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Zhao in Chinese / Japanese...

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zhào
chou
Zhao Vertical Wall Scroll

In Chinese, this is Zhao, one of the seven states during the Warring States Period (476-220 B.C.). 趙 is a different period than the Former Zhao 前趙 (304-329 A.D.) and Later Zhao 後趙 (319-350 A.D.) of the Sixteen Kingdoms.

趙 is also a surname in Chinese.

In Japanese, this can be the surname Hiyon or Chou (there are a few other possible pronunciations and names in Japanese).

Past experience is the teacher for the future.

Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events.
qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
Past experience is the teacher for the future. Vertical Wall Scroll

The most literal translation to English of this ancient Chinese proverb is:
"Past events not forgotten serve as teachers for later events."

However, it's been translated several ways:
Don't forget past events, they can guide you in future.
Benefit from past experience.
Past experience, if not forgotten, is a guide for the future.
Past calamity is my teacher.
A good memory for the past is a teacher for the future.
The remembrance of the past is the teacher of the future.
If one remembers the lessons of the past; They will serve as a guide to avoid mistakes in the future.

The origin:
This proverb comes from the 5th century B.C. just before the Warring States Period in the territory now known as China.
The head of the State of Jin, Zhi Bo, seized power in a coup. He did this with help from the armies of the State of Han and Wei. Instead of being grateful for the help from Han and Wei, he treacherously took the land of Han and Wei. Never satisfied, Zhi Bo employed the armies of Han and Wei to attack and seize the State of Zhao.

The king of Zhao took advice from his minister Zhang Mengtan and secretly contacted the Han and Wei armies to reverse their plans and attack the army of Zhi Bo instead. The plan was successful, and the State of Zhao was not only saved but was set to become a powerful kingdom in the region.

Zhang Mengtan immediately submitted his resignation to a confused king of Zhao. When asked why, Zhang Mengtan said, "I've done my duty to save my kingdom but looking back at past experience, I know sovereign kings are never satisfied with the power or land at hand. They will join others and fight for more power and more land. I must learn from past experiences, as those experiences are the teachers of future events."
The king could not dispute the logic in that statement and accepted Zhang Mengtan's resignation.

For generations, the State of Zhao continued to fight for power and land until finally being defeated and decimated by the State of Qin (which lead to the birth of the Qin Dynasty in 221 B.C.).

Tiger Rumor

sān rén chéng hǔ
Tiger Rumor Vertical Wall Scroll

These four characters together relay the meaning that can be expressed in English as, "When three people say there's a tiger running in the street, you believe it."

Of course, there is an ancient story behind this idiom...

三人成虎 is actually a proverb that resulted from a conversation that occurred around 300 B.C.

The conversation was between the king of the Wei kingdom and one of the king's ministers named Pang Cong.

It was near the end of one of many wars, this time with the Zhao kingdom. Pang Cong was to be sent by the king to the Zhao kingdom with the king's son who was to be held hostage. It was common at the time for a king to make his son a hostage to secure stable peace between warring kingdoms.

Before minister Pang Cong departed, he asked his king, "If one person told you there was a tiger running in the street, would you believe it?."

"No," the king said.

The minister continued, "What if two people told you?"

The king replied, "Well, I would have my doubts but I might believe it."

The minister continued, "So, what if three people told you that there is a tiger running in the streets?"

The king replied, "Yes, I would believe it, it must be true if three people say it."

The minister then reminded the king, "Your son and I are now traveling far away to live in the distant Zhao kingdom - much farther from your palace than the street. Rumors may fly about me in my absence, so I hope your majesty will weight such rumors appropriately."

The king replied, "I have every trust in you, do not worry"

While the minister was gone, the king's enemies gossiped about minister Pang Cong on many occasions. At first, the king thought nothing of these comments and rumors. But slowly as the rumors mounted, the king began to suspect ill of his minister.

Some time later when peace was well-established, the minister and prince were freed and returned to the kingdom of Wei. The king received his son, BUT DID NOT EVEN SUMMON MINISTER PANG CONG TO THE PALACE!

Hopefully this story will help you see how dangerous words can be when used to promote rumors, or create ill will. And perhaps will inspire you to not believe everything you hear.

There is also a secondary suggestion in this idiom that gossip is as ferocious as a tiger. Some Chinese people who don't know the ancient story above may believe that this scroll means that rumors are as vicious as three tigers.

Note: This proverb appears in my Korean dictionary but is not well-known in Korea.

Better Late Than Never

It's Never Too Late Too Mend
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll

Long ago in what is now China, there were many kingdoms throughout the land. This time period is known as "The Warring States Period" by historians because these kingdoms often did not get along with each other.

Some time around 279 B.C. the Kingdom of Chu was a large but not particularly powerful kingdom. Part of the reason it lacked power was the fact that the King was surrounded by "yes men" who told him only what he wanted to hear. Many of the King's court officials were corrupt and incompetent which did not help the situation.

The King was not blameless himself, as he started spending much of his time being entertained by his many concubines.

