take a great lesson from this parable: Circumstances change, so one should use methods that can handle the change. In modern China, this is used in business to mean that one should not depend on old business models for a changing market.

This proverb dates back to the Spring and Autumn period (770–476 BC) of the territory now known as China. It has spread and is somewhat known in Japan and Korea.


China gǎi biàn
Japan kaihen
Change Wall Scroll

This can mean to change, become different, or transform. This can refer to the changing world, or a person who changes their attitude or something about themselves.

変Note: An alternate version of the second character is used in Japanese. This is actually an old alternate Chinese form which is seldom seen in China anymore. If you want this version, please click on the Kanji shown to the right instead of the "Select and Customize" button.


China líng huó xìng
Flexibility Wall Scroll

Flexibility is being open to change. You consider others' ideas and feelings and don't insist on your own way. Flexibility gives you creative new ways to get things done. Flexibility helps you to keep changing for the better. This Chinese word could also be defined as "flexible nature."

See Also:  Cooperation


China dòng tài
Japan dou tai
Dynamic Wall Scroll

動態 is the Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja for a word that means "dynamic state."

This word can also mean:
movement; motion; development; trend; dynamic (science); the state of being dynamic.

This word can be used to describe someone or an organization that keeps up with cutting-edge trends. Always flexible, always changing, always moving.


China wú cháng
Japan mujou
Impermanence Wall Scroll

無常 is the state of being "not permanent," "not enduring," transitory, or evolving.

It can also mean variable or changeable. In some context, it can refer to a ghost that is supposed to take a soul upon death. Following that, this term can also mean to pass away or die.

In the Buddhist context, this is a reminder that everything in this world is ever-changing, and all circumstances of your life are temporary.
If you take the Buddhist philosophy further, none of these circumstances are real, and your existence is an illusion anyway. Thus, the idea of the eternal soul is perhaps just the attachment you have to your ego. Once you release your attachment to all impermanent things, you will be on your way to enlightenment and Buddhahood.

Language notes for this word when used outside the context of Buddhism:
In Korean Hanja, this means uncertainty, transiency, mutability, or evanescent.
In Japanese, the definition orbits closer to the state of being uncertain.


Moving / Motion / Ever-Changing
China dòng
Japan dou
Dynamic Wall Scroll

動 is the only Chinese/Japanese/Korean word that can encompass the idea of "dynamic" into one character.

This word can also mean:
to use; to act; to move; to change; motion; stir.

In Buddhist context, it means: Movement arises from the nature of wind which is the cause of motion.

The key point of this word is that it represents motion or always moving. Some might say "lively" or certainly the opposite of something that is stagnant or dead.

Note: In Japanese, this can also be a female given name, Yurugi.

Sing / Singing

China chàng
Sing / Singing Wall Scroll

唱 is how to refer to singing or song in Chinese.

In Japanese the meaning is similar but more closely means chant, recite or yell. Best if your audience in Chinese.

Glory and Honor

China róng
Japan ei
Glory and Honor Wall Scroll

This character relates to giving someone a tribute or praise. It's a little odd as a gift, so this may not be the best selection for a wall scroll.

I've made this entry just because this character is often misused as "honorable" or "keeping your honor." It's not quite the same meaning, as this usually refers to a tribute or giving an honor to someone.

榮 is often found in tattoo books incorrectly listed as the western idea of personal honor or being honorable. Check with us before you get a tattoo that does not match the meaning you are really looking for. As a tattoo, this suggests that you either have a lot of pride in yourself or that you have a wish for prosperity for you and/or your family.

栄In modern Japanese Kanji, glory and honor looks like the image to the right.

There is a lot of confusion about this character, so here are some alternate translations for this character: prosperous, flourishing, blooming (like a flower), glorious beauty, proud, praise, rich, or it can be the family name "Rong." The context in which the character is used can change the meaning between these various ideas.

In the old days, this could be an honor paid to someone by the Emperor (basically a designation by the Emperor that a person has high standing).

To sum it up: This character has a positive meaning, however, it's a different flavor than the idea of being honorable and having integrity.

Life Energy / Spiritual Energy

Chi Energy: Essence of Life / Energy Flow
Japan ki
Life Energy / Spiritual Energy Wall Scroll

This energy flow is a fundamental concept of traditional Asian culture.

