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Hand Painted
Ships from: USA

 This artwork is
100% hand-painted.

Typical Gallery Price: $110.00

$49.00

SOLD

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight
Japanese Philosophy Wall Scroll


Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight - Japanese Philosophy Wall Scroll
166cm
65¼"
50.2cm
19¾"

Approximate Measurements

Artwork Panel: 32.2cm x 94.8cm  ≈  12¾" x 37¼"

Silk/Brocade: 41.2cm x 166cm  ≈  16¼" x 65¼"

Width at Wooden Knobs: 50.2cm  ≈  19¾"

Information about caring for your wall scroll
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Discount Asian Art
Reason for discount: A black spot in the upper silk panel of this wall scroll. You could try to hide this with a sash or something, but it's a vivid black mark. Another option is cutting the top and bottom off the scroll and having this framed, as the artwork itself is flawless.
This was created by an authentic Japanese calligrapher and would have been $100+ ($230+ from other dealers) if not for this flaw.

七転八起

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight
Japanese Calligraphy Scroll


This Japanese proverb relays the vicissitudes of life. Some would more naturally translate it into English as "Always rising after a fall or repeated failures".

Fall Down Seven Times, Get Up Eight - Japanese Philosophy Wall Scroll close up view

Close up view of the artwork mounted to this silk brocade wall scroll

The first Kanji is literally "7". The second means "fall down" (sometimes this Kanji means "turn around", "revolve" or "turn over", but in this case, it's holds the meaning of "fall"). The third is "8". And the last is "get up", "rouse", or "rise".

Basically if you fail 7 times, you should recover from those events and be prepared to rise an 8th time. This is also applies if it is the world or circumstances that knock you down seven times...
...just remember that you have the ability to bounce back from any kind of adversity.

Note: This can be pronounced two ways. One is "shichi ten hakki". The other is "nana korobi ya oki".

This item was listed or modified
Sep 16th, 2017

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Gary's random little things about China:

Where's my soy sauce?

When you sit down to eat at a restaurant in China, you will almost never see a bottle of soy sauce on the table like you might at a Chinese restaurant in the USA or UK.
In Chinese cooking culture, soy sauce is a seasoning reserved for use in the kitchen.
The fact that soy sauce can be found at Chinese restaurants outside of China probably comes from westerner confusion between Japanese food and Chinese food.
The most popular Japanese food outside of Japan is sushi, which of course is always served with soy sauce. This is the most likely reason that soy sauce migrated out of the kitchen on onto the table at your Chinese restaurant in the west.

Typical Gallery Price: $110.00

$49.00

SOLD