One of the King's ministers, Zhuang Xin, saw problems on the horizon for the Kingdom, and warned the King, "Your Majesty, you are surrounded by people who tell you what you want to hear. They tell you things to make you happy, and cause you to ignore important state affairs. If this is allowed to continue, the Kingdom of Chu will surely perish, and fall into ruins."

This enraged the King who scolded Zhuang Xin for insulting the country and accused him of trying to create resentment among the people. Zhuang Xin explained, "I dare not curse the Kingdom of Chu but I feel that we face great danger in the future because of the current situation." The King was simply not impressed with Zhuang Xin's words.
Seeing the King's displeasure with him and the King's fondness for his court of corrupt officials, Zhuang Xin asked permission of the King that he may take leave of the Kingdom of Chu, and travel to the State of Zhao to live. The King agreed, and Zhuang Xin left the Kingdom of Chu, perhaps forever.

Five months later, troops from the neighboring Kingdom of Qin invaded Chu, taking a huge tract of land. The King of Chu went into exile, and it appeared that soon, the Kingdom of Chu would no longer exist.

The King of Chu remembered the words of Zhuang Xin, and sent some of his men to find him. Immediately, Zhuang Xin returned to meet the King. The first question asked by the King was, "What can I do now?"

Zhuang Xin told the King this story:

A shepherd woke one morning to find a sheep missing. Looking at the pen saw a hole in the fence where a wolf had come through to steal one of his sheep. His friends told him that he had best fix the hole at once. But the Shepherd thought since the sheep is already gone, there is no use fixing the hole.
The next morning, another sheep was missing. And the Shepherd realized that he must mend the fence at once. Zhuang Xin then went on to make suggestions about what could be done to reclaim the land lost to the Kingdom of Qin, and reclaim the former glory and integrity in the Kingdom of Chu.

The Chinese idiom shown above came from this reply from Zhuang Xin to the King of Chu almost 2,300 years ago.
It translates roughly into English as...
"Even if you have lost some sheep, it's never too late to mend the fence."

This proverb is often used in modern China when suggesting in a hopeful way that someone change their ways, or fix something in their life. It might be used to suggest fixing a marriage, quit smoking, or getting back on track after taking an unfortunate path in life among other things one might fix in their life.

I suppose in the same way that we might say, "Today is the first day of the rest of your life" in our western cultures to suggest that you can always start anew.

Note: This does have Korean pronunciation but is not a well-known proverb in Korean (only Koreans familiar with ancient Chinese history would know it). Best if your audience is Chinese.




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The following table may be helpful for those studying Chinese or Japanese...

Title CharactersRomaji (Romanized Japanese)Various forms of Romanized Chinese
Zhao
chou / chozhào / zhao4 / zhaochao
Past experience is the teacher for the future.前事不忘后事之師
前事不忘后事之师
qián shì bú wàng hòu shí zhī shī
qian2 shi4 bu2 wang4 hou4 shi2 zhi1 shi1
qian shi bu wang hou shi zhi shi
ch`ien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
chien shih pu wang hou shih chih shih
Tiger Rumor三人成虎sān rén chéng hǔ
san1 ren2 cheng2 hu3
san ren cheng hu
sanrenchenghu
san jen ch`eng hu
sanjenchenghu
san jen cheng hu
Better Late Than Never亡羊補牢猶未為晚
亡羊补牢犹未为晚
wáng yáng bǔ láo yóu wèi wéi wǎn
wang2 yang2 bu3 lao2 you2 wei4 wei2 wan3
wang yang bu lao you wei wei wan
wang yang pu lao yu wei wei wan
wangyangpulaoyuweiweiwan
In some entries above you will see that characters have different versions above and below a line.
In these cases, the characters above the line are Traditional Chinese, while the ones below are Simplified Chinese.


Not the results for zhao that you were looking for?

Below are some entries from our dictionary that may match your zhao search...

Characters

If shown, 2nd row is Simp. Chinese

Pronunciation
Romanization
Simple Dictionary Definition


see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 chō / ひよん
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
to surpass (old)
(surname) Hiyon
To hasten to, return; a long time; to hasten to

朝日

see styles
zhāo/ zhao1 ri4
chao jih
 ahisa / あひさ
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
morning sun
morning sun; (surname) Ahisa

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
old variant of 照[zhao4]

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 chou / cho / ちょう
omen; to foretell; million; mega-; trillion; tera-; billion (old)
(numeric) (1) 10^12; 1,000,000,000,000; trillion; (2) (See 兆し) sign; omen; indication; portent; (personal name) Toki
An omen; a million; sign

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 jō
to call together; to summon; to convene; temple or monastery (used in place names in Inner Mongolia)
To summon, call; to summon

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
chirp

see styles
zhāo / zhao1
chao
see 嘲哳, (onom.) twitter; twittering sound

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
sacrifice

see styles
zhǎo / zhao3
chao
to try to find; to look for; to call on sb; to find; to seek; to return; to give change

see styles
zhāo / zhao1
chao
 shō / まねき
to recruit; to provoke; to beckon; to incur; to infect; contagious; a move (chess); a maneuver; device; trick; to confess
(surname) Maneki
Call, beckon, notify, cause; confess; to invite