This character is romanized as "Qi" or "Chi" in Chinese, "Gi" in Korean, and "Ki" in Japanese.
Chi is believed to be part of everything that exists, as in “life force” or “spiritual energy”. It is most often translated as “energy flow,” or literally as “air” or “breath”. Some people will simply translate this as “spirit” but you have to take into consideration the kind of spirit we're talking about. I think this is weighted more toward energy than spirit.

米The character itself is a representation of steam (or breath) rising from rice. To clarify, the character for rice is shown to the right.

Steam was apparently seen as visual evidence of the release of "life energy" when this concept was first developed. The Qi / Chi / Ki character is still used in compound words to mean steam or vapor.

氣氣The etymology of this character is a bit complicated. It's suggested that the first form of this character from bronze script (about 2500 years ago) looked like one the symbols shown to the right.

氣However, it was easy to confuse this with the character for the number three. So the rice radical was added by 221 B.C. (the exact time of this change is debated). This first version with the rice radical is shown to the right.

The idea of Qi / Chi / Ki is really a philosophical concept. It's often used to refer to the “flow” of metaphysical energy that sustains living beings. Yet there is much debate that has continued for thousands of years as to whether Qi / Chi / Ki is pure energy, or consists partially, or fully of matter.

You can also see the character for Qi / Chi / Ki in common compound words such as Tai Chi / Tai Qi, Aikido, Reiki and Qi Gong / Chi Kung.

In the modern Japanese Kanji, the rice radical has been changed into two strokes that form an X.

気The original and traditional Chinese form is still understood in Japanese but we can also offer that modern Kanji form in our custom calligraphy. If you want this Japanese Kanji, please click on the character to the right, instead of the “Select and Customize” button above.

More language notes: This is pronounced like “chee” in Mandarin Chinese, and like “key” in Japanese.
This is also the same way to write this in Korean Hanja where it is Romanized as “gi” and pronounced like “gee” but with a real G-sound, not a J-sound.
Though Vietnamese no longer use Chinese characters in their daily language, this character is still widely known in Vietnam.

See Also:  Energy | Life Force | Vitality | Life | Birth | Soul


China chāng xī
Chauncey Wall Scroll

昌西 is a common transliteration to Mandarin Chinese for the name Chauncey.


China fán róng
Japan hanei
Prosperity Wall Scroll

繁栄 is the same "prosperity" as our traditional Chinese version, except for a slight change in the way the second character is written (it's the Japanese Kanji deviation from the original/ancient Chinese form). Chinese people will still be able to read this, though you should consider this to be the Japanese form (better if your audience is Japanese).


Sometimes the Kanji form shown to the right is used in Japanese. It will depend on the mood of the calligrapher, as to which form you may receive. If you have a preference, please let us know at the time of your order.


China kě wàng
Desire Wall Scroll

This Chinese word can mean desirous, wishful, or simply desire.

The first character means to thirst for [something], or to be thirsty. The second character means to hope for, to expect, to gaze (into the distance) or to look for something. The combined meaning of these two characters changes a bit but I think it's nice to know the individual meanings to give you a better understanding of where a word comes from.

Korean definitions of this word include craving, longing, and thirst for knowledge.

Dojo / Martial Arts Studio

China dào cháng
Japan dou jou
Dojo / Martial Arts Studio Wall Scroll

道場 is the Japanese term for a room or hall in which martial arts are taught. This word is often spelled "dojo" which has become a word in the English lexicon. However, the true Romaji is "doujou" or "dōjō."

Please note: The Chinese definition of these characters is quite different. In Chinese, this is a place where Buddhist or Taoist mass is held. It could also be the place where spiritual or psychic events are performed.

Let Us Try

China cháng shì
Let Us Try Wall Scroll

嘗試 is a close match for the English phrase, "let us try" or the French word "Essayons" as used by Combat Engineers in the U.S. Army.

This word can also be translated as "to try" or "to attempt."

Even if you're not a Combat Engineer, this word should inspire you to attempt to accomplish difficult things. If you don't try, you are certain to fail, if you do try, at least there is a chance of success.

The worst thing is not failure, the worst thing is not trying at all.

The Great Wall of China

China cháng chéng
Japan nagaki
The Great Wall of China Wall Scroll

長城 is the Chinese name for the Great Wall. Built at the northern border of China to protect from Mongol attack.

In Japanese, this is a surname Nagaki. Japanese use a longer title for the Great Wall of China.
In Korean, this refers to Changsŏng (a city in Changsŏng-kun county, Chŏllanam-to province).


China gé xīn
Japan kakushin
Innovation Wall Scroll

革新 is innovate or innovation in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The literal meaning is, "new leather" but you need to first understand that colloquially, this leather character also means renewal, reform, change, or transform.

