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Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $100.00

$44.88

SOLD

» Chinese Character & Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls

Taekwondo Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scroll


Taekwondo Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scroll
121cm
47½"
49cm
19¼"

Approximate Measurements

Artwork Panel: 30.8cm x 65.5cm  ≈  12" x 25¾"

Silk/Brocade: 40cm x 121cm  ≈  15¾" x 47½"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 49cm  ≈  19¼"

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跆拳道

Taekwondo

Taekwondo Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the calligraphy artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

This is one of the most widespread types of martial arts in the world as well as being an Olympic sport. Taekwondo was born in Korea with influences of Chinese and Japanese styles, combined with traditional Korean combat skills. Some will define it as the "Korean art of empty-handed self-defense".

In the simplest translation, the first character means "kick", the second character can mean either "fist" or "punching" the third means "way" or "method". Altogether, you could say this is "Kick Punch Method". When heard or read in various Asian languages, all will automatically think of this famous Korean martial art.

Taekwondo

It is written the same in Japanese Kanji, Chinese, and Korean Hanja characters - so the appearance of the characters are rather universal. However, you should note that there is another way to write this in modern Korean Hangul characters which looks like the image to the right.

Note: In Japanese, this is pronounced/Romanized as tekondo.
In Mandarin Chinese, it's tái quán dào.
In Korean, it's pronounced 태권도.
This Korean title is most commonly Romanized as Taekwondo, but sometimes it's written Tae-Kwondo, Tae Kwon Do, Taekwon-do, Taegwondo, Tai Kwon Do, Taikwondo, Taekwando, Tae Kwan Do.
Chinese alternates include Taiquandao, Tai Quan Dao, Taichuando, or Tai Chuan Tao.


See our Taekwondo custom Korean Hanja wall scrolls page for more custom Korean Hanja calligraphy options.


This calligraphy was created by Li Dan-Qing of Beijing, China. Materials are xuan paper (known in the west incorrectly as "rice paper") mounted to a silk brocade wall scroll. Painted by hand, and the wall scroll is crafted by hand.

This item was listed or modified
Dec 20th, 2016

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Gary's random little things about China:

Where's my fortune cookie?

So after traveling to China, you have just finished your first meal in a real Chinese restaurant.
But the bill comes, and the waiter forgot to bring everyone their fortune cookies!
Well, actually not...
You see, fortune cookies did not come from China (at least not directly).
One legend has it in the late 1800s or early 1900s, a Chinese man running a noodle making shop in San Francisco accidentally mixed a bunch of sugar in his dough, and didn't want to waste it. So he made cookies and stuck papers with people's fortunes on them as a novelty.
In the end, it's really the Chinese visitors to America that are confused when the waiter brings them a blob of sugary noodle dough with a piece of paper stuck in it.

Typical Gallery Price: $100.00

$44.88

SOLD