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
banner

see styles
zhāo / zhao1
chao
 shou / sho / しょう
bright; clear; manifest; to show clearly
(prefix) (abbreviation) (See 昭和・1) nth year in the Shōwa era (1926.12.25-1989.1.7); (personal name) Masaharu
Bright, illustrious; clear

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
name invented for herself by Tang empress Wu Zetian 武則天|武则天[Wu3 Ze2 tian1]

see styles
zhāo / zhao1
chao
 chou / cho / ちょう
morning
(n,n-suf) (1) dynasty; (2) reign; (3) period; epoch; age; (4) court; (n,n-pref,n-suf) (5) (abbreviation) (See 北朝鮮) North Korea; (personal name) Hajime
Morning. Court, dynasty; towards; morning


see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 kai / かい
oar (archaic); scull; paddle; to row; a boat
paddle; oar; scull; (female given name) Kai

see styles
zhǎo / zhao3
chao
 numa / ぬま
pond; pool
(1) marsh; swamp; wetland; bog; pond; (2) (slang) being hooked (on a video game, TV show, etc.); (personal name) Masanori


see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
variant of 照[zhao4]; to shine; to illuminate
See:

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 shō / ひかる
according to; in accordance with; to shine; to illuminate; to reflect; to look at (one's reflection); to take (a photo); photo; as requested; as before
(given name) Hikaru
To shine, illumine; to superintend; a dispatch, pass; as, according to; to illumine

see styles
zhǎo / zhao3
chao
"claw" radical in Chinese characters (Kangxi radical 87)

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 zaru / ざる
loosely woven bamboo ladle
(1) (kana only) draining basket (traditionally made of bamboo); colander; strainer; sieve; (2) (kana only) (See ざる法・ざるほう) something full of holes; (3) (abbreviation) (kana only) (See ざる蕎麦) zaru soba; (4) (colloquialism) (kana only) strong drinker; someone who can drink like a fish; (surname) Zaru

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
cover; fish trap (basket); shade

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 chō / はじめ
at first; devise; originate
(given name) Hajime
To begin, initiate; to initiate


see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
the start; the origin
See:


see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
 shō / のりかつ
imperial order
(personal name) Norikatsu
a decree


see styles
zhāo / zhao1
chao
to encourage; to cut; to strain


𬬿

see styles
zhāo / zhao1
chao
sickle

see styles
zhāo / zhao1
chao
(horse)

see styles
zhào / zhao4
chao
pheasant

L照

see styles
l zhào / l zhao4
l chao
nude picture (from 裸照[luo3 zhao4])

一朝

see styles
zhāo / yi1 zhao1
i chao
 icchou / iccho / いっちょう
(n-adv,n-t) temporarily; short period; once; one morning; (given name) Kazutomo
overnight

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Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Wall Scroll


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Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Better Late Than Never Horizontal Wall Scroll
Better Late Than Never Vertical Portrait
Dictionary

Lookup Zhao in my Japanese & Chinese Dictionary


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When the calligrapher finishes creating your artwork, it is taken to my art mounting workshop in Beijing where a wall scroll is made by hand from a combination of silk, rice paper, and wood.
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Allow a few weeks for delivery. Rush service speeds it up by a week or two for $10!

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A nice Chinese calligraphy wall scroll

The wall scroll that Sandy is holding in this picture is a "large size"
single-character wall scroll.
We also offer custom wall scrolls in small, medium, and an even-larger jumbo size.

A professional Chinese Calligrapher

Professional calligraphers are getting to be hard to find these days.
Instead of drawing characters by hand, the new generation in China merely type roman letters into their computer keyboards and pick the character that they want from a list that pops up.

There is some fear that true Chinese calligraphy may become a lost art in the coming years. Many art institutes in China are now promoting calligraphy programs in hopes of keeping this unique form of art alive.

Trying to learn Chinese calligrapher - a futile effort

Even with the teachings of a top-ranked calligrapher in China, my calligraphy will never be good enough to sell. I will leave that to the experts.

A high-ranked Chinese master calligrapher that I met in Zhongwei

The same calligrapher who gave me those lessons also attracted a crowd of thousands and a TV crew as he created characters over 6-feet high. He happens to be ranked as one of the top 100 calligraphers in all of China. He is also one of very few that would actually attempt such a feat.


Check out my lists of Japanese Kanji Calligraphy Wall Scrolls and Old Korean Hanja Calligraphy Wall Scrolls.

Some people may refer to this entry as Zhao Kanji, Zhao Characters, Zhao in Mandarin Chinese, Zhao Characters, Zhao in Chinese Writing, Zhao in Japanese Writing, Zhao in Asian Writing, Zhao Ideograms, Chinese Zhao symbols, Zhao Hieroglyphics, Zhao Glyphs, Zhao in Chinese Letters, Zhao Hanzi, Zhao in Japanese Kanji, Zhao Pictograms, Zhao in the Chinese Written-Language, or Zhao in the Japanese Written-Language.

27 people have searched for Zhao in Chinese or Japanese in the past year.
Zhao was last searched for by someone else on Jul 22nd, 2018