The while the first character is leather or reform, the second character strictly means "new."


China líng gǎn
Japan reikan
Inspiration Wall Scroll

靈感 is the Chinese word that is the closest to hitting the mark for the English word "inspiration." In a more extended context, I have even seen this translated as "brain wave."

The first character means alert, departed soul, efficacious, quick, effective or intelligence. The second character means to feel, to move, to touch or to affect. The combined meaning of these two characters changes a bit but I think it's nice to know the individual meanings to give you a better understanding of where a word comes from.

You could describe this word as, "the thought that pops into your head just before you patent the greatest widget ever invented, that everyone in the world will want."
…At least, that's the idea.

This term can also mean "intelligent thought" if you were to translate it directly from each of these characters. If you are looking for inspiration or otherwise need to be inspired, this is the word for you.

霊When the first character was absorbed into Japanese from Chinese, an alternate form became the standard in Japan. The Kanji shown to the right is the form currently used in Japan. This is still considered an alternate form in China to this day. It's readable by both Chinese and Japanese people but if your audience is Japanese, I recommend the Kanji shown to the right - just click on that Kanji to order that version.

Longevity / Long Life

China cháng shòu
Japan chouju
Longevity / Long Life Wall Scroll

Used as a noun, this word means "longevity" or "the ability to live long." It can also be an adjective meaning "long lived."

Japanese LongevityPlease note that Japanese use a simplified version of the second character of longevity - it also happens to be the same simplification used in mainland China. Click on the character to the right if you want the Japanese/Simplified version of this two-character longevity calligraphy.

Lover / Spouse / Sweetheart

China ài ren
Japan ai jin
Lover / Spouse / Sweetheart Wall Scroll

愛人 means lover, sweetheart, spouse, husband, wife, or beloved in Chinese, Japanese Kanji, and old Korean Hanja.

The first character means "love" and the second means "person."

This title can be used a lot of different ways, depending on context. Husbands and wives may use this term for each other. But, if you change the context, this title could be used to mean "mistress." It's pretty similar to the way we can use "lover" in many different ways in English.

In modern Japan, this lover title has slipped into the definition of mistress, and is not good for a wall scroll.

Progress Day by Day

China rì jiàn
Progress Day by Day Wall Scroll

This Chinese word means to progress, increase, or change, day-by-day. It suggests something getting better one day at a time, or with each passing day.

Adapt Oneself

China yìng biàn
Japan ou hen
Adapt Oneself Wall Scroll

應變 means, "to meet a contingency," "to adapt oneself to changes," or "to adapt to changes" in Chinese. It's also used in Japanese but usually only in the context of Buddhism. 應變 is probably the shortest way to express the idea of adapting and overcoming whatever circumstances present themselves.

The Book of Changes / I Ching

China yì jīng
The Book of Changes / I Ching Wall Scroll

易經 is the Chinese title for "The Book of Changes" also known as "I Ching" or "YiJing."

Evolve / Evolution

China yǎn huà
Evolve / Evolution Wall Scroll

演化 means to evolve or evolution in Chinese.

The first character means to develop, to evolve, to practice, to perform, or to extend.

The second character means to make into, to change into, to transform, or to metamorphose.

Iris Flower

China chāng pú
Japan ayame / shoubu
Iris Flower Wall Scroll

菖蒲 is the title for the iris flower in Japanese.

If your name happens to be Iris, this is a nice way to express your name by meaning in Japanese (it will mean your name but not sound like your name).

Can also mean Siberian iris (Iris sanguinea) or sweet flag (Acorus calamus / Acorus gramineus) varieties.

Note: This will also be recognized in Chinese, though it is generally written with the addition of a character meaning "stone" in front in the Chinese language.


Little Forest
China shǎo lín
Japan sho rin
Shaolin Wall Scroll

The Shaolin monks of China have been practicing the art of Kung Fu for thousands of years. While there are many schools of Kung Fu in China, Shaolin are one of the more religiously devout and disciplined.

The title of Shaolin actually refers to a specific Buddhist monastery. It should be noted that the Shaolin were famous in China long before the Kung Fu TV show. Their fame in China is due to the monks' heroic and swift rescue an emperor during the Tang Dynasty. Most Chinese people are not keenly aware of the Kung Fu TV show, and have no idea who David Carradine is or anything about his character, Kwai Chang Caine.

Note: The literal meaning of these two characters is "little forest."

The fame of the Shaolin has spread all over Asia, as even though this is a Chinese title, the same characters are used in Japanese with the same meaning.

Kai Zen / Kaizen

China gǎi shàn
Japan kai zen
Kai Zen / Kaizen Wall Scroll

改善 means betterment, improvement, to make better, or to improve - specifically incremental and continuous improvement.

This word became very important in post-war Japan when Edwards Deming came to Japan to teach concepts of incremental and continuous improvement (for which the big 3 auto-makers did not want to hear about at the time - even kicking Deming out of their offices). The Japanese workforce absorbed this concept at a time with their culture was in flux and primed for change.

This kaizen term is closely associated with the western title "Total Quality Management." Perhaps dear to my heart since I spent years studying this at university before I moved to China where TQM did not seem to exist. Slowly, this concept has entered China as well (I've actually given lectures on the subject in Beijing).

If you are trying to improve processes at your business or need to remind yourself of your continuous TQM goals, this would be a great wall scroll to hang behind your desk, or in your workplace.

See Also:  Kansei

Heijoshin / Presence of Mind

China píng cháng xīn
Japan hei jou shin
Heijoshin / Presence of Mind Wall Scroll

平常心 is the title Heijoshin, as associated with Kendo and Aikido schools of Japanese martial arts.

平常心 is also a word in Japanese which can be translated as "one's self-possession" or "presence of mind."

In Chinese and Korean, this means "simplicity heart," "composure," "calmness," or a "sense of orderliness." In Chinese and Korean, this implies that you enjoy what you have, keep your heart in balance, and have no over-blown ambitions.

Ba Gua Zhang

Martial arts term
China bā guà zhǎng
Japan hakkeshou
Ba Gua Zhang Wall Scroll

八卦掌 is the title Baguazhang, a form of Chinese boxing.

Literally-translated, this means, "Eight Trigrams Palm.

You will see this romanized as, "Ba Gua Zhang," or "Pa Kua Chang" (same characters, just different romanization used in mainland China versus Taiwan).

八卦掌 is also known in Japan as hakkeshou or hakkesho.


China cháng chūn téng
Ivy Wall Scroll

常春藤 is a common way to write "ivy" in Chinese. There are varieties of ivy, and other ways to say ivy in Chinese but this version is probably the nicest. It's the one you would use if writing a poem about ivy etc.

If you want the actual meaning, this is, "Always Young Vine," or "Ever Living Vine." The literal meaning of the characters is more like, "Always Spring[time] Vine." But Spring can have other representations in Chinese such as new life, youth, freshness, joyfulness, etc.

Xing Yi Quan

Style of Martial Arts
China xíng yì quán
Japan ke i ken
Xing Yi Quan Wall Scroll

形意拳 is the title for the Xingyiquan style/form of Chinese martial arts involving explosive linear movements.

Some translate this as "shape-of-the-mind fist."

While pronunciation has never changed in Chinese, the old romanization was "Hsing I Chuan." 形意拳 is still used in Taiwan.

This term is used in some Japanese martial arts circles where it's romanized from Japanese as keīken, keiiken, or keiken.

Distance Runner

China cháng pǎo zhě
Distance Runner Wall Scroll

長跑者 is probably the shortest but still reasonable title for, "long-distance runner," in Chinese.

長跑者 is kind of a funky title for a wall scroll but if you run marathons or long distance races, this could be for you.

Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do

China táng shǒu dào
Japan kara te do
Old Karate / Tang Hand Way / Tang Soo Do Wall Scroll

唐手道 is the alternate title for Karate-do. This title uses a character which represents the Tang Dynasty of China. Thus, this is often translated as the "Tang Hand Way" or incorrectly, "Tang Fist Way." I have also seen some call it "China Hand Way."

There is not a lot of information on this title but some believe that a simplified form of Kung Fu that started in China, and ended up very popular in Japan used this title initially. It was later changed in Japan to a different Karate title which means "Empty Hand" (as in, without weapons).

In Korean, this title represents a certain style of martial arts. From Korean, this is often romanized as "Tang Soo Do," "Tangsudo," "Dang Su Do," or "Dangsudo." The last two romanizations on that list are the official Korean government romanization, though martial arts schools tend to use other non-standard versions.

Never Forget

Never forget your vow or path
China cháng bù wàng shī
Japan jou fu bou shitsu
Never Forget Wall Scroll

This title is used almost exclusively in a Buddhist context (not all Chinese or Japanese people will recognize it).

常不忘失 means, "Never forget your vow/path" in Chinese characters and Japanese Kanji.

High Mountain Long River

China shān gāo shuǐ cháng
High Mountain Long River Wall Scroll

This Chinese idiom means, "high as the mountain and long as the river." It figuratively means, "noble and far-reaching."

Not sure this is valid or commonly used in Korean. It probably was borrowed into Korean a few hundred years ago but is obscure now.


China shēn tǐ jiàn kāng
Japan shin tai ken kou
Wellness Wall Scroll

身體健康 is how to express "wellness" in Chinese. The meaning is not much different than the idea of "good health." In fact, the first two characters alone are often translated as "health." Some will also translate this title as "physical health."

If you want to fill your room with a feeling of wellness, this is the wall scroll for you.

身體健康 is also the ancient way to express wellness in Japanese Kanji and old Korean Hanja. The modern Japanese form is only different on the second Kanji but Koreans have completely changed their common writing system in the last 100 years.

See Also:  Health | Vitality

Happy New Year

China xīn nián kuài lè
Happy New Year Wall Scroll

If you want to wish someone a happy new year this is the way. You can hang this up during Western New Years (Dec 31st - Jan 1st) and keep it up until after Chinese New Years which happens in either January or February of each year (it changes from year to year because China uses a lunar calendar).

Everyday Life

China rì cháng shēng huó
Japan nichi jou sei katsu
Everyday Life Wall Scroll

This simply means everyday life or regular life. You can also translate it as "Living day to day."

Broken Mirror Rejoined

Used in modern times for divorced couples that come back together
China pò jìng chóng yuán
Broken Mirror Rejoined Wall Scroll

A husband and wife separated and reunited.

About 1500 years ago in China, there lived a beautiful princess named Le Chang. She and her husband Xu De Yan loved each other very much. But when the army of the Sui Dynasty was about to attack their kingdom, disposed of all of their worldly possessions and prepared to flee into exile.

They knew that in the chaos, they might lose track of each other, so the one possession they kept was a bronze mirror which is a symbol of unity for a husband and wife. They broke the mirror into two pieces, and each of them kept half of the mirror. They decided that if separated, they would try to meet in the fair during the 15th day of the first lunar month (which is the lantern festival). Unfortunately, the occupation was brutal, and the princess was forced to become the mistress of the new commissioner of the territory, Yang Su.

At the Lantern Festival the next year, the husband came to the fair to search for his wife. He carried with him, his half of the mirror. As he walked through the fair, he saw the other half of the mirror for sale at a junk market by a servant of the commissioner. The husband recognized his wife's half of the mirror immediately, and tears rolled down his face as he was told by the servant about the bitter and loveless life that the princess had endured.

As his tears dripped onto the mirror, the husband scratched a poem into his wife's half of the mirror:

You left me with the severed mirror,
The mirror has returned but absent are you,
As I gaze in the mirror I seek your face,
I see the moon but as for you, I see not a trace.

The servant brought the inscribed half of the mirror back to the princess. For many days, the princess could not stop crying when she found that her husband was alive and still loved her.

Commissioner Yang Su, becoming aware of this saga realized that he could never obtain the love of the princess. He sent for the husband and allowed them to reunite.

This proverb in Chinese is now used to describe a couple who has been torn apart for some reason (usually divorce) but have come back together (or remarried).
It seems to be more common these days in America for divorced couples to reconcile and get married to each other again. This would be a great gift if you know someone who is about to remarry their ex.


(phonetic version)
China yī sī lán jiào
Islam Wall Scroll

This both means and sounds like "Islam" in Mandarin Chinese.

The first three characters sound like the word "Islam," and the last character means "religion" or "teaching." It's the most general term for "Islam" in China. The highest concentration of Muslims in China is Xinjiang (the vast region in northwest China that was called The East Turkistan Republic until 1949 and is sometimes called Chinese Turkistan, Uyghuristan). Here you will find Uygurs, Kazakhs, and Kyrgyz and others that are descendants of Turkmen (possibly mixed with Persians and Arabs). Many of their ancestors were traders who traveled the silk road to buy and sell spices, silk, and exchange other goods from the Orient and the Middle East.

I spent some time in Xinjiang and got to know this community. They are strong people who can endure much. They are friendly and love to have a good time. I was a stranger but treated by villagers (near China's border with Afghanistan) as if I was a good friend.
However, I have heard that it's best not to cross them, as in this land, the law is the blade, and everything is "eye for an eye." The Chinese government has little control in Xinjiang with almost no police officers except in the capital of Urumqi (so it's a 60-hour roundtrip train ride to seek the aid of law enforcement in most cases).

While few seem to be devout, there are at least small mosques in every village. And you will never see a man or woman outside without a head covering.

It should be noted that these people are all citizens of China, but they are officially of the Caucasian race. A visit to Xinjiang will change your idea what it means to be Chinese.

Shaolin Chang Chuan

China shǎo lín cháng quán
Shaolin Chang Chuan Wall Scroll

少林長拳 is a combination of two titles. The first two characters mean little forest, as in the little forest of the Shaolin monks (shao lin = little forest). The second two characters mean "long fist."

This title is specific to a certain technique - if you are studying Shaolin Chang Chuan, then you are already aware of all the ramifications.

Battle of Chosin Reservoir

China cháng jīn hú zhàn yì
Battle of Chosin Reservoir Wall Scroll

長津湖戰役 is the Chinese title for the Battle of Chosin Reservoir.

Occasionally this is spelled Chosen. The pronunciation has led surviving Marines who fought there to call themselves, "The Chosen Few" or "The Chosin Few."

A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will)

Japan kun shi hyou hen su
A Wise Man Changes His Mind (but a fool never will) Wall Scroll

This Japanese proverb suggests that a wise man is willing to change his mind but a fool will stubbornly never change his.

The first word is 君子 (kunshi) man of virtue, person of high rank, wise man.

The second word is 豹変 (hyouhen) sudden change, complete change.

The last part す (su) just modifies the verb to a more humble form.

The "fool" part is merely implied or understood. So if wise and noble people are willing to change their minds, it automatically says that foolish people are the ones unwilling to change.

Ch'ang Hon Taekwondo

Ch'ang Hon Taekwondo Wall Scroll

蒼軒跆拳道 is the title "Chang Hon Taekwon-Do" written in old Korean Hanja.

This literally means, "Pale Blue Kick Fist/Punch Way."

The rather awkward official romanization is "cang heon tae gweon do."

Occasionally, you will see the first Hanja character written as 苍 instead of 蒼. It's just a different way to write the same character. If you want 苍 instead of 蒼, just let me know.

Distance Runner

China cháng pǎo yùn dòng yuán
Distance Runner Wall Scroll

長跑運動員 is a Chinese title for, "long-distance runner."

長跑運動員 is kind of a funky title for a wall scroll but if you run marathons or long distance races, this could be for you.

Move On / Change Way of Thinking

Japan norikaeru
Move On / Change Way of Thinking Wall Scroll

乗り換える is the Japanese way to say, "move on." This can also be translated as, "to change one's mind," "to change methods," "to change one's way of thinking." For instance, if you changed your love interest, or political ideology, you might describe the act of that change with this title.

Colloquially in Japan, this is also used to describe the act of transferring trains or to change from one bus or train to another.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

God is Always With You

God is With Me Always
China shàng dì yǔ nǐ cháng zài
God is Always With You Wall Scroll

The direct translation of these Chinese characters is "God Together [with] You Always Exist."

Keep in mind that Chinese grammar is sometimes very different from English. This makes perfect sense in Chinese.

Note: The title for God is the first two characters - the other words in the direct translation represent one character each.

Gay Pride

China tóng xìng liàn zì háo gǎn
Gay Pride Wall Scroll

Gay Pride is kind of a new idea in China. In fact, it's so new, that we may have just started the movement by translating this phrase.

If they ever do start having gay pride parades in China, my best guess is that these 6 characters will constitute the term they use to title the parade / movement.

Who knows, maybe in 10 years they will have a pride parade march straight past Tian'anmen Square on Chang An Street (the main drag in Beijing).

Trust No One / Trust No Man

Japan dare mo shin ji ru na
Trust No One / Trust No Man Wall Scroll

The first two characters mean everyone or anyone but change to "no one" with the addition of a negative verb.

The third through fifth characters express the idea of to believe, to believe in, to place trust in, to confide in, or to have faith in.

The last character makes the sentence negative (without the last character, this would mean "trust everyone," with that last character it's "trust no one").

誰も信じるな is as close as you can get to the phrase "trust no man" in Japanese, though no gender is specified.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
China wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King’s court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King’s ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin’s words.
Seeing the King’s displeasure with him and the King’s fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it’s never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.

Warriors Adapt and Overcome

Soldiers need a fluid plan
China bīng wú cháng shì shuǐ wú cháng xíng
Warriors Adapt and Overcome Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: Troops/soldiers/warriors have no fixed [battlefield] strategy [just as] water has no constant shape [but adapts itself to whatever container it is in].

Figuratively, this means: One should seek to find whatever strategy or method is best suited to resolving each individual problem.

This proverb is about as close as you can get to the military idea of "adapt improvise overcome." 兵無常勢水無常形 is best way to express that idea in both an ancient way, and a very natural way in Chinese.

United Arab Emirates

China ā lā bó lián hé qiú cháng guó
United Arab Emirates Wall Scroll

阿拉伯聯合酋長國 is the Chinese name for the United Arab Emirates

See Also:  Asia

One who walks by the river
may end up with wet feet

China cháng zài hé biān zǒu nǎ néng bù shī xié
One who walks by the river / may end up with wet feet Wall Scroll

常在河邊走哪能不濕鞋 is an old Chinese proverb that is sometimes compared to the English saying "Shit Happens."

It's a reflection that there are risks in life, and you should not be surprised when things don't go your way.

A secondary translation might be, "When walking by a river, often one cannot avoid wet shoes."

Only the sleepless know the length of night

China bù mián zhī yè cháng jiǔ jiāo zhī rén xīn
Only the sleepless know the length of night Wall Scroll

This literally translates as: [Only one who does] not sleep, learns how long the night is; [Only by] long acquaintance [does one] learn a person ['s true] character.

Basically, this proverb suggests that we really need to experience something intimately and for a long time to really know everything about it.

This can also be translated as, "Spending years with someone is the only way to know them."

Note: Sometimes this proverb is split into just the first or second idea alone (first 5 or last 5 characters only).

Confucius: Universal Education

China zì xíng shù xiū yǐ shàng wú wèi cháng wú huì yān
Confucius: Universal Education Wall Scroll

This quote from the Analects of Confucius translates as:

For anyone who brings even the smallest token of appreciation, I have yet to refuse instruction.

Another way to put it is: If a student (or potential student) shows just an ounce of interest, desire, or appreciation for the opportunity to learn, a teacher should offer a pound of knowledge.

This was written over 2500 years ago. The composition is in ancient Chinese grammar and phrasing. A modern Chinese person would need a background in Chinese literature to understand this without the aid of a reference.

Any success can not compensate
for failure in the home

China suǒ yǒu de chéng gōng dōu
wú fǎ bǔ cháng jiā tíng de shī bài
Any success can not compensate / for failure in the home Wall Scroll

This Chinese proverb could also be translated in English as "No success can compensate for failure in the home."

Also, the word for "home" can be exchanged with "family."

Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu

China yuǎn shàng hán shān shí jìng xiá bái yún shēng chù yǒu rén jiā tíng chē zuò ài fēng lín wǎn shuàng yè hóng yú èr yuè huā
Mountain Travels Poem by Dumu Wall Scroll

This poem was written almost 1200 years ago during the Tang dynasty. It depicts traveling up a place known as Cold Mountain, where some hearty people have built their homes. The traveler is overwhelmed by the beauty of the turning leaves of the maple forest that surrounds him just as night overtakes the day, and darkness prevails. His heart implores him to stop, and take in all of the beauty around him.

First before you get to the full translation, I must tell you that Chinese poetry is a lot different than what we have in the west. Chinese words simply don't rhyme in the same way that English, or other western languages do. Chinese poetry depends on rhythm and a certain beat of repeated numbers of characters.

I have done my best to translate this poem keeping a certain feel of the original poet. But some of the original beauty of the poem in it's original Chinese will be lost in translation.

Far away on Cold Mountain, a stone path leads upwards.
Among white clouds peoples homes reside.
Stopping my carriage I must, as to admire the maple forest at nights fall.
In awe of autumn leaves showing more red than even flowers of early spring.

Hopefully, this poem will remind you to stop, and "take it all in" as you travel through life.
The poet's name is "Du Mu" in Chinese that is: 杜牧.
The title of the poem, "Mountain Travels" is: 山行
You can have the title, poet's name, and even Tang Dynasty written as an inscription on your custom wall scroll if you like.

More about the poet:

Dumu lived from 803-852 AD and was a leading Chinese poet during the later part of the Tang dynasty.
He was born in Chang'an, a city of central China and former capital of the ancient Chinese empire in 221-206 BC. In present day China, his birthplace is currently known as Xi'an, the home of the Terracotta Soldiers.

He was awarded his Jinshi degree (an exam administered by the emperor's court which leads to becoming an official of the court) at the age of 25, and went on to hold many official positions over the years. However, he never achieved a high rank, apparently because of some disputes between various factions, and his family's criticism of the government. His last post in the court was his appointment to the office of Secretariat Drafter.

During his life, he wrote scores of narrative poems, as well as a commentary on the Art of War and many letters of advice to high officials.

His poems were often very realistic, and often depicted every day life. He wrote poems about everything, from drinking beer in a tavern to weepy poems about lost love.

The thing that strikes you most is the fact even after 1200 years, not much has changed about the beauty of nature, toils and troubles of love and beer drinking.

Tom Clan Generational Poem

China ěr chāng yǒu yán sì jié kāi wén yì guāng zōng chuán shì zé yuǎn jìn běn lì dào lóng jī shàn jiā guó zhòng xué yè guǎng chéng fāng
Tom Clan Generational Poem Wall Scroll

爾昌友延嗣捷開文裔光宗傳世澤遠晉本立道隆積善家國重學業廣成芳 is the Tom Clan Generational Poem. If you are interested in this poem, you probably already know the meaning, so for now we'll forgo including a translation.

Serenity Prayer

China shàng dì cì wǒ píng jìng qù jiē shòu wǒ suǒ bù néng gǎi biàn de wǒ yǒng qì qù gǎi biàn wǒ suǒ néng gǎi biàn de bìng wǒ zhì huì qù fēn biàn zhè liǎng zhě
Serenity Prayer Wall Scroll

上帝賜給我平靜去接受我所不能改變的給我勇氣去改變我所能改變的並給我智慧去分辨這兩者 is the serenity prayer, as used by many 12-step programs and support groups.

In Chinese, this says:
God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Serenity Prayer

Japan kamisama ha watashi ni kaeru koto no deki nai mono o ukeireru odayaka sa to kaeru koto no dekiru yuuki to sono chigai o shiru kenmei sa o ataeru
Serenity Prayer Wall Scroll

神様は私に変える事の出来ない物を受け入れる穏やかさと変える事の出来る勇気とその違いを知る賢明さを与える is a Japanese version of the serenity prayer, as used by many 12-step programs and support groups.

In Japanese, this says:
God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

Note: Because this selection contains some special Japanese Hiragana characters, it should be written by a Japanese calligrapher.

The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji(Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Changing Oneself
Self Reformation
自己改革ji ko kai kaku
Mark the boat to find the lost sword
Ignoring the changing circumstances of the world
kè zhōu qiú jiàn
ke4 zhou1 qiu2 jian4
ke zhou qiu jian
k`o chou ch`iu chien
ko chou chiu chien
Change 改變 / 改変
kaihengǎi biàn / gai3 bian4 / gai bian / gaibian kai pien / kaipien
Flexibility 靈活性
líng huó xìng
ling2 huo2 xing4
ling huo xing
ling huo hsing
Dynamic 動態
dou tai / doutai / do tai / dotaidòng tài / dong4 tai4 / dong tai / dongtai tung t`ai / tungtai / tung tai
Impermanence 無常
mujou / mujowú cháng / wu2 chang2 / wu chang / wuchang wu ch`ang / wuchang / wu chang
dou / dodòng / dong4 / dong tung
chàng / chang4 / chang ch`ang / chang
Glory and Honor
荣 / 栄
eiróng / rong2 / rong jung
Life Energy
Spiritual Energy

气 / 気
kiqì / qi4 / qi ch`i / chi
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.

Successful Chinese Character and Japanese Kanji calligraphy searches within the last few hours...

God Loves You
Good Luck
Heart Sutra
I Love You
Keep Calm
Live for What You Love
Love and Protect
Love Forever
Never Give Up
Noble Eightfold Path
Once in a Lifetime
Semper Fi
Tae Kwon Do
Yin Yang

All of our calligraphy wall scrolls are handmade.

When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
After we create your wall scroll, it takes at least two weeks for air mail delivery from Beijing to you.

Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

When you select your calligraphy, you'll be taken to another page where you can choose various custom options.

A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.

Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Changing Kanji, Changing Characters, Changing in Mandarin Chinese, Changing Characters, Changing in Chinese Writing, Changing in Japanese Writing, Changing in Asian Writing, Changing Ideograms, Chinese Changing symbols, Changing Hieroglyphics, Changing Glyphs, Changing in Chinese Letters, Changing Hanzi, Changing in Japanese Kanji, Changing Pictograms, Changing in the Chinese Written-Language, or Changing in the Japanese Written-Language.